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St Finabbars, Fowey

       Pattrick Mould's
           

....The.Mould.Families. 

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 Mould Name

Mould - Town
Mould Name
Moulds at War
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  The Families

G Y Mould
GY Mould

GG Mould
George Richard
Henry Frederick
Maria Catherine
Anne
Arthur William
Walter Edward
Archibald Charles



Emily Augusta Mould
William R Mould
Maria Mould
Frederick J Mould


Associated Families

Cranch Family
Devenny Family

dd

Associated Sites
Kybeyan Kids
Monaro Pioneers

Welcome to the Mould Family Website    
Although this is only a relatively new site, we have received and posted a lot of interesting material about different lines of the  family.

People interested in the MOULD FAMILIES are encouraged to check out the relevant WebPages . If you have material you would like to submit to this site, please do so. If there is nothing up on your family, how about starting it off by letting us put a page up about your lot. It doesn't matter if you haven't got a great deal of material. Please share what you have with others, you will be the one to benefit in the long run.

I will put up as much genealogy (Family Tree) as you have (not those living please without their permission) and also the biographical information. If possible I prefer that we limit each biography to a maximum of  five pages. ( I have 112 pages on one of my gggg's). I don't except material that is already on a web-site, but I will link to that information.
Regards, Pattrick Mould, Coordinator.
e-mail: Pattrick Mould

The MOULD Surname DNA Project
has been created to develop a collection of various MOULD family groups who descend from the same male MOULD ancestor. DNA analysis provides a tool for identifying participants who share a common male ancestor; and, when used in unison with documented MOULD pedigrees, can also aid in establishing links between MOULD groups who previously were thought to be unrelated. Because many MOULD surname researchers have exhausted traditional genealogy research methods without identifying their elusive MOULD ancestor, this project combines genetics and genealogy in an effort to break through the proverbial "brick wall".
For further information

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http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mould/Devenny/index.htm

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mould/mould/wrmould.htm


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Links: Other WebPages featuring "Mould" or similar, 
please submit yours to the Web-Master.


The MOULD Surname DNA Project

http://www.familytreedna.com/public/mould/
http://www.mouldfamily.com/moulddnaproject/
http://www.mouldfamily.com/


Associated Families
Freebody Family (Jamieson, Gilbert etc.)

Chris Pattison's Genealogy Pages (MOLD)


Organizations with Mould Boards, Mailing Lists etc. 
Please submit your favourite to the Web-Master.

Family History. com

Rootsweb

WorldGenWeb Project

My Gencircles


Submissions
Your contributions are most welcome.

We are only to happy to put up a new page for people submitting their Family Trees, Family Histories, Regional Information or any other relevant information.

I will put up as much genealogy (Family Tree) as you have (not those living please without their permission) and also the biographical information. If possible I prefer that we limit each biography to a maximum of  five pages. ( I have 112 pages on one of my gggg's). I don't except material that is already on a web-site, but I will link to that information.

Information will be accepted in the following formats:
     
Links to associated pages.
      HTML Documents.
      Email document
      Word Documents
      Text Document
      'Narratives' from your history program.
      GEDCOM Files (Preferable links to at Rootsweb)

Please mail to
Web-Master


Mould History (Biographies etc.)

Descendants of Ezekiel Mould
John Rawe Mould,
1771-1827, Reg Mould's research
George Yonge Mould,
1817-1883, Reg Mould's research

George Yonge Mould, 1817-1883, a history from Glen Hall
Ron Mould DFM, 1909-1978, Pattrick Mould's research

Family of Simon Mould
Simon Mould or Moulds
,
one of four children of Charlotte Ale and Simon Mould,  He next came to attention in the Essex Assizes, as a young labourer, for his involvement in four offences of cattle stealing in 1796 and 1797, the sentences were reduced to transportation.

Coats of Arms 
Coats of Arms etc


MOULD NAME INFORMATION
From Patrick Kenney <patrickekenney-at-yahoo-com>

This is what I have come up with thus far, perhaps some of our other listers may be able to elaborate further...

You may want to start with a free 14 day trial membership on ancestry.com and start researching the history of your MOLE surname... if may have been something else previously...both familysearch.org rootsweb.com have free valuable information for the willing on-line researcher... Usually the best way to start is with your parents and grandparents or aunts/uncles and grand aunts/uncles, these are typically your best place to start to find out the history of your family name...You can also open up your local telephone book and find the nearest Family History Center, that is free to the public and run by the LDS worldwide, they always have someone there to help you in your endeavors...

1. forma or formare is my best guess thus far, my conjecture is that the original bearer of the name, not known to me, was a armor maker/builder or perhaps just wore some great armor for his day...

2. Known Mould Surname Variants To Date:
Mol, Molli, Moulde, Moule, Mole, Moll, Molle, Mollie, Moolle, Mold, Molde, Mal, Molo, Maul, Mowld, Mowle, Mawle, Male, Menl. Further, a "S" on any of the aforementioned is also quite common...

3. In Old English "Molle" is synonymous with "Mold", which may mean the Mould's have some connection to Mollington and perhaps their name came to being there, more research is required.

4. Mollington is a chapelry in Cropredy parish, partly in Oxford and partly in Warwick. By 1891 it had become two civil parishes, one in each county.

5. The family of Thomas Mole/Mould Sr. appears to go through 4 main surname variations during their early years upon arrival in New York in 1839; they are Mole/Mold/Mould/Moul, the most common variation now used by this particular family is MOULD.

