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VOORUS

Compiled by: Andrew L. Moore

Email: PAmoores@juno.com

Dated: 22 Sep 2015


 

 

 

 

 

VOORUS

 

 

 

John Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

Samuel Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth

 

 

 

 

James Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John A Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hugh Watt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Watt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alexander White

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth White

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rachel Henderson

 

 

Calvin Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Samuel Irwin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Irwin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Margaret

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Irwin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Thompson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Thompson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah Gilliland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert A Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garret Voorhees

Andrew Voorhees / Jane Sutphen

 

 

Eleazor Voorus

 

 

 

 

 

Lavina Franscisco

 

Hendrick Voorhees / Jannetje Jensen

 

Andrew Voorus

 

 

 

 

 

Hon. Warner Miller

 

Garret Coerte VanVoorhees / Willemptie Luyster

 

Margaret Miller

 

 

 

 

 

Margaret

 

Hiram A. Voorus

 

 

 

 

Coert Stevense VanVoorhees / Marretje Couwenhoven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Coerte VanVoorhees /
Aaltjen Wessels

Hannah Tibbitts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dorothy Voorus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Watson, Jr.

Robert Watson, Sr. / Jane

 

 

Rev. James Watson

 

 

 

 

 

 

Margaret Henderson

/ Sarah

 

Robert M Watson

 

 

 

 

 

 

John McConnell

 

 

 

Susan McConnell

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah Gaston

 

 

 

Melvina Watson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Spangler

 

 

 

 

George W Spangler

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Pressler

 

 

 

 

Delilah Spangler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Cosper

Jacob Cosper

 

 

 

Rebecca Cosper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abigail St. Clair

 

 

 

 

VOORUS

 

 

 

In the 1942 publication entitled The Van Voorhees Association at its Tenth Anniversary 1932-1942, the Association published the following biographical sketch:

 

A Voorus Family of Central New York

 

An early member of our Association was Robert A. Voorus who holds the position of Clerk of the Library of Congress in Washington. When presenting his application he traced his ancestry to his grandparents, Andrew Voorus and Hannah Tibbetts, who lived at Manlius, near Syracuse, N.Y. This application was accepted without assurance that the correct ancestral line would be discovered.

Correspondence with two of his distant cousins, Miss Alta J. Day of Normal, Ill., and Rev. Charles H. Coker of Westport, Conn., revealed much, but not enough to be of real help. A little later a communication received from Dr. Leo O. Voorus, a physician of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a second cousin of Robert of Washington, made the problem even more interesting.

Its solution resulted from correspondence with Franklin John Voorhees Stowitts, a lawyer of New York, whose father had married Emma Harriet Voorhees and lived in Montgomery County, N. Y.

Her grandparents were John H. and Mary Francisco Voorhees whose father Garret (1761-1831) signed his will Garret Voorus as Mr. Stowitts revealed. Apparently only his sixth son, Eleazer, held to that spelling. He made his home at Manlius, married Margaret Miller, and 2d her sister Caroline, sisters of Hon. Warner Miller, United States Senator from New York. Eight of their twelve children were sons. From Andrew and Hiram, both sons of Margaret Miller, came our two Voorus kinsmen, Leo the physician and Robert the clerk. Going farther back, Garrets parents were Andrew and Jane Sutphen Voorhees of Monmouth County, N. J. Andrew was the second son of Hendrick, who was the son of Garret Coerten, an early grandson of Steven Coerten, our common ancestor. So the cousins Voorus are in the tenth generation, which assures them a welcome in our Association.

 

 

Steven Coerte VanVoorhees

 

Steven Coerte VanVoorhees was born circa 1600 in Drente, Netherlands. His wife was Aaltjen Wessels.

 

Steven Coerte VanVoorhees and Aaltjen Wessels had the following children:

 

1.     Coert Stevense, married Marretje Couwenhoven.

 

 

 

Coert Stevense VanVoorhees

 

Coert Stevense VanVoorhees married Marretje Couwenhoven.

 

Coert Stevense VanVoorhees and Marretje Couwenhoven had the following children:

 

1.     Garret Coerte, married Willemptie Pieters Luyster.

 

 

 

Garret Coerte VanVorhees

 

Garret Coerte VanVoorhees married Willemptie Pieters Luyster.

 

Garret Coerte VanVoorhees and Willemptie Pieters Luyster had the following children:

1.     Hendrick Voorhees, married Jannetje Andries Jensen.

 

 

 

Hendrick Voorhees

 

Hendrick Voorhees married Jannetje Andries Jensen.

 

Hendrick Voorhees and Jannetje Andries Jensen had the following children:

 

1.     Andrew, married Jane Sutphen.

 

 

 

Andrew Voorhees

 

Andrew Voorhees married Jane Sutphen.

 

Jane Sutphen was born in Monmouth Co NJ.

 

Andrew Voorhees and Jane Sutphen the following children:

 

1.     Garret, born circa 1761, married Lavina Franscisco, died circa 1831.

 

 

 

Garret Voorhees

 

Garret Voorhees was born circa 1761. He married Lavina Franscisco and died circa 1831.

 

Garret Voorhees and Lavina Franscisco had the following children:

 

1.     Eleazer, born circa 1801 Montgomery Co NY, married (1) Margaret Miller 21 Jan 1824 German Reformed Church, Lawyersville, Montgomery Co NY, (2) Caroline Miller circa 1838/1840 NY, died 15 Oct 1868 Manlius, Onondaga Co NY, buried Gates Cemetery, Chittenango, Madison Co NY.

 

 

 

Eleazer Voorhees

 

Eleazer Voorhees was born circa 1801 in Montgomery Co NY. He married twice: (1) Margaret Miller on 21 Jan 1824 at the German Reformed Church in Lawyersville, Montgomery Co NY, and then (2) Caroline Miller circa 1838/1840 in NY. Eleazer died 15 Oct 1868 in Manlius, Onondaga Co NY and is buried in the Gates Cemetery, Chittenango, Madison Co NY.

 

Margaret and Caroline Miller were the daughters of the Honorable Warner and Margaret Miller. Margaret was born circa 1791 in Herkimer Co NY.

 

Eleazer's first wife was Margaret Miller.

 

Eleazer's second, Caroline Miller, was born circa 1824 in Schoharie Co NY and, according to the 1865 Onondaga Co NY state census, she bore him 4 children.

 

In 1843, Manlius, Onondaga Co NY deed records indicate that Eleazer and Caroline sold "Lot 89" to N. Marsh. (Deed Book 83, page 260).

 

 

The following announcement was located in the 6 Dec 1866 Fayetteville (NY) Recorder:

 

Auction SaleMessrs E. Voorus, A. Voorus and M. Hale, in a consolidated auction, offer for sale valuable farm stock, consisting of horses, cattle, and sheep, at the residence of A. Voorus, Eagle Village (Fayetteville/Manlius, NY area), on Thursday, the 13th at 10 oclock a.m.

 

 

Will of Eleazer Voorus

Onondaga Co NY, Book O, page 496

Written 29 April 1868, Probated 24 Dec 1868

 

The last will and testament of Eleaser Voorus of the town of Manlius county of Onondega and state of New York -- I Eleaser Voorus being of sound mind and memory do make publish an declare this my last will and testament in manner an form following that is to say: -

 

First, I direct my executrix herein after name to pay all my just debts and funeral expenses.

Second, I give an bequeath unto each of my sons and daughters now living the sum of five hundred dollars to them and their hers forever.

Third, I give and bequeath unto my granddaughter Harrit M. Voorus, the daughter of my son Wesley E. Voorus, now deceased, the sum of twenty-five dollars to her and her heirs forever.

Fourth, the rest residue and remainder of my estate of every description, real and personal, I give, devise and bequeath unto my beloved wife Caroline Voorus, to use occupy and enjoy, an to receive as her own, the rents, issues and profits thereof during the period of her natural life in lieu of Dower, and after the death of my said wife, I give devise and bequeath paid rest and remainder of my estate to my said sons and daughters to be dived equally between then to their kin heirs forever.

And lastly I nominate, constitute and appoint my said wife Caroline Vorrus sole executrix of this my last will and testament, authorizing and empowering her to sell and convey real estate, execute acknowledge and deliver deeds of conveyance therefor, and do all other wets and things necessary to carry into effect all the provisions of this my last will and testament - hereby revoking all former wills by me heretofore made.

