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Continuing the transcript of

Fifty Years of Sheffield Church Life
1866-1916

by
The Rev. W. Odom

[ photo ]
Hon. Canon of Sheffield


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Chapter II - Part 1

CHURCH LIFE IN SHEFFIELD 1866-1916

There are in this loud stunning tide
Of human care and crime,
With whom the melodies abide
Of th' everlasting chime;
Who carry music in their heart
Through dusky lane and wrangling mart,
Plying their daily task with busier feet,
Because their secret souls a holy strain repeat.

When the nineteenth century opened there were only three churches in Sheffield — the Mother Church of St. Peter (pre-Reformation), now the Cathedral; St. Paul's, built 1721 by subscription; and St. James's, built 1789 by subscription of new proprietary; with three ancient chapels — Attercliffe (1630), Ecclesall (thirteenth century), and the Shrewsbury Hospital Chapel.

The following interesting facts are extracted from a Return made in 1743 to the Archbishop of York (Dr. Herring) respecting the Parish Church and St. Paul's Chapelry:

I. As to the Parish Church, there were in addition to the Vicar (John Dossie) three assistant ministers paid by the Church Burgesses. "Public service twice on every Lord's Day and twice on every other Holy Day, as often on Wednesday and Friday." Children and servants were catechized from the beginning of June till the beginning of October. The Sacrament of the Lord's Supper "is administered on the first Sunday of every month, and on Christmas Day, Palm Sunday, Good Friday, Easter Day, and Whit-Sunday. On Palm Sunday, Good Friday, and on Easter Day (1743) about 500 in all did communicate."

II. As to St. Paul's Chapelry, the incumbent (J. Downes) had no curate. "Public Service is performed twice on every Sunday. Every summer the incumbent catechized and expounded so long as any children, &c., offered themselves. The Sacrament of the Lord's Supper is administered monthly, over and besides the great Festivals. About forty usually communicate, but on such Festivals perhaps one hundred."

It is added that "the number of families in the parish of Sheffield is supposed to be above 2,000. Of these there may be 250 families who are Dissenters, most of them Independents and the rest Presbyterians." These had two meeting houses, and the Quakers one.

Up to the year 1846 Sheffield was one huge parish. In addition to the three churches already named, there were the four large churches built under the Million Act, namely, St. George's (1825), Christ Church, Attercliffe (1826), St. Philip's (1828), and St. Mary's (1830). The ancient chapel at Ecclesall had been replaced in 1788 by a new church, built on a site given by Earl Fitzwilliam. The site of St. George's was given by the Sheffield Church Burgesses, that of St. Philip's by Mr. Philip Gell, and that of St. Mary's by the Duke of Norfolk. St. John's Church in the Park was built in 1836 by subscription, the site being given by the Duke of Norfolk. Christ Church, Fulwood, was built and the site given (1838) by Miss Silcock. St. Thomas's, Crookes, and Holy Trinity, Darnall, were built in 1840 by subscription. Each church had its incumbent or perpetual curate.

The parish of Sheffield, however, remained undivided until 1846, when the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, with the sanction of the Privy Council, determined that it should be divided into twenty-five parishes or districts, each with its church, and incumbent, viz:

The Mother Church of SS. Peter and Paul
Attercliffe
Darnall
Brightside (St. Thomas)
The Wicker (Holy Trinity)
Pitsmoor (Christ Church)
Sheffield Park (St. John)
Dyers Hill (St. Luke, now the Sale Memorial Church)
Heeley (Christ Church)
St. Paul
Porter Street District (now St. Simon)
Carver Street (St. Matthew)
Eldon (St. Jude)
Gillcar (St. Silas)
St. George
Hollis Croft (St. Luke)
Netherthorpe (St. Stephen)
Moorfields (St. Jude)
St. James
St. Philip
Crookes (St. Thomas)
Fulwood (Christ Church)
Ecclesall (All Saints)
St. Mary
Broomhall (St. Mark).

