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Ancestors of Gary and Ardis Dahlstrom Morrison

Generation No. 4
Our ggg grandparents

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130. John Forsyth, Sr., born September 1788 in Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died November 1853 in Richland Township, Wapello County, Iowa. He was the son of 260. George Forsyth and 261. Mary Patterson. He married 131. Elizabeth McKinley May 09, 1813 in County Down, Northern Ireland.
Notes for John Forsyth, Sr.:
We are fortunate to have the family history as laid down by Frances (Fanny) Forsyth for a 1904 Forsyth family reunion near Griswold, Cass County, Iowa.  A trascription of her history is found at the bottom of the family group sheet page.  The family history dates pre-date most records available in Northern Ireland that would provide family member names, family relationships and birth/death/marriage dates.  Because of the precision of birth dates, down to the day of the week, they must have come from a family bible and been recorded as they occurred.  While there are inconsistencies in some of the other information, that can easily be corrected, but the basic information would otherwise be hard to come by.
Northern Ireland is divided into several administrative districts, and the smallest and most essential division for genealogical purposes is the townland.  The townland is very similar to the township used in many American states.  The other administrative districts that can occur are County, Barony (now obsolete), Civil Parish, Church of Ireland Parish, and Roman Catholic Parish.  For example, John's birth place is Ballymageogh Townland, Barony of Mourne, Civil Parish of Kilkeel, and Roman Catholic Parish of Lower Mourne.  I have tried to use a consistent, non-ecclesiastic nomenclature - e.g. Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland.  Ballymageogh Townland is comprised of 1345 acres in the western part of Kilkeel Civil Parish at the foothills of the Mourne Mountains.  That land mass is a little more that 10 times the size of the farm John and Elizabeth Forsyth purchased in Wapello County, Iowa.  An excellent web site about Ballymageogh Townland, which also contains other great links to County Down information, can be found here.
The biographies and obituaries of several of the children, including Fanny, stated they were received in the Presbyterian church as youngsters.  Many continued in that faith the remainder of their life.  From the web site Ask about Ireland, and the article The Ulster Plantation by the Donegal Cultural Services, "As early as 1603, King James had granted confiscated lands in County Down to Scottich nobles James Hamilton and Hugh Montgomery.  This is how the colonisation of Counties Antrim and Down by mostly Protestant lowland Scots began.  It prepared the way for the later official plantation of Armagh, Coleraine, Cavan, Donegal, Fermanagh and Tyrone, an event known at the Plantation of Ulster."  With the Presbyterian faith, it is likely the Forsyth ancestors were among the transplanted Scots.  Within the Civil Parish of Kilkeel, there were 5 Presbyterian congregations in existence in the mid-1800s - Annalong, Kilkeel City, 1st Newry, 2nd Newry and 3rd Newry.  With the center of Ballymageogh Townland being only 3 miles as the crow flies from Kilkeel City, it is very possible this is the congregation attended by the Forsyths.  James' narrative below will give a further explanation as to why I think this might be a likely assumption.
Tithe surveys (applotments) were undertaken beginning in 1823 through 1838 in order to calculate the amount of tax payable,in money rather than in kind, by the landholders of Northern Ireland for the upkeep of the Church of Ireland.  With no census data available prior to 1901, these particular records constitute the closest thing to a census in this time period for Northern Ireland.  The applotment surveys identified every landholder with details such as name of townland, size of holding, land quality, and types of crops.  The tithe applotment list for Ballymageogh was done in 1830, and contained the names of George, James and John Forsythe as follows:
Landholder Amount of Survey Quality Amount of Tithe
#18 George Forsythe 0 acres; 0 roods; 10 perches Second 0 pounds; 0 shillings; 1 1/2 pence
#19 James Forsythe 3 acres; 1 rood; 9 perches Fourth 0 pounds; 3 shillings; 9 1/2 pence
#20 John Forsythe 2 acres; 2 roods; 30 perches Fifth 0 pounds; 2 shillings; 1 pence
The land measure used here is what is called Irish Plantation Measure.  John's 2 acres, 2 roods and 30 perches is the equivalent of approximately 4 1/3 acres American.  The quality value classified the quality of the land according to its fertility.  Thus land used for crops and that was fertile and produced excellent yields would be classified as first and so on down the scale.  There is no way to know for sure this is our John, but that is my assumption as well as it being my assumption that James and George are his brothers.  In the 1803 Live and Dead Stock records for Ballymeogh only James appears and with 1 pig, 4 barrels of oats and 6 sacks of potatos.  The above data and interpretations are thanks to volunteer Sheila Phillips in County Down.  With John being 15 years old in 1803, I guess James to be an older brother, and I guess George to be younger because of his small plot of land in 1830.
The family emigrated in 1843 arriving in Philadelphia 23 May 1843 aboard the Ship Georgiana, last from Liverpool:
John Forsyth 50 Male
Mrs. Forsyth 48 Female
Mary Jane Forsyth 20 Female
John Forsyth 18 Male
Wm. Forsyth 16 Male
Eliza Forsyth 14 Female
George Forsyth 12 Male
Thompson Forsyth 10 Male
Fanny Forsyth 8 Female
Archibald Forsyth 7 Male
All are generically listed as Farmers, Mechanics and Laborers.  After arrival in Philadelphia they migrated to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania where they settled for about 8 years.  Fanny's history states they settled in neighboring Allegheny County, and it is possible they started out there.  According to the John T. Forsythe biography, son of James and Sarah Perry Forsyth, he was born 24 October 1848 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania ("History of Wapello County", Harrison L. Watterman, Editor; S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1914).  In the John K. Forsyth biography, son of John and Ellen Perry Forsyth, it states the family first located in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania before migrating to Iowa ("Compendium of History & Biography of Cass County, IA; Henry Taylor & Co., Chicago, 1906).  The John and Elizabeth Forsyth family are found in the 1850 census in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County (page 334B, October 21), which borders on Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County.
Elizabeth Forsythe 60 F Ireland
George Forsythe 25 M Ireland
Elizabeth Forsythe 25 F Ireland
Thompson Forsythe 21 M Far(mer) Ireland
Frances Forsythe 19 F Far(mer) Ireland
Archibald Forsythe 17 M Far(mer) Ireland
John Forsythe (Jun.) 30 M Boat? Maker Ireland
John Forsythe (Sen.) 62 M Far(mer) Ireland
Ellen Forsythe 24 M 1,300  Penn.
This is an interesting census entry for a couple of reasons.  First, Elizabeth is listed as though she is head of household, and the index is thusly built with her name, yet John Sr. is part of the household.  George is listed without occupation and Frances is listed as a farmer?  Ellen is listed with real estate valued at $1,300, which would be unheard of in that age.  John Jr. is listed here as what appears to be a boat maker, but careful scrutiny under magnification seems to show an "o" and then overwritten by an "a".  John and Ellen are also enumerated in 1850 in neighboring Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County (page 206A, September 27, see John below) and there he is listed as a shoe maker (his trade in Northern Ireland and his trade in the 1856 State of Iowa census).  Boot maker would seem to make more sense than boat maker given the other sources.
The 1856 State of Iowa Richland Township, Wapello County census shows John Forsythe, Jr. (page 359), George Forsythe (page 367), Archibald Forsythe (page 367), James Forsythe (page 379) and Frances Hayden (page 391) as having been in Iowa for 5 years.  According to the John K. Forsyth biography, son of John and Ellen Perry Forsyth, in the year of his birth (1851) the family "migrated to Iowa -- by boat, via the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to Burlington, and thence by team to Wapello county".  John and Elizabeth's arrival in Wapello County in 1851 is further supported by two land transactions whereby John Forsythe, Sr. of Wapello County purchased from John Baldwin of Wapello County in June 1851 the W 1/2 of SW 1/4 of Section 17 (80 acres) as recorded in Deed Book E, page 71 and in July 1851 the SW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 17 (40 acres) as recorded in Deed Book E, page 72.  Fanny stated that Eliza and her husband (whom she erroneously identified as John) migrated to Wapello County, Iowa with her parents in 1851.  John Forsythe (Sr.), James Forsythe and John Forsythe (Jr.) are listed on page 7 of the 1852 State of Iowa Richland Township, Wapello County census, but no Joseph Morrison.  In the 1854 State of Iowa Richland Township, Wapello County census Joseph Morrison is shown on page 1, along with William Foresythe, John Forsythe, with Elizabeth Forsyth (widow) on page 2.  This is consistent with Joseph's entry in the 1856 State of Iowa Richland Township, Wapello County census (page 369) where it shows Joseph, Elizabeth and son Thomas being in Iowa 2 years.  Additionally, the obituary of son Thomas states he was born in Pennsylvania October 21, 1852.
Fanny records that father John died in November 1853.  John recorded his will May 5, 1853 and the children identified therein agrees with the list of children as recorded by Fanny.  On November 2, 1853 John recorded a codicil to his will and on December 15, 1853 his will was proven with the testimony of Henry Kirkpatrick and Dewitt Bennet (name has some importance for Archibald below).

For further information on this line see the link from my Home Page "Forsyths of Wapello Co., IA - A New Line".


131. Elizabeth McKinley, born March 1790 in probably Cabragh Townland near Rathfriland, Clonduff Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died 1873 in Richland Township, Wapello County, Iowa. She was the daughter of 262. William McKinley and 263. Jane Thompson.
Notes for Elizabeth McKinley:
Fanny's history states her mother was born in Camray, Parish of Clonduff, near Rathfriland, in County Down.  The Civil Parish of Clonduff adjoins the Civil Parish of Kilkeel immediately on the other side of the Mourne Mountains from the Townland of Ballymageogh.  The proximity to the townland of the Forsyths certainly provides opportunity.  There is no known location named Camray, but there is a Townland of Cabragh within the Civil Parish of Clonduff, which is approximately 3 miles east of Rathfriland.  More than likely this is the townland location of the McKinleys.  Cabragh means "poor land" and is roughly 267 acres, a little more than twice the size of the Forsyth farm in Wapello County, Iowa in 1851.  There was another McKinley linkage in the Forsyth family that will be spoken of in the Thompson Forsyth narrative.  Could the McKinleys be related?  There will be no conclusions, but information will be shared and suppositions put forth in some of the children narratives.
Elizabeth outlived John by 20 years.  In his will John tried to provide for his wife - "To my beloved wife one Cow and Pig ['and Pig' appears to be crossed out] of her own choice together with all my household and kitchen furniture also a sufficient support in sickness and health during her natural life in lieu of dower" (Wapello County Probate Book C, page 157).  In the accompanying codicil John directs "...that my will is that my loving wife shall have two fleeces of wool paid to her yearly so long as she lives, by my sons George and Archibald..."  Elizabeth is shown in her own residence in the 1854 State of Iowa Richland Township, Wapello County census, page 2, line 13 - 2 males; 2 females; 2 voters; 2 militia; 4 total.  The 2 males are likely George and Thompson, both unmarried at this point in time.  Archibald is probably already in Hocking County, Ohio at this point.  The other female is Fanny.  The 1854 census also gives the total population of all men, women and children as 506 for Richland Township, or approximately 14 individuals per square mile.  When the Forsyths settled in Richland Township in 1851 (2 adults and 6 children), there was probably one other family of an equivalent size in the same square mile.  Iowa became a state just five years before the Forsyths arrived, so it was truly still a frontier at that time.
In the 1856 State of Iowa Richland Township, Wapello County census, page 268, Elizabeth is age 54 (sic) and a widow, and living with the George Forsythe family.  It is noted that Elizabeth and George have resided in Iowa for 5 years.  The 1860 Federal Census for Richland Township, Wapello County, page 630B/631A shows Elizabeth living with the George Forsythe family.  In this census she is listed as age 74 (sic).  Elizabeth appears in her last census in 1870 Richland Township, Wapello County, page 256B and again is living with the George Forsythe family.  In this census she is listed as 80 (sic) years of age.  This wide variation in age has been noted with Joseph and Eliza Forsyth Morrison as well as with Elizabeth.  John's will charged George and Archibald with taking care of their mother.  George appears to have borne the brunt of this support.
John and Elizabeth are buried in Westview Cemetery, Kirkville, Richland Township, Wapello County, and share a stone.  Sharing the stone with John and Elizabeth is Emma Catherine Forsyth, daughter of son Archibald and wife Mary, who was born about March 1860 and died 1862.

Children of John Forsyth and Elizabeth McKinley are:

i. William Forsyth, born May 08, 1814 in Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died September 22, 1816 in Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland.
William died of smallpox.
ii. James Forsyth, born February 16, 1816 in Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died March 04, 1885 in Richland Township, Wapello County, Iowa; married Sarah Perry December 23, 1844 in Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; born 1820 in probably Maghereagh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died July 04, 1885 in Richland Township, Wapello County, Iowa.
According to Fanny's family history "...the eldest son, James, emigrated to America and soon persuaded his parents to join him here."  According to a biography of son John T. Forsyth written in "History of Wapello County", Harrison L. Waterman, Editor, S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1914, " In 1840 James Forsyth sailed for America, landing in New York where he worked in the market.  He later went to western Pennsylvania and worked on a steamboat, then rented a farm and sent for his parents."  It is possible the James Forsyth found on the roster of the ship Glenview that arrived from Liverpool in the port of New York on June 25, 1841 is our James (Nationial Archives Mircofilm M237, roll 45, page 3, line 34).  This James is shown as age 23, with no occupation listed, originating in Northern Ireland and traveling to the US.  While the age is off by 1 year, that does not seem bad compared to some age discrepancies associated with records of this family (see Elizabeth census entries above).  Arrival in New York seems to match his son's recollections and the time is certainly in the right timeframe.
Why did James decide to settle in the Allegheny and Westmoreland County area?  It could simply be the sizable Scots-Irish population in that area of the western frontier.  He would certainly have felt comfortable among that population.  There is another angle that I am researching as a possiblity.  There was a family of McKinleys in Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania (adjoins Rostraver Township of Westmoreland County) that figure in Thompson's narrative below.  William McKinley was born 1788 in Ireland.  Could this have been a brother, uncle, or cousin, to Elizabeth?  It turns out this family migrated to Mahaska County, Iowa (adjoins Wapello County to the north) in 1851, same year as the Forsyth family migrated to Wapello County.  There will be other intertwinings mentioned in Thompson's narrative that make it seem feasible there could be some connection.
Fanny states he and Sarah married in December 1845, while son John's biography states "In 1844 he returned to Northern Ireland for his marriage and soon afterward brought his bride to the new world."  From James' obituary in the Ottumwa Courier, "In 1844 he returned to his native land and was united in marriage with Miss Sarah Perry, December 23, 1844."  This seems to be confirmed by the roster of ship United Kingdom that arrived from Liverpool in the port of New York on May 28, 1845 (National Archives Mircofilm M237, roll 57, lines 32 and 33).  Jas. Forsyth, age 26, with occupation of laborer and Sarah Forsyth, age 24, are enumerated.
James, 34 and farmer, and Sarah, 30, are shown living in Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County in the 1850 census (page 205A) along with their first four children.  Living with them are John Forsyth, 30 and shoe maker, and Ellen Peary, 24.  They joined John and Elizabeth the following year in migrating to Wapello County, Iowa.  When John Sr. died his will called for James to receive one dollar one year after his death.  Why such an insignificant amount?  Had John given him money to purchase land in Wapello and therefore felt he had already given James his inheritance?  James entered into land transactions with Peter Bridenstine purchasing land in February 1852 (Deed Book F, page 493) and March 1859 (Deed Book L, book 240).  He farmed until his death.  His obituary said he died after a lingering illness on March 8, 1885.  His death certificate states he died of progressive paralysis the result of softening of the brain structure.  His obituary confirms they migrated to Iowa in April 1851, and that James was a member of the Presbyterian church from his childhood.  He was laid to rest in Westview Cemetery, Kirkville, Richland Township, Wapello County, Iowa.
I gave Sarah's birth place as likely Maghereagh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland.  That is because James' obituary states he was "born near Maghereaugh, county Down..."  I made the assumption the obituary was written with Sarah's help and from her perspective.  There was a James Peery listed in the 1830 Tithe Applotment for Maghereagh Townland, which helps to lend some credence to this possibility.  Maghereagh Townland is located on the coast of the Irish Sea about 1/2 mile east of Kilkeel city.  If James and Sarah both attended the Presbyterian church in Kilkeel it would have provided the opportunity for them to get acquainted, and fall in love.  Sarah died a scant 4 months later and was also laid to rest in Westview cemetery.  She and James had 10 children, 6 daughters and 4 sons.
iii. Mary Jane Forsyth, born September 22, 1818 in Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died September 19, 1898 in Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland; married John Kidney 1844 in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania; born November 8, 1821 in Straban, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland; died January 27, 1897 in Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland.
Mary Jane was among the children on the ship roster as John and Elizabeth and family immigrated in May 1843.  According to Fanny she married John Kidney in 1844.  John arrived in Philadelphia from Londonderry via Liverpool on August 21, 1838 aboard the ship Cadmus (National Archives and Records Administration M425, roll 53, page 2, lines 40-44).  His father, Robert, must have already been in America since John came over with his mother Sarah and siblings Margaret, James and William.  They are not found in the 1840 census, but Robert and Sarah show up in the 1850 Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania census (household 573, page 186A) where he is identified as a shoe maker.  By this time, John and Mary Jane have married and they are found in Elizabeth Township as well, being found on page 190B (household 622).  John is age 27 and a farmer and Mary Jane is listed as 30, and they are both shown as born in Ireland.  They have their first three children, Josiah age 4, Susana age 3, and James W. age 2.
John and Mary Jane did not go to Iowa like the rest of the children.  There may have been some special affinity between Mary Jane and sister Eliza.  John and Mary Jane live just 7 households away from the family where Joseph Morrison (husband-to-be of Eliza) lives in 1850.  Joseph, also born in Ireland, is a hired hand on the Samuel Rankin farm, household 615.  It is likely Mary Jane played a role in Joseph and Eliza meeting.  When the Forsyth family moved to Wapello County in 1851, Mary Jane and Eliza, along with William, stayed behind.  Likely William stayed behind because of wife Mary Ann - there seemed to be a special bonding in the Thomas Forsythe family.  Then by 1853 John and Mary Jane have moved to Ohio.  In 1860, John and Mary are found in Liberty Township, Washington County, Ohio (page 428B), where John is again shown as a farmer, and they have 8 children.  Son John, age 9, was born in Pennsylvania and daughter Sarah, age 7, was born in Ohio.  This would have been a rather easy migration for them as Washington County lies on the Ohio River.  It is possible Mary Jane chose not to stay in touch with her family since the report of George Forsyth on June 27, 1857, as executor of the will of John Forsyth, Sr., stated "All other claims satisfied with the exception of one Heir, Mary Jane Kidney of Ohio."  She was bequethed one dollar.
By 1870 the census shows they have moved across the county line to Washington Township, Monroe County, Ohio (page 299A) and they have one more child, their last.  The major change shown with this census entry is John's occupation - minister.  It is unclear whether he was an ordained minister, or chose to serve in that role without the official backing of a religious denomination.  That is because they show up next in Hedgesville in 1880 Berkeley County, West Virginia (page 293D) where he is shown again as a farmer.  After this point they disappear from the censuses and it was not until I found their obituaries that I learned what became of them.
Name: John Kidney
Publication Place: Washington County, Maryland
23 January 1897 issue of Hagerstown Mail
Obituary
Rev. John Kidney, a local Methodist preacher, died at 6 o'clock on Friday evening at his home on Elizabeth-st, from a complication of troubles, aged 75 years.  He had been in failing health for several years.  Rev. Kidney was born in Straban, Ireland, and emigrated to this country with his parents when 16 years old.  The family settled near Pittsburg  He engaged in active ministerial work when a young man, but of late years had been a supply.  He moved to Hagerstown from Berkeley county, W. Va., in 1891, and on special occasions assisted in the services of St. Paul's and Washington Square M. E. churches.  He was a man of intelligence and strict integrity and was highly esteemed by all who knew him.  He was the last of a family of five children.
The survivors are his wife and these children: Mrs. S. S. Middlekauff, E North-st, this city; Rev. J. E. Kidney, Derry, Pa., Pittsburg Conference; John D. Bridgeport, O.; Wm. R., Berkeley county, W. Va.; Otho E., McKeesport, Pa.; Matthew E., this city.
The funeral will take place on Sunday, services by Revs. G. C. Bacon and W. S. German; interment in Rose Hill Cemetery.

Note: Strabane, historically spelled Straban, is a town in west County Tyrone, Northern Ireland.