 

Witness my hand and seal this 29th day of April 1868.

Eleaser Voorus.

 

Whereas I Eleaser Voorus of Manlius have made my last will and testament in writing bearing date the 29th of April 1868, in and by which I have given and bequeathed unto each of my sons and daughters now living the sum of five hundred dollars to them and their heirs forever:

Now therefore I do by this my writing which I hereby declare to be a codicil to my last will and testament, and to be taken as a part thereof, own? And declare that my will is, that the said sum of five hundred dollars, to each of my said sons and daughters, be paid to each of them, at the expiration of five years from and after my decease, without interest. This codicil is made to fix definitely the time of payment of said legacies.

And lastly it is my desire that this codicil be annexed to and made a part of the last will and testament as aforesaid to all intents and purposes. In witness whereof, I have hereto set my hand and seal this 5th day of May 1868. Eleaser Voorus.

 

Eleazer and Margaret had the following children:

 

1.     Andrew Voorus, born in November 1824 NY, married (1) Frances C ________, (2) Hannah Tibbits, (3) Susan _________, died 20 May 1889 Manlius, Onondaga Co NY, buried Christ Church/Manlius Cemetery, Manlius, Onondaga Co NY.

2.     Hiram, born circa 1828 NY, married Roxina .

3.     Wesley E, born circa 1831, died 25 Aug 1852, buried Gates Cemetery, Chittenango, Madison Co NY.

4.     E.W, born circa 1832 NY.

5.     Franklin, born circa 1835 NY.

6.     Pricilla, born circa 1837 NY.

 

Eleazer and Caroline had the following children:

 

1.     Philip, born circa 1840 Onondaga Co NY.

2.     Charles, born circa 1847 Onondaga Co NY.

3.     Anna M., born circa 1849 Onondaga Co NY.

4.     Helen/Ellen, born circa 1852 Onondaga Co NY.

 

 

 

Andrew Voorus

 

Andrew Voorus was born in November 1824 in NY. He married three times: (1) Frances C ________, (2) Hannah Tibbits, and (3) Susan _________. Andrew died on 20 May 1889 at the age of 64 years, 6 months in Manlius, Onondaga Co NY and is buried in Christ Church/Manlius Cemetery, Manlius, Onondaga Co NY.

 

Andrew's first wife Frances C was born in March 1825 and died 7 Oct 1853 (age 28 years, 7 months) and is buried in the Christ Church/Manlius Cemetery, Manlius, Onondaga Co NY.

 

Andrew's second wife Hannah Tibbits was born 13 Jul 1813 in NY and died in Eagle Village on 20 Oct 1867. She is buried in Oran Cemetery, Pompey, Onondaga Co NY.

 

Andrew's third wife Susan _________ was born in March 1839 and died 18 Dec 1874 at the age of 35 years and 9 months. She is buried in the Christ Church/Manlius Cemetery, Manlius, Onondaga Co NY.

 

According to the 1874 Sweet's New Atlas of Onondaga Co NY(*), Andrew Voorus is listed under "Farmers" in the section entitled "Principal Farmers, Manufacturers & Merchants of Onondaga Co NY - Town of Manlius" and is listed as having 388 acres and lots 90 and 78.

(*) Source: Homer D. L. Sweet, Sweet's New Atlas of Onondaga Co., New York. NY: Walker Bros. & Co., 1874., pp. 107-108.

 

The children of Andrew and Hannah (Tibbits) Voorus were:

 

1.     Hannah, born Feb 1843, died 23 Oct 1843, buried Oran Cemetery, Pompey, Onondaga Co NY.

2.     James E, born circa 1850, died 2 Apr 1870, buried Christ Church/Manlius Cemetery, Manlius, Onondaga Co NY.

3.     Georgianna, born circa 1855/1856 NY.

4.     Hiram Andrew, born 2 Dec 1856 Cazenovia, Madison Co NY, married (1) Calista ______ circa 1874 NY, (2) Melvina Lucinda Watson circa 1886, died 24 Nov 1927 Shamburg, Venango Co PA, buried Fairview Cemetery, Pleasantville, Venango Co PA.

5.     Thomas, died 23 Oct 1843 buried Oran Cemetery, Pompey, Onondaga Co NY.

 

 

 

Hiram Andrew Voorus

 

Hiram Andrew Voorus was born 2 Dec 1856 in Cazenovia, Madison Co NY. He married twice: (1) Calista ______ circa 1874 NY and (2) Melvina Lucinda Watson circa 1886. Andrew died 24 Nov 1927 in Shamburg, Venango Co PA and is buried in the Fairview Cemetery, Pleasantville, Venango Co PA.

 

Hiram's first wife was Calista _________ . She bore him at least one child - Gracie, who was born 20 Sep 1875, died 25 Aug 1877 and is buried in Christ Church/Manlius Cemetery, Manlius, Onondaga Co NY.

 

Hiram's second wife Melvina (Vina) Lucinda Watson was born 29 Nov 1867 in Venango Co PA and died 23 Jul 1940 in Titusville, Crawford Co PA. She is buried next to her husband. She is the daughter of Robert M and Delilah (Spangler) Watson. For more information on Delilah's ancestry, please see the chapter entitled Spangler.

 

 

Venango County, Pennsylvania - Her Pioneers and People

by Charles A. Babcock, A.M., LL.B.

J.H. Beers & Company, 1919, Chicago IL

Pages 1005-1007

 

 

HIRAM A. VOORUS is a notably progressive farmer and oil operator of Oil Creek township, owning a valuable tract improved entirely through his own efforts and largely along original lines. While industry and thrift have played their due part in his success, the results have been doubled by the scientific methods which he has employed in all his work and the keen intelligence back of all his labors. His accomplishments are worthy of notice in any record of the development of Venango county, as proving the possibilities of its great natural resources.

 

Mr. Voorus was born in December, 1856, near Syracuse, N. Y., son of Andrew and Hannah (Tibbits) Voorus, and his paternal lineage goes back to Knickerbocker stock in eastern and central New York. Andrew Voorus lived and died at Manlius, that State. His wife, Hannah, was a sister of George Tibbits, whose daughter Maria S. Tibbits married Manley Colton Beebe, who settled at Pleasantville in the early days. Hiram A. Voorus became interested in this section of Pennsylvania through Mr. Beebe, who visited his people in New York. Accordingly he came to Pleasantville when a young man, and having been brought up in a region famous for its rich farms and dairy stock he was asked by Mr. Beebe to instruct the latter's tenant in the care of stock, for which his thorough early training well qualified him. His efforts were successful, the tenant accepting the new ideas and adapting them to the great satisfaction of Mr. Beebe. Mr. Voorus was engaged in farm work here for several months returning to New York to assist his father, and remaining at his old home for a year and a half. He had decided to secure a tract of land in Venango county, being influenced largely by the attitude of the local papers, who declared that with proper handling all this territory could be made to yield oil in paying quantities, even though there was a sentiment in some quarters that it bad been drained out. So upon his return to the county he obtained one hundred acres of his present farm, paying from eight to twelve dollars an acre for the place, which to many did not look particularly promising. There were some old oil wells on it, abandoned, and the most valuable timber had been taken off, and as it was his desire to improve it for agricultural purposes he began to clear off the brush. As he had no capital to finance his labors, he made his living mostly by teaming for several years, hauling oil, giving up outside work as the returns from his land increased sufficiently to make it worth while to devote all his time to it.

 

Mr. Voorus had valuable farm experience in his youth, and found plenty of need for it in his independent work, but he went farther and kept in touch with the newest methods evolved in experiments by scientific agriculturists, especially at State College, whose activities have been a great assistance in his work. Some of his neighbors thought he was wasting his time trying to make a productive farm out of "sand,'' but he had faith in its properties, and by having the soil analyzed and using proper fertilizer he soon proved that abundant crops were possible under skillful cultivation. He added to his area as prosperity enabled him to do so, now having two hundred acres, one half of which is cleared and about sixty acres under close cultivation. The body lies advantageously, and its sandy loam is now second to none in Venango county in fertility, while in attractive arrangement, buildings, etc., it compares favorably with the most desirable farm properties in this section of Pennsylvania. He has built a new house, and his barn is commodious, modern and well kept up, equipped in up-to-date style and furnished with a silo of proper dimensions for the quantity of stock which he keeps regularly.