6. A Variant origin of MOULD/MOLD/MOLES from the Domesday book...Moeles, Baldwin of - Also called Baldwin of Exeter, Baldwin de Brion and Baldwin de Sap. From Meulles, Calvados. Son of Gilbert of Brion, brother of Richard
FitzGilbert of Tonbridge. Sheriff of Devon. Castle at Okehampton. Custody of Castle of Exeter. Large holdings in Devon. Also in Dorset and Somerset.

7. One of the earliest references to a known variant of the MOULD surname is the following abstract: "Edward's (King Edward 1st.) progress through Scotland met with no opposition except at Brechin, where Sir Thomas de MAULE maintained a heroic resistance until he was killed on the castle wall." This event was said to have occured between 9 April 1303 and  13 September 1303. Sir William Wallace,  Page 150, Geddes & Grosset, ISBN 1 85534 925 6

8. Earliest Historical References to Bamborough (Banbury) & Warkwork I have found to date are September 1322, in historical accounts of King Robert The Bruce of Scotland. E.G.: "Bruce instantly followed up his advantage. By the middle of September (1322), the Scots were before Bamborough and Norham. (Northamptonshire) Bamborough bought off the invaders, and on September 26, (1322) Sir Rodger de Horsley, the constable, as well as the constables of Warkworth,
Dunstanburgh and Alnwick Castles, received a severe rebuke from Edward (King Edward the 2nd.), for not showing fight against such an inferior force." King Robert The Bruce, Page 163, Geddes & Grosset, ISBN 1 85534 905 1

9. William Shakespeare (1564-1616) is the most famous playwright of all times. His emphatic expression and unique writing style make an impact on the reader.
MOULD(Y) surname found in William Shakespeare Play... King Henry IV.

10. Latin Mould/Mole Equivalents: Mould as in a pattern - forma Mould as in leaf mould - humus Mould as in fungus - mucor
Mould as in to shape - formare Mole as in animal - talpa Mole as in mole on skin - naevus Mole as in pier - moles

11. Spelling variations include: Maude, Maud, Mawd, Mold, Mould, Moulds, Molds and others. First found in Cheshire where the family of Maude, originally the Lords of Monte Alto, in Italy, settled in the Lordships and manors of Montalt and Hawarden in the county of Flint.

Some of the first settlers of this name or some of its variants were: John Maud who settled with his wife and four children in Boston Mass. in 1769; Daniel Maude settled in Boston Mass. in 1635; Jacob Maud arrived in Philadelphia Pa. in 1751.


May be of interest From Patrick Kenney <patrickekenney-at-yahoo-com>

The name Mohaut arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066.
The Mohaut family lived in Cheshire. Before migrating to Normandy and then England, this family
was originally the lords of Monte Alto, in Italy. Their name is thought to be a version of this
place-name which underwent significant corruption through translation through several languages
before being Anglicized. Spelling variations include: Maude, Maud, Mawd, Mold, Mould, Moulds,
Molds and others.First found in Cheshire where the family of Maude, originally the Lords of Monte
Alto, in Italy, settled in the Lordships and manors of Montalt and Hawarden in the county of Flint.


12. MOULDING MISCELLANEOUS INFO 
Origin of the Moulding name? This was produced by "The Historical Research Center, Inc". It is interesting but can they back up their imaginative theory with evidence?!

The English surname Moulding, and its variant Moulden, is of matronymic origin, being one of those names that was based on the first name of the mother. During the Middle Ages, when the system of surnames first developed, nothing could be more natural than for children in the community to be known by the name of one of their parents. Names of patronymic origin, that
is, ones which were based on the first name of the father, were much more common, matronymics being relatively unusual. In this case, the name literally means "the son of Mould or Mold", Mold being a variant of Mathilda (the suffix "en" or "ing" is a diminutive ending). The feminine name of Mathilda was first introduced into England at the time of the Norman Conquest of 1066. The wife of William I was Queen Mathilda.

This personal name is derived from the Germanic "Mathildis", composed of "mahti", meaning "might", and "hildi", meaning "battle/strife". Mathilda became one of the most popular of female names, rivaled only by Alice. In England, in certain areas, this French name became Mahild, Mould, Molde, and Maud. In Yorkshire it was even rendered as Moule, the "d" being dropped. Instances of the personal name Mathilda can be found in the Domesday Book of 1086. By the thirteenth
century, this name was increasingly being used as a surname, thus, in the Hundred Rolls of 1379 there is a reference to a Hugh Mold who lived in Worcestershire. Catherine Mulden sailed on the "Washington" from Liverpool in 1851 bound for New York. The blazon of arms described below is associated with the name or a variant.

BLAZON OF ARMS: Sable, two bars wavy, in chief a lion passant guardant, all argent. 
Translation: The lion in heraldry is a symbol of Majesty and Kingship. It also signifies Beware to the Foe.

CREST: A demi-lion rampant guardant or.

MOTTO: Semper verus.

Translation: Always true.

ORIGIN: ENGLAND

Source: http://www.mouldingname.info/origin.html


From Patrick Kenny

Simular to others that we have seen; still interesting all the same... enjoy...

What does the Mould name mean?

Last Name: Mould
 English: from the Middle English female personal name Mau(l)d, a reduced form of the Norman name
Mathilde, Matilda, composed of the Germanic elements maht 'might', 'strength' + hild 'strife',
'battle'. The learned form Matilda was much less common in the Middle Ages than the vernacular
forms Mahalt, Maud and the reduced pet form Till. The name was borne by the daughter of Henry I of
England, who disputed the throne of England with her cousin Stephen for a number of years
(1137-48). In Germany the popularity of the name in the Middle Ages was augmented by its being
borne by a 10th-century saint, wife of Henry the Fowler and mother of Otto the Great.
 
Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4
First Name: 
 
A Dictionary of First Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0192800507


 

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