Name: Mary Kidney

Publication Place: Washington County, Maryland
20 September, 1898 issue of The Daily Mail
Obituary
Mary J., widow of Rev. John Kidney, and a second cousin of President McKinley, died at the home of her son, M. S. Kidney, Washington and Elizabeth-sts., Monday, from heart trouble, aged 80 years.  The deceased was born in Liverpool, England (sic), and her maiden name was Mary Jane Forsythe.  She came to America when very young, and for many years lived in Berkeley county, W. Va.  She removed to Hagerstown eight years ago, since which time she has resided with her son.  She was a member of Washington Square M. E. church, and as long as health permitted was a regular attendant at all services.  These children survive: Mrs. S. S. Middlekauff, Rev. J. E. Kidney, Derby's Station, Pa.; John D., of Ohio; W. R., Berkeley county, W. Va.; O. E., McKeesport, Pa. and M. S., of this city. Funeral at 4 o'clock, services at Washington Square M. E. church; interment in Rose Hill cemetery.
The information found in Mary Jane's obituary is not as complete and not as accurate as that of her husband simply because it was her children who were responsible.  They evidently did not get the information from Mary Jane before she died.  It does however establish her date and location at death.  They were the parents of 7 sons and 3 daughters - Josiah Elmer, Susannah, James Watson, Rev. John Dean, Sarah Ann, William Robert, Margaret J, Otho E., Matthew Simpson, and George A. B.  Rev. John and Mary Jane were buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland.
iv. John Forsyth, Jr., born May 31, 1820 in Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died December 07, 1858 in Richland Township, Wapello County, Iowa; married Ellen Perry 1849 in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania; born Abt. 1826 in probably Maghereagh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died 1900 in Ottumwa, Wapello County, Iowa.
John was among the children on the ship roster as John and Elizabeth and family immigrated in May 1843.  According to Fanny's history, John married Ellen Perry in the fall of 1849.  Census entries show Ellen as born in Ireland.  The assumption at this time is that Ellen is a sister of Sarah, wife of James, and that her birth location is the same as for Sarah.  Unlike with James, no record has been found of John and Ellen arriving together in America.  That would seem to suggest that they got married in America.  The only Ellen Perry I have found arriving in America and fitting the known facts is a 23 year old female, native of Ireland, arriving from Liverpool in the port of New York June 28, 1848 aboard the ship Sarah Sands (Ancestry.com "Famine Irish Entry Project, 1846-1851", Washington, D.C.; Nationial Archives and Records Administration).  This individual traveled by steerage with plans to stay in America.  Her age of 23 places her birth date circa 1825, which is consistent with the census records.  The one item I have not been able to reconcile yet is the occupation stated for her of chemist.  This evidently does not have the same professional meaning we would apply to it now since she traveled in steerage.  It could be as simple as being a worker in an apothecary.
John and Ellen appear twice in the 1850 census - first John and Ellen, both with the surname of Forsythe, appear with his parents in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania (page 334B on October 31) and secondly John Forsyth and Ellen Peary are enumerated living with the James Forsyth family in Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania (page 206A, September 27).  This could mean the census enumerator simply made a mistake for the Elizabeth Township listing, and John and Ellen were married in the fall of 1849 as Fanny said.  Or it could be that Fanny was wrong about this recollection as she was with some of the others.  It is possible Ellen came to this country to live with Sarah and that she married John in October 1850.  I am leaving the marriage data at 1849, assuming the former explanation, but leaving the door open for the latter explanation.
John and Ellen moved to Wapello County with the rest of the family in 1851.  On September 29, 1852 John purchased from John Kirkpatrick the NE 1/4 of SE 1/4 of Section 18 (40 acres, Deed Book F, page 417).  I am not sure how much he worked the farm as his 1856 State of Iowa census entry (Richland Township, page 359) gave his occupation as shoe maker, not farmer.  He died very young, but he evidently saw it coming as he wrote a will dated November 20, 1858 and then died 17 days later.  Since this date predates mandatory death reporting and the newspaper for that time was found on microfilm but there was no obituary found, it is unknown whether it was the result of an accident or natural causes.  He and Ellen had four sons and they were named in the will - John, James, Henry Kish and George McCullough.  His will was witnessed by George Forsyth and David McCollough  McCullough will factor into this family in the Thompson narrative also.
Ellen appeared in the 1860 Richland Township census (page 650) as Elenor Forsyth, along with her four sons.  In 1862 she married William James Sinnamon, a native of County Armaugh, Northern Ireland.  He was much younger, being born in 1844, and immigrated in 1857 with his parents and located in Ottumwa, Wapello County, Iowa.  Three of the Forsyth sons are living with William and Ellen in the 1870 1st Ward Ottumwa, Wapello County census (page 170) with James living in Richland Township as a laborer on the Alex Simpson farm (page 265).  By 1880 all four Forsyth sons have moved to Cass County, Iowa to be with the George Forsyth clan.  Even though William was younger, he preceded Ellen in death by nearly 7 years, dying October 13, 1893 and she in May 1900.  She and William had two daughters, and Ellen was buried with William in the Ottumwa Cemetery.  It is assumed John was buried in Westview Cemetery, Richland Township.
v. William Forsyth, born October 16, 1822 in Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died May 16, 1869 in Marion Township, Davis County, Iowa; married Mary Ann/Polly Forsythe 1849 in probably Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; born Abt. January 1812 in possibly Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania; died Aft. 1900.
William was among the children on the ship roster as John and Elizabeth and family immigrated in May 1843.  William was also among the chilren listed in John's will who were to receive one dollar on the expiration of one year after John's death.  William appears in the 1850 South Huntingdon Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania (page 286) census with wife Mary and 8 month old daughter Elizabeth.  His wife is Mary Ann Forsythe, daughter of Thomas Forsythe originally of Fayette County, Pennsylvania and also appearing in the 1850 South Huntingdon Township census (page 281).  The Thomas Forsythe family was in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County in the 1840 census and may have been there when the John Forsyth family arrived.  That could be how William and Mary Ann met.
When the John Forsyth family migrated to Iowa in 1851, William and Mary Ann did not join them at that time.  They did follow some time later.  In the 1856 State of Iowa Marion Township, Davis County, Iowa census William, Mary Ann and Elizabeth are found on page 454.  In that census William is identified as having been in the state 3 years - in other words, since 1853.  On the other hand, Mary Ann and Elizabeth are shown as haveing been in the state only 2 years.  Could William have received word of John's failing health and traveled to see him?  The 1854 State of Iowa census for Richland Township, Wapello County (page 1) have William with 2 males and 2 females.  This is likely not another child for William and Mary Ann, but rather a boy who shows in the 1856 census as living with them and also a resident of the state for 2 years.  In the 1856 Marion Township census Sylvanes McGinity, age 10 and born in Pennsylvania, is living with them.  It is not known who Sylvanes is and why he is living with William and Mary Ann.  More information appears under Mary Ann Forsythe in the next family below.
vi. George Forsyth, born April 16, 1825 in Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died July 26, 1902 in Griswold, Cass County, Iowa; married Rachel Edgar March 22, 1855 in Wapello County, Iowa; born August 31, 1835 in Ohio; died December 16, 1903 in Griswold, Cass County, Iowa.
George was among the children on the ship roster as John and Elizabeth and family immigrated in May 1843.  In John's will George was one of what might be considered two favorite sons, to wit "To my son George the farm whereon I now reside containing one hundred and twenty acres (120) together with the SW 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Lot ten (10) Section Sixteen (16) Township No. 73 Seventy three of Range fourteen (14) West..."  Additionally he and Archibald were to pay sister Fanny the sum of fifty dollars each one year after John's death and to support Fanny in sickness and in health as long as she remained single.  George and David McCullough were named Executors of his estate.
George married Rachel Edgar March 22, 1855 in Wapello County.  Rachel moved to Iowa quite some time before George.  Rachel is shown as the daughter of James Edgar in the 1850 census for District 13 (Richland Township had not been created yet), Wapello County, Iowa (page 451A).  In the 1856 State of Iowa Richland Township, Wapello County census (page 367) George and Rachel are at home with their 1 year old son and George's mother Elizabeth.  Rachel is shown as having lived in Iowa for ten years while the James Edgar household (page 379) states they had been in Iowa 14 years.  That would have placed her here when Iowa was still a territory and was living here when Iowa became a state in 1846.  George remained loyal to John's will and took care of his mother for the remainder of her life - 1860 Richland Township, page 630 and Elizabeth is age 74 in this census; 1870 Richland Township, page 256B and Elizabeth is age 80 in this census.
George and family are in Richland Township yet in the 1880 census (page 27C, June 4 enumeration) and in the 1885 State of Iowa census George and family are in Pleasant Township, Cass County, Iowa.  This seems to corroborate a George Forsyth biography from the book "Cass County Iowa", 1980 by Cass County--1980 History, Inc. which atates, "George and Rachel Forsyth were among the early residents in Pleasant Township; moving here from Wapello County, Iowa in the summer of 1881...In late summer of 1881, Mr. Forsyth bought a farm in Section 24 of Pleasant Township."  George was a farmer all his life, retiring to Griswold in Cass County in May 1900.  The 1900 census, page 191B, shows George and Rachel living with son Samuel Forsythe and the household also has Jennie L. Wilfong age 19 and identified as niece.  Since Samuel is the head of household it would be his niece, and is the daughter of Samuel's sister Anna Elizabeth.  The "Cass County Iowa" also identifies Rachel's birth date as August 31, 1833, however all census records, except for the 1900 census, were pretty consistent in identifying 1835 to 1836 as the correct year range.  I have assumed the person reporting the birth date knew the month and day, but got the year wrong.  The 1902 Directory of the Town of Griswold, Cass County shows George Forsythe, retired farmer, and a count of 3 in the family.  Since Samuel is not identified in this directory, he could be the third individual in the household.
As written in his obituary in the July 30, 1902 issue of "The Griswold American" newspaper, "Mr. Forsyth was in his usual health on the morning of his death, ate a hearty breakfast, and started to the post office as was his usual custom and had proceeded about a hundred yards, when from all indications he felt that his strength was failing, and turned around to return home.  When within some thirty yards of his residence he fell dead...and Uncle George has passed to his reward."  The obituary also identified him as "one of the most earnest members of the Presbyterian church."  One of his children was named John Calvin, which belies a Presbyterian faith.  In 1893 the Presbyterian Church was built near Griswold and one mile north of the Methodist Church.  The land was donated by Mr. and Mrs. John Forsyth.
George evidently spoke openly and fervently to instill pride in the family's immigration and new beginning.  It is from this branch of the family where the story of James' migration to this country resulted from him striking an English Lord's horse with a stone.  This story has not appeared in any articles or obituaries of the other Forsyth family members that has been found to this point.  This story is retold at the bottom of the group sheet page, and is retold in the "Cass County Iowa" book from above.  That same book speaks of the Forsyth Reunion Association formed by this branch in 1904 after the passing of George and Rachel.  The first reunion was held on August 23, 1904 on the John Forsyth east of Griswold, and when this book was published in 1980 the 76th reunion was planned for August 19 in Griswold.  George and Rachel are buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Lewis, Cass County, Iowa.  They had 10 children, 3 girls and 7 boys.
65 vii. Eliza Forsyth, born March 10, 1827 in Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died June 10, 1866 in Richland Township, Wapello County, Iowa; married Joseph Morrison Abt. 1851 in possibly Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.
viii. Thompson Forsyth, born October 28, 1828 in Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died July 10, 1900 near Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa; married Sarah McKinley March 08, 1859 in Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa; born December 24, 1832 in Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania; died June 23, 1915 near Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa.
Thompson appears in the 1860 Oskaloosa Township, Mahaska County, Iowa census (page 301) with wife Sarah and daughter Eva age 9 months.  On March 8, 1859 Thompson married Sarah McKinley in Oskaloosa Township, Mahaska County, Iowa.  Sarah was the daughter of William McKinley and Martha McCullough and was born in Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania in 1832.  This McKinley family lived in Allegheny County from at least 1820 until they moved to Oskaloosa Township in 1851, the same year the Forsyth family moved to Wapello County.  William McKinley was born 1788 in Ireland.  Is it possible William could be related to Elizabeth McKinley - brother, uncle, cousin?  Could this be why James decided to settle in the Allegheny and Westmoreland County area of Pennsylvania?
Also migrating in 1851, but settling in Wapello County was John McKinley, born about 1792 in Maryland, and his wife Hannah, born about 1802 in Maryland also (1856 Richland Township, Wapello County, Iowa, page 367 and 2 households away from George Forsyth).  This John McKinley family was in the Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania census of 1840 (page 263) and 1850 (page 339A).  This is the township where John and Elizabeth Forsyth settled in 1843, and adjacent to Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County.  The 1850 census shows John McKinley as born in Ireland.  Additionally there is a David McCullough family in Rostraver Township in the 1840 census (page 258) and the 1850 census (page 305 and the next family following the John McKinley family).  This same David McCullough family migrated to Wapello County, Iowa in 1851.  The 1850 census shows David as born at sea and his wife in Ireland, while the later census data shows David as born in Maryland.  The 1856 Richland Township census has a Sarah McCullough, age 66 and born in Ireland, living with the family.  It certainly raises the thought that the William and Margaret McCullough McKinley family of Mahaska County and the John McKinley and David McCullough families of Wapello County are related to each other, and possibly to Elizabeth McKinley Forsyth.  And in turn certainly raises the thought that these families may have drawn James, and subsequently the John Forsyth family, to the Westmoreland and Allegheny County area.
There seemed to be further affinity between the Forsyth family and McCulloughs.  David McCullough, along with son George Forsyth, were named executors of John's will and son Samuel McCullough was one of two witnesses to John's codicil.  David McCullough and George Forsyth were also witnesses to John Jr.'s will.  Also, John and Ellen Perry Forsyth had a son named George McCullough Forsyth and George and Rachel Edgar Forsyth had a son they named Samuel McCullough Forsyth.  Could the close association with the McKinley and McCullough families of Wapello County be how Thompson met Sarah McKinley in Mahaska County, or did they know each other from Pennsylvania, or was it just by accident they met?  Thompson and Sarah married in Oskaloosa, Mahaska County on March 8, 1859.  In the 1860 Oskaloosa Township census (page 301) enumerated July 23, Thompson, a farmer, and Sarah are at home with 9 month old daughter Eva.  In 1870 Thompson and Sarah are found in Richland Township, Wapell County (page 255A) and their family is as complete as it is going to get with two daughters at home.  By 1880 they are found back in Mahaska County in East Oskaloosa Township, page 376A.  In the 1900 census Thompson, Sarah and their two unmarried daughters are in Spring Creek Township, Mahaska County, page 323A, and they are living next to 3 of Sarah's single siblings, David, Archibald and Hannah McKinley.  Thompson was a farmer, but by the 1900 census he was retired.  In fact he may have been near death at the time of the census.  The census states it was taken on July 11, and Thompson's obituary states he died July 10.  The obituary, from the July 19, 1900 issue of the Oskaloosa Weekly Herald newspaper states, "For several years his health has been on the decline, and the past winter he has been almost entirely confined at home."  His funeral service was held at the First Presbyterian church "with which the deceased was for many years a member."  It was Sarah's obituary in the July 1, 1915 issue of the Oskaloosa Weekly Herald that confirmed her birth place as "Elizabeth, Pennsylvania."  It was her death register entry that confirmed her father as William McKinley and her mother as Margaret McCullough.
To add one more interesting linkage, there is a Wm. McKinley among the roster of the Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County First Rifle Company serving in the War of 1812.  Since this William McKinley, father-in-law of Thompson, was found in Elizabeth Township it is likely they are one and the same individual.  This is the same company in which Thomas Forsythe, Jr. of the next family below served, as will be described there.
ix. Fanny Forsyth, born July 27, 1831 in Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died February 18, 1905 in daughter Frances' home near Griswold, likely Wright Township, Pottawattamie County, Iowa; married Samuel Hayden March 04, 1855 in Wapello County, Iowa; born April 7, 1833 in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; died April 1, 1908 in Silver Star, Madison County, Montana.
Frances (Fanny) may have known her husband-to-be from her days in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.  From the 1850 Rostraver Township census, page 321B, Samuel, age 17 and a farmer, is at home with his parents.  On March 4, 1855 he marries Fanny in Wapello County.  The 1856 State of Iowa census for Richland Township, page 391, shows Samuel, now age 25 and a farmer, and Frances, also age 25, and Samuel is identified as having lived in Iowa 1 year.  It would appear he came to Wapello county with the express purpose of marrying Fanny.  They are found in the 1860 Richland Township census (page 653) with 3 young children.  By 1870 Frances is found in Richland Township (page 271) without Samuel, and with 5 children, the youngest being 5 years old.  Samuel is nowhere to be found until he shows up in the 1880 Montana census (page 32) Silver Star in Madison County.  He is living alone, but identified with a tick mark in the married column and is a quartz miner.  At this time Fanny is enumerated in Kirkville, Richland Township (page 36A) as Francis (sic) Haden (sic) with her last child, daughter Frank (sic) B. (Frances Belle) still at home and attending school. He is enumerated as Samual Hadin in the 1900 Rochester, Madison County, Montana census (295B) where he is shown as age 67, born Apr 1833, an ore miner and married 45 years.  It is unknown whether he has been sending money back to his family in Iowa.  Why did they not come back together as a family?  He must not have been entirely estranged from his family.  Samuel's obituary appeared in the April 10, 1908 issue of the Monitor newspaper of Madison County, Montana.  "He located near Silver Star, and for a number of years was engaged in ranching and livestock raising.  He also was interested in mining at different times in the Silver Star district.  During recent years he became enfeebled in health and disposed of most of his property.  He is survived by his daughter of Lakeview and a son, A.H. Hayden, of Silver Star."  What about his other children?  There obviously was some estrangement involved.
Fanny's obituary appears in The Griswold Gleaner newspaper issue of February 24, 1905.  There it states at the early age of nine she was formally received into the Presbyterian church of Ireland.  After she moved to Iowa she united with the Methodist Episcopal church.  The obituary also stated that for the past twenty years she had been making her home with her children, spending a good part of the time with her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Morford.  In 1900 she is found living with her son William H. in Wenatchee Precinct, Chelan County, Washington, page 38B.  Both are shown as widowed, even though Samuel is alive and living in Montana.  In the 1900 census the Frank S. Morford family is found in Wright Township, Pottawattamie County, Iowa (page 51).  This county is immediately to the west of Cass County, and Wright Township is along the eastern border of Pottawattamie County and bordering Cass County at a point where Griswold is practically touching the southeast corner of Wright Township.  In 1910 The Frank Morford family is found in Griswold, Cass County, Iowa (page 175) where Frank is manager of a feed shed.  It is not known where they were living in 1905 when Fanny died, but it is assumed they were still in Wright Township since Fanny's obituary starts off "When the news was telephoned into Griswold..."  This would seem to indicate they were not living in the town of Griswold, thus were likely still in the Wright Township area.
According to the obituary, "A brief funeral service was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Morford Monday afternoon at two oclock conducted by Rev. A. R. Miller, after which the remains were brought to Griswold from which place they were conveyed to Kirkville, Iowa, where the regular funeral services were held Tuesday and interment made."  Thus the first Forsyth Family Reunion, where Fanny presented the Forsyth family history, was also her last.  She was laid to rest in Westview Cemetery in Kirkville, Richland Township.  She and Samuel had 5 children, 2 sons and 3 daughters.
x. Archibald Forsyth, born June 04, 1833 in Ballymageogh Townland, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died April 15, 1922 in Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa; married Mary Nunemaker/Nunnemaker September 7, 1854 in Hocking County, Ohio; born August 1, 1831 in possibly Perry County, Ohio; died February 19, 1921 in Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa.
Archibald was the other apparent favored son of John as one reads John's will - "To my Son Archibald Lot No. 5 SE 1/4 of NW 1/4, Lot No. 7 NW 1/4 of the SE 1/4 Lot No. 8 NE 1/4 of SW 1/4 and Lot No. 11 SE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Section No. Sixteen (16) Township No. 73, Seventy three, N. of Range fourteen (14) - together with the priviledge (sic) of taking the timber off one half of the timber land belonging to the farm whereon I now reside in."  He and George inherited the land, Fanny received fifty dollars and was to be taken care of by George and Archibald until she married, and all others received one dollar.  That seems to be very favored, but then we do not know what the others received in the way of help as they came of age.  Archibald did not seem to care much about the land because after he got back from Ohio he began selling off the property - Archibald and George Forsyth to J. S. & W. T. Major on June 29, 1857 E 1/2 of SW 1/4 and SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of Section 16, Township 73, Range 14N (Wapello County Deed Book J, page 513) and Archibald to Otho B. Kent on March 25, 1859 SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 16, Township 73, Range 14N (Wapello County Deed Book K, page 569).  The following shows he was more interested in other activities instead of farming.
On September 7, 1854 he wed Mary Nunemaker/Nunnemaker in Hocking County, Ohio.  How is it he happened to go to Ohio to marry?  Mary was born in possibly Perry County, Ohio to Peter Nunemaker and Catherine Hammer.  She was fifth born of 13 children to Peter and Catherine.  Their first born, Sarah, married Dewitt Bennett in Hocking County December 30, 1841.  That name may seem familiar as Dewitt was a witness to John Sr.'s will.  The second born child, Elizabeth, married John Sinif in Hocking County March 2, 1846.  Examination of the 1850 District 13, Wapello County, Iowa census, page 451A shows family 410 as Dewitt and Sarah Bennett and family, and living with them is John and Elizabeth Sinif and daughter.  Family 411 is the James Edgar family, including Rachel, the wife-to-be of George Forsyth.  Thus the Dewitt Bennett and John Sinif families were there to greet the Forsyths when they arrived in 1851.  It could be that Archibald met Mary when she visited her siblings in Iowa, or it could be that he travelled to Ohio based on input from Sarah and Elizabeth.  Either way, it appears the trip to Ohio was specifically to marry Mary since they are back in Iowa for the 1856 State of Iowa census (Richland Township, Wapello County, family 56, page 375) where Archibald is shown as a farmer, Mary is shown as having been in Iowa 1 year, and they have their first child, Noah.
By 1860 they have added two more children, and now Archibald's occupation is shown as Miller (Richland Township, Wapello County, page 633A).  By 1865 they have moved back to Ohio according to the 1870 York Township, Athens County, Ohio census (page 279B) where Archibald is shown again as a farmer and daughter Margaret, age 5, is shown as having been born in Ohio.  At this point Archibald and Mary have 7 children.  In 1880 Archibald and Mary are still in Ohio, but this time in Ward Township, Hocking County (page 165A) and Archibald has changed occupations to coal miner and son Noah is also shown as a coal miner.  They have 11 boarders staying in the same residence.  They may be living in a coal company facility.  For some reason, Archibald and Mary return to Iowa.  Perhaps it was that Mary's parents were both dead.  In 1900 they are shown in 3rd Ward Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa (page 189A) and Archibald is still shown as a coal miner, at age 67, and Mary stated she had birthed 10 children with 7 still living.  Noah and family are also found in 1900 Oskaloosa and he is still listed as a coal miner also.  Assuming they moved together, it would appear they moved from Ohio about 1897 based on where and when Noah's children were born.  Archibald and Mary live out their lives in Oskaloosa, appearing in the 1910 census (page 94A) as retired and in the 1920 census (page 148B) living with their daughter and son-in-law, Adaline and Will Stump.  Archibald's obituary from the April 22, 1922 issue of The Saturday Globe newspaper (Oskaloosa) states, "Deceased has been in a gradual decline incidental to old age for almost a year, but not until this week had his condition occasioned uneasiness."  They are buried in Forest Cemetery in Oskaloosa.

 

132. Thomas Forsythe, Jr., born December 23, 1791 in Tyrone Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania; died January 18, 1872 in Davis County, Iowa. He was the son of 264. Thomas Forsythe, Sr. and 265. Nancy Parker. He married 133. Elizabeth ? March 29, 1811 in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.
Notes for Thomas Forsythe, Jr.:
There is no known link at this time between this Forsythe family and the John and Elizabeth McKinley Forsyth family above, other than through the marriage of William Forsyth of the above family and Mary Ann Forsythe of this family.  After his father died, Thomas, Jr. appeared to become rather restless.  He is found in Tyrone Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania in the 1810 census (page 235).  Although he comes of age in 1812, he is not found in the Tyrone Township tax lists until the tax years 1817, 1818 and 1819 (FHL film #1449318 - Fayette County, Pennsylvania Tax records of Tyrone Township, 1785-1855) and then disappears from the tax list again after those dates.  His entries identify him as a laborer, and a renter rather than land owner.  Each of the three years he is shown on a rented 40 acres with the 1818 entry showing him with a grist mill.  In 1820 he and family are found in Pleasant Township, Brown County, Ohio (page 383) where his brother John moved, probably immediately after his father's death.  In 1830, it appears he and family are located in Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania (page 196).  In this census there is no son enumerated the age of John, but at age 17 it is possible he was apprenticed out to learn a trade (in the 1850 census, John is shown with occupation of potter).  In 1840 Thomas and his family are found in the next county to the east, Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania (page 264).  It appears that son John is living with them, along with his wife and young daughter Eliza Jane.  In 1850 Thomas, Jr. and John are found in neighboring households in South Huntingdon Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania (281A) where Thomas is identified as a farmer with real estate valued at $500.
The grave of Thomas, Jr. has a star identifying him as a veteran of the War of 1812.  It is very possible the listing found in the Pennsylvania Archives Series 6, Volume VII, Chapter: Miscellaneous Rolls, Fifteenth Division 1812-1814, page 790 contains Thomas in the roster.  Private Thos. Forsythe is among the returns of the "First Rifle Company Attached 125th Regt. Who Volunteered Their Service."  The unit consisted of 42 privates guided by Captain James Scott, Lieutenant John Cochran, and Ensign Petter Beddsworth.  A footnote to the listing stated "30 of the above Roll in uniform and Armed with Rifles & Tomahawks."  This association is confirmed by Thomas' War of 1812 pension application which identifies him as serving in James Scott's Company of the Pennsylvania Militia (pension application No. 24379).  A number of the members of the company had names found only in the Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County neighborhood in the 1810 Pennsylvania census, including Henry Bruce, Jesse Waddle, Arther Mullen, Zadock Wilson, Hugh Drennon, John Pangburn, Aaron Applegate and Petter Beddsworth.  This also is confirmed by his pension application where he states "... volunteered that he entered the Serves at Rounhill Alleghania Pa on the Twelth day of September A.D. 1812 for the term of Six Months ..."  Richard T. Wiley, in his book "Elizabeth and Her Neighbors", 1936, republished by Closson Press, Apollo, Pennsylvania wrote:
 
"Samuel Cooper, himself an officer in the War of 1812, whose contributions to local history are quoted in a number of places in this work, wrote for the 'Elizabeth Black Diamond,' dated February 21, 1874, as follows:
"There was a fine company of riflemen raised in the Forks, in the neighborhood of Round Hill meeting house, bearing the blazing name of 'Round Hill Hornets.'  They joined the celebrated Brigade of Pennsylvania Volunteers, commanded by memorable General Tannehill and the company commanded by the celebrated Captain James Scott of the Forks of Yough.  The Brigade was marched to Black Hawk (sic), and when ordered by Brigadier-General Alexander Smyth, U.S.A., to cross into Canada, lo and behold! the sight of the scarlet coats made the hornets lose the virtue of their sting, and they swarmed in a very few days for their nests in the neighborhood of Round Hill.  This swarming homewards killed them up.  Who was blamed for this disgrace?  The living survivors of the company, if there be any, can tell the tale.  I know it, my company being attached to the Brigade at that time, which company to a man volunteered to cross into Canada twice."
Thomas' pension application and this quote from "Elizabeth and Her Neighbors" clearly shows Thomas present in Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania at the time of his enlistment.  His pension application also states he married Elizabeth March 29, 1811 in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, but unfortunately does not give her maiden name.  This explains why the family appears again in Elizabeth Township in the 1830 census as most likely Elizabeth's family is still living there at the time.  In 1840 they are found in Rostraver Township of Westmoreland County.  But the east border of Elizabeth Township shares the western border of Rostraver Township, so they did not move far.  By Black Hawk, I am certain the author in the above article meant Black Rock.  Thomas, in his pension application, does state "... and Capt the Serves at black rock in the State of New York ..."  Given a couple of names, Tannehill and Smyth, as well as the location in the pension application it was possible to find some information from various sources, sometimes with different points of view:
 
From "History of Pittsburgh and Environs", George Thornton Fleming, American Historical Society, Inc., New York, 1922:
"Erie being threatened by the enemy from the lake, the governor ordered the rendezvous at Meadville of 2,000 militia with the design to protect the coast.  A large American force began to collect at Fort Niagara for the protection of Western New York.  The Allegheny county militia at this time consisted of 1,050 men, and under the call for volunteers 331 were accepted and detailed to go to the Niagara department.  Companies from other counties in Western Pennsylvania commenced to arrive in Pittsburgh, in all twenty-two, and were moved to Meadville, and thence to Buffalo for orders.
"The Pittsburgh contingent that were detailed from Meadville, to become a part of the army of Western New York, performed service attended without much glory or honor.  The battle of Queenstown was fought in November, 1812, without the aid of the Pennsylvania Militia, which, under the command of General Tannehill, was still at Meadville, destitute of proper arms and equipments.  The companies from Pittsburgh, commanded by Captains Cooper and Lithgrow, were not only willing, but desirous of crossing the river to engage the British; but a dispute between the American generals caused the attempt to be relinquished and the American troops were ordered to disembark.  This was accomplished with many murmurings and much discontent.  Excitement prevailed over the failure to cross the river, and about four thousand men without order or restraint discharged their guns in every direction.  Succeeding these events the Pennsylvania militia under General Tannehill deserted almost in a body, returning home in squads.
"In the last years of the war, Pittsburgh played but a small part."
 