 

Mr. Voorus has always made a specialty of stock, and has given much attention to the improvement of cattle, with such excellent results that few herds of the same size anywhere surpass his in milk yield. He has always had enough stock to utilize all the hay and grains raised on the land, an economical arrangement which has made it unnecessary for him to market many of his valuable crops, his profits coming from the dairy products, for which there is always ready sale. His hogs are the Ohio Improved Chester strain.

 

When he felt that he could spare money for the venture Mr. Voorus began to drill for oil, in that as in his agricultural operations following scientific knowledge of the territory he had to deal with. He made a careful study of local geological formations before he entered into this work, and has been well repaid for the time he spent in this way, having had a profitable yield from every well sunk on his property. Seven wells are now producing there.

 

In 1886 Mr. Voorus married Melvina L. Watson, daughter of Robert and Delilah (Spangler) Watson, who are mentioned elsewhere in this work in the sketch of her brother, Lewis N. Watson. Nine children have been born to this union, namely: Grover Archie is now in the United States army, stationed at Camp Lee; Lena B. graduated from high school and from the normal school at Slippery Rock, Pa., taught several terms in Venango county, and is now teaching in the primary grade at Spring Creek, Warren Co., Pa.; Robert A. attended public school and business college at Oil City, and is now engaged as a clerk by the Interstate Commerce Commission at Washington, D. C.; Bessie B. graduated from the State Normal School at Slippery Rock, and is now teaching in Oil Creek township; Blanche is at home; Dorothy is a student at Slippery Rock Normal; Elizabeth is at home; Marion Milton and Philip are attending school.

 

Mr. Voorus has held the office of road supervisor for twelve years, and has served his fellow citizens loyally, giving his public duties as close attention as he pays to his personal affairs. Originally a Democrat in political doctrine, he is now independent, supporting the men and measures which represent his views best, regardless of party. His credit and standing are high wherever he is known, for he has endeavored to practice the principles he holds regarding his responsibility to his fellow men. His wife is associated with the M. E. Church at Plumer, and five of their children are members of the Christian Church.

 

 

Obituary of Hiram A. Voorus

Titusville (PA) Herald - Friday November 25, 1927

 

SHAMBURG MAN DIES SUDDENLY AT HIS HOME

 

Hiram A. Voorus Suffers Heart Attack and Passes Away Before Medical Aid is Summoned. Survived by Large Family.

 

A gloom was cast over the usual joyousness of Thanksgiving Day throughout the Shamburg community because of the death of one of its most highly respected citizens, H.A. Voorus, who passed away very suddenly about 3 o'clock Thursday morning.

Mr. Voorus had always enjoyed the best of health but had been ailing some during he past week. On Wednesday he was feeling much better and was able to be out around with his usual cares of the farm. He retired early as usual on Wednesday evening and got up about 3 o'clock, turned on the light in his room and walked into the hallway, apparently starting to go down the stairs, when he fell, death coming suddenly, due to heart paralysis.

Hiram Andrew Voorus was born in 1856 and would have been 71 years of age had he lived until Dec. 2. He spent his early boyhood in Manlines, N.Y., coming to Pennsylvania about 1870. He was united in marriage to Miss Vina Watson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Watson of Shamburg, in the year 1886. They established their home on the old Phil Becker farm near Shamburg.

 

Leader in Community

 

Mr. Voorus served as road commissioner in Oil Creek township for a number of years and was very much interested in the public schools and the community activities, always willing to give much of his time in helping to make the community life better.

He is survived by his wife and nine children. Grover, the oldest of he children, has remained at home with the exception of a two-year period spent in France during the World War I. Philip, a student in high school, and Lena and Bess, teachers in the public schools in Oil City, are also at home.

Robert, one of the assistant secretaries in the Congressional Library at the national capitol, Washington, D.C., and Marion, a successful farmer who makes his home with a sister, Mrs. Dorothy Hogg of Harrisville; Elizabeth, a student in the Pittsburgh General Hospital, and Blanche, an instructor in the teachers' training school in Cortland, N.Y. He is also survived by a half sister, Mrs. Minnie Peters, of Pittsburgh.

Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

 

 

Obituary of Vina (Watson) Voorus

The Titusville (PA) Herald - Wednesday July 24, 1940

 

VINA L. VOORUS DIED YESTERDAY

Well Known Resident Of Shamburg Community With Wide Acquaintance

 

Mrs. Vina L. Voorus, aged 72, widow of Hiram Andrew Voorus, died at the City hospital at 10 a.m. yesterday, following serious illness of several weeks. She submitted to an operation at the hospital about two weeks ago.

The deceased was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Watson and was born November 29, 1867. She had lived in the Shamburg community for many years and enjoyed a wide acquaintance, among whom she was loved and regarded as a woman of strong Christian character, a good neighbor and true friend.

Mrs. Voorus leaves the following children: Robert A., of Washington D.C., Blanche of Cortland, N.Y., Elizabeth of Pittsburgh, Mrs. Calvin Hogg of Slippery Rock; Lena, Grover and Besse at home. There are six grandchildren; a sister, Mrs. Georgia Shaw of Pleasantville, and two brothers, Herman and Lewis Watson of Shamburg.

Mrs. Voorus was a member of the Plumer Methodist church and the Woman's Missionary society of the Shamburg Christian church.

Services will be conducted from the family home Thursday, July 25, at 2:30 p.m. with interment in Fairview cemetery, Pleasantville.

Arrangements by Paul B. Kerr funeral home.

 

 

The children of Hiram Andrew and Melvina Lucinda (Watson) Voorus were:

 

1.     Grover Archie, born 3 Oct 1887 Shamburg, Oil Creek Twp, Venango Co PA, died 17 Jul 1964 Shamburg, Oil Creek Twp, Venango Co PA, buried Fairview Cemetery, Pleasantville Venango Co PA.

 

Obituary of Grover A. Voorus

Titusville (PA) Herald - July 18, 1964

 

Grover A. Voorus, 76, of Pleasantville, R.D. 2, died at his home early yesterday morning (Friday July 17, 1964).

Mr. Voorus was born Oct. 3, 1887, at his home where he had lived his entire life with the exception of active duty in World War I. He was engaged all his life in the oil business. He also maintained his own farm.

His parents were Hiram A. and Vina Watson Voorus.

He was a veteran of World War I and was a private in the 80th Div., Co. L, 320th Infantry. He enlisted April 4, 1918 at Oil City. He was discharged from Camp Sherman, Ohio, June 8, 1919. He served in the following engagements in Germany: The Arter's Sector, the St. Mihel offensive, the Muse-Argonne offensive in which he was wounded twice. He also was in the Somme offensive.

Mr. Voorus is survived by four sisters: Lena V. Voorus, Bess B. Voorus, Blanche C. Voorus of Pleasantville, R.D.2 and Mrs. Dorothy Hogg of Slippery Rock, Pa.: one brother, Robert A. Voorus of Pleasantville, R.D.2; four nieces and two nephews; 19 grandnieces and nephews; one sister Elizabeth and two brothers, Marion and Phillip, died previously.

Friends may call at the Raymond W. Arnold Funeral Home from 7 to 9 p.m. today and from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Sunday and attend the funeral service there at 2 p.m. Monday with Rev. H. Curtis Shaw, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Pleasantville, officiating. Interment will be in Fairview Cemetery, Pleasantville.

 

 

Funeral Service Announcement of Grover A. Voorus

Titusville (PA) Herald - July 21, 1964

 

The funeral service for Grover A. Voorus was held at the Raymond W. Arnold Funeral Home yesterday (Monday July 20, 1964) afternoon with Rev. H. Curtis Shaw, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Pleasantville, officiating.

Interment was in the Fairview Cemetery in Pleasantville with the following serving as pallbearers; Will Roth, Clair Caldwell, Clarence Spangler, William Brandon, Howard Hilton and Kenneth Burt.

Honorary pallbearers were B.G. Monroe, Ray White, John Fleming, Thomas Stewart and George Johnson.

