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MOORE

 

Summary Information

 

Compiled by: Andrew L. Moore

Email: PAmoores@juno.com

Dated: 22 Sep 2015


 

 

MOORE

 

ÜÜÜÜ

Jesse Moore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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John R Moore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ý

 

Richard Milton Jr

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Richard Milton Sr/Eliza ____

 

 

 

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Molly Milton

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Margaret Ross

 

 

 

 

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Milton Moore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ý

 

 

Ebsworth Bayne

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Walter Bayne/Martha

Þ

 

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Ý

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Walter Bayne

 

 

 

 

 

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Ý

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Susannah Middleton

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Thomas Middleton/Penelope Hatton

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Martha Bayne

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ý

 

Robert Wade

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Robert Wade

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Meek A Wade

 

 

 

 

 

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Mary Henry

 

 

 

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Wm Berry Moore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ý

 

 

 

Isaac Lewis Sr

 

 

 

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Ý

 

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Isaac Lewis Jr

 

 

 

 

ß

Ý

 

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Mary

 

 

 

ß

Ý

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Berry Lewis

 

 

 

 

 

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Ý

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Ý

 

Azariah Lewis

 

 

 

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Ý

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Elizabeth Lewis

 

 

 

 

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Ý

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Mary Ann Berry

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William Berry

 

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Elizabeth Lewis

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ý

 

 

Rev William H Hays

 

 

 

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Ý

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William Hays Jr

 

 

 

 

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Ý

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Mary Slack

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Randolph Slack/Sarah Penn

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Mary Hays

 

 

 

 

 

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David Burcham

 

 

 

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Eleanor Burcham

 

 

 

 

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Rebecca VanVactor

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Benjamin VanVactor

 

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Claude S Moore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

 

 

 

Jacob Sorency

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Florin Sorency / Ann ________

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Ý

 

 

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Samuel Sorency

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

 

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Jemima Higham

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John Higham / Rachel Bradshaw

 

Ý

 

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David Sorency

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

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Ý

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

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Ann West

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

ß

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

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Silas Sorency

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

ß

Ý

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

ß

Ý

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Thomas Brown

 

 

 

 

Ý

ß

Ý

ß

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

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Susannah Brown

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

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Ý

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Ý

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Annie L Sorency

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

 

 

Henry Wilson I

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

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Henry Wilson

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

ß

 

?????

 

 

 

 

Ý

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Lewis Wilson

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

ß

Ý

 

John Faulkner

 

 

 

 

Ý

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Frances Faulkner

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

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Rejoice Craig

Ü

Toliver Craig/Mary Hawkins

Þ

 

ÜÜÜÜ

Martha Wilson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

 

Richard Thomas II

Ü

Richard Thomas/Isabella Pendleton

Þ

 

 

Ý

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Richard Thomas III

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

ß

 

Frances Hawkins

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Philemon Hawkins/Sarah Smith

Þ

 

 

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Sarah A Thomas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

Jesse Bowles

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Elizabeth Bowles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hannah Perkins

 

 

 

 


MOORE

 

 

MOORE.  (1) English: topographic name for someone who lived on a moor or in a fen, both of which were denoted by Middle English more (Old English mor), or habitation name from any of the various places named with this word, as for example Moore in Cheshire or More in Shropshire  (2) English: nickname for a man of swarthy complexion, from Old French more Moor, Negro (Latin Mauras, ultimately from Phoenician mauharim Eastern.  (3) English: from a personal name of the same origin as in #2 above, which was borne by several early saints.  The given name was introduced into England by the Normans, but was never popular in England as on the Continent.  (4) Irish:  Anglicized form of Gaelic.  O’Mordha ‘descendant of Mordha’, a byname meaning ‘Great’, ‘Proud’, or ‘Stately’.  (5) Scots and Welsh: nickname for a large man, from Gael. mor, Welsh mawr big great.  Numerous variations.  Excerpted from A Dictionary of Surnames by Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges, Oxford University Press, Oxford NY  1988.

 

 

Research to confirm who our early Moore ancestors were has been inconclusive.  We know with a high degree of certainty that our earliest known Moore ancestor is Jesse Moore.  He was probably born in Virginia in the late 1730s or early 1740s.  In a 5 Aug 1762 Prince William Co VA Court Deposition, Jesse states that he is of “full age”.  He begins to appear in Northern Virginia records (specifically Prince William Co VA) as early as 1762.  From Prince William County he either traveled a short distance north to Fairfax and Loudoun Counties, VA or was originally in northern Prince William Co VA – which later became Fairfax Co and which was later partitioned into Loudoun Co.  After appearing a number of times in these counties, he migrated to Nelson Co KY in 1789.  Jesse first appears in Nelson Co records when he joins an Oct 1789 petition to the State government to build better roads and a tobacco warehouse. 