From "Pictorial Field-Book Of The War Of 1812" by Benson J. Lossing, Harper & Brothers, New York, 1896:
"...General Smyth expressed his opinion to General Van Rensselaer, on his arrival on the frontier, that the proper place to cross the Niagara River for the invasion of Canada was somewhere between Fort Erie and Chippewa.  A few days after the bombardment of Fort Niagara, Smyth attempted to act upon that opinion.  His proclamation had stirred the people of Western New York, and large numbers had flocked to his standard; for his flaming sentences warmed their zeal, and they believed that all his glowing hopes would be realized and his flattering promises would be fulfilled.  On the 27th of November, when Smyth called the troops to a general rendezvous at Black Rock, they numbered about four thousand five hundred.  They were composed of his own regulars, and the Baltimore Volunteers under Colonel Winder, the Pennsylvania Volunteers under General Tannehill, and the New York Volunteers under General Peter B. Porter.  With these he felt competent to invade Canada successfully.
"As early as the 25th, General Smyth issued orders for 'the whole army to be ready to march at a moment's warning.'  'The tents,' he said, 'will be left standing.  Officers will carry their knapsacks.  The baggage will follow in convenient time.'  After giving directions for the embarkation of the troops in the boats provided by Colonel Winder, to whom that important service was intrusted, he gave the following directions for forming the troops in battle order on the Canada shore: 'Beginning on the right, as follows: Captain Gibson's Artillery; the Sixth and Thirteenth Infantry; Captain Towson's Artillery; the Fourteenth and Twenty-third Infantry as one regiment; Captain Barker's and Captain Branch's Artillery; the Twelfth and Twentieth Infantry; Captain Archer's Artillery; General Tannehill's Infantry; a company of Riflemen; the Infantry of Colonel Swift and Colonel M'Clure; a company of Riflemen; General Porter's Infantry; Captain Leonard's Artillery; a battalion of Riflemen on each flank, in a line perpendicular to that formed by the main army, extending to the front and rear.'
"Tomorrow came, but not the promised achievement.  All the officers disapproved of the time and manner of the proposed embarkation, and expressed their opinions freely.  At General Porter's quarters a change was agreed upon.  Porter proposed deferring the embarkation until Tuesday morning, the 1st of December, an hour or two before daylight, and to make the landing-place a little below the upper end of Grand Island.  Winder suggested the propriety of making a descent directly upon Chippewa, 'the key of the country.'  This Smyth consented to attempt intending, as he said, if successful, to march down through Queenston, and lay siege to Fort George.  Orders were accordingly given for a general rendezvous at the navy yard at three o'clock on Tuesday morning, and that the troops should be collected in the woods near by on Monday, where they should build fires and await the signal for gathering on the shore of the river.  The hour arrived, but when day dawned only fifteen hundred were embarked.  Tannehill's Pennsylvania Brigade were not present.  Before their arrival rumors had reached the camp that they, too, like Van Rensselaer's militia at Lewiston, had raised a constitutional question about being led out of their state.  Yet their scruples seem to have been overcome at this time, and they would have invaded Canada cheerfully under other auspices.  But distrust of their leader, created by the events of the last forty-eight hours, had demoralized nearly the whole army.  They had made so much noise in the embarkation that the startled enemy had sounded his alarm bugle and discharged signal-guns from Fort Erie to Chippewa.  Tannehill's Pennsylvanians had not appeared, and many other troops lingered upon the shore, loth to embark.  In this dilemma Smyth hastily called a council of the regular officers, utterly excluding those of the volunteers from the conference, and the first intimation of the result of that council was an order from the commanding general, sent to General Porter, who was in a boat with the pilot, a fourth of a mile from shore, in the van of the impatient flotilla, directing the whole army to debark and repair to their quarters.  This was accompanied by a declaration that the invasion of Canada was abandoned at present, pleading, in bar of just censure, that his orders from his superiors were not to attempt it with less than three thousand men.  The regulars were ordered into winter quarters, and the volunteers were dismissed to their homes."
 
From "Citizen Soldiers in the War of 1812" by Carl Edward Skeen, University of Kentucky Press, 1999:
"Meanwhile, 2,000 Pennsylvania militiamen called out by Governor Simon Snyder on August 25 to rendezvous at Meadville on September 25 moved tardily toward Buffalo.  Governor Snyder pointedly noted in his call that the patriotism of the volunteers was 'too sincere and ardent to permit them to make any objections to crossing the boundary line of the United States; otherwise they will render no service to their country.'  Smyth asked General Dearborn on November 9 whether the Pennsylvania Militiamen could be forced to cross the line.  'I am told they will refuse.'  When the Pennsylvania militiamen finally arrived in Buffalo on November 18, Smyth quickly queried their commander, Brig. Gen. Adamson Tannehill, on this point.  Tannehill replied that 413 of the approximately 2,000 troops had volunteered.  (**See next quote, which has a letter exchange between General Smyth and General Tannehill.)
"On November 10, Smyth issued a bombastic proclamation calling for volunteers, declaring that his troops would soon 'plant the American standard in Canada.'  Nevertheless, Smyth twice embarked his troops, and twice disembarked them, without making a crossing.  It did not appear that the British would have offered much opposition to a landing.  In fact, while the troops were on board ships after the first embarkation, three American sailors crossed over to the opposite shore and spent two hours burning houses and stores, shooting 'fowls, ducks, and pigs,' and returned unmolested with loot taken from the houses.
"Smyth's defense was that he had been ordered by General Dearborn to make the assault with 3,000 men and that on the first occasion he had only 1,465 men and on the second only 1,500.  Although as many as 7,000 troops were in and around Buffalo, many were physically in no condition to cross over, others were in such a state of discipline that they would have been totally unreliable, and some, such as the Pennsylvania militia, simply refused to cross into Canada.
"...In the aftermath of Smyth's cancellation of the invasion, large numbers of militiamen deserted.  Some 600 Pennsylvania militiamen deserted within twenty-four hours, and nearly that many left in the next few days. Discontented since their arrival, the Pennsylvanians, living in tents, had been much exposed to the weather and sickness.  General Tannehill lamented that a large number of officers joined their troops in deserting.  He hinted to Smyth that his remaining force (267 privates, plus officers, noncommissioned officers, and musicians) should be dismissed before they added to the exodus.  He argued that to hold his force any longer, raising expenses without any benefits, 'would only be an accumulation of the same evil.'  General Smyth organized the remaining force into a battalion under one of the majors and dismissed General Tannehill and the other field officers.  This battalion, however, was disbanded within two weeks.  The Pennsylvania militiamen contributed nothing to the campaign; their presence was in fact a disruptive element."
 
From "The Documentary History of the Campaign Upon the Niagara Frontier" by Ernest Alexander Cruikshank, Lundy's Lane historical society, Welland, Ontario, 1901:
"General Smyth to General Tannehill.
  "Headquarters, Camp Near Buffalo,
"November 21st, 1812.
 
"SIR, ---- Will you be pleased to ascertain whether there are any companies of your brigade who will refuse to serve the United States in Canada.
"I deem it essential we should know on whom we may rely with confidence."
 
"Brigadier-General Adamson Tannehill to General Smyth.
  "Camp at Granger's Farm,
"22nd November, 1812.
 
"SIR, ---- To enable me to answer your note of yesterday I convened my field officers in camp.  The prevailing opinion appears to be that if an efficient force can be had to cross into Canada a very general embarkation of my brigade may be expected.  If, on the contrary, it is difficult for me to say what number may be calculated on.
"Return of the officers and privates of the First Brigade of Pennsylvania Volunteers, under the command of Brigadier-General Adamson Tannehill, who have volunteered to cross the boundary line in the Province of Upper Canada to asist in establishing the American standard in that Province:
"First regiment of riflemen ---- Lieut.-Colonel Irwin, seven companies, 13 officers, 79 privates.
"Second regiment of riflement ---- Lieut.-Colonel Piper, seven companies, 8 officers, 133 privates.
"First regiment of infantry ---- Lieut.-Colonel Snyder, six companies, 35 privates.
"Second regiment of infantry ---- Lieut.-Colonel Pruviance, nine companies, 16 officers, 145 privates.
"Total ---- 413."
 
It is unclear whether Thomas was counted among any of those in the companies counted above.  His pension application simply states that he "... was on duty guard duty between Black Rock and the Niagra River during the Greater part of My term of Service ..."  It appears from various sources that Thomas' service in the War of 1812 was without distinction and was of short duration.  This is confirmed during his applications for bounty land where "The Auditor reports that the rolls show that he served from 15th Sept. to 24th Nov. 1812 ..." for a total of only 61 days.
While previous acts of Congress had made bounty land warrants available to veterans of this war, the first act that extended to those of Thomas' rank and term of service was approved September 28, 1850.  While living in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania Thomas applied for and received bounty land voucher number 48124 issued March 16, 1852.  Thomas had applied for an 80 acre voucher, but the Auditor approved only 40 acres, stating the he had served "a period that would only entitle him to 40 acres."  Again on March 3, 1855 Congress approved an additional offering of bounty lands to those engaged in the military service of the United States, which included volunteers, rangers, or militia, and included those who served in the War of 1812.  Thomas once again applied for a bounty warrant and received warrant number 90792 on November 11, 1856 from his home in Davis County, Iowa.  This new act of Congress allowed for more generous conditions and thus Thomas was awarded 120 acres, bringing his total awards to the maximum 160 acres.  The warrants were valid for lands set aside in Arkansas, Missouri and Illinois.  Since Thomas did not live in any of those locations, it must be assumed he assigned his rights to someone else, which he confirms in his pension application.  On April 19, 1872 he was awarded a pension of $8 per month effective retroactive to the date of the pension act, February 14, 1871.  There is no documentation in the file as to how the payments were handled as Thomas had died January 18, 1872 and his wife had died May 21, 1865.  It is possible the amount that would have accrued from February 14, 1871 until his death the following January 18 was paid to his surviving son, John, and daughter, Mary Ann.
The other thing this service in the War of 1812 shows us is that Thomas, Jr. was on the move shortly after his enumeration in the 1810 census to have married Elizabeth in Allegheny County in 1811 and shown up in the Elizabeth Township militia company.  It is possible his appearance in the 1817, 1818 and 1819 Tyrone Township tax lists indicate he returned to Tyrone Township, Fayette County because his mother's health was poor.  His appearance in the 1820 Brown County, Ohio census likely tells us that his mother has died, and he has chosen to move on with brother John (mother Nancy's narrative gives another reason for considering this possibility).  Possibly John came back to say goodbye to his mother and Thomas and family went back to Ohio with him?  Also, his "return" to the Elizabeth Township and neighboring Rostraver Township areas in the 1830 and 1840 censuses is understandable and may have been because his wife's family still lived there.
After their appearance in the 1850 census, they are next found in Marion Township, Davis County, Iowa in the 1856 census (page 451) where Thomas and Elizabeth along with John and his family are all living in the same household.  In the 1856 special Iowa census (10 years after becoming a state), Davis County, William Forsyth (the one that married Thomas, Jr.'s daughter Polly/Mary Ann) states he has been in the state 3 years (1853), while wife Mary Ann and daughter Elizabeth state they have been in the state 2 years (1854).  On the previous page of this census Thomas, Jr. and John and families are all living together and state they have all been in the state 1 year (1855).  It appears William went ahead and paved the way.  They had probably received word from his family who moved to neighboring Wapello County in 1851 about the productivity of the land and he decided to blaze the way for Thomas' family.  William appears in the 1854 State of Iowa census Richland Township, Wapello County, page 1, along with the rest of his family.  Where William's family lived (Richland Twp) and where Thomas' family and William/Polly settled (Marion Twp) are neighboring counties with the two family locations about 25 miles apart.  William did not start buying Davis County property until 1855, probably because Thomas and John went ahead and bought 160 acres of Marion Township, Davis County property, perhaps on his word that the move to Iowa was worth it.  I am sure that it did not hurt that Thomas' brother John was in neighboring Appanoose County and probably writing back about its worthiness.  On 5 August 1854 a deed was recorded in Westmoreland County where Thomas and John jointly paid $640 to Daniel W. and Mary Frick, also of Westmoreland County, for property in Marion Township, Davis County, Iowa.  This was not entered in the Davis County records until 28 January 1887.  John had started disbursing his land in 40 acre chunks and one 80 acre plot to his 4 surviving daughters, and evidently ran into trouble verifying ownership, so he had the county of Westmoreland verify in writing to Davis county his ownership.  Thomas, Jr., Elizabeth, John and Mary Ann lived out their lives in Marion Township, Davis County, Iowa.

133. Elizabeth ?, born August 25, 1797 in New Jersey; died May 21, 1865 in Marion Township, Davis County, Iowa.
Notes for Elizabeth ?:
Elizabeth's last name is unknown.  As quoted in the book "The Pioneer Forsythes of Fayette County, Pennsylvania and Their Descendants" by Glenn Luther Forsythe, "She was born in New York or New Jersey in 1797.  He may have met her while serving in the war of 1812 as there were no families from New York or New Jersey in the area.  The couple stayed in Fayette County and probably farmed until 1855 when they moved west with their whole family.  They settled in Davis County, Iowa."
He was correct about Elizabeth being born in 1797.  They did move to Davis County, Iowa, but in stages as discussed in the notes for Thomas, Jr. above, and they certainly did not stay in Fayette County until 1855.  In all censuses where birth location is identified and where Elizabeth could provide input (1850, 1856 and 1860) she is identified as being born in New Jersey.  To say that there were no families from New Jersey in the area is extremely misleading.  It may not lead me to who Elizabeth was because the source documentation just does not seem to be readily available, but there was a plethera of New Jersey immigrants in the Fayette County area to choose from, although I have not found one with an Elizabeth of the right age yet.  Some examples are Reuben Skinner, George Sleasman, Benjamin Phillips, Jonathan Hill, William Barton (born 1795 - of age to be her brother) and his parents, Ephraim Vansickle, Hope Shotwell, Thomas Herbert, Henry Lane, Joseph Page, Samuel and Beulah Taylor Brown family to name the few I have found so far.  Also, since Thomas seemed to be on the move after the 1810 census, I checked Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County and found in Richard T. Wiley's "Elizabeth and Her Neighbors" reference to an area called the Jersey Settlement.  "Starting in about 1766 a seemingly large number of folks from Monmouth County, New Jersy migrated to what is today Elizabeth, Pennsylvania (south of Pittsburgh, in the 'tip' of the county)."  At that time this area was then part of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania and jointly claimed by Virginia as Yohogania County within the District of West Augusta.  Some of the New Jersey immigrant family names in the Jersey Settlement included Applegate (found in the roster of the Rifle Militia Company Thomas enlisted in), Wall, Dey/Dye, Nunro, Davidson, Halleday, Terry, Parker, Reed, Devore, Miller, McClure, Rodgers, Smith, Thompson, McConnell (also in the Rifle Company roster), Wilson (also in the Rifle Company roster), Neiley, Dunlap, Pearce, Warne, Pearse, Pangburn (also in the Rifle Company roster) and more.  While many of these immigrants arrived before Elizabeth was born, it identifies many people in the area who were from New Jersey.  And there is every expectation that this immigration continued through the time Elizabeth could have migrated, and beyond.  With Thomas' War of 1812 pension application confirming his marriage to Elizabeth in Allegheny County well before he entered the service, the notion above suggested in the Forsythe book is proven incorrect.  I suspect he met and married a girl from the Jersey Settlement although it is possible Elizabeth was a New Jersey girl living in Fayette County and they eloped and married in Allegheny County.
With Elizabeth born in August 1797 she would have been 13 when married in March 1811.  One wonders if she was self conscious about her age after checking out some census entries.  The Thomas Forsythe family in 1820 Pleasant Township,Brown County, Ohio, page 383 has 1 male 0 to 10 (John, age 7), 1 male 26 to 45 (Thomas, age 29), 1 female 0 to 10 (Mary Ann, age 8), and 1 female 26 to 45 (Elizabeth would be age 23 in 1820).  Assuming this is our Thomas Forsythe, could this mean that Elizabeth gave an infalted age, or did another person provide her age, or does it simply mean another census taker's error?  It is hard to know for certain because if you consider the 1830 Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania census (page 196) then Mary Ann is in the wrong age group.  In the 1840 Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania census (page 264) again it is Elizabeth who is in the wrong age group and in the 1850 South Huntingdon Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania census (page 281A), where Elizabeth is named and a defined age is given, she is 48 when she should be 53 based on her birthdate, which is the opposite direction from previous census entries.  By the time they are enumerated in the 1860 Marion Township, Davis County, Iowa census (page 695) it is Elizabeth who is very close to the correct age, and it is Thomas who has shaved off a number of years.  It is almost as if they worked to appear to be close in age to each other.
Thomas and Elizabeth are buried in Glassburner Cemetery, Marion Township, Davis County, Iowa.  Thomas' headstone says died January 18, 1872, aged 80 years, 26 days and Elizabeth's headstone says died May 21, 1865, aged 67 years, 8 months, 26 days.  While it is possible they had other children who did not survive to show up in any census records, they only had two children that I am aware of.  They worked hard to stay close as a family unit.

Children of Thomas Forsythe and Elizabeth ? are:

i. Mary Ann Forsythe, born Abt. January 1812 probably in Elizabeth Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania; died Aft. 1900 probably in Davis County, Iowa; married William Forsyth Abt. 1848-1849 probably in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania; born October 16, 1822 in Ballymageogh, Kilkeel Civil Parish, County Down, Northern Ireland; died May 16, 1869 in Marion Township, Davis County, Iowa.
Mary Ann/Polly Forsythe was still single and living in the Thomas Forsythe household in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania in the 1840 census (page 264).  This may be how Mary Ann and William met.  William left Northern Ireland and immigrated along with his parents and most of his siblings in 1843, arriving in Philadelphia May 23, 1843 aboard the ship Georgiana.  In 1850 William's parents, with some children still at home, are found in the Rostraver census, page 334.  If they moved to Rostraver Township while Thomas' family was living there, the chances improve that William and Mary Ann may have met there.  In 1850, the South Huntingdon Township, Westmoreland County census (page 286B) shows William and Mary Ann with 8 month old Elizabeth L., thus making their marriage likely circa 1848-1849 and probably in Westmoreland County.  In fact they may be new comers to South Huntingdon Township since William is shown with no occupation and with no value for real estate owned.
Mary Ann is known to be alive on January 18, 1887 when she relinquished her rights to land inherited from Thomas' estate.  "Know all men by these presents:   That I Mary Forsythe widow & the only heir at law of Thomas Forsythe Except the grantee herein John Forsythe of the county of Davis and State of Iowa for the consideration of Fifty Dollars hereby Quit Claim to John Forsythe of the County of Davis and State of Iowa the following described real Estate situated in Davis County and State of Iowa to-wit All my right title and interest in and to North West quarter of the South West quarter of Section twenty eight (28) and the East half of the South East quarter and the South west quarter of the South East quarter of Section 29 Township (70) North Range 15 west containing One Hundred and sixty acres.  In witness whereof I have set my hand this 18th day of Jany 1887" (Davis County Deed Book 31, page 585).  This is signed with her mark and witnessed by George H. Adams (husband of niece Sophia Lorinda Forsythe) and Happie E. Jones (daughter of George Adams by a previous marriage).  The 1900 Drakesville, Drakesville Township, Davis County, Iowa census (page 36) shows George H. and Sophia L. Forsythe Adams at home and living with them is aunt Polly Forsythe, age 88, born Jan 1812 in Pennsylvania.  This fixes her birth date as mentioned in the notes of her mother above.  It is not known when she died, as her grave has not been located.
As stated, William preceded Thomas and John to Iowa, arriving in 1853.  He is found in the 1854 State of Iowa census in Richland Township, Wapello County, page 1.  He purchased land on September 12, 1855 (Deed Book P, page 125), January 11, 1856 (Deed Book G, page 550), September 12, 1856 (Deed Book G, page 550) and October 17, 1866 (Deed Book Q, page 9).  I have not found yet where this land was sold.  Mary Ann is shown in the 1870 Marion Township census (page 111B) with her daughter Elizabeth and my great grandfather Thomas Morrison (census taker really messed up Thomas' last name).  She is shown without a husband, because he died May 16, 1869.  The WPA listing shows him buried in Glassburner Cemetery, Marion Township, Davis County, Iowa.  He is not to be confused with William, son of John, who also died in 1869 and is buried in Glassburner Cemetery.  This William is shown as buried in row 6 where William, son of John, is shown buried in row 5 (and died July 1869) along with his parents.  A cemetery survey done by the Davis County Historical Society some decades later does not show this William in its listing and neither listing shows Mary Ann.  Either his grave was moved, or they were buried in Glassburner and the stones were such poor quality they have not survived.
66 ii. John Forsythe, born December 11, 1813 in Tyrone Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania; died March 02, 1883 in Davis County, Iowa; married Mary Ann Johnson.

 

136. Robert Elder, Jr., born Abt. 1807 in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania; died Aft. 1880. He was the son of 272. Robert Elder, Sr. and 273. Mary A. Dempsey. He married 137. Rachel McKinnis Bef. 1828 in Jackson County, Ohio.

137. Rachel McKinnis, born June 18, 1809 in Pennsylvania; died August 24, 1867 in Soap Creek Township, Davis County, Iowa. She was the daughter of 274. Charles McKinnis, Jr. and 275. Martha Craner.