The following members of the Cleo J. Ross Post of the American Legion conducted graveside services at the cemetery: Commander V.O. Reed and Edward Beaucha Sr., chaplain. Harris Williams and E.D. Gifford folded and presented the flag to the family.

Friends and relatives attending from a distance were Mrs. Theodore Hogg; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hogg and family all of Slippery Rock, Pa. and Mr. and Mrs. Vance Burtner of Butler, Pa.

 

2.     Lena Violet, born circa 12 Oct 1889 PA, died 13 Oct 1978 Oil City Hospital, Oil City, Venango Co PA, buried Fairview Cemetery, Pleasantville, Venango Co PA.

 

Obituary of Lena Voorus

Paper Unknown


Lena Voorus, Area School Teacher, Dies

 

Titusville---Lena Violet Voorus, 88, of Pleasantville R.D.1, a former Oil City school teacher, died at 2:20 p.m. Tuesday at Oil City Hospital after a long illness.

Miss Voorus was born November 12, 1889, in Oil Creek Township, the daughter of Hiram A., and Vina Watson Voorus.

She graduated from Pleasantville High School in 1905 and in 1909 received a degree from Slippery Rock State College.

Miss Voorus taught in the elementary grades for 42 years at schools in Venango, Crawford, and Warren counties. In 1952, she retired from the Oil City School District.

She was a member of the Shamburg Christian Church, the National and Pennsylvania Retired Teachers Association, and the Alumni Associations at both Pleasantville High School and Slippery Rock State College.

Miss Voorus is survived by one sister, Besse B. Voorus and one brother, Robert A. Voorus, both of Pleasantville.

In addition, two nephews, four nieces, 14 grandnephews, and seven grandnieces survive.

Arrangements are being handled by the Leo N. Hennes Funeral Home but no visiting hours will be observed.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Friday in the funeral home with Warren Helms, minister of the Shamburg Christian Church, officiating. Interment will follow in Fairview Cemetery.

The family asks that donations be made to the Shamburg Christian Church.

 

 

3.     Robert Andrew (also known as "Sox"), born circa 10 Dec 1891 PA, died 20 Dec 1985 Oil City Hospital, Oil City PA, buried Fairview Cemetery, Pleasantville, Venango Co PA.

 

In 1975, Sox recorded a few of his affiliations and work experiences for a person who was to introduce him for a sermon or speech:

 

         Member of Petrolia Lodge F. & A.M., Oil City, PA.

         Member of Albert Pine Consistory 32, Washington, D.C.

         Member of Almas Temple Shrine, Washington, D.C.

         A.B. Degree, George Washington University, Washington D.C.

         Graduate work American University, Washington, D.C.

         Retired from Library of Congress after 30 years in the Federal Government in Washington, D.C.

         A native of Venango Co, PA.

         5 years with the Penn R.R. - 1909-1914.

         5 years with the Interstate Commerce Commission, Washington, D.C. (appointed Under Clerk in the ICC effective 1/12/1914, at a rate of $720/yr, resigned 2/4/1919).

         25 years with the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

         Since Retirement, teaching Higher Accounting and Business Administration.

         Spoke at numerous Memorial Day programs in Pleasantville, PA.

 

 

Titusville (PA) Herald - Monday May 29, 1944

Pleasantville Arranges Suitable Program, for Memorial Day

Former Shamburg Man To Be Orator at Cemetery

 

PLEASANTVILLE, May 29. - The exercises for Memorial Day will be carried out on Tuesday at 2 o'clock at Fairview cemetery as planned except in case of rain, when they will be held at Robert Clark Memorial High school. Victor Monroe will be chairman of the day. There will be no parade, but the High school band will play from 1:45 to 2 o'clock at the cemetery preceding the program. The music will be under the direction of Rollin Tuttle. Lincoln's Gettysburg Address will be given by Harold Waddell and the speaker of the day will be Robert Voorus of Washington, well known to us all, a former resident of Shamburg. The rest of the program will consist of the usual features.

 

 

Titusville (PA) Herald - Tuesday May 30, 1944

Pleasantville Exercises Well Attended

Fairview Cemetery In Beautiful Array; Inspiring Talk Given

 

PLEASANTVILLE, May 30. -The Memorial Day services held in Fairview cemetery at 2 p.m. today, were well attended, but not as many were present as a year ago. A parade was dispensed with this year and in its place a concert of fifteen minutes before the program was given by the High school band.

 

Fairview was never more beautifully decorated with flowers on many graves and flags marking the resting places of all soldiers and sailors.

 

The address was given by Robert Voorus of Washington, D. C., a former resident of Shamburg, and those present said it was one of the best they ever have heard at a similar service here. Mr. Voorus followed the thought conveyed in Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, and his tribute was tender as well as inspiring.

 

The wreath for the soldiers' monument was made by Mrs. Willard Carson, who has performed this service for many years. The complete program for the exercises was as follows:

 

Chairman of the Day, V. G. Monroe.

Raising the Flag, Music by the High school band.

Salute to the Flag, Boy Scouts.

Singing of "America," first and fourth stanzas Assembly.

Invocation, Rev. Ivan Hunsberger.

Song--"Cover Them Over With Beautiful -Flowers," Quartette.

'Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, Harold Waddell.

Oration, Robert Voorus, Washington, D. C.

Song, Male Quartette.

Taps.

Lowering the Flag.

Benediction-Rev. Hunsberger.

 

 

The following is a Memorial Day Speech given by Sox in 1947. This speech will give the reader a glimpse of the oratory skills of this man.

 

MEMORIAL DAY

By

Robert A. Voorus

 

May 30, 1947 Pleasantville, Pa.

 

Our national Memorial Day dates back to the Civil War. That was the outstanding event in our history as a separate nation. From the vantage point of this year of our Lord 1947 we see it as a point near the chronological center of our history. But regardless of chronology it remains and will remain a pivotal historical way-mark in the annals of our country.

 

I. It was shortly following that war that the beautiful custom was inaugurated of decorating the graves of the fallen soldiers with flowers on a day set apart for the purpose, the exercise being accompanied by the strains of martial music and appropriate ceremonies. The custom was not restricted to the northern states, those of the "lost cause" being equally thoughtful of their "soldier dead." It was beautifully expressive of the one common bond that remained between the divided sections.

 

III. The scope of Memorial Day exercised has widened with the passing years. Not the soldiers only, but all who have been gathered to their final earthly resting place may become the subjects of this beautiful and tender ministry. And so the cemeteries throughout the land are made fragrant and beautiful as fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, sweethearts and friends a carry their floral tokens of love and place them upon the graves of those whom they loved "and lost awhile."

 

IV. Our National Memorial Day remains peculiarly associated with the soldiers who have fought our country's wars. It is a solemn reminder of human frailty, for war is but the evidence that our fallen humanity is not yet fully redeemed -- the symptom of violating the moral laws of the universe that has figured in human lives and in human history. Wars are not of God, but made by man. Likewise, depressions are not acts of the Creator. They are acts of man and man can change them and prevent them.

 

The simple rule of doing right would at once consign war to the realm of oblivion. A long, long time ago a prophet in Israel made use of these immortal words, which shall forever remain among the gems of sacred and classic literature: "What doth the Lord require of thee but to do justly, to love mercy and to walk humbly with thy God?" There is indicated the way of peace which all people pretend to want but which mankind has not yet been willing to follow.

 

V. But this is Memorial Day. It is not a festive occasion; nor is a funeral. It is a day of remembrance. Whether we think of the soldier or the civilian dead, we do well to think of them in terms of appreciation, of admiration and of gratitude. In whatever capacity it has been theirs to serve, their work is done. They have made their contribution to their country and to us. For this we give them honor and if we are at all worthy to follow in their train we will strive to perpetuate the good they have done.

 

Since Memorial Day is more directly associated with war, it is fitting that we approach it in a spirit of humility and penitence. Surely it is no time to exalt war or to boast of military superiority or achievements. It were better that we search our hearts to ascertain to what extent we are guilty.

 

Holy Writ declares that "all have sinned and come short of the glory of God." Neither as individuals nor as a nation dare we claim immunity.

 

We are a part of the wrongs of humanity which is responsible for all the maladjustments of this world and for which we may well implore the Divine mercy and resolve, in the language of the Great Emancipator, that the dead who made their sacrifice on field of battle or who made their contribution in some other worthy way "shall not have died in vain."