 

From Nelson Co KY, his son and our direct ancestor, John R., migrated across the Chaplin River to Washington Co KY.  John’s son, Milton, lived and died in that County.  From there, Milton’s son, William Berry, migrated with his sister, Sarah (Moore) Murphy, and her husband, Daniel Boone Murphy, to Reno Co Kansas sometime between 1880 (when they were listed in Washington Co KY census records) and 17 Sep 1884.  On that date Daniel Boone and Sarah (Moore) Murphy purchased 160 acres of Reno Co KS land for $1650.  Daniel Boone’s obituary states that they migrated from Kentucky to Kansas in March of 1884.

 

More about Jesse Moore and his descendants later.

 

Extensive research has been conducted to determine the parentage and ancestry of Jesse Moore.  In a 14 Oct 1782 Loudoun Co VA Deed Book entry, a potential smoking gun was located.  A Jesse Moore petitioned the Loudoun County court in regards to the last will and testament of his father William Moore of Craven County, South Carolina…..with the will bearing the date 20 Nov 1780.....telling the court that will “shall” be committed to record in Virginia or South Carolina (why it had not been up to that date is a mystery)…..and also telling the court that he (Jesse) resigns all right and title to the administration of said estate and asks that the court transfer this administrative authority to his “beloved” brother Jeremiah Moore.  An extensive search has been made to locate this will in either Virginia or South Carolina – but to no avail.  Reference: Loudoun Co VA Deed Book N, pages 377-378 (complete reference below).

 

From this Court record, we learn that: 1) Jesse and Jeremiah’s father William died in Craven County, South Carolina between 20 Nov 1780 and 14 Oct 1782; 2) the will had yet to be recorded; 3) because the reference indicates that the will “shall” be committed in either Virginia or South Carolina, Jesse was probably carrying his father’s will with him at the time (or at least had it in his possession) but for some reason did not submit it to the county for recording and probating; and 4) Jesse did not feel qualified to be one of Executors of his father’s estate.

 

I have come to the conclusion that Jeremiah Moore, the famous Baptist preacher of northern Virginia during the colonial period, is the Jeremiah Moore listed in the above court reference and was the brother of our direct ancestor Jesse Moore.  This conclusion is based on the numerous censuses, as well as court and church references, mentioning Jesse and Jeremiah.  As our Jesse did not leave any trace of his ancestry, a search for information on the parentage of Jeremiah Moore was conducted.  Several individuals have conducted character studies on Jeremiah Moore – the most notable of which is probably Dr. William Cabell Moore.

 

 

Background on Jeremiah Moore, Jesse’s presumed brother

Jeremiah Moore was born on 7 June 1746 in Dumfries, Prince William Co VA.  According to a biographical sketch in Virginia Baptist Ministers, “his parents, though not wealthy, were respectable.”  According to the History of the Rise and Progress of the Baptists in Virginia, Jeremiah was born “of parents in the middle rank of life and raised in the Protestant Episcopal Church.”  The pamphlet entitled Moorefield – Fairfax County Virginia by Thomas V DiBacco and published by the Fairfax County (VA) Office of Comprehensive Planning provides a wealth of information on Jeremiah, his parentage (two possibilities are outlined) and his life as a Baptist preacher and church planter.

According to "The Reno Family" by William L. Reno, Jr., Jeremiah was ordained in the Episcopal Church but left it and founded the first Baptist congregation and church in Alexandria, VA for which he was prosecuted by the Bishop of VA--Patrick Henry and George Washington aided in his defense.  A bronze plaque on the side of the city building in Alexandria indicates that it is the site of the Old City Jail in which Rev. Jeremiah Moore was incarcerated for "preaching the gospel without a license". 

According to John K. Gott, Member of the Executive Committee of the Virginia Baptist Historical Society, Jeremiah “was a prominent native Virginian who was converted (from Episcopalism) to the Baptist faith at an early age and zealously led the denomination in Northern Virginia to prominence.  From his home, ‘Moorefield’, he traveled over the area, preaching, establishing churches and leading the cause of absolute religious freedom and absolute separation of church and state.” Excerpted from Moorefield – Fairfax County Virginia, page v.

 

The two schools of thought on Jeremiah’s paternal ancestry mentioned in the pamphlet are:

 

1.     Jeremiah was the son of William Moore and the grandson of a John Moore who immigrated to America from Northern Ireland in the year 1700 and spent his first years in South Carolina.  John Moore was the brother of James Moore, the first Governor of South Carolina.

2.     Jeremiah was the son of William Moore and the grandson of a John Moore who came from England and settled in Elizabeth City County, Virginia in 1620.