Children of Robert Elder and Rachel McKinnis are:

68 i. Alexander Johnson Elder, born June 20, 1828 in Jackson County, Ohio; died January 02, 1905 in Davis County, Iowa; married Marcia Jane Baker August 17, 1850 in Jackson County, Ohio.
ii. Lineas Elder, born June 12, 1831 in Jackson County, Ohio; died Aft. 1900 in likely Webster County, Missouri; married (1) Sarah Warren November 16, 1854 in Jackson County, Ohio; born Abt. 1834 in Virginia; died Abt. 1860 in Iowa; married (2) Harriet Smales May 08, 1861 in Wapello County, Iowa; born February 05, 1841 in Coles County, Illinois; died Bef. 1900 in Missouri.
iii. Martha Eleanor Elder, born September 15, 1833 in Clinton Township, Jackson County, Ohio; died December 28, 1907 in Chillicothe, Ross County, Ohio; married Joseph Oakes October 23, 1850 in Jackson County, Ohio; born March 11, 1824 in Greene County, Pennsylvania; died January 14, 1900 in West Junction, Vinton County, Ohio.
iv. Nancy Ellen Elder, born May 10,1836 in Clinton Township, Jackson County, Ohio; died March 20, 1915 in Clark Township, Wright County, Missouri; married Isaac Meredith July 30, 1857 in Wapello County, Iowa; born Abt. 1832 in Ohio; died Bet. 1880 and 1900 in probably Missouri.
v. Eliza Jane Elder, born June 1, 1841 in Clinton Township, Jackson County, Ohio; died )ctober 14, 1915 in Jackson Township, Lucas County, Iowa; married Joseph Ginn January 08, 1863 in Wapello County, Iowa; born April 3, 1829 in New Jersey; died June 15, 1903 in Jackson Township, Lucas County, Iowa.
vi. Clarissa C. Elder, born Abt. 1846 in Clinton Township, Jackson County, Ohio; died February 14, 1879 in Locust Grove Township, Jefferson County, Iowa; married John Downey September 18, 1864 in Wapello County, Iowa; born December 25, 1836 in Massachusetts; died September 24, 1907 in Locust Grove Township, Jefferson County, Iowa.

 

138. Benjamin Baker, born Abt. 1803 in New York; died 1869 in Jackson County, Ohio. He was the son of 276. ? Baker. He married 139. Lucia Phinney Abt. 1829.

139. Lucia Phinney, born May 8, 1815 in New York; died November 21, 1912 in Van Buren County, Iowa. She was the daughter of 278. Apollus Finney, Sr. and 279. Phoebe Buck.

Children of Benjamin Baker and Lucia Phinney are:

i. John Baker, born Abt. 1833 in Pennsylvania; died Unknown.
69 ii. Marcia Jane Baker, born January 27, 1835 in Pennsylvania; died May 17, 1909 in At Finley Maines' Home, Soap Creek Township, Davis County, Iowa; married Alexander Johnson Elder August 17, 1850 in Jackson County, Ohio.
iii. Lucy Baker, born Abt. 1839 in Pennsylvania; died Unknown; married (1) ? Valentine; born Unknown; died Unknown; married (2) ? Lee; born Unknown; died Unknown.
iv. Joel Baker, born Abt. 1840 in Pennsylvania; died Unknown; married Mary Raeynish; born Unknown; died Unknown.
v. George Baker, born Abt. 1844 in Pennsylvania; died Unknown.
vi. James Baker, born Abt. 1844 in Pennsylvania; died Unknown.
vii. Martha Baker, born Abt. 1853 in Jackson County, Ohio; died Unknown.
viii. George Baker, born Abt. 1860 in Jackson County, Ohio; died Unknown.
ix. Elizabeth Baker, born Unknown; died Unknown; married Abraham Byers April 21, 1846 in Jackson County, Ohio; born Unknown; died Unknown.
x. William Baker, born Unknown; died Unknown.

 

140. Abner Tharp, born Abt. 1807 in South Carolina; died February 04, 1851 in Savannah, Davis County, Iowa. He was the son of 280. Nathan Tharp, Sr. and 281. Sarah/Sally ?. He married 141. Sarah Moots December 20, 1829 in Zanesfield, Jefferson Township, Logan County, Ohio.

141. Sarah Moots, born May 12, 1811 in Zanesfield, Jefferson Township, Logan County, Ohio; died March 08, 1905 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah. She was the daughter of 282. Conrad Moots and 283. Anna Elizabeth Linksweiler.

Children of Abner Tharp and Sarah Moots are:

i. Augustus Milton Tharp, born August 28, 1830 in West Liberty, Logan County, Ohio; died October 20, 1920 in At daughter's home in Moulton, Appanoose County, Iowa; married Joanna Dooley April 21, 1852 in Henry Dooley's residence, Davis County, Iowa; born November 17, 1832 in Boone County, Missouri; died May 24, 1906 in Wycondah Township, Davis County, Iowa.
ii. Ann Elizabeth Tharp, born Abt. 1833 in West Liberty, Logan County, Ohio; died 1868; married Bishop Cowgill October 01, 1848 in Schuyler County, Missouri; born Unknown; died Unknown.
iii. Martha Ann Tharp, born Abt. 1835 in West Liberty, Logan County, Ohio; died December 07, 1881 in Saunders County, Nebraska; married (1) Joshua Jasper Carter April 20, 1854 in Davis County, Iowa; born Abt. 1832 in McDonough County, Illinois; died March 1870 in Toronto, Woodson County, Kansas; married (2) Greene C. Carter 1870; born Unknown; died Unknown.
70 iv. Conrad Moots Tharp, born November 07, 1835 in West Liberty, Logan County, Ohio; died September 11, 1926 in Daughter's home in Unionville, Appanoose County, Iowa; married Margret Sidwell February 1858 in Davis County, Iowa.
v. Margarett Elizabeth Tharp, born 1839 in West Liberty, Logan County, Ohio; died Unknown in Wahoo, Nebraska; married (1) Thomas J. Toner Abt. 1860; born Unknown; died Bef. 1865; married (2) Henry Miller Bef. 1872; born Abt. 1839 in Denmark; died Unknown.
vi. Cassander Virginia Tharp, born 1840 in Wycondah Township, Davis County, Iowa; died September 28, 1916 in Moulton, Appanoose County, Iowa; married George M. Carter March 06, 1856 in Davis County, Iowa; born 1835 in Fayette County, Illinois; died September 13, 1913 in Moulton, Appanoose County, Iowa.
vii. Nathan Dee Tharp, Sr., born May 22, 1842 in Savannah, Davis County, Iowa; died August 26, 1938 in Wahoo, Saunders County, Nebraska; married (1) Arena Dabney March 11, 1864 in F. M. Dabney's residence, Davis County, Iowa; born March 11, 1848 in Savannah, Davis County, Iowa; died February 18, 1920 in Wahoo, Saunders County, Nebraska; married (2) Sarah Jane Dabney July 07, 1921 in Wahoo, Saunders County, Nebraska; born January 22, 1854 in Savannah, Wycondah Township, Davis County, Iowa; died September 19, 1932 in Wahoo, Saunders County, Nebraska.
viii. Nancy Ann Tharp, born December 09, 1844 in Savannah, Davis County, Iowa; died September 03, 1899 in Valparaiso, Saunders County, Nebraska; married John Lewis Magee January 19, 1861 in Davis County, Iowa; born February 12, 1841 in Macon County, Missouri; died April 1927 in Saunders County, Nebraska.
ix. Sarah Frances Tharp, born Abt. 1847 in Savannah, Davis County, Iowa; died Unknown; married James L. Umphres September 23, 1862 in Sarah Tharp's residence, Davis County, Iowa; born May 03, 1838 in Indiana; died January 20, 1908 in Saunders County, Nebraska.
x. Lody Helen M. Tharp, born Abt. 1849 in Savannah, Davis County, Iowa; died February 03, 1921; married William Wilcox November 16, 1869 in Sarah Tharp's residence, Davis County, Iowa; born February 03, 1848 in Wycondah Township, Davis County, Iowa; died November 02, 1916 in at home, in Bloomfield, Davis County, Iowa.
xi. Christena Evelyn Tharp, born July 18, 1851 in Wycondah Township, Davis County, Iowa; died November 21, 1924 in Ogden, Weber County, Utah; married James Ayers Smith December 01, 1869 in Davis County, Iowa; born August 09, 1848 in Washington Court, Fayette County, Ohio; died Unknown.

 

142. David Sidwell, Sr., born Abt. 1801 in Cumberland County, Kentucky; died Unknown. He was the son of 284. William Sidwell, Sr. and 285. Mary Key. He married 143. Mary Ann Guthrie Bef. 1823 in Kentucky ?.

143. Mary Ann Guthrie, born Abt. 1803 in Kentucky; died Aft. 1880. She was the daughter of 286. George Guthrie, Sr. and 287. Hannah ?.

Children of David Sidwell and Mary Guthrie are:

i. George Sidwell, born Abt. 1823 in Kentucky; died Abt. 1883; married Easther Jane Capps November 12, 1854 in Schuyler County, Missouri; born Abt. 1835 in Missouri; died 1933.
ii. William Sidwell, born January 09, 1825 in Cumberland County, Kentucky; died August 28, 1904 in Davis County, Iowa; married Sarah Abigail Hill July 15, 1855 in Davis County, Iowa; born February 02, 1837 in Knox County, Illinois; died September 06, 1899 in Moulton, Appanoose County, Iowa.
iii. Mary Ann Sidwell, born September 12, 1835 in Illinois; died March 06, 1913 in Foss, Custer County, Oklahoma; married James Simpson Ball, Sr. February 26, 1853 in Lancaster, Schuyler County, Missouri; born January 01, 1833 in Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana; died February 04, 1912 in Foss, Custer County, Oklahoma.
iv. Elizabeth Sidwell, born February 15, 1828 in Fayette County, Illinois; died July 04, 1915 in Schuyler County, Missouri; married John David Enlow, Sr. 1847 in Fayette County, Illinois; born 1818 in Ohio; died 1875 in Schuyler County, Missouri.
v. John Sidwell, born Abt. September 1829 in Cumberland County, Kentucky; died April 19, 1913 in Queen City, Missouri; married Elisabeth Jane Young August 23, 1855 in Davis County, Iowa; born Abt. January 1834 in Tennessee; died March 25, 1912 in Queen City, Missouri.
71 vi. Margret Sidwell, born October 27, 1835 in Fayette County, Illinois; died January 21, 1907 in Davis County, Iowa; married Conrad Moots Tharp February 1858 in Davis County, Iowa.
vii. Loda Ann Sidwell, born February 15, 1839 in Fayette County, Illinois; died October 31, 1918 in Bozeman, Gallatin County, Montana; married (1) Joseph Marion Yaden April 14, 1855 in Adair County, Missouri; born Unknown; died Unknown; married (2) John Houston Lay August 18, 1864 in Jefferson County, Iowa; born April 07, 1825 in Grainger County, Tennessee; died 1896 in Gallatin County, Montana.
viii. David Sidwell, Jr., born Abt. 1842 in Illinois; died Unknown; married Nancy Jane Baker; born Unknown; died Unknown.

 

144. Lazarus Robertson, born Abt. 1801 likely in Anderson County Tennessee; died March 02, 1847 in Agua Nueva, Mexico. He was the son of 288. Stephen Robertson and 289. Winnie Chitwood. He married 145. Jane Leeper Abt. 1821 in Tennessee.
Notes for Lazarus Robertson:
The first recording of Lazarus Robertson by name is in the 1823 tax list for Campbell County, Tennessee ("Early East Tennessee Tax Lists", Mary Barnett Curtis; Arrow Printing Company; Fort Worth, TX; 1964) along with his father Stephen.  This would place Lazarus' birth year no later than 1802, and more likely 1801.  Fred Robertson (1899-1985) in his Robertson Family document, published in December 1956, stated that Lazarus and his family moved to Washington County, Indiana in 1826 after stopping first to visit relatives in Mercer County, Kentucky.  At this time no records have been found that show Lazarus and family to have been in Washington County.  No land transactions have been found in his name in Washington County, and he has not been found in the 1830 census.  Lazarus next appears in Brown County, Indiana with the patent of 40 acres in Section 5 of Township 10N, Range 2E likely in August 1835 with Federal certificate issued March 20, 1837.  This land was immediately east of the then east border of Monroe County, in an area not yet formed into a county.  The modern boundaries of Monroe and Brown counties were formed when Brown County was formed April 1, 1836.  According to Wikipedia describing Brown County in 1836, "The country was very wild in 1836.  Bears, panthers, and wolves were plentiful.  The wolves were so numerous and destructive to livestock that the Commissioners paid $1 for every wolf scalp brought to them.  Settlers lived a rugged pioneer type of life for many years.  Their cabins and small settlements were mere niches in the great forest that covered hills and valleys.  The men hunted deer, rabbits, squirrels, wild turkeys and pigeons for food.  As soon as enough land was cleared they planted corn, potatoes, wheat, hops for yeast, flax, and tobacco.  Women made quilts, wove wool and flax into cloth, made the family clothes, carried water from a well or stream, cooked food in open fireplaces, raised the children, and nursed them when they were sick."
Lazarus continued to purchase several parcels of land in the area as follows.  The first date is when the patent purchase was transacted with the date in parentheses being the date the Federal certificate was issued.  Lazarus purchased 26.39 acres in Section 5, Township 9N, Range 2E on September 16, 1837 (August 1, 1839); then 26.39 acres in Section 5, Township 9N, Range 2E on October 21, 1839 (August 1, 1844); then a third 26.39 acres in Section 5, Township 9N, Range 2E on December 17, 1844 (May 10, 1848) and finally 50.92 acres in Section 5, Township 9N, Range 2E on January 7, 1847 (May 10, 1848).  The last two purchases resulted in Federal certificates being delivered after Lazarus' death. 
Lazarus answered the call to arms issued by President Polk for the War with Mexico.  According to page 405 of "Indiana in the Mexican War", compiled by Oran Perry, Adjutant-General; Indianapolis, 1908, Lazarus is shown as mustered in the 3rd Regiment Company E of the Indiana Volunteer Infantry June 18, 1846 at New Albany, Indiana by Colonel Samuel Churchill.  This company consisted mostly of soldiers from Brown County, Indiana, called the Brown County Blues.  Page 703 of "Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana: Historical and Biographical" by Charles Blanchard; F. A. Battey & Co., 1884 says, "Company E, 3rd Indiana, ...had purchased bright uniforms of bright blue jeans and had styled themselves Brown County Blues, a name by which they were known all through the war."  In early July the company under command of Colonel James H. Lane reached New Orleans and a week later took ships to Mexico.  Blanchard states the deaths started right away, "While at New Orleans, Caleb Bidwell died of measles, his death being the first in the company, Reese Brummet and John Followell died of disease on the Gulf and were buried beneath the waves with cannon balls at their feet, Joshua Brummet and several other died at Brazos Island and were entombed in the sand ... The regiment occupied Matamoras, Marine, Saltillo, Nueva and various other points, doing guard or garrison duty and suffering severely from the peculiar Southern diseases."  The following February American forces numbering 5,000 were encamped at Agua Nueva when they discovered a huge Mexican force of 20,000 advancing.  The Americans withdrew to nearby Buena Vista because it offered a better defensive position and awaited the Mexican force.  The battle of Buena Vista took place February 23, 1847 and when it was over there were more than 3,500 Mexicans and 650 Americans dead.  After the battle the American force returned to camp at Agua Nueva, where Lazarus died on March 2.  When Lazarus died he was a Sergeant, evidently having been promoted in the field.  Blanchard goes ahead to report, "Just at the close of the battle, at almost the last fire from the enemy, while Company E was being thrown back, Capt. Taggart received a mortal wound from a carbine ball ... No other casualties occurred, and Company E, commanded by Capt. T. M. Adams, saw no more fighting."  Blanchard identifies some of the Company E wounded as "Elias Weddel, who was shot through the hips...Squire Stewart was prostrated by concussion from a howitzer ball...Matthew Mathews, was shot through the hand..."  In his book Perry corroborates this statement on page 147 by giving Captain Taggart as the only death and added to the list of wounded the names of J. Brown, S. Fred and J. G. Arter, but like Blanchard did not identify Lazarus among the wounded.  The assumption has to be that Lazarus died of disease.  For the entire war American casualties numbered approximately 13,000, all but 1,733 of which were caused by disease.  So it is not known if Lazarus was even able to participate in the battle.
Included in Perry, page 175, was the following from the June 5, 1847 Madison Courier newspaper "A meeting of the citizens of Jefferson County for the purpose of arranging a suitable welcome to our volunteers on their return ... Resolved, That we exult with pride at the gallant and intrepid conduct and bearing of the Third Indiana Volunteers at Buena Vista, the sole regiment which throughout that memorable struggle was not staggered by the shock of arms, always maintaining its front to the foe and its flag aloft, without retreat from its position and without confusion at any moment, and which by its well-timed junction with the Mississippi regiment at a perilous crisis, upon which the safety of the entire army was in hazard and suspense, restored the fortunes of our troups and turned the tide of battle into a triumph for our arms."  It is not uncommon for the local populace to embellish the actions of their "sons" in action.  Major General Zachary Taylor spoke more dispassionately of their actions in his report of the Battle of Buena Vista to the Secretary of War, "The Mississippi riflemen, under Colonel Davis, were highly conspicuous for their gallantry and steadiness, and sustained throughout the engagement the reputation of veteran troops.  Brought into action against an immensely superior force, they maintained themselves for a long time unsupported and with heavy loss, and held an important part of the field until reinforced.  Colonel Davis, though severely wounded, remained in the saddle until the close of the action.  His distinguished coolness and gallantry at the head of his regiment on this day, entitle him to the particular notice of the government.  The Third Indiana regiment, under Colonel Lane, and a fragment of the Second, under Colonel Bowles, were associated with the Mississippi regiment during the greater portion of the day, and acquitted themselves creditably in repulsing the attempts of the enemy to break that portion of our line."  It is not known exactly where Lazarus is buried.

145. Jane Leeper, born February 2, 1800 in Tennessee; died September 05, 1886 in Sugar Creek Township, Poweshiek County, Iowa.
Notes for Jane Leeper:
No marriage bond has been found for Lazarus and Jane.  I have Jane's maiden name because it has come down through the family history.  Jane was born February 2, 1800 in Tennessee.  This is an example of why it is important to try to locate corroborating evidence where possible.  Her death certificate information was evidently supplied by a not too savvy family member as Mahaska County (Iowa) Death Certificate Book 1, page 49, item #616 noted she died in 1886, at age 80 and was born in Pennsylvania.  This information would place her birth year as about 1806.  Yet her 1850 census entry says she is 50, 1860 census entry says she is 60, 1870 census entry says she is 70 and her 1880 census entry says she is 80 and all entries agree that her birth location was Tennessee.  The clincher is her headstone in Stewart Cemetery, Prairie Township, Mahaska County, Iowa which gives her birth date as February 2, 1800.
Little is known of Jane's origin, although some things can be surmised.  The 1880 census (Sugar Creek Township, Poweshiek County, Iowa, page 642A) shows Jane living with son and head of household, Moses.  This census shows Jane as born in Tennessee and her mother and father both born in Pennsylvania.  However, Moses' entry shows he was born in Indiana and his parents as both born in Pennsylvania as well.  This does not make sense since Jane is listed as born in Tennessee yet according to Moses' entry she was born in Pennsylvania.  Multiple lines before and after their entries also show the parents as born in Pennsylvania.  Was this the case of a lazy census taker, or erroneous information provided by Moses/Jane, or correct at least for Jane?
There were Leepers in northeastern Tennessee during the time Lazarus was in Campbell County.  This family had its American beginning in Orange County, Virginia as noted by an oath of importation of himself and family from Ireland to America made by James Leeper (Orange County Order Book II, page 109).  Per Lyman Chalkley's "Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia", volume II, page 372 James is noted in a copy of "Hume's Old Field Book" with May 13, 1738 survey for James (Leap)er, beginning at Jinnings Cor., then May 13, 1738 for James Patton, cor. James Leaper, branch of Chrystie's Kreek.  This would be in the unorganized Augusta district carved from Orange County (Augusta did not become a county until 1745).  A patent dated June 25, 1747 in Augusta County bestows 400 acres "on the south Fork of the north River of Shanando" (Land Office Patents No. 26, 1747-1748, page 42) on John Smith "...for and in Consideration of the Importation of eight Persons to dwell within this our Colony and Dominion of Virginia whose names are James Leeper Margaret Leeper Nicholas Leeper Sarah Leeper James Leeper Andrew Leeper James (Jane) Leeper and Guine Leeper..."  James Leeper obtained a January 12, 1746/47 patent for 116 acres in Augusta County on a branch of Shanando called Naked Creek (Land Office Patents No. 24, 1745-1746, page 562) and a June 25, 1747 patent for 66 acres on a branch of Naked Creek (Land Office Patents No. 26, 1747-1748, page 20) as well as many other land transactions in the county.  On various land deeds, James is described as a blacksmith.  Son Guine Leeper appears in 12 Augusta County Court records between 1747 and 1779, identified variously as: Guine, Gawen and Gawin.  His last recorded transaction in Augusta County was dated January 19, 1779 where Gawin Leaper, late of Augusta, sold to John Oliver 66 acres patented to James Leeper, father of said Gawen, 5th June, 1747 (Augusta County Deed Book 22, pg 430).  Thus he had left that county.  James Leeper, son of Gawen, wrote his will April 13, 1826 in Hawkins County, Tennessee.  In the will he mentions land in Hawkins County given to him by his father, Gawen Leeper.  This gives us a place to look.  In 1782, Gawen received a North Carolina Land Grant (#1412) for Sullivan County, North Carolina.  In 1783 Hawkins County, North Carolina was created from Sullivan County, and in 1796 became part of Tennessee when that state was formed.  This son James had a daughter Jane who could fit the vitals to be wife of Lazarus, but no confirming documentation exists to prove this.  Additionally, William Brown wrote a will in Knox County, Tennessee dated August 6, 1803.  On August 21, 1803 James Brown and Felix Brown (son of William) along with Jos. McCulloch witnessed an addendum to the will.  Felix Brown was enumerated as one free poll with 200 acres in Captain Boyd's Company in the 1806 Knox County tax list ("Early East Tennessee Taxpayers" by Pollyanna Creekmore; Southern Historical Press; Easly, SC, 1980).  The reason for this digression is that Felix married Jane Leeper, daughter of Gawin Leeper of Hawkins County.  With Stephen in Knox County at the same time, it gave them opportunity to meet and for Robertsons to potentially get acquainted with Leepers.
This description would have the possibility of Jane's parents as born in Virginia.  What if the 1880 census is correct and her parents were born in Pennsylvania?  Researcher Tom Goldrup has done extensive research on the Leeper family of Augusta and, in trying to identify ancestry of that line, has done extensive research on a Leeper line in Chester County, Pennsylvania.  He states that the Leeper family originated in Scotland and moved to Northern Ireland, settling in County Donegal by 1610.  From there, the earliest known relative to come to America was Gawin Leeper who appeared on the 1719 New London, Chester County tax list.  The next Leeper to appear on tax rolls is Andrew in 1734 along with Gawin in New London.  Variously through 1758 Gawin, Andrew, James and Alexander Leeper appear in New London and West Nottingham, Chester County tax records.  Gawin's will dated June 13, 1741 identifies, among other items, that he has a "cousin" (Mr. Goldrup notes that this probably referred to a nephew as that term was commonly used that way in those days) James Leeper who had a son Gawin (Augusta County relative?).  His will also mentions his sister Jean Muckleduff.  A son, Joseph Muckleduff, wrote his will in September of 1750 which included articles left to Andrew Leeper of Nottingham (Chester County), and to his son James Leeper.  An additional stipulation that seems to tie this Chester County family to the Augusta family is "To James Lipard (Leeper) of Naked Creek in Virginia my beaver hat and wigs, and to his son Andrew my gun."  Mr. Goldrup also states that a Robert Leeper went from Pennsylvania to North Carolina, but stopped over a while in the Shenandoah Valley (Augusta County) and lived near his "kinsman" there.  Robert appears on the 1742 Augusta militia roll of Capt. John Smith's Company (the same John Smith who supported the importation of the James Leeper family) per Chalkley, Vol. 2, pages 507-508.  When he went to North Carolina, Nicholas Leeper, son of James of Augusta, followed to the same vicinity.  It seems there could be possibilities with these families to fit either a Virginia or Pennsylvania heritage.  These bear further investigation.
After Lazarus died in Mexico in 1847 Jane was left a widow with 7 children yet at home - Miriam, Rebecca, Stephen, William Tazewell, Moses, Andrew Jackson and Charles.  Miriam and Rebecca each married in 1849 and Stephen died of typhoid fever in 1849.  The 1850 Jackson Township, Brown County, Indiana census (page 210A) shows Jane at home with 4 children:
Jane Roberson 50 F TN
Tazewell Roberson 17 M Farmer IN
Moses Roberson 15 M Farmer IN
Andrew Roberson 12 M IN
Charles Roberson 8 M IN
Jane would have inherited the land Lazarus had purchased in Brown County prior to enlisting.  This would also include a patent for 40 acres in the NE 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 33, Township 10, Range 2N issued June 10, 1848.  The application and money were actually submitted January 24, 1845.  The land was obviously purchased by Lazarus, but the grantee changed to Jane prior to issue.  Additionally, commencing March 3, 1852 Jane started receiving $6.50 monthly as a widows pension.
In the 1860 Jackson Township, Brown County, Indiana census (page 146) Jane Roberson is living in the Joel and Miram Richerson household.  This is her daughter Miriam and son-in-law Joel Richardson.  Jane is enumerated as age 60 and born in Tennessee. The 1870 census again finds her enumerated as Roberson but this time in the Charles Roberson household in 1870 Sugar Creek Township, Poweshiek County, Iowa (page 392A).  Charles is a son and the household also includes another son, Moses.  Jane is enumerated as age 70 and born in Tennessee.  In the 1880 census Jane is finally enumerated as a Robertson and is found living with bachelor son Moses in Sugar Creek Township (page 642A).  She is shown as age 80 and born in Tennessee.