 

--------------

 

On Memorial Day, we "cover them over with beautiful flowers". That is good, but it is not enough. A truly memorial spirit is not satisfied with merely strewing flowers once a year upon the graves of those who fought the battles to preserve their country's precious heritage and have answered their final call. A real appreciation of that service results in a consecration of one's self to the highest interests of the land for which they struggled and for which many of them paid the price of supreme devotion. Our country today is threatened by greed and fanaticism and hatred of law. Many in positions of power would despoil our land for their own gain and their own gratification. Unwise reasoning leads to efforts which undermine the foundations of government and produce its down-fall. (Thomas Jefferson, University of Virginia, "The Art of Government in the Art of Being Honest.") In such circumstances we should not stand idly by and see the disaster. We should not allow indifferent ease or selfish interest or even personal fear to compromise our efforts to promote righteousness and law and sobriety and right relations between men. This is the vital message for Memorial Day'.

 

--------------

 

Tradition and history, while not authentic, discloses that Mrs. John A. Logan while in company with her husband, Maj. Gen. John A. Logan, Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, on a trip through the country, deplored the fact that so many graves of Union soldiers were being neglected. This was early in May, 1868.

 

Research reveals that John A. Logan was the founder of Memorial Day. As Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Amy of the Republic he promulgated General Order No. 11, dated at Washington, D.C. May 5, 1868, designating the thirtieth day of May for the purpose of decorating the graves of comrades who died in the defense of their country.

 

The General Order, in part, is as follows:

 

"1. The 30th day of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land. In this observance no form or ceremony is prescribed, but Posts and comrades will, in their own way, arrange such fitting services and testimonials of respect as circumstances may permit.

 

"***We should guard the graves (of our heroic dead) with sacred vigilance. All that the consecrated wealth and taste of the nation can add to their adornment and security is but a fitting tribute to the memory of her slain defenders. Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.

 

"If other eyes grow dull and other hands slack, and other hearts cold in the solemn trust, ours shall keep it well as long as the light and warmth of life remain in us.

 

"Let us, then, at the time appointed, gather around their sacred remains, and garland the passionless mounds above them with the choicest flowers of springtime; let us raise above them the dear old flag they saved; let us in this solemn presence renew our pledges to aid and assist those whom they have left among us a sacred charge upon the Nation's gratitude--the soldier's and sailor's widow and orphan.

 

"II"

 

--------------

 

America comes to another Memorial Day. The rich memories that have clustered around it for more than seventy five years belong to another period, now happily closing. A new struggle and a new set of experiences have cut across the lines graven from 1861 to 1865. The day which has necessarily been sectional in its observance, though the softening lapse of years has taken all bitterness away, will have a new and more truly national significance. For wherever Memorial Day is celebrated those who strew flowers on the graves of the blue-coated dead who died that the Union might live will have in mind also the unseen dead, the khaki-clad boys--sons and grandsons of these who were arrayed against each other in 1861--who loved and served a common country and died under a common flag, and now lie buried in European soil, in Africa, the lands of the Far and Near East and in the Islands of the seven seas, made sacred by the blood of sacrifice.

 

As a nation, how much we owe to the sacrifice of others? Our inheritance from the past generations is large and rich. We owe a great debt to the men and women of former days who toiled and endured making possible the manifold richness of our national and spiritual inheritance. We enjoy today the rich fruits of others' devotion and sacrifice. Scattered over the country in town and city and cemetery are many monuments--mute reminders of the cost of service and the nobility of sacrifice. They stand as witnesses to the great debt we owe to the brave men and women of the past, who freely gave their toll and shed their blood for others.

 

The struggles, privations, and sufferings of our colonial and revolutionary forefathers speak eloquently of sacrifice. How much that spirit has meant not alone to the beginnings of our nation but to all its subsequent and worthwhile character and achievement? Our national life has been enriched and made glorious by the sacrifice of those who counted not their lives dear unto themselves.

 

Yet we have never been a-war-like nation. Separated by the Atlantic from Europe we needed to give but little thought and attention to warfare. Our national tastes were averse to war. We did not believe that war was either a biological or moral necessity. As a people we diligently cultivated the arts of peace.

 

While we have not shrunk from necessary sacrifice, we have taught the doctrines of peace. We have fought in many wars, yet we have hated war. We have believed in the school-house and not in the fort and not the bomb-shell; in the home and not the arsenal or the armory; in free, happy industrious towns and cities, and not in Krupp gun-works.

 

When, therefore, on April 12, 1861 the national flag was fired on by the bombardment of Fort Sumter, the Federal government was wholly unprepared to meet such a situation. But when President Lincoln called me to rally to the nation's defense, from all sections of the north men rushed to Washington by the thousand, at first more rapidly than they could be efficiently trained and adequately equipped for service. Thus originated, as you know, the Union Army. And for four black, purgatorial years the Union soldier faced the horrors of death in many forms. He soon discovered that "without shedding of blood" the rebellion could not be put down.

 

We rejoice today that the bitter animosities of the past are forgotten that the North and the South have clasped hands in token of friendship and brotherly love. The Confederate soldier believed that he was in the right and fought sacrificially and shed his blood freely as only a brave man can. Like his brother of the North, he was a man of courage; he braved every peril, suffered every hardship, and faced death fearlessly for what he conceived to be his sacred rights. In Libby Prison are to be seen two bullets which met in mid-air over the battlefield of Petersburg. One is a Union bullet, the other a Confederate. In the shock of battle those two bullets met, and such was the heat and Impact of the collision they were welded into a leaden star. Beautiful symbol this of that union, one and indivisible, which exists among us today. Henceforth we are to be one in spirit and in purpose, as we have been one in struggle and in sacrifices as well as one in destiny as we face the larger tasks of the future.

 

How much we owe to the spirit sacrifice as manifested on a more colossal scale in that Armageddon of the world? Never such a crisis, never such great issues in the history of the world. Never before such shedding of blood, such stupendous sacrifices of human life and treasure in the history of men. The appalling cost of the last two World Wars in human life is staggering. In his "Direct and Indirect Costs of the War," (First World War) E. L. Bogart tells us that the total known dead number about ten million; the seriously wounded over six million; otherwise wounded over fourteen million. Hardly is it possible for the human mind to comprehend the awful significance of these figures; of ten million men and boys (the pick of nations) killed in that great struggle, a number about equal to the population of the State of New York. Do we grasp this? Can we permit ourselves too complacent about it? Yet, many among us are trying to forget and are putting their patriotism in cold storage. All too many have reverted to a life of selfish pleasure-seeking and are supporting a policy of aloofness forgetful of the fearful sacrifices made in their behalf in the shedding of the blood of millions of their follow men. Can those mothers whose sons made the supreme sacrifice on the plains of Picardy, in Flanders Field, in Africa, in Italy, in the Islands of the Pacific and around the world ever forget this struggle and what it meant for them to give of their dearest and their best? But among these millions who paid the last full measure of devotion to their country and the principles for which it stands NOT one of them regretted his sacrifice supreme if only thereby world freedom and peace might be established and war throughout the world forever outlawed.

 

Notwithstanding all this, there are these who talk lightly of the next war. They know not what they say. Another war on such a scale is most terrible to contemplate, for it would be sheer folly and madness. The practical impossibility of national neutrality has been abundantly established, so that another war would mean the virtual destruction of the white race, or at least its fatal weakening. The war microbe seems to be in the blood of some, and the sane, peace-loving people of the nations must labor to rid us all of the deadly germ.

 

-----------------

 

So there is still ample scope and abundant need for the manifestation of the spirit of heroism and sacrifice. Shall we not highly resolve to dedicate ourselves anew to a holy crusade to bring about peace and good- will among the nations.

 

It is difficult for us these days to realize that we are living in one world and how necessary it is for us to take more interest in world affairs, in order to prepare ourselves for world citizenship. We're living in one world, whether we like it or not.

 

There is a psychological termite which affects some of us middle age. It makes us cynical, and we lose the glamour of living. The best way to avoid this is to take an active interest in worthwhile civic projects.

 

Like many of you, I am tired of hearing every public speaker, radio voice, and newspaper editor drag in allusions to the Atomic bombs and fit it into the arguments they are presenting.