 

According to the pamphlet, Jeremiah Moore’s mother was Angelina French, whose family settled in the Northern Neck area of Virginia (the strip of land between the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers).  In Dumfries in 1763, the practicing Episcopalian, Jeremiah, heard the preaching of pioneer Baptist preacher Elder David Thomas and his interest in the faith was piqued.  In 1765 at age 19 he married a Lydia Reno/Renno, daughter of Francis Renno, and by 1772 he had publicly professed his Baptist faith and was baptized by Elder Thomas, who at the time prophesized that “I think I have this day baptized a preacher.”  During his early years as a preacher, he and other Baptist preachers were persecuted for their preaching by the established church of the day: The Church of England.  Some sources indicate that Jeremiah’s preaching activities were once defended by Patrick Henry.  Jeremiah served for a short time in the Revolutionary War as a Corporal in the Virginia Infantry.  On 2 Oct 1789 Jeremiah and his wife sold the 264 acres of land they owned on a branch of Difficult Run.  It is assumed that he moved to Moorefield (present day location is in the Townes of Moorefield subdivision off of Nutley Street in southwest Vienna).  In 1800 he wrote to and received a reply from Thomas Jefferson on the topic of political freedom.  Jefferson ran for President that very year.

 

It was estimated that during his lifetime, Jeremiah rode over 52,000 miles, visiting and preaching in Virginia, Maryland, North and South Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey and New York.  He delivered his last sermon in the winter of 1814 to congregations in Leesburg and Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia and died at his home in Moorefield on 23 Feb 1815.  He is buried in the Moorefield Cemetery, which is approximately 1000 ft west of Nutley Road at the intersection of Moorefield Creek and Tapawingo Road, S.W. Manassas.

 

Jeremiah’s will can be found in Fairfax Co VA Will Book K, page 271.  The will was written 1 Aug 1814 and it was probated 20 Mar 1815.  The will mentions wife and Executrix Lydia, sons John (who is to get Moorefield, located south of Ellzey’s Church Road), Jesse, Francis, Ammishaddia, William F, and daughters Angelina Hunter (wife of George W Hunter), Elizabeth S, Nancy T and Margaret F. Smith.  It gives a mill in Jefferson Co to sons Jesse and Francis and it gives Condens Concordance, Robertson Ecclesiastical researches and Benedicts History of Baptists (his library books?) to son (and “preacher”) Francis “not because is my son but because he is a preacher for although preaching is not a loosing business, still he that would discharge this duty in the fear of God, will find it a heavy check on all worldly interests.”  In reference to the slaves that he owned, Jeremiah stated “The situation of the Laws at present and the State of this unhappy Country, generally leaves no opportunity to say anything about that part of my family that are slaves by law, I must leave them therefore to the mercy of my children and hope they will do to and for them what is right.”

 

Rev. Jeremiah Moore’s Obituary

25 Feb 1815, The Alexandria (VA) Gazette

Died, on the 23rd instant, after a long illness, Jeremiah Moore, Senior, of Fairfax County, Va in the 69th year of his age. He has left behind him a aged widow, the companion of his youth, with nine children to bemoan the loss of a kind husband and affectionate father.  The characters of the deceased, is generally known in his own, and neighboring states.  He was a laborious and faithful defender of the doctrines of the everlasting gospel—nor did he more assert, and illustrate these in his writings and public discourses, than he confirmed their heavenly origin, by a conduct according to Godliness. More than forty years he labored in the Vineyard of his Divine Master.  He now is entered home to receive his wages—not of debt, but of grace.--Gratis, that theme which so many years employed his tongue, and rejoiced his heart. 

            The whole course of his public ministry proved that he was mindful of that divine injunction, “Buy the truth and sell it not.”  Many there are, who need not printed columns to revive in their minds a recollection of his labors—many upon the fleshly tables of whose hearts his commendatory epistles are deeply written.

He signified to a familiar friend a few weeks before his death, that the time of his departure was at hand—may we not add that “he has fought the good fight; finished his course; kept the faith.”

 

--------------------------------

 

 

Jesse Moore, son of Reverend Jeremiah Moore, was born 4 Sep 1766 and died 26 Sep 1835. Jesse married (1) Catherine Brent on 20 Apr 1788 and (2) Jane Wallace on 18 Dec 1806.  His first marriage was officiated by his father.  Catherine Brent was born 18 Feb 1772 and died 19 Nov 1804.  She was the daughter of Charles and Ann (Gunnell) Brent.  They lived in Jefferson Co VA where Jesse was an attorney.  His second wife, Jane Wallace, was born 21 Jan 1786.  She was the daughter of William and Mary Jane Wallace.

 

Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) references to Jeremiah Moore include: 119059, 123013, 136088.