Several of these districts were not provided with churches until some years later, the services being held in mission rooms and schools. To several, generous grants were made by the Church Pastoral Aid Society towards the stipends of curates-in-charge. The first grant of the Society was made to Attercliffe for the Darnall District in 1838, and ever since then to the present the Society has been a most liberal benefactor of the Church in Sheffield, several parishes owing their inception to grants given by the Society. It must be said that the Church in our city owes to the Society a debt which can never be fully repaid.

Footnote: In 1916, the C.P.A.S. made to the City of Sheffield forty-five grants, amounting to £2,970, given to twenty-eight working-class and poorer parishes, with a gross population of about 300,000, in aid of the stipends of thirty-four curates, six lay agents, and five women workers.

In the year 1855 the Archbishop of York (Dr. Musgrave) constituted the Parish of Sheffield a separate Deanery, and appointed Dr. Sale, Vicar of the Mother Church, as Rural Dean. The following succeeded him in the office: Rowley Hill, John Edward Blakeney, Alfred Pearson, James Gilmore, and Thomas Houghton.

In 1884, under Archbishop Thomson, the Archdeaconry of Sheffield was created, comprising the Rural Deaneries of Sheffield, Ecclesfield, and Rotherham, the first Archdeacon being John Edward Blakeney. He was succeeded by Henry Arnold Favell, Vicar of St. Mark's, on whose death in 1896 John Rashdall Eyre was appointed, he in turn being succeeded by Herbert Gresford Jones.

It is fifty years since I began work as a voluntary teacher in the Sheffield Church of England Educational Institute, of which the Rev. James Moorhouse, when a curate of the Parish Church, was one of the chief founders. It flourished then and for many years afterwards, the number of students each term averaging about 300, special attention being given to Scriptural instruction. The Annual Soirée was a high day, prominent ladies of the city presiding over the tea tables. Teachers and students contributed to the entertainments, and it was at these that many of us made our first essays in elocution. It was delightful to see Canon Sale, who invariably presided, throw his whole heart into the proceedings.

The institute was managed by a committee of clergy and laity, the officers at that time being:

President

Rev. Canon Sale, D.D.

Vice-Presidents

Rev. James Moorhouse, M.A.
Rev. George Sandford, M.A.
Mr. Thomas Dunn

Treasurer

Mr. Henry Rodgers

Honorary Secretaries

Rev. George Depledge, M.A.
Mr. Henry Pawson

Assistant Secretary and Librarian

Mr. J. Casson

For several years it was my lot to prepare the annual Abstract of Accounts. Before me is a list of honorary members, which included many leading Churchmen of that day.

The appended copy of the Class List for the Michaelmas Term, 1866, indicating the subjects taught, with names of teachers, [see below] shows what the Church was doing fifty years ago to assist young people in educational matters. No one was admitted under the age of fifteen. Several of the old students became clergymen, whilst many others attained responsible positions, one having filled the honourable office of Lord Mayor of our City.

For some years Dr. Griffiths was Medical officer of Health for Sheffield; the Rev. H. J. Barton, who had been a Missionary in India, was curate of St. Matthew's, and subsequently of St. Philip's; the Rev. E. T. Hustwick was on the staff of the Parish Church.

Amongst the teachers during the terms of 1867-9 were the Rev. J. B. Draper, Vicar of All Saints, who took the Epistle to the Hebrews; The Rev. W. Milton, first Vicar of St. Mark's, who took the Epistle to the Romans; the Rev. Thomas Wilkins, Vicar of Neepsend; and the Rev. F. W. Bindley, Curate of St. Jude's Moorfields.

A Mathematical Class, conducted by Mr. N. Sanderson, and one for Physical Geography by Mr. John Sutton, both well-known Church day school head masters, were commenced about this time, the students of which had to present themselves at the Government Science and Art Examinations.

The Rev. George Depledge, Curate of the Parish Church, afterwards Vicar of Attercliffe, was for several years an indefatigable worker, taking four classes weekly, including Greek and Senior Latin. The Elocution Class, conducted by Mr. Arthur Thomas, was most popular.