 

But the Atomic bomb is here. It is no longer a theory, but a fact. Our country has a supply of them, and it is a matter of public knowledge that we are still manufacturing the materials.

 

We must think more constructively and intensely about this matter of Atomic energy, and we must do something about it. President Truman has said truly, "The release of Atomic energy constitutes a new force far too revolutionary to consider in the framework of old ideas."

 

The Atomic Age is here, and nothing remains for the human race but to adjust its total life to an entirely new set of forces. It is impossible to turn back now.

 

The problem simply resolves itself into this: We have released a force which may destroy man and all his works in the twinkling of an eye. Can we control it, use it for our moral purposes, and make it further our peaceful and progressive civilization? Or will we fail to utilize the force we have unloosed for the human good and allow it eventually to blast this race from God's universe?

 

The pressing question of the day is, How can we have ONE WORLD, in which peace prevails and man's discoveries are used exclusively for man's good? How can all hates and jealousies and animosities be set aside so that nations will go to war no more?

 

The Atomic Age demands an answer.

 

In 1945 we discovered Atomic energy and used it destructively.

 

In 1947 we have nuclear energy and the means to produce it, and do not know what to do with it.

 

We must be sure that those men, these heads of government who have the responsibility for decisions to control the bomb--are upright moral and Christian men, with a deep sense of responsibility to their God and their brothers. THAT NOT ONE OF THEM WILL WANT TO SET OFF THAT BOMB.

 

General Leslie R. Groves declared that "the real problem is not to outlaw the Atomic bomb, but to outlaw war."

 

We have only one problem and one choice, it's either ONE WORLD-or none. It's either the universal Brotherhood of Man, or its annihilation through the utter destruction of our material world by the power we have but will not control.

 

We have had the ultimate in spiritual power for twenty centuries; we now have the ultimate in material power. One creates life; one destroys. Which will we use?

 

-----------------------

 

This bomb can be planted in a seaport or inland city, then detonated from a plane or submarine miles away. Unless we find the spiritual equivalent of the atomic bomb, it will continue to be used for the destruction of mankind instead of for peaceful purposes.

 

International control is the only way of conquering the atomic bomb. There are now five ways of making such a bomb and the cost of producing one is 85 per cent cheaper than when the first one was made.

 

Never before was there a greater need for brotherhood. That is a clich and because it is obvious, it has been neglected too long. We have never been nearer to what the prophets have spoken of as the abundant life than we are today, if we use our heads.

 

* * * * * * * *

 

This is the day of remembrance. Throughout the land the flags hang at half-mast and there is a somber stillness in the air as people move toward the peaceful place where their loved ones rest in their last sleep.

 

No household is left untouched by this remembrance, none but cherishes some memory of grief, though the years may have stolen away the pain of parting and set in its stead the knowledge that "It is not all of life to live nor all of death to die."

 

The boys who lie so silently under the white crosses speak to us this day in a tremendous shout that shakes our very souls -- a shout that will echo through the earth, sea and sky where they battled for truth add right until their victory is secured for all time.

 

Their work is done. Ours is but begun. In our hands, on our conscience, lies the victorious cause for which they died. It is our task to cherish, to nurture and maintain that victory, secure that peace, and so justify their sacrifice to our selves and to our children's children.

 

Mere living is not enough. Dying is not enough. There is something else; there is the aspiring soul of mankind that must be served. Not in words; not in lip service; in consecrated devoted service to the ideal of peace on earth and good will toward men -- ALL Men. Until this is achieved, until this hope of a suffering world is made manifest in deeds, the silence of our soldier dead must shout us down.

 

------------

 

The problem before us today is the crushing nut of democracy to give way to Communism. Communism has been tried time and time and again. The Indians practiced communism but they never had anything and they were lazy -- depended on the community.

 

The United States is the battleground today in this great Armageddon which the world is going through. Russia is trying to put Communism in America in order to rule the world.

 

We go forward through sympathy not through hatred toward any groups or nations.

 

Sail on O ship of state sail on

O nation strong and great

Humanity with all its fears

With all its hopes of future years

Is hanging breathless on thy fate.

 

 

 

 

Obituary of Robert A. Voorus
Oil City
(PA) Derrick December 20, 1985

Robert Voorus, 94, was teacher

 

Robert A. Voorus, 94, of Pleasantville RD 1, died at 2:50 a.m. today in the Oil City Area Health Center where he was admitted Dec. 13.

He was born in Pleasantville RD 1 Dec. 10, 1891, a son of Hiram and Lavina Watson Voorus.

Mr. Voorus had resided at Pleasantville RD 1 all his life except for the 30 years he worked in Washington, D.C., as chief clerk at the Library of Congress, retiring there in 1945.

He returned to the Oil City area where he became affiliated with Welch's Business College and worked there as an instructor until seven years ago, leaving the post at the age of 87 years.

Mr. Voorus was a member of the Shamburg Christian Church. He was very active in the Masonic fraternity, holding membership in Petrolia Lodge 363, F. & A.M., and the Albert Pike Consistory, Washington, D.C.

He is survived by a sister, Besse Voorus, at home.

Seven brothers and sisters are deceased.

Friends may call in the Louis H. Osenider Funeral Home, Oil City, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday. Funeral arrangements will be announced.

 

 

4.     Bess Blanche, born 12 Dec 1893 Oil Creek Twp, Venango Co PA, died 31 Mar 1992 Hillcrest Nursing Home, Grove City, Mercer Co PA, buried Fairview Cemetery, Pleasantville, Venango Co PA.

 

Obituary of Besse B. Voorus

Oil City (PA) Derrick, 2 June 1992

 

Besse B. Voorus, 98, a former Oil City schoolteacher and resident of the Hillcrest Nursing Home in Grove City since 1988, died at 5:20 pm Sunday in the home.

She was the last of her immediate family, which was formerly of the Pleasantville area.

Born December 12, 1893, Oilcreek Township, Venango County, she was a daughter of the late Hiram A. and Vina Watson Voorus.

Miss Voorus was graduated from Pleasantville High School and received her bachelor of arts degree from Slippery Rock Normal School.

She was an elementary school teacher for over 43 years, teaching in both the Oil City and Meadville school districts. Miss Voorus was a member of Shamburg Christian Church. She was a former member of the Pennsylvania Teachers Association and the American Association of Retired Persons.

She is survived by several nieces and nephews. Miss Voorus was preceded in death by eight brothers and sisters.

Friends will be received from 7 to 9 pm today at the Leo N. Hennes Funeral Home in Titusville.

Funeral services will be held at 11 am Wednesday in the funeral home. Rev. John D. Swartzfager, a retired minister, will officiate.

Interment will be in Fairview Cemetery at Pleasantville.

The family suggests memorials may be made to the Shamburg Christian Church in Pleasantville.

 

VOORUS

 

The funeral service for Miss Besse B. Voorus was conducted at 11 a.m. Wednesday, June 3, 1992, from the Leo N. Hennes Funeral Home with Rev. John Swartzfager, retired pastor of the Shamburg Christian Church, officiating.

Interment was in Fairview Cemetery in Pleasantville with the following serving as pallbearers: Philip Hogg, Stanley Hogg, Andrew Moore, Darrell Burtner, James Hogg, David Burtner and Greg Hogg.

Relatives and friends attending were Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hogg, Mrs. Ted Hogg and Ted Kneupper, all of Slippery Rock; Mr. and Mrs. Vance Burtner and Mr. and Mrs. Darrell Burtner, all of Butler; Philip Hogg of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Hogg of Pittsburgh; Mr. and Mrs. David Burtner of Brookville; Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Moore and family of Sarver; Mr. and Mrs. James Hogg of Erie; and Mr. and Mrs. Greg Hogg of Freedom.

 

 

5.     Clara Blanche, born 23 Jan 1897 Shamburg, Oil Creek Twp, Venango Co PA, died 27 Feb 1976 Pleasantville, Venango Co PA, buried Fairview Cemetery, Pleasantville, Venango Co PA.

 

Obituary of Clara Blanche Voorus

Titusville (PA) Herald - February 28, 1976

 

Miss Clara Blanche Voorus, 79, of Pleasantville, R.D. 2, died unexpectedly Feb. 27 at 10:30 a.m.

She was born January 23, 1897, in Oil Creek Township, Venango County, the daughter of the late Hiram A. and Vina Watson Voorus.

