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Hail Our Sturdy Pioneers

The name Jardine is synonymous with Nimmitabel, so it is fitting that we join them to celebrate their proud history in the Back to Nimitybelle Festival and Centenary Show in the year 2003. They have demonstrated their love for the land their forebears entrusted them, by continuing fanning through good times and adversity to have the 5th generation still working hard and improving their land.

William Jardine was born at Ryedale, Dumfries, Scotland in 1819. He arrived in Sydney in 1841, and finally made his way to Monaro in 1846. A year later, in association with Mr. Stewart Ryrie he started a flour mill at Jindabyne, the motive power being the waters of the Snowy River. He worked at this for a number of years.

William Jardine purchased quite a bit of land around Monaro, but finally acquired Curry Flat, where he applied his energies to improving it and producing fine livestock.

He was a generous supporter of his church and the Nimmitabel community, hence his name appears in many records of community organizations in Nimmitabel, where his wise counsel and contribution was valued.

One of his sons John Jardine, shared his father's dedication to the well-being of the community, and he will have his name indissolubly linked with Nimmitabel as long as our village exists. It was largely due to his drive and support that the Nimmitabel Show Society as we know it was established.

John Jardine was instrumental in the establishment of the Nimmitabel Pastoral and Agricultural Association, the forerunner to our present Show Society.

He was also interested in the welfare of the wider community, and as an elected councillor served 8 years as President of Monaro Shire. He excelled in sport and represented Nimmitabel in football and cricket.

The vision, commitment and generous support given by William and John Jardine 'in making Nimmitabel a great place to live will be long remembered by the present generation, who reap the fruits of their labour. I'm sure their descendants will remember them proudly during our celebrations in 2003.