The Rev. John Flowers Serjeant, afterwards Assistant Chaplain at the English Church, Paris, and subsequently Incumbent of St. Mary's, Fulham, a highly-intellectual man, overflowing with fun, was a most popular teacher. When in Sheffield he was in charge of All Saints district, and conducted services in a room at the works of John Brown & Co. before the church was built. He died in 1880, at the comparatively early age of fifty-eight years.


SHEFFIELD CHURCH OF ENGLAND EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE CLASS LIST,
Michaelmas Term, 1866
Term will begin on Monday, September 17th, and end on Friday, December 14th

HALF-PAST 7 TO HALF-PAST 8 O'CLOCK

Monday

Room

Senior Reading

Rev. Canon Sale, D.D.

D

Junior Latin

Rev. Walter Senior

G

French Conversation

Dr. Griffiths

E

German Reading

Mr. S. Kay

F

Arithmetic

Mr. Buckle, B.A.
Mr. G. H. Bellhouse

A

Writing

Mr. H. Machon
Mr. J. C. Wing
Mr. H. E. Robinson

L

Junior Reading

Rev. E. T. Hustwick, M.A.
Rev. F. W. Bindley, B.A.
Mr. Fawcett
Mr. Meeson

C

Reading for Beginners

Mr. C. Chadwick

B

Tuesday

Senior Reading

Rev. J. E. Johnson, M.A.

D

Advanced Arithmetic

Mr. Mayall

F

Spelling

Mr. H. M. Edwards

E

Arithmetic

Mr. R. Henderson
Mr. W. P. Jackson

A

Writing

Mr. Boulton
Mr. Glencross
Mr. H. E. Robinson
Mr. J. C. Colver

L

Junior Reading

Mr. Gregory
Mr. W. Heald
Mr. M. Hartley
Mr. James Hill

C

Reading for Beginners

Mr. Wallace

B

Wednesday

Senior Reading

Mr. John Collier

D

French Conversation

Dr. Griffiths

E

Arithmetic

Mr. Albert Walker
Mr. J. W. Johnson

A

Writing

Mr. B. Wharton
Mr. Hugill

L

Junior Reading

Mr. Evans
Mr. Walker
Mr. W. Swift

C

Reading for Beginners

Mr. Wallace

 

Thursday

Senior Reading

Rev. H. J. Barton

D

German

Herr C. Wehnert

G

Arithmetic

Mr. Boulton

A

Writing

Mr. J. M. Dyson
Mr. Walker

L

Junior Reading

Mr. Haygarth
Mr. Fairmaner

C

Reading for Beginners

Mr. T. Hodgson

B

Friday

Senior Reading

Rev. E. W. Clarke, B.A.

D

Greek and Senior Latin

Rev. G. Depledge, M.A.

G

Arithmetic

Mr. Cundiff

A

Writing

Mr. Swift
Mr. Marshall

L

Junior Reading

Mr. Kirkland
Mr. Denton

C

Reading for Beginners

Mr. W. Hodgson

B

HALF-PAST 8 TO HALF-PAST 9 O'CLOCK

Monday

Room

Gospel of S. Matthew

Rev. H. H. Wright

D

Junior Latin

Rev. F. W. Bindley, M.A.

G

French Reading

Dr. Griffiths

E

English Grammar (Highest Section)

Mr. S. Kay

F

Arithmetic

Mr. Wm. Johnson
Mr. G. H. Bellhouse

A

Writing

Mr. H. Machon
Mr. A. Evans
Mr. H. E. Robinson

L

Junior Reading

Rev. E. T. Hustwick, M.A.
Mr. C. Chadwick
Mr. J. C. Wing
Mr. J. Kay

C

Reading for Beginners

Mr. W. Stanyard

B

Tuesday

Senior Reading

Mr. J. Mettam

D

Singing

Mr. H. W. Pawson

L

English Composition and Dictation

Rev. G. Depledge, M.A.