Miss Voorus was a graduate of Pleasantville High School, Slippery Rock State College and Teachers College of Columbia University. At the time of her retirement she was a teacher of English at Cortland State Teachers College, Cortland, N.Y. She was a member of the Shamburg Christian Church and the National Retired Teachers Association.

She is survived by two sisters, Lena Voorus and Besse Voorus and one brother, Robert A. Voorus, all of Pleasantville, R.D. 2. Several nieces and nephews also survive.

Friends may call at the Arnold and Gosnell Funeral Home today from 7-9 p.m., Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. And may attend the funeral at the funeral home Monday at 1 p.m. with Rev. Warren Helms, pastor of the Shamburg Christian Church, officiating. Interment will be in Fairview Cemetery, Pleasantville.

 

Funeral Service Announcement of Clara Blanche Voorus

Titusville (PA) Herald - March 2, 1976

 

The funeral service for Clara Blanche Voorus was conducted Monday at 1 p.m. at the Arnold and Gosnell Funeral Home with Rev. Warren Helms, pastor of the Shamburg Christian Church, officiating.

Interment was in Fairview Cemetery, Pleasantville, with the following serving as pallbearers: Ted Hogg, Robert Hogg, Greg Hogg, Stanley Hogg and Vance Burtner.

Attending from a distance were: Mr. and Mrs. Ted Hogg and family and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hogg and family, all of Slippery Rock, Pa.; Mr. and Mrs. Vance Burtner, Butler, Pa.; Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Waddell, Miss Georgia Shaw, Mrs. Fred Fogle, Mrs. Viola Johnston and Mrs. Chester Dean, all of Pleasantville, Pa.; Mrs. Janet Craft, Rouseville; and Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Reason on Oil City.

 

6.     Dorothy Pearle, born 8 Jun 1899 Venango Co PA, married Calvin Hogg 29 Aug 1921 Hogg Homestead, Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA, died 10 Sep 1975 Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA, buried Slippery Rock Cemetery, Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA. For more information on the descendants of this union, please see the chapter entitled Hogg.

7.     Elizabeth D, born circa 1903 PA, died 7 Jan 1951, buried Fairview Cemetery, Pleasantville, Venango Co PA.

8.     Marion Milton, born circa 1905 PA.

9.     Philip O, born circa 1912 PA, died 18 Jun 1936, buried Fairview Cemetery, Pleasantville, Venango Co PA.

 

 

 

 

Federal and State Census Records

 

VOORUS

 

Garrett Voorus (b 1761 - 1831).

 

Eleazor Voorus (b 1801 Montgomery Co NY - d 1868 Manlius NY) & Margaret Miller (b ?, m 1824, d bef 1838, & Caroline (b 1818 Schoharie Co NY - d ??).

 

1800 Garrett Voorus

1810 Garrett Voorus

1820 Garrett Voorus - Town of Florida, Montgomery Co NY, page 353.

1830 Garrett Voorus (d 1831) - Parish, Oswego Co NY, page 218.

 

1830 Eleazor Voorus - Parish, Oswego Co NY, page 218.

1840 Eleazor Voorus

 

1840 Andrew Voorus - Town of Florida, Montgomery Co NY, page 256.
1855 Andrew Voorus (state census)

1865 Andrew Voorus (state census)

1870 Andrew Voorus (with son Hiram Andrew)

 

1850 Federal Census, Manlius, Onondaga Co NY Household 702

Name

Age

Sex

Occupation

Value of Estate Owned

Born

Eleazor Voorus

46

M

Farmer

$6000

NY

Caroline (Miller)

32

F

 

 

NY

E.W.

18

M

Farmer

 

NY

Franklin

15

M

Att'd school

 

NY

Pricilla

13

F

Att'd school

 

NY

Philip

11

M

Att'd school

 

NY

Charles

3

M

 

 

NY

Anna M.

2

F

 

 

NY

George Camp

51

M

Laborer Idiotic

Can't Read/Write

ENGLAND

 

Household 707 (a few houses down from Eleazor - containing unknown Tibbett family)

Henry Tibbett/s

48

M

Farmer

$300

NY

Diana

35

F

 

 

NY

Elizabeth

10

F

 

 

NY

Geo H.

11

M

 

 

NY

Harriett

8

F

 

 

NY

Hannah (*)

70

F

 

 

CT

(*) Possibly the mother of the Hannah Tibbetts (who married Andrew Voorus his 2nd marriage) possibly living with her son Henry.

 

1850 Federal Census, Cazenovia, Madison Co NY Household 1274

Andrew Voorus

25

M

Farmer

$2200

NY

Frances (1st wife)

25

F

 

 

NY

Edgar

2/12

M

 

 

NY

 

Household 1275 (next door - possibly Andrew's brother)

Hiram Voorus

22

M

Farmer

$2200

NY

Roxina

22

F

 

 

PA

 

Household 1276 (next door - possibly a relative?)

Fredrick Voorus

46

M

Farmer

$3000

CT

Lovina

44

F

 

 

NY

Amy J

9

F

 

 

NY

Lydia Walters

53

F

 

 

CT

 

1855 State Census, Manlius, 1st District, Onondaga Co NY Household 376

Name

Age

Sex

Occupation/Relation

Value of Estate Owned

Born

Yrs in this town

Eleazor Voorus

54

M

Farmer

 

Montgomery Co NY

14

Caroline (Miller)

36

F

Wife

 

Schoharie Co NY

14

Franklin

20

M

Son

 

Onondaga Co NY

14

Philip

15

M

Son

 

Onondaga Co NY

14

Charles

8

M

Son

 

Onondaga Co NY

8

Anna M.

7

F

Dau

 

Onondaga Co NY

7

Ellen

3

F

Dau

 

Onondaga Co NY

3

Elizabeth Heckman

25

F

Domestic

 

Germany

3/12

Fredrick Stevens

23

M

Servant

 

Germany

3/12

 

1860 Federal Census, Manlius, Onondaga Co NY Household 38

 

 

 

 

Value of Estate Owned

Place of

Name

Age

Sex

Occupation

Real Est.

Personal

Birth

Elizer Voorus

59

M

Farmer

$10,000

$2,000

NY

Caroline (Miller)

42

F

 

 

 

NY

Charles

13

M

Attd'd school

 

 

NY

Anna M.

12

F

Attd'd school

 

 

NY

Ellen

8

F

Attd'd school

 

 

NY

Margaret (Miller)

70

F

(Carol's mom)

 

 

NY

George Camp (*)

60

M

Farm Laborer

 

 

ENGLAND

Patrick Haley

23

M

Farm Laborer

 

 

IRELAND

Robert Waltz

17

M

Farm Laborer

 

 

NY

(*) Pauper - can't read/write.

 

1860 Federal Census, Cazenovia, Madison Co NY Household 432

 

 

 

 

Value of Estate Owned

Place of

Name

Age

Sex

Occupation

Real Est.

Personal

Birth

Andrew Voorus

35

M

Farmer

$4,000

$1,000

NY

Hannah (Tibbets)

44

F

 

 

 

NY

James E.

10

M

Attd'd school

 

 

NY

Ester N.

8

F

Attd'd school

 

 

NY

Georgianna

4

F

Attd'd school

 

 

NY

Hiram A.

3

M

 

 

 

NY

 

1865 State Census, Manlius, 1st District, Onondaga Co NY Household 293, Frame House, Value $1400.

Name

Age

Sex

Relation

Occupat'n

NY County Born

Times

married

#Children

Had

Eleazer Voorus(*)

63

M

Head

Farming

Montgomery

2

 

Caroline (Miller)

41

F

Wife

 

Schoharie

1

4

Anna B.

16

F

Dau

 

Onondaga

 

 

Helen

13

F

Dau

 

Onondaga

 

 

Hiram Conrad

16

M

Servant

Farm Laborer

Madison

 

 

Daniel Brown

22

BM

Servant

 

PA

 

 

Margaret Miller

74

F

Carol's Mom

Widowed

Herkimer

1

4

(*) Died 1868, "Native, Owner of Land".

 

1880 Federal Census, Manlius, Onondaga Co NY Household 34 (Canal Street)

 

 

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

Andrew Voorus (*)

55

M

 

Farmer

NY

NY

NY

Luanna/Susana (3rd wife?)