Children of Lazarus Robertson and Jane Leeper are (many of the notes for the children, contained in quotes, come from the history of this Robertson family by Fred Robertson):

72 i. William Riley Robertson, born January 02, 1822 in Claiborne County, Tennessee; died October 31, 1908 in Taintor, Prairie Township, Mahaska County, Iowa; married (1) Gabriella Stephens April 20, 1845 in Brown County, Indiana; married (2) Elizabeth Jane Bailey September 06, 1849 in Monroe County, Indiana.
ii. Claiborn Robertson, born December 15, 1823 in Claiborne County, Tennessee; died December 19, 1912 in Needmore, Brown County, Indiana; married (1) Mary Stephens June 25, 1845 in Monroe County, Indiana; born 1822 in Indiana; died 1872 in Indiana; married (2) Sarah Brown Dillingham March 20, 1873 in Indiana; born October 23, 1833 in Cardington, Morrow County, Ohio; died April 8, 1911 in Brown County, Indiana.
"Claiborn Robertson, second child of Lazarus Robertson and Jane Leeper, was born in Claiborne Co. Tenn. on 12-15-1823.  When he was three years old the family moved to Washington Co. Ind. and when he was about fourteen years old they moved to Brown Co. Ind.  He told about spending the first night in Brown Co. under a beech tree at the west end of the cut and north of the I.C.C. railroad tracks...A spring was under the tree and the family lived here for some time.  Three or four stones remain in the graveyard east of the beech tree.  His brother Stephen who died about 1850 is buried there."
"His grandfather Stephen Robertson patented land northeast of Helmsburg and his father Lazarus patented land between Trevlac and Halmsburg...He and his father patented adjacent lands one mile east of Needmore Brown Co. Ind.  It is what the family calls the old place and has been in the family continuously."
"He married Mary Stephens on 6-5-1845."  According to the Marriages Through 1850 database at the Indiana State Library, Claborn Robinson married Mary Stephens June 25, 1845.  "They had a large family, nine children.  The eldest Jacob died in the Civil War at Resaca Ge. on 10-15-1864.  He is buried in grave 9103 Sec. L, National Cemetry Chattanooga Tennessee."  Their other children were George Winfield, Lazarus, Gabriella, Agnes, James H., Della Jane, Amanda, and Louisa.
"His wife died when she was 50 years 6 months old in the year 1872, leaving six small children."
"On March 20, 1873 he married Sarah Brown (Dillingham) whose husband died leaving her with six small children, all girls.  To this union two children were born, Ora and Clarence."  Claiborn and Sarah are shown in the 1900 Jackson Township, Brown County, Indiana census, page 25B, with Claiborn as Head of household but with no occupation listed.  Living with them, in addition to Nellie Dillingham a step-daughter of Sarah's previous marriage, is Clarence and wife Catherine and son Frederick.  Clarence has an occupation of farmer and is evidently taking care of his parents.
"He visited his brothers Wm Riley and Moses in Iowa about 1900.  Riley's son Wm P visited the relatives in Indiana at least twice."
In the 1910 Jackson Township census, page 176B, Clarence is now head of household and has wife Kathrine and 4 children.  Living in the household are Claiborn and Sarah along with another of Sarah's single daughters by her first marriage.  In this census Clarence is a merchant of a general store, and even though he is 86 years old Claiborn is identified as a farmer.  "He died 12-19-1912 at Needmore and is buried in the cemetery at Needmore Brown Co. Ind."  The tombstone inscription reads:
Claiborn Robertson
Born Dec. 15 - 1823
Died Dec. - 19 - 1912
Sarah Robertson
Born Oct. 23 - 1833
Died Apr. 8 - 1911
iii. Miriam Robertson, born February 11, 1827 in Washington County, Indiana; died March 01, 1889 east of Needmore, Brown County, Indiana; married (1) Joel Richardson December 31, 1849 in Brown County, Indiana; born 1827 in Tennessee; died May 5, 1865 in a Civil War Regimental Hospital; married (2) John Franklin Young November 21, 1865 in Brown County, Indiana; born June 18, 1822 in Kentucky; died February 13, 1875 in Unionville, Monroe County, Indiana.
"Miriam Robertson, 3rd child of Lazarus Robertson and Jane Leeper, was born in Washington Co. Ind. in 1827.  When about eight years old she came to Brown Co. Ind. with her parents.  There is a story she told about riding a mule to Brown Co.  The younger generations forgot about the stop in Washington Co. and coming to Indiana and Brown Co. were one and the same to them.  She married Joel Richardson on 12-31-1849.  She and her sister Rebecca were married on the same day.  Her husband died in the Civil War.  Later she married John Franklin Young on 11-21-1865.  They had one child Albert Joel Young.  She lived east of Needmore Brown Co. Ind. where she died on March 1, 1889."
Joel and Miriam appear in the 1850 Benton Township, Brown County, Indiana census, page 283B, and the 1860 Jackson Township census, page 146.  Jane Roberson, Miriam's mother, is living with the couple in the 1860 census (It was not until 1865-1866 that Jane moved to Sugar Creek Township, Poweshiek County, Iowa with sons Charles and Moses).  The couple is childless.  Joel enlisted September 19, 1864 in Company C, 25th Indiana Infantry Regiment.  He died March 5, 1865 in a Regimental Hospital of acute diarrhea and is buried in section B of the Florence National Cemetery, Florence, Darlington County, South Carolina.
John Franklin Young married Pernetia Jane Richardson January 26, 1842 in Johnson County, Indiana and they were the parents of 8 children.  Pernetia died April 19, 1865 and is buried in Little Union Cemetery, Unionville, Monroe County, Indiana.  Then in November of that year John and Miriam are married.  John Franklin is buried with Pernetia in Little Union Cemetery.  Miriam is buried in Lanam Ridge Cemetery, Needmore, Brown County, Indiana.
iv. Rebecca Robertson, born March 18, 1829 in Washington County, Indiana; died August 20, 1900 in Monroe County, Indiana; married (1) James Richardson November 1, 1849 in Brown County, Indiana; born 1827 in Tennessee; died November 16, 1863 in Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee; married (2) Jacob A. West April 30, 1865; born June 01, 1829 in Virginia; died March 19, 1882 in Brown County, Indiana.
"Rebecca Robertson, 4th child of Lazarus Robertson and Jane Leeper, was born in Washington County, Indiana on March 12, 1829."  Note: Her tombstone shows March 18 as her birth date.  "The family had moved there from Tennessee three years before.  When she was six years old the family moved to Brown County, Indiana.  She married James Richardson on December 31, 1849."  Note: LDS film #1295890 Indiana Marriages, 1802-1892 shows the marriage date as November 1, 1849.  "Her sister Miriam was married on the same day.  The children are Moses, William, Caleb, Jane, Risdon and Charles.  On May 11, 1865 she marrid Jacob West.  Their children are Joseph and James."
James Richardson enlisted in Company D, 82nd Indiana Infantry Regiment on August 30, 1862.  This regiment was organized at Madison (Indiana) and was mustered in August 30, 1862.  It left the state September 1 for Louisville, where it was assigned to a brigade in Buell's army and joined the pursuit of Bragg.
It next moved with Rosecrans' army to Murfreesboro, and was engaged at Stone's River.  It remained in camp at Murfreesboro until June, and was in the engagement at Hoover's Gap.  It was at Chickamauga, where its corps withstood every assault and the regiment's loss was 21 killed, 72 wounded and 29 missing.  It was engaged in a skirmish in front of Chattanooga during the siege of that place.  The battle of Chattanooga took place November 23-25, 1863. Unless James died as the result of this minor skirmish, he likely died of disease, as did a significant number of soldiers during the War.  No report has been found to identify which caused his death.  The assumption is that he was buried at Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee.
"The following was written by her grandson, Caleb Richardson.  Grandma Rebecca never lived in Monroe County.  As I remember her home was between Trevlac and Helmsburg on the sourth side of Bean Blossom Stream near the Leander Weddle place.  (Note: The house was on the north side of the stream and was vacant for some years. It was torn down circa 1920.)  She lived here until most of her children were married.  Caleb and James West were never married.  Caleb died at the age of 31 years.  James West lived to be 81 years old and died in Illinois.  In the meantime she was persuaded to sell the farm and move to Centerton, Indiana.  She lived here for several years and finally moved to Fair Grange, Illinois.  Here she resided until her death which occurred while she was on a visit back to Indiana.  She died at my father's home in the summer of 1900.  She died August 20, 1900 and is buried at Needmore, Brown County, Indiana."
In the 1900 Fair Grange village, Seven Hickory Township, Coles County, Illinois census, page 346A, Rebecca, age 71 and widowed, is shown in the household of William Richardson.  Also living in the household are brother Charles, sister Jane, and half-brother James West.  According to Indiana Deaths, 1882-1920, Book H-14, page 13 produced by the Indiana Works Progress Administration, Rebecca's death is confirmed as August 20, 1900 in Monroe County, Indiana.  She and Jacob are buried in Needmore Cemetery, Needmore, Brown County, Indiana.
v. Stephen Robertson, born 1831 in Washington County, Indiana; died Abt. 1849 in Brown County, Indiana.
He is said to have died of typhoid fever.
vi. William Tazewell Robertson, born November 11, 1833 in Washington County, Indiana; died 1915 in Bartholomew County, Indiana; married (1) Amanda Owens April 21, 1857 in Brown County, Indiana; born Abt. 1838 in Indiana/; died Unknown; married (2) Mary Elizabeth Beaty August 18, 1861 in Indiana; born February 1845 in Indiana; died 1919 in Bartholomew County, Indiana.
"Wm Tazewell Robertson, 6th child of Lazarus Robertson and Jane Leeper, was born in Washington Co. Ind. on Nov. 11, 1833.  When he was about two years old the family moved to Brown Co. Ind.  He lived in Brown and Bartholomew Counties.  On Aug. 18, 1861 he married Elizabeth Beaty.  They had four children who lived to maturity Charles, John, Wm Curtis and Alfred.  He died in 1915 and is buried in Garland Brook Cemetery Columbus Ind."  Fred's notes for their first born child, Charles, includes the following, "While yet young his father took his family to Nebraska where they lived for a while, then returned to Ind. and lived at Clifford (Bartholomew County)."
Fred's narrative for Tazewell does not mention his first wife, Amanada.  It is she who is enumerated in the 1860 Washington Township, Brown County, Indiana census, page 60.  They are enumerated as Roberson with Tazwell shown as age 27 and born in Indiana and Amanda shown as age 22 and also born in Indiana.  It is unknown whether Amanda died, or they divorced, before he married Elizabeth in 1861.  Mary Elizabeth is the daughter of Davis/Darius Beaty and Mary Ann McQueen.  She can be found in the Flat Rock Township, Bartholomew County, Indiana in 1850 and 1860.
The young Robertson family is at home in 1870 Flatrock Township, page 36 with sons Chas, age 7, Jno. C., age 5, and Alfred D., age 2.  Fred gives the birth date for son William Curtis as September 13, 1869 in Bartholomew County, yet he is not enumerated in the 1870 census.  As reported by son Charles, they are found in 1880 Grant Precinct, Kearney County, Nebraska, page 9A, enumerated as Robenson.  In addition to William and Elisabeth, the family consists of Charly, John, Albert and 9 year old Chuster, who was also born in Indiana.  Chuster is likely the census taker's attempt at Curtis.  However, with Curtis not appearing in the 1870 census, and with his age as 9 in the 1880 census, it is likely that William Curtis was born in September of 1870 rather than 1869.  The family was evidently back in Bartholomew County, Indiana before 1885 to allow for son Charles to meet Hannah Jane Spalding and then marry her on November 6, 1885.
After 1880, the family members seem to go their own way.  In 1900 Mary Elizabeth is found in Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana, page 5B, as head of household and Alfred D., age 32, is living with her and working as a carpenter.  Mary Elizabeth's marital status is showing as married, but Tazewell is not to be found in any census.  In the 1902 Columbus, Indiana city directory Wm T Robertson and spouse, Elizabeth Robertson, live at 133 4th St. and Tazewell is working as a clerk for W. C. Robertson.  In that same city directory W Curtis Robertson, with spouse Gertie Robertson, is shown as a grocer 1 1/4 miles southwest of Columbus.  But in the 1910 Columbus Township, Bartholomew County, Indiana census, page 14B, they are back to not being enumerated together, and now their marital status has changed.  William T, age 77 and occupied as cigar merchant, is enumerated as family 289/292, and his marital status is widowed.  Earlier on the same page, at family 281/283, is enumerated Elizabeth Robertson, age 77 and marital status of widowed.
It appears they are buried together.  There is one large tombstone for the two of them in Garland Brook Cemetery, Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana.
vii. Moses Robertson, born October 8, 1835 in Washington County, Indiana; died November 24, 1906; married Rebecca C. Sparks October 29, 1890 in Mahaska County, Iowa; born December 10, 1872 in Bethany, Harrison County, Missouri; died January 6, 1933 near Oelwein, Fayette County, Iowa.
"Moses Robertson, son of Lazarus Robertson and Jane Leeper, was born in Washington Co. Ind. about 1835.  When he was very young his parents moved to Brown Co. Ind.  He was drafted on the 20th day of Sep't 1864.  He served in Co. D. 31st Reg. Ind. Vol.; age 26; eyes, gray; hair, dark; height 5 ft. 8 in.; complexion, dark; nativity, Washington Co. Ind.; occupation, farmer; discharged at Nashville Tenn. June 21, 1865."
"Shortly afterward with his mother Jane, his brother Charles and the latters wife Sarah and son William he moved to Iowa near his brother Riley and uncle Joseph.  His log cabin was a short distance east of his brother Riley's near Taintor Iowa in Poweshiek Co."
     "His mother died on Sep't 5, 1886 and is buried northeast of Taintor Iowa.  Then he moved to a place five miles south of Montezuma Iowa.  In the winter he visited the cousins in Missouri.  It is probable they lived near St. Joseph.  About 1890 he married a woman named Rebecca C from Missouri.  She was called Kate.  They had three children Alta, Charles and Jessie.  He died in 1906.  His wife married a man named Clemens and they lived near Nevada Iowa.  There has been no contact with the family for years."
According to the 1870 Sugar Creek Township, Poweshiek County, Iowa census, page 392, Moses and the entire migrating family unit are found as family 70/71.  Charles, age 27, is a farm laborer and the family unit includes wife Sarah F., age 22, son William R., age 4, brother Moses, age 34 and also a farm laborer, and mother Jane, age 70.  The next family enumerated, 71/72, is the Samuel and Amanda Fleener family.  Samuel is Jane Robertson's nephew and cousin to Charles and Moses.  A short distance from these two households, at family 78/79, is the William Riley and Elizabeth Robertson family.  William is Jane's son, and a brother to Charles and Moses.  In 1880 Moses and Jane have moved out of Charles' household and Moses is now farming - Sugar Creek Township, page 642A.  Moses and Jane, and later Moses alone after Jane died, visited their Robertson kin in Harrison County, Missouri often.  These relatives were families of Lazarus' brothers Shadrach and Daniel.  Jane is buried in Stewart Cemetery, Prairie Township, Mahaska County, Iowa, just west of New Sharon.
Moses married Rebecca Catherine Sparks October 29, 1890 in Mahaska County, Iowa.  Rebecca is the daughter of Lyman Jared Sparks and Winnie Ann Robertson, and was born in Harrison County, Missouri.  Winnie Ann Robertson is the daughter of Shadrach Robertson and Phebia R. Wilson and was born abt 1844 in Harrison County, Missouri.  Shadrach and Lazarus are brothers, thus Shadrach and Moses are uncle/nephew.  Thus Winnie Ann and Moses are first cousins, and Rebecca is Moses' first cousin once removed.  Fred's history for Moses says he moved south of Montezuma after Jane died, but he in fact remained in Sugar Creek Township and can be found there in the 1895, 1900, and 1905 censuses.  He and Rebecca had one daughter, Alta Mae, and two sons, Charles H. and Jesse, with Jesse dying at 20 years of age.  Moses is buried in Highland Cemetery, New Sharon, Prairie Township, Mahaska County, Iowa.
On November 9, 1914 Rebecca married John Helm, Jr. in Fayette County, Iowa.  It is not clear why she moved to the Fayette County area resulting in meeting and marrying John.  Rebecca is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Oelwein, Fayette County, Iowa.
viii. Andrew Jackson Robertson, born May 15, 1836 northeast of Needmore, Brown County, Indiana; died September 16, 1903 in Monroe County, Indiana; married Nancy Jane Butcher December 28, 1859 in Monroe County, Indiana; born August 6, 1831 in Monroe County, Indiana; died May 24, 1906 in Monroe County, Indiana.
"Andrew Jackson Robertson was born on a farm northeast of Needmore Brown Co. Ind. on May 15, 1836.  At the age of about eleven his father died in the Mexican War.  When young he married and lived on the home farm for one year.  He then moved to Monroe Co. and rented farms for a few years and then bought a small farm five miles east of Bloomington and lived there until his death.  He belonged to the Friendship Separate Baptist Church and was a good christian man."
Nancy Jane is the daughter of Solomon Butcher and Katherine Stephens.  She and Andrew were parents of 4 sons - Oscar Thornton, John Owen, Lewis Harrison, and Marion Francis - and 2 daughters - Elizabeth and Martha Ann.  Andrew died in 1903.  Shortly after this Nancy suffered a stroke that left her paralyzed.  She died after a second stroke, which left her unconscious for two days.  Andrew and Nancy are buried in Clear Creek Cemetery, Clear Creek, Monroe County, Indiana.
ix. Charles Robertson, born 1843 in Brown County, Indiana; died Unknown; married Sarah Frances Swisher March 10, 1864 in Brown County, Indiana; born 1848 in Indiana; died Unknown.
Little is known of this son of Lazarus Robertson and Jane Leeper.  Family lore has it that in 1873 they, with his niece Gabriella, moved to Missouri.  Another part of the Robertson family say that Gabriella left Indiana to visit the Robertsons in Poweshiek County, Iowa, but never showed up and was never heard from again.  Whatever happened, no contact was ever established with this Charles Robertson family after 1870.  Son William R. does appear in a marriage certificate in Columbus, Bartholomew County, Indiana on January 14, 1889 with J. Calkins.  But nothing more has been found on any of these individuals.

 

148. Moses Knox, Sr., born 1782 in Dover, Stratford County, New Hampshire; died October 19, 1856 in Millersburg, Mercer County, Illinois. He was the son of 296. William Knox and 297. Sarah Alley. He married 149. Susannah Perkins November 24, 1803 in Lebanon, York County, Maine.

149. Susannah Perkins, born 1784 in Dover, Stratford County, New Hampshire; died February 04, 1845 in Millersburg, Mercer County, Illinois.

Children of Moses Knox and Susannah Perkins are:

i. George W. Knox, born 1806 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; died Unknown; married Clarissa S. Fuller September 09, 1827 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; born 1809 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; died Unknown.
ii. Sarah Knox, born 1808 in Dover, Stratford County, New Hampshire; died 1885 in Taylor County, Iowa; married (1) Sumner Bean November 29, 1827 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; born September 26, 1806 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; died June 27, 1843 in Ohio; married (2) William McNulty January 25, 1844 in Mercer County, Illinois; born Unknown; died Unknown.
iii. Simon Knox, born Abt. 1811; died October 07, 1834 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine.
iv. Samuel Knox, born Abt. 1812 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; died May 12, 1887; married Elizabeth ? Abt. 1835 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; born Unknown; died Unknown.
v. Asa Foster Knox, born December 28, 1814 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; died January 18, 1901 in Keithsburg Township, Mercer County, Illinois; married Minerva Elmira Perkins October 13, 1836 in Fairfield, Somerset County, Maine; born August 10, 1815 in Fairfield, Somerset County, Maine; died June 11, 1899 in Keithsburg Township, Mercer County, Illinois.
vi. Mary Knox, born April 26, 1816 in Oxford County, Maine; died February 25, 1899 in Alma Center, Jackson County, Wisconsin; married Consider Fuller August 01, 1836 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; born April 28, 1808 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; died February 15, 1901 in Alma Center, Jackson County, Wisconsin.
vii. Hiran Knox, born 1821 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; died Unknown; married Lovantia Smith July 04, 1850 in Rock Island, Rock Island County, Illinois; born 1830 in New York; died Unknown.
74 viii. John William Knox, born Abt. 1822 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; died June 06, 1885 in Logan, Phillips County, Kansas; married Elizabeth Clark March 15, 1843 in Mercer County, Illinois.
ix. Sophia Ann Knox, born 1829 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; died Abt. 1870 in Calpella, Mendicino County, California; married John Burns Abt. 1850 in Mercer County, Illinois; born Abt. 1821 in Kentucky; died Abt. 1898 in Calpella, Mendicino County, California.
x. Daniel Quincy Knox, born 1829 in Jay, Franklin County, Maine; died January 12, 1912; married Margaret Ann Dennis February 14, 1850 in Rock Island, Rock Island County, Illinois; born 1833 in Ohio; died Unknown.
xi. Moses Knox, Jr., born Unknown in Dover, Stratford County, New Hampshire; died Unknown; married Olive Horn October 12, 1848 in Fairfield, Somerset County, Maine; born September 07, 1824; died May 12, 1887 in Anoka, Anoka County, Minnesota.

 

152. William Sexton, born Bet. 1802 - 1805 in Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia; died Bet. 1831 - 1840 in Sangamon County, Illinois. He was the son of 304. William Saxton and 305. Elizabeth Black. He married 153. Mary Jarrett Bet. 1822 - 1824.

153. Mary Jarrett, born Bet. 1800 - 1810 in Virginia; died Aft. 1846. She was the daughter of 306. David Jarrett and 307. Sallie Mitchell.