G

English Grammar (Lowest Section)

Mr. W. P. Jackson

F

Arithmetic

Mr. Rooks
Mr. Boulton

A

Junior Reading

Mr. Gregory
Mr. Wallace
Mr. Reed

C

Reading for Beginners

Mr. Crapper

B

Wednesday

Elocution

Mr. Arthur Thomas

D

Geography

Mr. Saunders

G

French Reading

Dr. Griffiths

E

English Grammar (Middle Section)

Mr. W. Swift

F

Arithmetic

Mr. J. Collier
Mr. J. Yates

A

Writing

Mr. Butler
Mr. Marshall
Mr. Pickford

L

Junior Reading

Mr. S. Smith
Mr. Evans
Mr. Windle

C

Reading for Beginners

Mr. W. Wharton

B

Thursday

The Reformation (doctrinally considered)

Mr. James Todd

D

Advanced Arithmetic

Mr. Bottom

F

French

Herr C. Wehnert

G

Arithmetic

Mr. Boulton
Mr. Belfitt

A

Spelling

Mr. Marshall

E

Writing

Mr. B. Smith
Mr. Haygarth

L

Junior Reading

Mr. Walker
Mr. Wm. Parkin Wiglesworth
Mr. W. Odom
Mr. G. H. Naylor

C

Reading for Beginners

Mr. J. M. Dyson

B

Friday

Senior Reading

Rev. G. Depledge, M.A.

D

Shorthand Writing

Mr. Henry Pawson
Mr. John Hall

G

Bookkeeping

Mr. R. H. Laughton

F

Geography

Rev. E. W. Clarke, B.A.

E

Arithmetic

Mr. Cundiff
Mr. Tarbuck

A

Writing

Mr. Myers
Mr. Bradshaw
Mr. Denton

L

Junior Reading

Mr. W. Hodgson
Mr. Kirkland
Mr. Robinson

C

Reading for Beginners

Mr. S. Newton

B

The early 'seventies were characterized by lively controversies on Church and State. The Liberation Society sent to Sheffield several of its leading speakers, including Mr. Carvell Williams, Pastor Gordon, Dr. Parker, Mr. Henry Vincent, and Mr. John Fisher, who in turn were replied to by such able Church defenders as Dr. Massingham, Dr. Potter, Mr. William Touchstone, and others. A reference to the Sheffield Telegraph of that day will show the widespread interest taken in the subject. The Cutlers' Hall and the Temperance Hall were packed again and again, and the correspondence columns of the Sheffield daily papers fully occupied.

Young as I was, I entered into the fray, it may be somewhat rashly, and was much encouraged by the Editor of the Sheffield Telegraph (Mr. W. C. Leng) allowing several letters to appear, signed "A Churchman". In May, 1872, the Liberation Society held a conference for the purpose of enlisting the sympathies of the young Sheffield Nonconformists, at which Mr. Carvell Williams said "the chief objection to the Established Church is that it is opposed to the spread of Christianity and the cause of religion". In a letter to the Telegraph referring to this conference I added a postscript — "Young men desirous of assisting in the formation of an Association for educating themselves in Church matters and acting in defence of the Church are requested to communicate with the writer – Box 14, Daily Telegraph Office".

The first letter received was from a youth in a merchant's office in Bow Street — Henry Byron Reed, hereafter named — who with two or three other young friends met at my rooms. The result was a meeting in the Lecture Hall of the Church Institute for the purpose of forming an Association of Young Churchmen "with a view to promote Education in Church History and Principles and to assist in upholding Religious Education generally — to disseminate accurate information on Church subjects, to support well-considered measures of Church Reform, and to aid in Church Defence," — a somewhat ambitious programme.

There was a large attendance, over which Canon Sale presided, whilst amongst those present, in addition to several of the Clergy, were Mr. Arthur Thomas, Mr. T. R. (afterwards Alderman) Gainsford, Mr. Francis Hobson, and Mr. Alexander Robertson. After addresses by the Chairman, Mr. Arthur Thomas, and others, it was resolved on the motion of Mr. T. R. Gainsford that "an Association be formed for the purposes named in the circular convening the meeting, to be called the Sheffield Young Churchmen's Protestant Association, and that all Churchmen be members who shall subscribe one shilling and upwards per annum." It is worth noting that leading Churchmen of that day, as Mr. T. R. Gainsford and Mr. Arthur Thomas — High Churchmen as they were — were not afraid of the term "Protestant". They knew what the word signified.