54

F

Wife

Keep'g House

NY

NY

NY

Minni

7

F

Dau

 

NY

NY

NY

Susie

5

F

Dau

 

NY

NY

NY

(*) died 1889.

 

Household 50

Hiram E. Voorus

23

M

 

Farm Laborer

NY

NY

VT?

Calista (1st wife)

22

F

Wife

Keeps house

NY

NY

NY

Georgiana B.

2

F

Dau

 

NY

NY

NY

Edgar H.

1

M

Son

 

NY

NY

NY

 

1900 Federal Census, Oil Creek Township, Venango Co PA Household 2

 

 

Yrs

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Md

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

Hiram A. Voorus

43

M

14

Head

Farmer

NY

NY

NY

Vina L (Watson) (*)

31

F

14

Wife

 

PA

PA

PA

Grover A.

11

M

 

Son

Attd'd school

PA

NY

PA

Robert A.

8

M

 

Son

Attd'd school

PA

NY

PA

Lena

10

F

 

Dau

Attd'd school

PA

NY

PA

Bessie B.

6

F

 

Dau

Attd'd school

PA

NY

PA

Cora

3

F

 

Dau

Attd'd school

PA

NY

PA

Dorothy

11/12

F

 

Dau

 

PA

NY

PA

(*) Listed as having 6 children, 6 of which are alive.

 

1910 Federal Census, Oil Creek Twp, Venango Co PA Household 319 (on Plummer Rd)

 

 

Yrs

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Md

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

Hiram H. Voorus

51

M

24/2x

Head

Farming

NY

NY

NY

Vina L (Watson) (*)

42

F

24

Wife

Wife

PA

PA

PA

Grover A.

22

M

 

Son

Helper on Farm

PA

NY

PA

Lena V.

20

F

 

Dau

Public School Teacher

PA

NY

PA

Robert A.

18

M

 

Son

 

PA

NY

PA

Blanch

15

F

 

Dau

 

PA

NY

PA

Bessie B.

16

F

 

Dau

 

PA

NY

PA

Dorotha

10

F

 

Dau

 

PA

NY

PA

Elizabeth D.

7

F

 

Dau

 

PA

NY

PA

Marion M.

5

M

 

Son

 

PA

NY

PA

(*) Listed as having 8 children, 8 of which are alive.

 

1920 Federal Census, Oil Creek Township, Venango Co PA Household 100

 

 

 

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

Hiram Voorus (*)

63

M

Head

Farmer

PA?

PA?

PA?

Vina L (Watson) (**)

52

F

Wife

 

PA

PA

PA

Grover A.

32

M

Son

Farmer

PA

PA?

PA

Lena V.

30

F

Dau

School Teacher

PA

PA?

PA

Robert A.

29

M

Son

School Teacher

PA

PA?

PA

Bessie B.

27

F

Dau

School Teacher

PA

PA?

PA

Blanch C.

23

F

Dau

School Teacher

PA

PA?

PA

Dorothy A.

21

F

Dau

School Teacher

PA

PA?

PA

Elizabeth

18

F

Dau

 

PA

PA?

PA

Marion M.

15

M

Son

 

PA

PA?

PA

Philip O.

8

M

Son

 

PA

PA?

PA

(*) Died 1927.

(**) Died 1940.

 

 

1920 Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia (ED 49-10B) (listing Robert A. Voorus boarding with a family in DC).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

Day, Mary C.

55

F

Head

None

DC

France

DC

, Harold B

25

M

Son

Correspondent, War Dept

DC

MA

DC

, Mabel

23

F

Dau

Comptometer Operatr, Treas.

MD

MA

DC

, Elizabeth

20

F

Dau

Comptometer Operatr, Treas.

MD

MA

DC

, Mary H

9

F

Dau

None

DC

MA

DC

Voorus, Robert A

28

M

Lodger

Teacher, Private School

PA

U.S.

U.S.

Richenbrode, How

25

M

Lodger

Field Clerk, ICC

KS

PA

NY

Johnson, Samuel

25

M

Lodger

Clerk, RR Office

DC

U.S.

U.S.

(*) Lived at 537 21st St, Washington, DC

 

 

1920 Federal Census, Pleasantville Borough, Venango Co PA Household 84 (containing a Beebe family and a Tibbitssee Tibbits chapter for more information)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

William D. Beebe

65

M

Head

Office Bookeeper

PA

NY

NY

Delia J

63

F

Wife

None

PA

PA

PA

Manly? C

36

M

Son

None

PA

PA

PA

Mildred D

27

F

Dau

None

PA

PA

PA

Maria S

88

F

Mother-in-law

None

NY

NY

NY

Adeline E Tibbetts

80

F

Aunt

None

NY

NY

NY

 

1930 Federal Census, Oil Creek Twp, Venango Co, PA (ED 61-33)

 

 

 

First

 

Father

Mother

 

 

Name

Relatn

Age

Status

Marr

Born

Born

Born

Occupation

Industry

Voorus, Vina L (**)

Head

62

Widow

17

PA

PA

PA

Farmer

Own farm

, Grover A

Son

42

S

 

PA

NY

PA

Farmer

Farm

, Lena V

Dau

40

S

 

PA

NY

PA

Teacher

Public Sch

, Bess B.

Dau

36

S

 

PA

NY

PA

Teacher

Public Sch

, Philip O.

Son

18

S

 

PA

NY

PA

None

 

(*) Value of owned home: Not mentioned

(**) Died 7/1940

 

 

1940 Federal Census, Oil Creek Twp, Venango Co, PA (ED 61-47, page 4)

 

 

 

First

 

Father

Mother

 

 

Name

Relatn

Age

Status

Marr

Born

Born

Born

Occupation

Industry

Voorus, Vina (*)(**)

Head

72

Wd

 

PA

 

 

 

 

, Grover

Son

52

S

 

PA

 

 

Farmer

Just operates his mothers farm

, Lena

Dau

48

S

 

PA

 

 

Teacher

Oil City Grade School

, Besse

Dau

45

S

 

PA

 

 

Teacher

Oil City Jr. High School

(*) Road 600, House 57, Value $4000.

(**) Died 7/1940

 

 

 

1940 Federal Census, Washington, District of Columbia (ED 274-C) (listing Robert A. Voorus boarding with a family in DC)

 

 

 

First

 

Father

Mother

 

 

Name

Relatn

Age

Status

Marr

Born

Born

Born

Occupation

Industry

Braithwaiter, W (*)

Head

53

M

 

WV

 

 

Business Specialist

Bureau of Standards

, Helen L.

Wife

54

M

 

SD

 

 

 

 

, Edna L.

Dau

18

S

 

DC

 

 

 

 

, Margaret F.

Dau

17

S

 

DC

 

 

 

 

Voorus, Robert A.

Lodger

48

S

 

PA

 

 

Researcher

Library of Congress

(*) Lived 3714 Military Road, Arlington, VA (part of DC in 1940 I believe).

 

 

 

 

 

VOORUS INFORMATION

 

Christ Church Cemetery Burials, Manlius, Onondaga Co NY

Voories, Frances C., wife of Andrew, d. 7 Oct 1853 age 28y7m

Voorus, James E., son of. Andrew, d. 2 Apr 1870 age 20y

Voorus, Susan, wife of Andrew, d. 18 Dec 1874 age 35y9m

Voorus, Gracie, dau. of Hiram, d. 25 Aug 1877 age 1y11m5d

Voorus, Luania M. d. 22 Jun 1902 age 75

Voorus, Andrew d. 20 May 1889 age 64y6m

 

Oran Cemetery Burials, Oran Station Road, Pompey, Onondaga Co NY

Voorus, Hannah d. Oct. 20, 1867, age. 54y2m20d, w/o Andrew

Voorus Hannah d. Oct. 23, 1843, age. 8m, d/o Andrew & Hannah

Voorus, Thomas d. Oct. 23, 1843, s/o Andrew & Hannah

 

 

VOORUS SOURCES

 

         Genealogical and historical research I conducted.

         The Van Voorhees Association (www.vanvoorhees.org).

         Venango County, Pennsylvania - Her Pioneers and People by Charles A. Babcock, A.M., LL.B., J.H. Beers & Company, 1919, Chicago IL.