Children of William Sexton and Mary Jarrett are (Calvary is the only one proven):

76 i. Calvary T. Sexton, born May 20, 1824 in Cabell County, (West) Virginia; died September 06, 1892 in Mahaska County, Iowa; married (1) Nancy Young Dodd March 25, 1847 in Sangamon County, Illinois; married (2) Mary Ann Miller February 11, 1882 in Mahaska County, Iowa.
ii. John Wesley Sexton, born Abt. 1825 in Cabell County, (West) Virginia; died August 10, 1853 in Loami Township, Sangamon County, Illinois; married Angeline Holdridge June 26, 1844 in Sangamon County, Illinois; born Abt. 1830 in New York; died Unknown.
iii. Elizabeth Sexton, born Abt. 1827 in Cabell County, (West) Virginia; died Bet. 1880 - 1900 in Lucas County, Iowa; married (1) Henry Rumasher June 01, 1843 in Sangamon County, Illinois; born Abt. 1810 in France; died Bet. 1850 - 1853 in Macoupin County, Illinois; married (2) John Harris Briggs, Sr. December 15, 1853 in Macoupin County, Illinois; born 1829 in New York; died April 03, 1905 in Lucas County, Iowa.
iv. James M. Sexton, born January 29, 1828 in Sangamon County, Illinois; died March 04, 1900 in Howell neighborhood, north of Darlington, Gentry County, Missouri; married Eliza O. Pierce March 04, 1852 in Sangamon County, Illinois; born May 25, 1835 in Kentucky; died February 20, 1925 in Gentry County, Missouri.
v. Catharine Sexton, born Bet. 1830 - 1835 in Sangamon County, Illinois; died Unknown; married Patrick DeWitt December 01, 1854 in Sangamon County, Illinois; born Unknown; died Unknown.
vi. Mary Sexton, born Bet. 1830 - 1835 in Sangamon County, Illinois; died Unknown; married Peter Vansil February 03, 1846 in Sangamon County, Illinois; born Unknown; died Unknown.

 

154. Josiah Dodd, born November 19, 1800 in Tennessee; died February 17, 1859 in Richland Township, Mahaska County, Iowa. He was the son of 308. William L. Dodd, Sr. and 309. Agnes Blakely. He married 155. Elizabeth Duncan March 16, 1824 in Jefferson County, Tennessee.

155. Elizabeth Duncan, born Abt. 1802 in Tennessee; died Unknown.

Children of Josiah Dodd and Elizabeth Duncan are:

i. Daughter Dodd, born Abt. 1824 in Tennessee; died Bef. 1838 in Jefferson County, Tennessee.
ii. John Dodd, born Abt. 1825 in Tennessee; died Abt. March 1869 in Linn County, Kansas; married Cassie Peak; born Unknown; died Unknown.
iii. Mary Jane Dodd, born Abt. 1825 in Tennessee; died Bef. 1912 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California; married Willis Lacy July 18, 1848 in Sangamon County, Illinois; born Unknown; died Unknown.
77 iv. Nancy Young Dodd, born April 11, 1827 in Tennessee; died October 06, 1880 in Prairie Township, Mahaska County, Iowa; married Calvary T. Sexton March 25, 1847 in Sangamon County, Illinois.
v. William P. Dodd, born Abt. 1838 in Illinois; died October 5, 1862 in Matamora County, Tennessee in the Civil War.
vi. Charles J. Dodd, born December 22, 1839 in Morgan County, Illinois; died February 02, 1923 in Lane County, Oregon; married (1) Mary A. Kirkpatrick June 17, 1860 in Mahaska County, Iowa; born September 18, 1840 in Pike County, Illinois; died November 15, 1911 in Oregon; married (2) A. F. ? After 1911 in Oregon; born Abt. 1863 in Canada; died Unknown.

 

156. Joseph Farr, Sr., born Bet. 1790 and 1800 in Pennsylvania; died September 15, 1836 in Adams Township, Coshocton County, Ohio. He married 157. Catherine Caton Abt. 1820 in likely Pennsylvania.
Notes for Joseph Farr, Sr.:
The Joseph Farr family is found in the 1830 St. Clair Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania census, page 219.  This census identifies his age, as well as Catherine's, as being of 30 and under 40.  Thus his birth identified as between 1790 and 1800.
The 1880 Federal census listing for Joseph, Jr. and family identifies his birthplace as Pennsylvania as well as listing his father's and mother's birth states as Pennsylvania (page 210A, Prairie Township, Mahaska County, Iowa).
Joseph's death is first hinted at in the biography of son Joseph, Jr.  "He came with his parents, when seven years of age to Avendale (sic), Coshocton county, Ohio (which would place the date as circa 1834).  Soon after his father died, he and his eldest brother were then mothers only support."  Since the last child was born in 1837 and Catherine is listed as head of household in the 1840 Coshocton County census (page 383) his death must have been circa 1836-1837.
The obituary of Joseph Jr. that appeared in the "Coshocton Morning Tribune" of Wednesday morning, April 12, 1916, page 2 under the heading "Death of Mr. Joseph Farr, An Old Coshocton County Pioneer" gives a few details about his father Joseph Sr.  It goes ahead to state, "Joseph sr., was a stonemason by trade and in the year 1836, he with others laid the abutments of the Walhonding and Tuscarawas bridges.  When near completion, took with a fever from which he died, without receiving full payment, Sept. 15 of the same year."

157. Catherine Caton, born December 20, 1799 in Amwell Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania; died December 03, 1885 in Mahaska County, Iowa. She was the daughter of 314. George Caton and 315. Jemima ?
Notes for Catherine Caton:
The 1880 Federal census shows her living with son Joseph Farr and wife Ellen (page 210A, Prairie Township, Mahaska County, Iowa).  It identifies her birthplace as Pennsylvania and also lists her father's and mother's birth states as Maryland.
Quote from page 4 of the December 12, 1885 Oskaloosa Saturday Herald: "Old Mrs. Farr, who fell down stairs, was so badly hurt that she died. -- Peoria News"  Her birth and death information is taken from her tombstone in Appel Cemetery near Peoria, Mahaska County, Iowa.
A couple of notes regarding the identity and ancestry of Catherine and Joseph.  Many trees appear on the web showing Joseph as the son of Joseph Farr and Hannah Reed/Read and as the husband of Catherine Bowman.  I believe this is incorrect on both accounts. 
First, according to "The Descendants of John Rugg" by Ellen R. Rugg; Frederick H. Hitchcock Genealogical Publisher; New York; 1911, and "The Family of Willis Vernon Farr ..." compiled by Jane B. Bickford; 1977, Hannah Read (born 1777 in New Hampshire) married Joseph Farr (born 1775 in Massachusetts) on November 17, 1796.  Among their children was Joseph Farr, Jr. born July 13, 1803 in Windham, Vermont.  When 8 years old, he went to Conventry, Vermont to live with his aunt Levina Gray.  This Joseph lived out his years in Vermont, dying January 27, 1855, contrary to the biography of Joseph above.  Also, the Bowman he married was Cosbi Bowman who died January 27, 1840 at Albany, Vermont, not our Catherine who died 1885 in Iowa.  Disregarding census information (which can often contain errors) from our Joseph bio above, the known element from his son's bio that he died in Coshocton, Ohio between 1837 and 1840 proves this Joseph could not fill the criteria.
Second, many of the trees show the parentage of their Catherine Bowman as Jacob Bowman and Isbella Lowry.  According to "History of Fayette County, Pennsylvania ..." by Franklin Ellis; L. H. Everts & Co.; Philadelphia; 1882, Jacob Bowman was born in Hagerstown, Maryland June 17, 1763 and came to Brownsville, Fayette County when twenty-four years of age (about 1787).  He married Isabella Lowry in 1787 and evidently moved to Fayette County very soon thereafter.  The children of Jacob and wife Isabella are listed as Mary (married Henry Sterling), Annie E. (married Henry Sweitzer), Henry, Harriet E. (married John Thompson), James L., Matilda L. (married Thomas M. T. McKennan), Louisa (married Samuel Bell), William Robert, Goodloe Harper, and Nelson Blair, but no Catherine.  While Jacob and Isbella were born in Maryland (same as Catherine's 1880 census entry above) and ended up in Fayette County, Pennsylvania (same as Joseph and Catherine), it is clear that Catherine was not a daughter of Jacob and Isabella.
Updates as of July 12, 2013 follow:  Catherine's entry on the State of Iowa Death Register identifies her as Catherine Farr, a widow, born in Pennsylvania.  She died at 9:00 p.m. on December 3, 1885 at the age of 85 years, 11 months and 14 days.  Her cause of death was given as fractured ribs, consistent with the newspaper quote above.  According to the Register entry, she suffered from the injury for 36 hours before succumbing.  Unfortunately this tool did not ask for the names of the parents of the deceased until 1904.  In fact, it was not usual to even be collecting death certificate information yet in 1885.  Only 50% of the deaths were registered between 1880 and 1921, when registration was required.
Finding Joseph's death register entry from March 31, 1916 answered the question of who his mother was.  According to information supplied by son Jasper C. Farr, Joseph's parents were given as Joseph Farr and Kathern Caton.  Catherine had been living with Joseph and Ellen Funk Farr in Mahaska County, Iowa since at least the 1860 census.  That would mean that Catherine was always in the home during Jasper's lifetime until her death and he likely heard of the family history.  In fact, while the informant for Catherine's death register entry is not given, the fact that her age is given in years, months and days rather than simply in years suggests there was a family bible in existence.  Some of Jasper's Funk and Farr relatives still lived in Coshocton County, Ohio, where Catherine's Caton relatives also lived, and there were evidently some trips back to visit some or all of these relative since Jasper ended up marrying a girl from Coshocton County and moving to neighboring Licking County, Ohio.  Chances are extremely good that the information is reliable.
Updates as of July 24, 2013 follow:  I am fairly confident Catherine was born in Amwell Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania, the neighboring county to Fayette County.  When Joseph and Catherine and family moved to Coshocton County, Ohio in the 1833/34 timeframe a Caton family from Washington County also moved to the current day Fresno area in Coshocton County.  According to Caton researcher Jane Curci this village used to be known as Avondale at the time these families moved there, but the name was changed when the postal service kept getting mail confused with another Avondale, Ohio near Cincinnati.  That village being larger got to keep its name and the one in Coshocton County was changed to Fresno.
The 1823 will of Susanna Caton in Amwell Township listed among the beneficiaries one Catherine Caton, granddaughter of Susanna and daughter of George Caton.   Page 166 of Will Book No. 4 for Washington County, Pennsylvania states "...Second I give and devise to my grand daughter Lucy Vankirke aforesaid daughter of my deceased child Priscilla Vankirk one hundred dollars to be paid to her in one year after my decease and I direct all my wearing clothes to be equally devided between her and Catherine and Susanna Caton Daughters of my son George Caton..."
In the 1800 Amwell Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania census, page 2 George's family has 3 children, including 2 daughters under the age of 10.  By 1810 George's family consists of 7 children with two being daughters ages 10 through 15 (Amwell Township census, page 62).  With Catherine's birth year of 1799, this supports the possibility that Catherine Farr is the daughter of George Caton fronm a birth year perspective.  The 1820 census (Amwell Township, page 229) has the George Caton family with 8 children, but the two daughters who were born prior to 1800 are no longer in the household.  It is right around this time that Catherine Caton would have married Joseph Farr.
Now we know that George Caton had a daughter Catherine and this daughter could possibly fit the same age as Catherine Farr.  The will referenced above ended with "Find probate on page (490)".  This turned out to not really be a probate, but a little over 2 pages of testimony before "Samuel Cunningham, Deputy Register for the probate of Wills and granting letters of Administration".  The reason for this questioning was the unusual terms in the will whereby "...to wit first I give and devise to my old friend & trusty inmate Gabriel Blackeney all my real and personal estate of whatever kind or nature soever during his natural life subject however to the payment of my funeral charges and the legacy to my grand-daughter Lucy hereinafter mentioned meaning thereby to give him the said Blackeney a complete life estate in my real property in Washington County or else where and an absolute right in and to all my personal property of whatever kind or nature it may be..."  Rather unusual in that for the life of Gabriel Blackeney it froze the family from receiving any of the estate other than potentially that which was specifically willed to a family member.  Susanna's will does state "...that after the death of the said Gabriel Blackeney I will and devise to my sons George Caton & Dorsey Caton and to my daughters Milcah Prawl Susanna Lackey and Anna Conklen all my real estate aforesaid to be equally divided between them to have and to hold the said real estate to them their heirs and assigns forever..."  According to Gabriel Blackeney's will (Book 4, page 316 of Washington County, Pennsylvania Wills), the slave Betsy was freed while all his possessions, real and personal, were given to his three illegitimate daughters.  It is assumed Susanna's property finally made it's way to her children as was her intent.
Hoping to find something relating to Catherine's surname I turned to the actual probate file - Probate Book C, Case File 33 for 1825.  While I did not find Catherine mentioned - the only distribution mentioned was that of the entire estate to Gabriel Blackeney - I did find some interesting entries.  First of those items encountered were two judgments to pay one Joseph Farr the amounts of $17.25 and $7.99.  This introduces Joseph Farr as being in the lives of the Caton family for the first time.  The inventory and appraisal documents give a little more information of interest.  Among the inventory are:
1 Hay Fork & 1 Dung Fork - appraised at $ .62 1/2
1 Plough & one Shovel Plough - appraised at $ 2.50
1 Horse (Bay) about seven years old - appraised at $25.00
1 Light Bay Mare about seven years old - appraised at $30.00
These items are grouped together within brackets with the notation "Claimed Held & in possession of Joseph Farr by contract with Mrs. Caton".  Later on the same page the following bracketed items
2 Collars - appraised at no value
2 Pair of Horse Geers - appraised at $ 4.25
1 Harrow - appraised at $ 2.55
had the notation "in Jos. Farr's possession as above".  One other entry contained
1 inch Auger - appraised at $ .06 1/4
with the note "in Jos. Farr's possession".
The probate shows that all personal property contained in the inventory were given to Gabriel Blackeney and no indication is given of Catherine's surname or if she and the other women ever received the clothing they were bequeathed.  However, Joseph Farr being possessed of Susanna's personal property seems to show a much more intimate relationship with Susanna, the kind that might occur between "family members".  The only other personal association noted on the inventory list was 1 Good Scythe that was said to be "George Caton's property".
Joseph Farr, Jr.'s biographical article states they moved to the Avondale, Coshocton County, Ohio area when he was seven years of age.  That is approximately 1834.  George Caton's family moved to White Eyes Township, Coshocton County, Ohio, near Avondale, in the same timeframe.  I have not located any Farr deed transactions, but several of George's sons purchased land located in the United State Military District (part of the land in the area reserved by Congress for Revolutionary soldiers) through the Zanesville, Ohio land office.  The following purchases are found in "Early Ohio Settlers; Purchasers of Land in East & East Central Ohio, 1800-1840" by Ellen Thomas Berry and David A. Berry; Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.; Baltimore, MD, 1989 and sre located in Range 05, Township 06, Section 04 (White Eyes Township, Coshocton County near Avondale/Fresno):
Purchaser Date Acres Resident of:
Gabriel 12 Nov. 1832 42.5 Washington Co. PA
Charles & Daniel 25 Feb. 1833 42.5 Coshocton Co. OH
Gabriel 27 Aug. 1834 42.5 Coshocton Co. OH
Daniel 15 Dec. 1835 42.5 Coshocton Co. OH
One more instance of proximity is worth mentioning.  The 1850 census finds a single 22 year old Joseph Farr Jr., prior to marrying Ellen Funk, living with his widowed mother Catherine and 3 younger siblings in Admas Township, Coshocton County (page 316, family 195/195, enumerated 18 November 1850) . Caton researcher Jane Curci pointed out that in that same census he is also shown as a laborer on the Daniel Caton farm in neighboring White Eyes Township (page 237, family 97/97, enumerated 5 October 1850).  This last entry has Joseph born in Ohio, but this is likely a census enumerator's error as there are no other Farr's in the county at that time.
While the data given here is circumstantial, there are enough relationships and interactions shown here to make a very strong case that the Catherine Caton identified as wife of Joseph Farr, Sr. in Joseph Jr.'s death register and the Catherine Caton identified as granddaughter of Susanna Caton and daughter of George Caton are one and the same.  The final piece came with the discovery of an obituary for Joseph Farr, Jr. that appeared in the "Coshocton Morning Tribune" of Wednesday morning, April 12, 1916, page 2 under the heading "Death of Mr. Joseph Farr, An Old Coshocton County Pioneer".  It goes ahead to state "Joseph Farr, son of Joseph and Cathern Caton Farr, was born in Fayett (sic) county, Penn., March 2nd, 1827, died at his home in New Sharon, Iowa, March 30, 1916.  Age 89 years and one month."

Children of Joseph Farr and Catherine Caton are:

i. George Washington Farr, Sr., born Abt. 1822 in Pennsylvania; died Bet. 1880 and 1900; married (1) Mary Ann Norris October 20, 1842 in Coshocton County, Ohio; born Abt. 1823 in Ohio; died Abt. 1864; married (2) Anna Norman January 22, 1866 in Adair County, Missouri; born May 13, 1824 in Ohio; died April 29, 1903 in Adair County, Missouri.
George's second wife, Anna Norman, was twice a widow prior to this marriage.  She was first married to John Pinkerton and by him had 7 children, 3 of whom married George's sons - Catherine married Andrew Jackson Farr, Jemima married George Washington Farr, Jr., and Margaret married Alexander C. Farr - all marriages taking place after George Sr. and Anna were married.
John Pinkerton died July 1858 in Adair County, Missouri and Anna then married Charles Farr (George's brother, see viii below) November 23, 1859 in Adair County and then George in 1866.  Anna is shown on page 107A of the 1900 Liberty Township, Adair County, Missouri census in another Pinkerton household Isaiah Pinkerton, age 76, born in Ohio (likely her brother-in-law).  She is shown as being age 86 (born May 1824 according to the census) and a widow, thus George Washington Farr is dead by 1900
ii. Marie Farr, born Abt. 1823 in Pennsylvania; died Bet. 1865 and 1870 in Coshocton County, Ohio; married David Cain October 01, 1840 in Coshocton County, Ohio; born Abt. 1818 in Ohio; died October 26, 1896 in Coshocton County, Ohio.
Parents of 2 sons and 6 daughters.
iii. Harriet Farr, born May 18, 1824 in Pennsylvania; died May 26, 1893 in near Miami, Ottawa County, Oklahoma; married James Norris, Sr. November 11, 1847 in Coshocton County, Ohio; born May 1826 in Coshocton County, Ohio; died February 04, 1903 in Kansas.
Parents of 3 sons and 6 daughters.
iv. Andrew Jackson Farr, born Abt. 1825 in Pennsylvania; died Bef. 1880; married Catherine E. Proolney February 13, 1850 in Coshocton County, Ohio; born Abt. 1828 in Ohio; died Bef. 1880.
Andrew and family were very transient.  In 1860 they are found in the Prairie Township, Mahaska County, Iowa census (page 75).  In 1870 the family is in Harrison Township, Clay County, Indiana census (page 70B).  In 1880 Catherine and family are found in the Coal Township, Vernon County, Missouri census (page 519).  It is likely Andrew died in Vernon County.  They were parents of 3 sons and 3 daughters.
78 v. Joseph Farr, Jr., born March 02, 1827 in Fayette County, Pennsylvania; died March 30, 1916 in Prairie Township, Mahaska County, Iowa; married Ellen Funk November 15, 1853 in Avondale, White Eyes Township, Coshocton County, Ohio.
vi. Martha Farr, born Abt. 1832 in Adams Township, Coschocton County, Ohio; died Unknown; married John Miller October 10, 1860 in Mahaska County, Iowa; born Unknown; died Unknown.
vii. Mary Farr, born Abt. 1835 in Adams Township, Coschocton County, Ohio; died Unknown; married John Anderson October 9, 1856 in Coshocton County, Ohio; born Unknown; died Unknown.
viii. Charles Farr, born Abt. 1837 in Adams Township, Coschocton County, Ohio; died bet. 1861 and 1864 in Civil War; married Anna Norman Abt. 1860 in Adair County, Missouri; born May 13, 1824 in Ohio; died April 29, 1903 in Adair County, Missouri.
Charles has a tombstone in Pinkerton Cemetery, Adair County, Missouri that identifies him having been in Company H, 7th Regiment of the Missouri Cavalry and with no other information.  He was a private in this Union regiment.  It is possible he died in service, either from battle wounds or disease, and is buried elsewhere.  His birth estimate is from the 1860 Liberty Township, Adair County, Missouri census, page 105 and his death date is estimated based on Anna's marriage to George Sr. above.  Charles and Anna were parents to John A. Farr.

 

158. Jacob Funk, born July 29, 1799 in Frederick County, Virginia; died October 18, 1881 in White Eyes Township, Coshocton County, Ohio. He was the son of 316. Michael Funk I and 317. Savina Slusher. He married 159. Anna Margaret Miller June 16, 1823 in Washington County, Pennsylvania.

159. Anna Margaret Miller, born 1800 in Amwell Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania; died September 17, 1863 in White Eyes Township, Coshocton County, Ohio. She was the daughter of 318. Abraham Miller and 319. Mary Margaret Peck.

Children of Jacob Funk and Anna Miller are:

i. Margaret Funk, born November 10, 1828 in West Bethlehem Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania; died January 14, 1915 in Greene County, Indiana; married Charles Hattery, Jr. March 14, 1847 in Coshocton, Coshocton County, Ohio; born March 14, 1820 in Tuscararas County, Ohio; died September 09, 1907 in Linton, Greene County, Indiana.
ii. Abraham Funk, born August 25, 1829 in West Bethlehem Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania; died November 25, 1906 in Jefferson Township, Coshocton County, Ohio; married Margaret Urey September 16, 1852 in Coshocton County, Ohio; born November 13, 1831 in Coshocton County, Ohio; died April 28, 1908 in Jefferson Township, Coshocton County, Ohio.
iii. Morgan Funk, born July 24, 1831 in West Bethlehem Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania; died December 21, 1920 in Coshocton County, Ohio; married Lucinda C. Scott November 26, 1863 in Coshocton County, Ohio; born 1844; died August 02, 1906 in Coshocton County, Ohio.
79 iv. Ellen Funk, born January 22, 1833 in West Bethlehem Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania; died August 31, 1916 in Prairie Township, Mahaska County, Iowa; married Joseph Farr, Jr. November 15, 1853 in Avendale, Adams Township, Coshocton County, Ohio.
v. Mary Malinda Funk, born 1835 in West Bethlehem Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania; died Unknown; married Joseph Kent June 05, 1845 in Coshocton County, Ohio; born Unknown; died Unknown.
vi. Sarah Funk, born 1837 in West Bethlehem Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania; died Unknown; married Andrew Suntheimer August 03, 1863 in Coshocton County, Ohio; born Unknown; died Unknown.
vii. Martha Funk, born 1841 in White Eyes Township, Coshocton County, Ohio; died Aft. 1860.
viii. David Funk, born September 20, 1842 in White Eyes Township, Coshocton County, Ohio; died Unknown; married Harriet A. Stough May 14, 1872 in Coshocton County, Ohio; born January 18, 1850; died Unknown.
ix. George Funk, born June 1843 in White Eyes Township, Coshocton County, Ohio; died October 26, 1863 in Coshocton County, Ohio.
x. Eliza J. Funk, born Abt. 1848 in Coshocton County, Ohio; died September 10, 1869 in White Eyes Township, Coshocton County, Ohio.
xi. John Funk, born Unknown in Washington County, Pennsylvania; died Unknown; married Lucina Thomas November 29, 1849 in Coshocton County, Ohio; born Unknown; died Unknown.
xii. Lavina Funk, born Unknown in White Eyes Township, Coshocton County, Ohio; died February 02, 1861 in Coshocton County, Ohio.