The first officers of the Association were:

President

Rev. Canon Sale, D.D.

Vice-Presidents

Rev. S. Chorlton
Mr. Arthur Thomas

Executive Committee

Mr. H. Biggin
Mr. W. B. Esam
Mr. B. Fletcher
Mr. W. Hydes
Mr. A. Jackson
Mr. H. Byron Reed
Mr. T. G. Shuttleworth
Mr. A. Shaw

Treasurer

Mr. Joseph Ridge

Hon. Secretary

W. Odom (photo)

It soon numbered 200 members and did useful work for several years. Its meetings were largely attended, and tens of thousands of tracts and leaflets bearing on Church subjects were circulated. During the first three years, in addition to papers read at meetings of members, public lectures were given on the following subjects by those named:

Rev. H. H. Wright: "The English Church and the New Testament"
Mr. Arthur Thomas: "Convocations - the Synod of our National Church"
Mr. Wm. Touchstone: "Education and Religious Liberty"
Rev. Samuel Earnshaw: "The question — What is the Church? — considered in its bearing on practical Church Reform"
Rev. Dr. Potter: "Our National Church: Is it Worth Defending?"
Rev. C. G. Coombe: "Our National Church: Its Work among the Masses"
Rev. James Battersby: "Our National Church: What are its Principles? Objections answered"
Rev. John Burbidge: "Our National Church: How it may be Defended, and how it is Maintained"
Rev. C. A. Goodhart: "The Principles of the Reformation"
Rev. George Sandford: "The Church's Work in the Mission Field"
Rev. William Milton: "The True Protestant Bishop"
Rev. J. F. Witty: "The Gospel or Ritualism"
Rev. G. W. Weldon (London): "The Priests of the Three Temples"
Rev. Robert Maguire (London): "The Dangers and Duties of our Day"
Dr. Barnardo (London): "The Claims of Street Children on the Church of Christ"
Mr. Arthur Thomas: "The Supremacy of the Crown, and Church of England comprehension"
Rev. Brewin Grant (London): "The Principles of Liberationism" (two lectures)
Rev. J. E. Gladstone (Wolverhampton): "Church Defence, the duty of Churchmen as Protestants, Patriots, and Christians"

Amongst subjects for discussion were:

"Our Street Youths! How can they best be brought under religious and moral influences?"
(in which the Revs. Rowley Hill, J. E. Blakeney, and James Russell, Mr. Arthur Thomas, and others, took part);

"Our Prayer Book — does it need revision?"

"The Church's Mission Work — its requirements, how can they be met?", and

"The Educational Tendencies of the Age".

Respecting Dr. Barnardo's Lecture, given in St. Paul's Lecture Hall, which was densely crowded, it may be said that this was his first visit to Sheffield. His great life-work of child rescue was only then beginning to be more widely known, and the immediate results of his visit, if I remember rightly, were contributions to his Homes approaching £100. When Dr. Barnardo made his last visit to Sheffield, not very long before his death, I had the pleasure of meeting him, and on reminding him of his first visit he said he remembered it well, as indeed I did, since we had to keep the great audience going for nearly an hour, owing to his having lost a train connection.

Before the Association was a year old its members had to lament the loss of their honoured president, Canon Sale, who passed away with startling suddenness. He was succeeded by the Rev. Rowley Hill, who had been preferred to the Vicarage of Sheffield. Mr. H. Byron Reed, one of the most active members of our Committee, became a lecturer to the Church Defence Institution, and subsequently editor of a Northern newspaper. In 1886 he was returned M.P. for East Bradford. Losing his seat at the General Election of 1892, he pluckily contested it again in 1895, defeating Mr. W. S. Caine. He was a most able and fluent speaker, and for many years did yeoman service in the cause of Church Defence.

I look back with peculiar pleasure on the close and happy friendship which existed between us, but which was, to my deep sorrow, brought to an end in October, 1896, by a fatal carriage accident to him near his home at Ventnor. He was honoured with a public funeral at Bradford, attended by an immense concourse. So ended, at the early age of forty, a brilliant life of great promise. The Sheffield Telegraph spoke of him as "an ardent Church defender, thoroughly honest and straightforward, with a fine resonant voice, a telling way of arranging facts and figures, of immense spirit, rendering him a most effective platform man."

On leaving Sheffield for college in 1875 my official connexion with the Association, in the formation of which I had taken an active share, necessarily came to a close. In its Report for 1876 appeared the following:

The departure of Mr. William Odom from Sheffield has deprived the Association of his valuable services as Honorary Secretary, and the thanks of the Association are due to him for his earnest and indefatigable labours from its formation [in 1872]; and it is with pleasure that the Committee mention that the Testimonial subscribed by members of the Association (nearly 200), consisting of the following works:

Alford's Greek Testament, 4 vols.

McClellan on the Gospels

Farrar's Life of Christ, 2 vols.

Christian Dogmatics

Trench on the Parables and Miracles

Principles at Stake

Aids to Faith

Dean Stanley's Palestrina

Proctor on the Prayer Book

Modern English Poets

was presented to him by the Rev. Rowley Hill, on January 24th, 1876.

The organizations that are now in formation in Sheffield upon the subject of Church Defence and Reform, contemplate the continuation of the work, which has hitherto been the object of the Association, upon a more extended basis.

When in the year 1866, as a voluntary teacher at the Church Institute, I became more fully acquainted with the Church Life of Sheffield, there were in the town — it was not then a city — only twenty-one churches. It may be of interest to recall these, with their Vicars:

The Parish Church (photo)

Canon Sale

St. Paul's

John Edward Blakeney

Ecclesall

Edward Newman

St. James's

Henry Henton Wright

St. Philip's

John Livesey

St. George's

William Mercer

Attercliffe

Thomas Walker Sale

St. Mary's

Charles Edward Lamb

St. John's, Park

Richard Heslop

Fulwood

E. Boteler Chalmer

Crookes

Charles George Coombe

Darnall

W. L. Gibson

Heeley (Christ Church - photo)

Henry Denson Jones

Holy Trinity, Wicker

John Aldous

St. Jude's, Eldon

George Sandford
(afterwards Vicar of Ecclesall)

Pitsmoor

Henry Barlow

St. Jude's, Moorfields

John Edward Johnson

Brightside

Thomas Hulme

St. Matthew's

John Francis Witty

St. Stephen's

John Burbidge

St. Luke's, Hollis Croft

Robert Henry Deane

The iron church of St. Mark, Glossop Road (afterwards removed to Carbrook), was served by the clergy of the Parish Church. Four other districts were without churches, namely:

Porter Street District,
afterwards St. Simon's

James Battersby

Dyer's Hill District

Peter Browne

All Saints',
church in course of erection

John Flowers Serjeant

Gilcar District,
now St. Silas

Ebenezer Rushton Talbot

There were two assistant ministers at the Parish Church,
Samuel Earnshaw and Canon Trevor non-resident.
The Rev. Thomas Smith, afterwards Vicar of Walkley, was Chaplain to the Infirmary.
John Stacye, a noted antiquarian, was Governor and Chaplain of the Shrewsbury Hospital.
George Barnes Atkinson, was Principal and Chaplain of the Collegiate School.

Of the curates of that day may be named:

George Depledge

Parish Church, afterwards Vicar of Attercliffe.

Walter Senior

St. Paul's, afterwards Vicar of the same Church.

Samuel Chorlton

Assistant Master of the Collegiate School and Curate of St. James's,
afterwards Vicar of Pitsmoor and Canon of York.

Charles Sisum Wright

Curate of St. Philip's, who became Vicar of St. Silas's,
and afterwards Vicar of Doncaster and Canon of York.

Robert Douglas

Curate of St. George's, afterwards Vicar of St. Stephen's.

Dr. John Harrison

Curate of Pitsmoor, afterwards Vicar of Fenwick,
author of Whose are the Fathers? and other works.

The Rev. Thomas Best, "father of the Sheffield clergy", who for forty-eight years had been the Incumbent of St. James's Church, long the fashionable church of the town, died in March, 1865.