 

162. Unknown Father, born Unknown; died Unknown. He met 163. Maja Ottosdotter.

163. Maja Ottosdotter, born January 14, 1805 in Dammen Rote, Ljusnarsberg Parish, Örebro Län, Sweden; died April 27, 1861 in Nabben Gård, Nederhyttan Rote, Ramsberg Parish, Örebro Län, Sweden. She was the daughter of 326. Otto Olsson and 327. Anna Hansdotter.

Child of Unknown Father and Maja Ottosdotter is:

81 i. Carolina Ottosdotter, born November 15, 1832 in Ostra Loa Rote, Ramsberg Parish, Örebro Län, Sweden; died Unknown; met (1) Unknown Father(s); met (2) Anders Jansson

 

164. Petter Larsson, born January 04, 1789 in Dalkarlssjön Rote, Nordmark Parish, Värmlands Län, Sweden; died April 10, 1849 in Grundsjöhyttan Rote, Nordmark Parish, Värmland Län, Sweden. He was the son of 328. Lars Matsson and 329. Anna Persdotter. He married 165. Maria Nilsdotter May 30, 1814 in Taberg Rote, Nordmark Parish, Värmlands Län, Sweden.

165. Maria Nilsdotter, born January 01, 1792 in Nordmark Parish, Värmland Län, Sweden; died 1871. She was the daughter of 330. Nils Sonesson and 331. Stina Larsdotter.

Children of Petter Larsson and Maria Nilsdotter are:

i. Stina Pettersdotter, born November 09, 1816 in Nordmark Parish, Värmland Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
ii. Lars Erik Pettersson, born December 09, 1818 in Nordmark Parish, Värmland Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
iii Nils Pettersson, born February 07, 1820 in Nordmark Parish, Värmland Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
iv. Sven Pettersson, born February 03, 1823 in Nordmark Parish, Värmland Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
v. Anna Pettersdotter, born October 10, 1825 in Nordmark Parish, Värmland Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
vi. Petter Pettersson, born October 11, 1829 in Nordmark Parish, Värmland Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
vii. Maria Pettersdotter, born July 13, 1832 in Nordmark Parish, Värmland Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
82 viii. Johan Pettersson Grund, born January 03, 1836 in Grundsjöhyttan Rote, Nordmark Parish, Värmlands Län, Sweden; died Unknown; married Maja Lovisa Ramkvist June 23, 1865 in Grufarbetare, Norra Grängesberg Rote, Grangärde Parish, Kopparbergs Län, Sweden.

 

166. Per Ersson Ramqvist, born May 16, 1804 in Sjötorp Rote, Ramsberg Parish, Örebro Län, Sweden; died December 04, 1863 in Grängesberg Rote, Grangärde Parish, Kopparbergs Län, Sweden. He was the son of 332. Erik Olsson and 333. Maria Eriksdotter. He married 167. Anna Andersdotter June 10, 1826 in Sweden.

167. Anna Andersdotter, born September 24, 1810 in Kittslingberg Rote, Norrbärke Parish, Kopparbergs Län, Sweden; died November 14, 1879 in Pärlby Rote, Grangärde Parish, Kopparbergs Län, Sweden. She was the daughter of 334. Anders Matsson and 335. Anna Abrahamsdotter.

Children of Per Ramqvist and Anna Andersdotter are:

i. Erik Anders Ramkvist, born June 30, 1827 in Norro Bredsjö Rote, Ljusnarsberg Parish, Örebro Län, Sweden; died July 05, 1828 in Norro Bredsjö Rote, Ljusnarsberg Parish, Örebro Län, Sweden.
ii. Per Fredric Ramkvist, born July 17, 1829 in Norro Bredsjö Rote, Ljusnarsberg Parish, Örebro Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
iii. Anders Gustaf Ramkvist, born July 03, 1831 in Norro Bredsjö Rote, Ljusnarsberg Parish, Örebro Län, Sweden; died February 17, 1876 in Persbo Rote, Ludvika Parish, Kopparbergs Län, Sweden.
iv. Carl Johan Ramkvist, born January 10, 1834 in Kungs-Barkarö Parish, Västmanlands Län, Sweden; died Unknown; married Anna Lisa Jonsdotter 1860 in Sweden; born March 31, 1832 in Norrbärke Parish, Kopparbergs Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
v. Lars August Ramkvist, born April 19, 1837 in Kungs-Barkarö Parish, Västmanlands Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
vi. Ludvig Ramkvist, born June 22, 1842 in Grängesberg Rote, Grangärde Parish, Kopparbergs Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
83 vii. Maja Lovisa Ramkvist, born May 22, 1845 in Grängesberg Rote, Grangärde Parish, Kopparbergs Län, Sweden; died October 28, 1872 in Guvdrängshustru Gård, Norra Grängesberget Rote, Grangärde Parish, Kopparbergs Län, Sweden; married Johan Pettersson Grund June 23, 1865 in Grufarbetare, Norra Grängesberg Rote, Grangärde Parish, Kopparbergs Län, Sweden.
viii. Anna Stina Ramkvist, born May 22, 1845 in Grängesberg Rote, Grangärde Parish, Kopparberg Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
ix. Wilhelm Ramkvist, born September 20, 1848 in Grängesberg Rote, Grangärde Parish, Kopparberg Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
x. Johanna Cathrina Ramkvist, born December 13, 1851 in Grängesberg Rote, Grangärde Parish, Kopparberg Län, Sweden; died Unknown.
xi. Axel Bernhard Ramkvist, born September 19, 1855 in Grängesberg Rote, Grangärde Parish, Kopparberg Län, Sweden; died 1857 in Grängesberg Rote, Grangärde Parish, Kopparberg Län, Sweden.

 

168. John Waterhouse, Sr., born Abt. 1788 in New Jersey; died Bef. 1854 in Scott County, Iowa. He was the son of 336. Asa Waterhouse. He married 169. Sarah Reynolds 1812.

169. Sarah Reynolds, born Abt. 1797 in New Jersey; died 1854 on the plains on her way to California.
Notes for Sarah Reynolds:
According to Waterhouse researcher and descendant of John and Sarah Reynolds Waterhouse, Bruce Schulz:
Sarah died on the plains in 1854.  The wagon train was on its way to California.  She died of cholera.  Her granddaughter, Louisa Loduska Mulkins, wrote a short biography that tells this story.  It appears that John, Sr. had already died in Scott County, Iowa before they left for California.  Sarah traveled with John Mulkins and his wife Sara Waterhouse.  John Mulkins also died of cholera on the plains in 1854/5.
Bruce has the bible John and Sara Mulkins carried across the plains.  It has their children's birth records.

Children of John Waterhouse and Sarah Reynolds are:

i. Robert Waterhouse, born February 16, 1815 in Geneseo, Livingston County, New York; died March 12, 1891 in De Witt, Clinton County, Iowa; married Ann Dawson Lee March 11, 1844 in Scott County, Iowa; born March 13, 1823 in Howard Township, Province of Ontario, Canada; died February 24, 1905 in Clinton County, Iowa.
ii. Sarah Waterhouse, born Abt. 1817 in New York; died abt 1901 in California; married (1) John Mulkins; born Abt. 1807 in New York; died Unknown; married (2) James Lassitor; born Unknown; died Unknown.
iii. John Waterhouse, Jr., born 1819 in New York; died Unknown; married Abigail E. Thomas Bef. 1840; born 1820 in New York; died Unknown.
84 iv. Isaac Waterhouse, born August 13, 1823 in New York; died May 12, 1914 in What Cheer, Keokuk County, Iowa; married Elizabeth Philenia Palmer March 08, 1844 in Scott County, Iowa.
v. Jane Waterhouse, born Abt. 1824; died Unknown; married Martin Vanduzen December 24, 1841 in Scott County, Iowa; born Abt. 1819; died Unknown.
vi. Abel Waterhouse, born 1827 in New York; died Unknown; married Rachael Ann Ellet December 15, 1848 in Scott County, Iowa; born 1827 in Indiana; died Unknown.
vii. Lodoiska Waterhouse, born Abt. 1829; died Unknown; married Robert A. Harrison June 30, 1846 in Scott County, Iowa; born Unknown; died Unknown.
viii. Matilda Waterhouse, born 1835 in Michigan; died Unknown; married Elijah F. Dixon December 14, 1850 in Scott County, Iowa; born Abt. 1822; died Unknown.
ix. Helen Waterhouse, born 1840 in Iowa; died Unknown.

 

170. William Palmer, Sr., born Abt. 1794; died January 16, 1848 in Princeton Township, Scott County, Iowa. He married 171. Amanda ? Bef. 1818.

171. Amanda ?, born Abt. 1798 in New York; died October 03, 1855 in Princeton Township, Scott County, Iowa.

Children of William Palmer and Amanda ? are:

i. Rufus B. Palmer, born December 17, 1818; died August 20, 1843 in Princeton Township, Scott County, Iowa.
ii. Marilla Palmer, born Abt. 1822; died Unknown; married Enos French April 01, 1845 in Scott County, Iowa; born Abt. 1818; died Unknown.
iii. William Palmer, Jr., born January 18, 1823; died February 27, 1848 in Princeton Township, Scott County, Iowa.
85 iv. Elizabeth Philenia Palmer, born October 20, 1824 in New York; died May 13, 1913 in What Cheer, Keokuk County, Iowa; married Isaac Waterhouse March 08, 1844 in Scott County, Iowa.
v. David Palmer, born Abt. 1826 in New York; died Unknown; married Clarissa Owens January 06, 1848 in Scott County, Iowa; born Abt. 1829 in Canada; died Unknown.
vi. Susan Palmer, born Abt. 1829; died Unknown; married Worder Tucker December 06, 1849 in Scott County, Iowa; born Abt. 1822; died Unknown.
vii. Lucy Palmer, born Abt. 1831; died Unknown; married Jacob Goble January 28, 1850 in Scott County, Iowa; born Unknown; died Unknown.
viii. Joel K. Palmer, born Abt. 1832; died Unknown; married Matilda Lewis April 24, 1856 in Scott County, Iowa; born Unknown; died Unknown.
ix. Adeninem Palmer, born Abt. 1834; died Unknown.
x. Mary P. Palmer, born Abt. 1842; died Unknown; married John F. Hall June 07, 1853; born Unknown; died Unknown.

 

172. James Coghlan, Sr., born 1790 in Maryland; died Unknown. He married 173. Peggy Watson March 18, 1806 in Warren County, Ohio.

173. Peggy Watson, born 1790 in Tennessee; died Unknown. She was the daughter of 346. Thomas Watson.

Children of James Coghlan and Peggy Watson are:

86 i. Isaac Watson Coghlan, Sr., born September 05, 1809 in Salem Township, Warren County, Ohio; died September 07, 1880 in Van Buren Township, Keokuk County, Iowa; married (1) Phebe Watkins January 05, 1830 in Warren County, Ohio; married (2) Mary Ford March 28, 1851 in Warren County, Ohio; married (3) Lydia Easton December 23, 1859 in Keokuk County, Iowa.
ii. Daniel Coghlan, born Abt. 1811 in Ohio; died Unknown; married Sarah Prickett February 24, 1833 in Warren County, Ohio; born Abt. 1813 in Ohio; died Unknown.
iii. James H. Coghlan, Jr., born Unknown; died Unknown; married Jane Wood September 21, 1843 in Hamilton County, Ohio; born Unknown; died Unknown.
iv. Mary Coghlan, born Unknown; died Unknown; married John Grenner May 08, 1849 in Stark County, Ohio; born Unknown; died Unknown.
v. Girl Coghlan, born Unknown; died Unknown.

 

176. Adam Zimmermann, born December 11, 1800 in Massenbachhausen, Duchy of Württemberg, Holy Roman Empire; died August 23, 1880. He was the son of 352. Joseph Zimmermann and 353. Elizabetha Weber. He married 177. Maria Barbara Leisle August 14, 1825 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation.
Notes for Adam Zimmermann:
According to the church register entry for Adam's birth and baptism, his father Joseph was a weaver and his mother was Elisabetha nee Weber.  The baptism was performed by Peter Edward Hepelbach, the chaplin in Schweigern.  The sponsors were Johannes Adam Gantner and his wife Elisabetha Zimmerman (unknown relationship, if any).
The marriage records state that Adam was single, a weaver from Massenbachhausen who was born on December 11, 1800.  His parents were Joseph Zimmermann, deceased citizen of Massenbachhausen and Elisabetha nee Weber.  Maria was a citizen of Massenbachhausen and single daughter of Joseph Leisle and Maria Elisabetha nee Farni who was born on October 14, 1800.  Witnesses to the marriage were Johann Adam Gartner and Augustin Merkle, both citizens of Massenbachhausen.

177. Maria Barbara Leisle, born October 14, 1800 in Massenbachhausen, Duchy of Württemberg, Holy Roman Empire; died December 27, 1854 (of dropsy) in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation. She was the daughter of 354. Joseph Leisle and 355. Maria Elisabetha Farni.
Notes for Maria Barbara Leisle:
According to the church register entry for Maria's baptism, her father Joseph was a shoemaker and her mother was Elisabetha nee Farni.  The sponsors were Michael Geiger, a shoemaker, and his wife Maria Barbara Lock.  The record of Maria's death/burial states that she was a farmer's wife from Massenbachhause.  Her husband was Johann Adam Zimmermann.  Her parents were Joseph Leisle, a farmer from Hausen (Massenbachhausen) and Maria Elis. nee Farni.

Children of Adam Zimmermann and Maria Barbara Leisle are:

i. Josef Zimmermann, born February 1, 1826 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; died July 29, 1882 (of suicide by hanging) in Alexandra Gully, Toowoomba, Queensland Province, Australia; married (1) Sophia Catharina Dalaker August 21, 1863 in Toowoomba, Queensland Province, Australia; born August 1, 1842 in Waldbach, Oberamt Weinsberg, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; died May 19, 1874 in Gowrie Road, Toowoomba Province, Queensland, Australia; married (2) Johanna Elizabetha Hermann December 28, 1881 in Toowoomba, Queensland Province, Australia; born 1838 in Zella-Mehlis, Gothe, Saxony; died June 7, 1916 in Queensland Province, Australia.
ii. Leobold Zimmermann, born January 3, 1827 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; died November 14, 1904 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Empire; married Katherine Barbara Scholl March 8, 1859 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; born March 13, 1832 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; died Unknown.
88 iii. Johannes Zimmermann, born October 13, 1829 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; died October 24, 1895 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Empire; married Katherine Schwarz May 13, 1856 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; born October 22, 1831; died February 24, 1901 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Empire.
iv. Johann Adam Zimmermann, born September 11, 1831 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; died January 9, 1833 (of gout) in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation.
v. Heinrich Zimmermann, born November 1, 1833 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; died March 6, 1835 (of gout) in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation.
vi. Anna Magdelena Zimmermann, born April 7, 1836 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; died February 18, 1837 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation.
vii. Maria Elisabetha Zimmermann, born July 10, 1837 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; died unknown.
viii. Franz Michael Zimmermann, born December 8, 1840 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; died (of gout and scurvy) February 11, 1842 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation.
ix. Franz Michael Zimmermann, born July 14, 1843 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; died October 17, 1847 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation.
x. Caspar Zimmermann, born January 20, 1846 in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation; died January 29, 1847 (of gout) in Massenbachhausen, Oberamt Brackenheim, Kingdom of Württemberg, German Confederation.

 

182. Karl Johann Hochwarth, born August 28, 1799 in Helmhof, Margraviate of Baden, Holy Roman Empire; died Unknown. He was the son of 364. Karl Hochwarth and 365. Veronika Maria Ruegner. He married 183. Dorothea Margaretha Fasch January 10, 1830 in Neckarbischofsheim parish, Grand Duchy of Baden, German Confederation.

183. Dorothea Margaretha Fasch, born November 29, 1796 in Helmhof, Margraviate of Baden, Holy Roman Empire; died July 21, 1830 in Helmhof, Grand Duchy of Baden, German Confederation.

Child of Karl Hochwarth and Dorothea Fasch is:

91 i. Katharina Eva Hochwarth, born June 11, 1830 in Helmhof, Grand Duchy of Baden, German Confederation; died Unknown.

 

184. William McKay, Sr., born 1824 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died April 1889 in Drumgauney, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. He was the son of 368. Joseph McKay. He married 185. Margaret Loughery May 13, 1845 in Presbyterian Church, Balteagh Parish, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland.
Notes for William McKay, Sr.:
From the LDS film #101271, Volume 9-10 of 1845 Marriage Records in the General Registry Office of Ireland:
Groom's Name: William Mckay
Bride's Name: Margret Loughry
Marriage Date: 13 May 1845
Marriage Place: Balteagh Parish, Londonderry, Ireland
William McKay's father was a Joseph McKay from the marriage record as recorded at Balteagh Presbyterian Church.  There are also the marriages of two possible brothers, James McKay in 1855 and Thomas McKay in 1860, both married in the same Presbyterian church and both with Joseph as father:
Groom's Name: James Mc Kay
Bride's Name: Mary Loughry
Marriage Date: 25 Oct 1855
Marriage Place: Balteagh, Derry, Ire
Groom's Father's Name: Joseph Mc Kay
Bride's Father's Name: Samuel Loughry
LDS film #101370, Volume 9 of 1855 Marriage Records in the General Registry Office of Ireland
 
Groom's Name: Thomas Mckay
Bride's Name: Jane Jackson
Marriage Date: 12 Jul 1860
Marriage Place: Balteagh, Derry, Ire
Groom's Father's Name: Joseph Mckay
Bride's Father's Name: David Jackson
LDS film #101420, Volume 9 of 1860 Marriage Records in the General Registry Office of Ireland
In addition to James and William having a same named father, they also married sisters, which seems to strengthen the potential they are brothers.
The Griffiths Valuation (a survey of all property in Ireland for taxation purposes) of 1858 for County Londonderry shows a William McCay renting a house and garden in Lower Drumgavenny, parish of Balteagh, from William Loughry. (Note: spelling in the Griffiths Valuation depended on the enumerator, just as with the U.S. censuses).  On Google maps this area can be found just south of the village of Drumsurn.  It is not known for sure which William Loughery this landlord is.  Two of William McKay's sons, Joseph and William Jr., married a woman whose first father-in-law was a William Loughery.  Were they the same William Loughery and is that how the two McKay sons may have become first acquainted with their future wife?  This is not an easy question to answer as Loughery was a very common name in that area of Northern Ireland.
William died at his residence in Drumgavenny, County Londonderry on Thursday, April 11, 1889 at the age of 65.  He was buried at Lislane burial ground on Friday, April 12 at 3 o'clock p.m.

185. Margaret Loughery, born August 18, 1819 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died August 28, 1845 in Thornburg, Keokuk County, Iowa. She was the daughter of 370. Samuel Loughery and 371. Anne McCloskey.
Notes for Margaret Loughery:
Margaret's obituary, combined with that of her daughter Elizabeth, shows that Margaret remained in Ireland and likely Scotland before coming to America likely in 1893.  Margaret's obituary states when William died, then "after which she and the family sailed for America".  However, the four oldest children had immigrated to Canada and son James had immigrated to America, all before their father died.  Son George never married, and likely lived with his parents.  George and Margaret seemed to live with Elizbeth and her husband Sam once in America, thus it is likely this is the family referred to in her obituary.
  Obituary
 
    "Margaret  Longhery  McKay was
born   August  18  in   county  Derry,
Ireland and passed away at the home
of  her  daughter, Mrs. Sam   Rogers,
August 28, 1914 at the advanced age
of 95 years, and 10  days.  The  hus-
band  and one  son  preceded her  in
death.    Her  husband  died  at  their
home in  Ireland  April 11,  25  years
ago, after  which  she and  the family
sailed  for  America and  settled  near
Reynolds, Ill., and  later  at  Viola, Ill.
and  2  years  ago  last  March  came
with her  daughter's family to Thorn-
burg,  Ia.,  at which  place  they  still
reside.    Grandma   McKay   was  a
faithful   believer   in   Christ,  having
always  belonged  to the Presbyterian
church.  She was  a kind  and  loving
mother,  always  had  a  cheery  wel-
come for  each and every  one, loved
by all  the  little  children  and all that
knew her.  Our loss  is her  gain.  She
leaves  to mourn  her loss 4 sons and
2  daughters;   being  Samuel,   James
and  George   all   of   Thornburg,   a
son  and  a  daughter  in  Canada,  24
grand children,  25  great  grand chil-
dren  and  2   great-great  grand  chil-
dren and  a host of friends.  The fun-
eral services  were  held at  the home
at  2 o'clock,  August  31,  conducted
by Rev. Hailer of Gibson.  Interment
at  Sixteen Cemetery.  The pall bear-
ers  were  the  four   grand  sons  and
Wm. Christy and Sam Hayer."
From  What Cheer Patriot newspaper
September 10, 1914 issue
The obituary identified her birth as August 18, while her entry in the microfilm of "Keokuk County Death Register Transcripts" identified her full birth date as August 18, 1819.  This transcript also identified her father as Sam Lougher (sic) and mother as Anna McClosky.
Only two of Margaret's siblings are known at this time - Mary who married James McKay above, and Elinor who was born 15 May 1827 in Boveva Parish, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland.  Nothing more is known of these sisters.