Continue to the second part of Chapter 2


Return to
Beginning of this chapter: Part 1 of Chapter 2

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Full Contents

I

Sheffield in the 'Sixties
The author's reminiscences of 'Old Sheffield' and its inhabitants.

II

THIS PAGE: The Church in Sheffield, 1866-1916 - Part 1 (Part 2 is here).

III

Memories of St. Simon's, 1877-1888
Details of this parish in one of the most densely-populated areas of Sheffield, anecdotes, names, etc.

IV

Christ Church, Heeley, 1888-1916
History, descriptions and anecdotes of Heeley before it became developed, names of residents, and a comprehensive account of the author's incumbency, including details of the church extensions, building of the Sunday Schools, fundraising, collections and expenditure, a little about Nonconformists, names of curates/scripture readers/deaconesses/churchwardens etc, and the author's eventual retirement — this chapter has been split into two pages, the link taking you to the first of these.

V

Heeley and the War
Names of congregation members fallen in the Great War, including one VC (Sgt-Maj J C Raynes, Royal Artillery, with citation given), together with extracts from letters written by servicemen giving accounts of conditions at the front (France, Belgium, Egypt), their experiences in battle, and thoughts of home; also an account from a survivor of the sinking of the hospital ship 'Anglia' in the Channel.

VI

Recollections – Men and Things
Many names and anecdotes of clergy, laymen and others known and befriended during the author's ministry — this chapter has been split into two pages, the link taking you to the first of these.

VII

Books and Travel
Author's favourite reading, details and a bibliography of other published work, and travel.

VIII

In Memoriam – Mary Odom
A very personal tribute from the author to his wife, Mary, who died in 1913.

IX

"God and Cæsar." A Sermon preached before the Mayor and Corporation.
Text of a sermon preached at Sheffield Parish Church in 1887.

X

"Public Worship – its Methods." A Paper read at the Islington Clerical Meeting, London, 1903.
Text includes the author's observations on the principles established at the time of the Reformation, the dangers of a return to 'mediaevalism', and public worship as laid out in the Book of Common Prayer.

Names of Subscribers
(the names of over 250 subscribers listed alphabetically by surname, of interest to those who may be "ancestor hunting" (in many cases only initials are given, not christian names).
Please note these are only the names of pre-publication subscribers as printed in the book, but many more individuals are mentioned in the text whose names have not been indexed. Throughout this transcript most names have been highlighted in bold at least once (not necessarily if they are repeated). If searching for specific surnames, place names or any other information through the various chapters, make use of the Find or Search facility in your browser while on each page.

Illustrations from the book — click thumbnails for enlargement in a new window
(for chapters and contents, see list above)

Interior of Sheffield Cathedral - click for enlargement

Interior of Sheffield Cathedral Church
(St Peter & St Paul)

Leonard Hedley Burrows, Bishop of Sheffield - click for enlargement

The Bishop of Sheffield, Leonard Hedley Burrows, D.D.,
to whom the book is dedicated

St Simon's Church, Sheffield - click for enlargement

St. Simon's Church, Sheffield (covered in Chapter III)

Exterior of Christ Church, Heeley - click for enlargement

Christ Church, Heeley: exterior
(the author's time at Heeley is covered in Chapter IV)

Interior of Heeley Church - click for enlargement

Heeley Church: Interior

Floor plan of Heeley Church - click for enlargement

Floor plan of Heeley Church,
dating the various extensions

Whit-Monday at Heeley - click for enlargement

Whit-Monday at Heeley
(no date given, but possibly ca. 1916/1917)

Heeley Vicarage - click for enlargement

Heeley Vicarage
The individuals are not named, but could well be Rev and Mrs Odom

Rev. Canon William Odom - click for enlargement

The author,
Rev. Canon William Odom

Memorial Cross, Heeley Churchyard - click for enlargement

Memorial Cross for Mary Odom,
Heeley Churchyard (see Chapter VIII)

Memorial Window, Heeley Church - click for enlargement

Memorial and Commemoration Window, Heeley Church

Dedication - click for enlargement

This copy of the book includes a handwritten dedication
from the author to the Bishop of Sheffield, 1917



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