Children of William McKay and Margaret Longhery are:

92 i. Samuel McKay, Sr., born December 20, 1845 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died January 02, 1929 in Black Hawk Township, Rock Island County, Illinois; married Margaret Flemming November 8, 1866 in Bovevagh Presbyterian Church, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland.
ii. Joseph McKay, born 1847 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died July 20, 1873 in Lobo Township, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada; married Elizabeth Hannah Semple May 28, 1867 in Newtonlimavady, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; born Abt. 1837 in Northern Ireland; died March 13,1918 in London, Ontario Province, Canada.
Joseph is first found in the 1871 Lobo Township, North Middlesex District, Ontario Province, Canada census where he is listed as age 23 and born in Ireland.  His wife is Hannah, age 34, born in Ireland, and they have two children, Margret I., age 3, and Fanny Ann, age 1, both born in Ontario Province.  The 1881 census, taken after Joseph's death, suggests another child, Lillie, born to this couple about 1871 and too late to appear in the 1871 census.  The 1871 census suggests that Joseph and Hannah were in Canada b 1868 for Margaret to have been born there.  In fact, the following suggests they immigrated soon after marrying.
From the LDS film #101509, Volume 6 of 1867 Marriage Records in the General Registry Office of Ireland one Joseph McKay married Hannah Loughery on 28 May 1867 in Newtownlimavady, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland.  That marriage record states Joseph's birth date as 1847 and gives his father's name as William McKay.  Hannah's birth date is not given, but her father's name is given as William Semple, and her marital status is given as widowed.  The name of her previous husband was not given.  But in looking for a marriage record of a Loughery to Hannah Semple, LDS film #101360, Volume 9 of 1854 Marriage Records in the General Registry Office of Ireland, shows Hannah Semple, daughter of William Semple, marrying Richard Loughrey, son of William Loughrey, July 24, 1854 in Boveva, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland.  This marriage record gives Hannah's birth date as 1835, but does not give Richard's birth date.  Is this William Loughery the same as the landlord for William McKay, Sr. above?
The Ireland Civil Registration Indexes (LDS film #101583) for the Newtownlimavady registration district show that Richard Loughery died in 1866 at age 50.  He died of a brain tumor on March 28, 1866.  According to Semple family history, Hannah left her 4 children who were raised by her sister and brother-in-law, Ann Semple and John Loughery.  This John was a brother of Richard Loughery and married a sister of Hannah.  In addition to the 4 children she left behind, she and Hannah had a daughter, Fanny, who was born the year Richard died.  Fanny died at 4 years of age in 1870.  It is not clear whether she left them with her sister shortly after Richard's death, or was it when she and Joseph left for Canada?  Her next marriage, to Joseph McKay, was a little more than 1 year after Richard's death.  While no connections have been found yet between the Loughery families, there may be a good likelihood there was one and that is how Joseph and Hannah first became acquainted.
Page 611 of Schedule C - Deaths for Lobo Township, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada contains the death registration for Joseph.  He died July 20, 1873 at age 25.  This would seem to suggest by combining this information with his birth year on the marriage registration that he was born between July 20, 1847 and January 1, 1848.  The death registration shows his employment as railway employee.  His cause of death was due to internal injuries received from falling from a stack of hay, with death occurring 14 hours later.  It does not state whether this happened while he was on the job.  He is buried in Campbell's Cemetery, Komoko, Lobo Township, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada.
Of the three children two died prior to Joseph and one lived to marry and have a family.  Margaret Isabella McKay died July 6, 1872 in London, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada of Scarlatina Maligna.  Her age is given as 5 years, 4 days and her birth location is given as Komoko, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada.  That would place her birth date as July 2, 1867, yet Joseph and Hannah just married on May 28, 1867.  If the data about Margaret is correct, then Hannah was 8 month pregnant when she married Joseph and must have jumped on the ship immediately after their marriage.  Fanny Anne McKay died just 3 weeks later, on July 30, 1872, also of Scarlatina Maligna.  Her death registration says she was 2 years, 9 months old and was also born in Komoko, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada.  The last child, Lillian, was born December 18, 1871 in Komoko, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada and married Richard Craib December 24, 1892 in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio.  They had 3 daughters and 2 sons.  They lived in Canada for a period in the early 1900s and were in Detroit by 1920 where Richard was a laborer in the automobile industry.  Lillian likely died between 1937 and 1940 in Elkhart, Indiana where daughter Ethel lived.
iii. William McKay, Jr., born August 12, 1851 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died October 29, 1933 in Ontario Hospital, London, Ontario Province, Canada; married Elizabeth Hannah Semple April 16, 1875 in Delaware Township, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada; born Abt. 1837 in Northern Ireland; died March 13, 1918 in London, Ontario Province, Canada.
William's marriage to Hannah Semple Loughery McKay establishes him as a son of William and Margaret Loughery McKay (LDS film #159953 Delaware Township, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada Register of Births, Marriages and Deaths, 1874-1900:
Groom's Name: William Mckay
Groom's Birth Date: 1851
Bride's Name: Hannah Mckay
Bride's Birth Date: 1837
Marriage Date: April 16, 1875
Groom's Father's Name: William Mckay
Groom's Mother's Name: Margaret Mckay
Bride's Father's Name: William Sempel
Bride's Mother's Name: Isabella Sempel
This marriage registration also identifies William's wife as the widow of brother Joseph.  This marriage record includes both parent's names for bride and groom.  Hannah Semple, with her sisters Ann and Matilda, were the daughters of William Semple and Isabella Mathewson.  The parents were from Tyrone (Ardstraw area), but the daughters were born in Donegal where their father was a physician.  Both parents died young leaving 3 young daughters who were raised by their uncle, John Semple.
I have not found William in the 1871 Canada census.  It is possible that Joseph blazed the trail and was the first of the McKay siblings to immigrate to Canada.  The 1881 census for Lobo Township, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada shows William McKay, age 29, Hannah, age 44, Lillie, age 9, Minnie, age 5 (December 30, 1875), and Hannah, age 3 (April 19, 1878).  They are all erroneously enumerated as born in Ireland.  Lillie is the child of Hannah and Joseph, and Minnie is the same as Mary. Mary married John Edmund Crawford and Hannah Irene married Douglas Dawson.  These same children, and none additional, appear in the 1891 census, thus this is the extent of the family size.
According to the Ontario Province, Canada death register, page 120, entry #351, Elizabeth Hannah McKay died March 13, 1918 in London, Ontario Province, Canada.  She was listed as 77 years of age, which gives yet another approximation of her birth date (likely provided by William).  Cause of death was given as Arterio Sclerosis and burial was given as Woodland Cemetery in London.
According to Province of Ontario Certificate of Registration of Death #023809, William died October 29, 1933 in Ontario Hospital, City of London, County of Middlesex.  This newer registration form gave significantly more information, including date of birth as August 12, 1851, father's name as William McKay, and mother's maiden name as Margaret Loughrey.  He was identified as a retired laborer and a widower who lived in London city.  He died from Acute Bronchopneumonia with Senility as a contributory cause, and was laid to rest with Hannah in Woodland Cemetery in London.
iv. Mary Ann McKay, born November 29, 1855 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died December 12, 1925 in London, Ontario Province, Canada; married John Hobbs, Jr. December 4, 1878 in Komoko, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada; born March 24, 1854 in London, County London, England; died April 30, 1931 in London, Ontario Province, Canada.
It is likely that Mary Ann is the one who served as witness to the birth of Samuel McKay, Jr. in Lobo Township, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada on 12 February 1876.  The informant is given as Mary McKay, living in Komoko, where the other McKay siblings were living.  It is very possible that Joseph led the way to Ontario, and that William, Samuel Sr., and Mary Ann followed and came over together between 1871 and 1873.  This timeframe results from not being able to locate William in the 1871 Canada census, and Samuel Sr.'s second child born 1871 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland and third child born 1873 in Ontario Province, Canada.
We know for sure that Mary Ann was in Canada in 1878 with her marriage to John Hobbs.  According to certificate #38658 registered on page 267 of Schedule B Marriages for Lobo Township, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada:
Groom's Name: John Hobbs
Groom's Age: 26 years
Groom's Birth Place: England
Groom's Occupation: Broom maker
Groom's Father: John H. Hobbs
Groom's Mother: Sarah Hobbs
Bride's Name: Mary A. McKay
Bride's Age: 23 years
Bride's Birth Place: Ireland
Bride's Father: William McKay
Bride's Mother: Margret McKay
Names of Witnesses: Robert Gardner and Hannah McKay (wife of Joseph and William Jr.)
Date and Place of Marriage: December 4, 1878, Komoko, Lobo Township.
From LDS film #380135, Parish Registers of St. Botolph Aldgate, London, Baptisms 1856-1927 John Hobbs was christened May 7, 1854 at St. Botolph and was born March 24, 1854 in London, England.
Schedule A of Births in London, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada, page 204 shows the birth of their first child, John Hobbs III on November 22, 1879.  This entry shows the father's occupation as broom manufactureer.  Circa 1901 John III married Lillian Mary Milligan and they had a daughter and a son.  John III died August 27, 1934 of Myocarditis.  According to Schedule A of Births, page 132 duaghter Alice Maude was born to John and Mary Ann in London, Middlesex County on May 19, 1881.  John is occupied as broom maker.  She only lived 3 1/2 years, dying on January 13, 1885 of "disease of the heart".  The 1881, 1891 and 1901 censuses show John as the only surviving child.
In the Death Register for London, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada, page 351, Mary Ann Hobbs death is recorded.  This document identifies several items, including parents William McKay and Margaret Loughrey, Mary's birth date as November 29, 1855 in Ireland, death on December 12, 1925 because of a heart attack, and burial in Mount Pleasant Cemetery on December 15, 1925.  It also identified Mary's length of residence in Canada, and Ontario Province, as 54 years, thus lending credence to her immigrating about 1872.  John lived another 5 1/2 years, dying April 30, 1931 as a result of myocardial failure due to cardio vascular disease.  His birth was confirmed as March 24, 1854 and he was shown as a broom manufacturer still.  He was buried beside Mary Ann on May 2, 1931.
v. Elizabeth McKay, born July 4, 1857 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died May 15, 1941 in Keokuk County, Iowa; married Samuel Stuart Rodgers September 1885 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; born April 18, 1864 in Dungiven, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died August 16, 1948 in Keokuk County, Iowa.
Service Saturday
For Mrs. Rodgers
    "Mrs Sam Rodgers, 83, died May
15  at   her   home   in  What  Cheer.
Funeral  was  Saturday  at 2 p.m.  at
the  Presbyterian  church,  with  ser-
vice by the Rev J. McInnis of  Deep
River.       Burial   was   at   Sixteen
cemetery.
     "Pallbearers   were   Jim McKay,
Sam   R.  McKay,  George  McKay,
William  McKay, John  McKay, and
Sam   McKay,   sr.   Mrs.  Matthew
Manion  and  Mrs.  Ross   Johnston
sang,  accompanied at the piano  by
Mrs L. W. Wilson.
    "Surviving  are her  husband  and
brother  George,  who  lived  in  her
home and helped care for her.  Four
brothers  and   one  sister  preceded
her in death.
    "Mrs Rodgers was born in County
Derry,  Ireland,  July  4,  1857.  She
was married  to Sam Rodgers in Ire-
land   in   September,   1885.   They
lived in  Glasgow,  Scotland, several
years and came  to America in 1893,
living  at  Gilcrist  and  Iola,  Mercer
county,   Ill.,   for  19  years.   They
came to Iowa in 1912.
    "They  lived on  a  farm four and
one-half  miles north of What Cheer
until   they  came  to   their   present
home.
    Mrs. Rodgers  became a  member
of  the  United  Presbyterian  church
when a young woman in Ireland."
From  What Cheer Patriot-Chronicle
newspaper
May 22, 1941 issue
LDS film #101085 Quarterly Returns of Births in the General Registry Office of Ireland Vol. 5 for 1864 identifies Samuel Stuart Rodgers as the son of Thomas Rodgers and Jane Michaels with birtn on April 20, 1864 in Dungiven, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland.  Although his tombstone shows a birth date of April 18, the April 20 is from a primary source.  They appear in the 1900 Greene Township, Mercer County, Illinois census, page 51, under the name of Samuel "Rogers".  Also living with them is Elizabeth's brother George and he and Samuel are shown as coal miners.
There are a few anomalies with this census entry:
  • While Samuel and Elizabeth are shown as married 12 years, it really should be 11 years if they were married in September of 1888.  This is a minor error.  However, combine this with Samuel showing as immigrating in 1893, and Elizabeth immigrating in 1863, it is hard to see when they would have gotten married.
  • Elizabeth is shown as born in June 1861, when she was born in July 1857.  George is shown as born in February 1874, when he was born in February 1865.  Samuel is shown as born in April 1865, when he was born in April 1864.  Having these birth dates in error is not uncommon, but one would think that at least the one providing the information would get their own birth date correct.
  • George is identified as brother-in-law to the head of household (Samuel), but is enumerated as George McKee and is shown as born in Pennsylvania.
This census shows that Elizabeth had 4 children with none surviving to 1900.  It this is also an error in census recording, then the assumption they had four children is incorrect.
The 1910 census shows Samuel and Elizabeth, enumerated as Sam and Lizzie Rodgers, still living in Greene Township, Mercer County, Illinois, page 128A.  George is not living with them for this census, living instead with nephew William McKay and family in Duncan Township (page 91A).  The columns related to number of children born and still living now shows as 0 and 0, thus suggesting the 1900 census entry was indeed in error.  Sam has occupation of farmer in this census.
Samuel and Elizabeth Rodgers are found in 1920 in Prairie Township, Keokuk County, Iowa, page 103B, north of Thornburg, and her brother George is living with them.  Sam and George are listed with an occupation of grain and stock farmer.  All three show as having immigrated in 1892 and as naturalized in 1900.  By 1930 they (Samuel, Elizabeth and George) are retired and living in the town of What Cheer in Keokuk County, Iowa.  This census shows them all immigrating in 1893.  All three appear again in 1940 What Cheer, Keokuk County, Iowa (page 4A).
After Elizabeth's death in May 1941, George continues to live with Samuel in What Cheer.  Samuel dies August 16, 1948 in What Cheer and is buried in Sixteen Cemetery, west of Thornburg in Keokuk County, Iowa.
vi. James McKay, born August 28, 1860 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died June 16, 1937 in Keokuk County, Iowa; married Rose Anna Selfridge February 23, 1887 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; born April 8, 1865 in Drumsurn, County, Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died June 28, 1930 near Barnes City, Mahaska County, Iowa.
The 1925 Iowa state census shows James McKay at home in Prairie Township, Keokuk County, Iowa near the town of Gibson.  Each person was asked the names of their parents and James gave William McKay as his father and Margret Laughary as his mother.  His obituary as published in the June 24, 1937 issue of the What Cheer Patriot-Chronicle newspaper gives a picture of the man.  He was born August 28, 1860 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland and spent his early years in Ireland and Scotland before coming to America.  It is possible he was in Scotland with his sister and brother-in-law Samuel and Elizabeth Rodgers.  He immigrated to America (in 1886 according to the 1900, 1910 and 1920 censuses) and settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  On February 28, 1887 he married Anna Selfridge who had immigrated earlier (in 1883 according to the 1900, 1910 and 1920 censuses).  After a few years they move to that part of Illinois where many of his McKay relatives had settled, appearing in the 1900 Buffalo Prairie Township, Rock Island County, Illinois as a farmer.  He was a farmer up to his death on June 16, 1937, dying on his farm.
According to LDS film #101105 Quarterly Returns of Births in the General Registry Office of Ireland Vol. 6 for 1865 Rose Ann Selfridge was born April 8, 1865 in Newtownlimavady, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland to William Selfridge and Mary McQuiston.  Rose, who went by Ann or Anna, according to McKay family history came from a family of 8 children, but only four siblings are known to this author.  Sister Jane, married John Osbourne in Philadelphia and moved to Mercer County, Illinois, likely when James and Rose did.  After 1930, Jane was in failing health, widowed and childless, so she lived with James so he and his family could look after her until her death.  Brother William married Mary McCloskey in Philadelphia and stayed there until 1920 when he is found living with his widowed sister Jane and where his death record says he died February 24, 1920 in Aledo.  Sisters Martha and Mary, for whom nothing else is know at this point other than their birth to William and Mary McQuiston Selfridge.
Rose Ann was killed in a one car accident rollover on June 28, 1930.  She and her daughter, Mrs. Della Murdock, were in a car with Samuel and Elizabeth Rodgers which was driven by Sam.  The accident occurred when Sam attempted to pass a car on a gravel road.  He lost control of the car on loose gravel in attempting to swing back to the right side of the road to avoid a car approaching from the other direction.  The car rolled and landed in the opposite ditch driving Rose's head through the floor boards and crushing her under the door frame.  She died instantly.  There were injuries to others in the car but none were life threatening.  James and Rose Ann are both buried in Sixteen Cemetery, west of Thornburg in Keokuk County, Iowa.
James and Rose had a large family, with seven sons and five daughters - William (1888-1961, James Selfridge (1890-1953), Margaret Ann (1892-1928), Samuel R. (1893-1963), Mary Jane (1896-1982), George (1897-1975), Elizabeth R. (1899-1987), John R. (1901-1981), Harry Johnson (1903-1918), Adella A. (1904-1970) and Earnest Allen (1906-1920).  Most did not stray from the area close to or in Keokuk County with the exception of James Selfridge McKay who died in Phoenix, and Mary Jane McKay Christie who died in Saskatchewan Province, Canada.
vii. George McKay, born February 10, 1865 in Newtownlimavady, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died December 11, 1948 in Peru, Madison County, Iowa.
LDS film #101100 Quarterly Returns of Births in the General Registry Office of Ireland Vol. 1 for 1865 George Mccay born to William Mccay and Margret Loughery on February 10, 1865 in Newtownlimavady, County Londonderry, Ireland despite his tombstone stating he was born February 28, 1867.  George never married, and was the last of the siblings to die.  It is entirely possible he lived with his parents, at least until his father died.  He made his home with his sister Mrs. Elizabeth Rodgers most of his life, and it is possible this occurred following his father's death.  Since Elizabeth, Samuel, George and Margaret all immigrated together in 1893, it is possbile they came together and lived as a unit after William died.  After Elizabeth died he continued to live with Sam Rodgers until Sam's death in August 1948.  From that time on, with failing health, he was taken care of in the home of his niece Mrs. Della Johnson, daughter of James and Rose Ann Selfridge McKay.  Having no close living relatives may explain why no obituary was found.

 

186. John Fleming, born Abt. 1812 in Drumhappy, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died September 7, 1887 in Mercer County, Illinois. He married 187. Mary Irwin in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland.
Notes for John Fleming:
The death date for John comes from his tombstone in Aledo Cemetery, Aledo, Mercer County, Illinois.  The inscription says he was 75 years old at death, hence the estimated birth year of 1812.  The Illinois death registration for son William says his parents were born in "Drumhaply, Ireland".  I have not been able to locate such a place, however there is a Drumhappy in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland between Dungiven and Limavady, both of which play a role in the McKay family locations.  For that reason I use Drumhappy, but make you aware of the use of Drumhaply in the death register.  Between these same towns of Limavady and Dungiven is the townland of Mulkeeragh in the parish of Carrick.  In that townland in Griffith's Valuation is a Joseph Fleming renting 25 acres from the Marquis of Waterford and a John Fleming also renting 25 acres from the Marquis.  This may possibly be the same John Fleming.  That is also consistent with his oldest child, William, being born in Mulkeeragh according to the same death register (although it is misspelled as Mulkarigh therein).  Just as Mulkeeragh was misspelled, it is not unlikely that Drumhappy was misspelled.  Also within the parish of Carrick in Griffith's Valuation are such surnames as Loughry, Irwin, Christie, McQuiston, and Selfridge, all of which play a role in the McKay family.

187. Mary Irwin, born Abt. 1815 in Drumhappy, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died February 27, 1894 in Mercer County, Illinois.
Notes for Mary Irwin:
The death date for Mary comes from her tombstone in Aledo Cemetery, Aledo, Mercer County, Illinois.  The inscription appear to say she was 78 years old at death (very difficult to make out the last digit), hence the estimated birth year of 1815.  John and Mary do not appear in any U.S. censuses that I can find.  Son William and daughter Elizabeth show in their 1910 and 1920 census entries that they immigrated in 1881.  It is possible their parents came with them and thus no census entry for them.

Children of John Fleming and Mary Irwin are:

i. William Fleming, born March 1839 in Mulkeeragh, Northern Ireland; died October 6, 1922 in Edgington Township, Rock Island County, Illinois.
William's information comes from his Illinois death registration, probably as supplied by sister Elizabeth.  William never married.  He is found living with brother James, as noted in the relationship column of the census, and his family in 1900 Buffalo Prairie Township, Rock Island County, Illinois census, page 204A.  There his birthdate is listed as March 1845, and his year of immigration is noted as 1880.  He is without occupation.  The 1910 and 1920 censuses are closer to matching his birth year above, suggesting that James may have been the one providing the information in 1900.  In 1910 and 1920 he is living in Edgington Township, Rock Island County, Illinois with his spinster sister Elizabeth.  In 1910 he is 70 years old and in 1920 he is 80 years old, suggesting a birth year of 1839-1840.  If Elizabeth was providing the information for those censuses, and for his death registration, that might explain the consistency, but not necessarily mean that the information is correct.
These latter two censuses show he and Elizabeth immigrating in 1881.  Based on sister Jane's marriage information below, it is clear he and Elizabeth could not have immigrated prior to 1881, and they would have had to travel not long after Jane's marriage.  Fellow McKay researcher, Judi Pegg, found the following short piece in the July 9, 1903 issue of The Milan Weekly Independent, Rock Island County, Illinois, "William Fleming of Buffalo Prairie township has been adjudged insane; he is aged 65 years.  He will have a conservator appointed for him".  It is likely Elizabeth was appointed his conservator.  William is buried in Aledo Cemetery, Aledo, Mercer County, Illinois.
ii. Elizabeth Fleming, born Abt. 1846 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died Aft. 1925.
Elizabeth never married.  When located in the U.S. censuses she was always living with her never married brother William.  In the 1900 census of brother James she is shown as born in January 1855 and having immigrated in 1880.  In 1910 she is 62 years old, thus born about 1848.  In 1920 she is 74 years old, thus born about 1846.  When brother William died in 1922 it left Elizabeth alone, the last of the known siblings still alive.  She is found in the 1925 State of Iowa census living with Samuel Jr. and Annie Jones McKay.  Samuel's mother was Margaret Fleming McKay, a sister of Elizabeth.  In that census her birth year is given as about 1844.  Because of the closeness of the last three census birth years, I took the middle one as an approximation.  No vital records have been found for Elizabeth, and that includes no death record.  There has also been no cemetery location found yet.
93 iii. Margaret Fleming, born May 5, 1848 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died June 27, 1886 in Mercer County, Illinois; married Samuel McKay, Sr. November 8, 1866 in Bovevagh Presbyterian Church, County Londonderry, Northern Ireland.
iv. Jane Fleming, born Abt. 1851 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died August 19, 1889 in Mercer County, Illinois; married John B. Osborne June 10, 1881 in Hyde Park, Middlesex County, Ontario Province, Canada; born Abt. September 1852 in Northern Ireland; died 1909 in Mercer County, Illinois.
The information for John and Jane is largely from their marriage registraion Ontario Province, Canada Schedule B Marriages for 1881, page 516.  John Osborne, age 26 (about 1855), and Jane Fleming, age 24 (about 1857), were both born in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland and were both living in Komoko, Middlesex County, Ontario Province (as were the McKays) when they married.  John gives his parent's names as Robert Dixon Osborne and Hadessah while Jane gives her parent's names as John Fleming and Mary.  Witnesses noted were William and Eliza Fleming, both living in Komoko, and Jane's brother and sister from above.
I took John's birthdate from his 1900 census.  Jane's birth date comes from her tombstone.  She is buried in Aledo Cemetery, Aledo, Mercer County, Illinois.  Her death date is August 19, 1889 and the inscription reads aged 38 years, thus suggesting about 1851 as a birth year.  Jane shares the same tombstone as her parents.  John married Jane Selfridge after his first wife died, and I suspect they are both buried in the same cemetery as his first wife.
v. James Fleming, born Abt. September 1860 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died Bet. 1904-1910; married Elizabeth Loughery Abt. 1879 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; born January 10, 1859 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland; died June 9, 1945 in Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa.
James is a son of John and Mary by virtue of his sibling relationship to William and Elizabeth, as noted in the 1900 Buffalo Prairie Township, Rock Island County, Illinois census, page 204A, referred to above.  His wife, Elizabeth, appears in the 1910 Big Grove Township, Johnson County, Iowa census, page 862B, with several of their children from the 1900 census and a new daughter born about 1901.  Elizabeth shows as widowed.  James' death date and location have not been found, but the following notice from the February 4, 1904 issue of The Milan Weekly Independent newspaper of Rock Island County, Illinois, as provided by fellow McKay researcher Judi Pegg, narrows the timeframe of his death, "PUBLIC SALE at my farm, 3 miles west of Edgington, on the John Edgington farm....on February 17th.  James Fleming".  This may also suggest that he had already arranged for the family to move to Iowa and was selling off his possessions and property to support that move.
Elizabeth Loughery was the daughter of James and Elizabeth J. Lindsay Loughery.  She and James had 11 children with the oldest, William James, born November 17 1880 in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, and the remaining 10 born in the Mercer and Rock Island Counties area of Illinois.  From Johnson County, Iowa Elizabeth moved to New Hampton, Chickasaw County, Iowa for a few years, but in 1917 moved to Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa to be near 4 of her children.  She is buried in Murdoch-Linwood Cemetery in Cedar Rapids.

 

190. Francis Whan, born Abt. 1773 in Ireland; died Aft. 1860. He married 191. Esther ?.

191. Esther ?, born Abt. 1779 in Ireland; died Aft. 1860.

Children of Francis Whan and Esther ? are:

i. Samuel Whan, Sr., born Abt. 1805 in Ireland; died Aft. 1860; married Nancy ?; born Aft. 1815 in Ireland; died Aft. 1860.
ii. William Whan, born Abt. 1814 in Ireland; died Unknown.
iii. Agnes Whan, born Abt. 1817 in Ireland; died Unknown.
iv. Ellen Whan, born Abt. 1821 in Ireland; died April 08, 1879.
95 v. Ann Whan, born January 25, 1829 in County Antrim, Ireland; died June 07, 1908 in Mercer County, Illinois; married Robert Jones March 23, 1865 in Mercer County, Illinois.

 

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