 

The father of Lydia Reno/Renno, Jeremiah’s wife, was Francis Reno.  According to a footnote in the Moorefield pamphlet, a Lewis Reno was naturalized on 2 Oct 1688 and “was presumably he was the first of Lydia’s ancestors to arrive in America.”  According to a now deceased Reno researcher named Sherman Reno, a Lewis Reno was born in London circa 1682, naturalized 2 Oct 1688, married a Margaret Harrison in St. Patrick’s Church in Dublin, Ireland by Anglican minister William Moore – “grandfather of Jeremiah Moore, Baptist minister”.  Unfortunately Sherman died in the late 1980s and I have been unsuccessful in learning the source of his information on William from his son, Kyle Reno, currently living (as late as 1998) in California.

 

According to "The Reno Family" by William L. Reno Jr, Lydia Reno was born in 1745 in Prince William Co., VA and also died at "Moorefield" in 1833.  She was the daughter of Francis Reno, 1719-1797 and Elizabeth Bayliss.

 

 

Jeremiah Moore ancestral research

By

Dr. William Cabell Moore

 

In the early 1900’s, a Dr. William Cabell Moore began to investigate the ancestry of his earliest known ancestor Jeremiah Moore.  His extensive research was published in the William and Mary Quarterly Magazine in 1937 in an article entitled Notes on Some Moore and French Families in Virginia and Carolina in the Colonial Period.  Below, reprinted with permission, are the article’s summary paragraphs.

 

 

 


Notes on Some Moore and French Families in Virginia and Carolina in the Colonial Period

By Dr. William Cabell Moore

The William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine

2nd Series, Volume XVII (1937), pages 372-398.

Reprinted with permission (dated 4/21/2000) from Ms. Kim Wahl, Office Manager, William & Mary Quarterly, Williamsburg, VA  23187-8781.

 

 

I.

 

THE MOORES OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA.

 

The following notes relating to some of the Moore and French families of Tidewater and northern Virginia and of eastern Carolina in the Colonial period were made in a search for information concerning the ancestors of Jeremiah Moore, of "Moorefield," Fairfax county, Virginia, who was born in or near Dumfries, in Prince William county, Virginia in 1746.  By no means all the available records that might throw light on the early Moore and French families in Virginia and the Carolinas have been studied, but considerable time was spent in collecting these notes, and they may be of value to future investigators.

Among Jeremiah Moore's descendants are two traditions with respect to his ancestry. One story relates that he was the grandson of John Moore, who came to America from the northern part of Ireland about 1700, and located first in South Carolina; the other, that he was descended from a John Moore who in 1620 came to Virginia from England and settled in Elizabeth City county.

Mention of his parents by name has not been found in the records of his time, but it has been understood in the family that the father of Jere­miah was named William Moore, and his mother, Angelina French Moore, and it seems reasonably certain that his parents were living in Prince William county in 1746, the year of his birth, for, as stated above, Jeremiah was born there, and he himself lived there during his youth, he married a Prince William county girl and when he was first grown he was a lay-reader in the Episcopal Church on Quantico in Prince William.  Mrs. Kate D. Berryman, of Washington, a descendant of Jeremiah, has examined many of the old court records and other records in Prince William (and adjoining counties) and has found occasional mention of a William Moore, a Jesse Moore (Jeremiah named his oldest son Jesse) and of Jeremiah Moore in lists of voters, witnesses and other records in Prince William, but whether this William Moore was the father of Jeremiah is not known. The writer was told in 1932 by one of Jeremiah's great-grandsons that he had heard that Jeremiah's father was at one time a post-rider or mail-carrier, but no record has been found to verify this statement.

The name of Jeremiah's mother was not known to the writer until recently, when Mrs. Jessie Virginia Elgin Ritchey (Mrs. Charles A. Ritchey), of New York, and her sister, Mrs. Mary Elgin Mann, of Balti­more, stated in an affidavit given to the writer that they had been in­formed personally by their grandfather, George Washington Hunter Smith (1812-1896), who was a grandson of Jeremiah, that the mother of Jere­miah was named Angelina French, and that this was the reason Jere­miah's eldest daughter was named "Angelina French Moore", and the ex­planation for the name "French" occurring in the given names of two of his other daughters and one of his sons, and in the names of children of several of his children (Francis and Margaret) and for being handed down to a recent time in Mrs. Ritchey's family.  The name Angelina French is unusual, but one other person with this name having been found in a search through many articles and books in the Library of Congress relating to the French family, an Angelina French who was born in 1862 near Camden, N. J. There were several families named French living in the Northern Neck and in Northern Virginia in the time of Jeremiah, but up to the present a search for data relating to these families has not brought to light a single maiden named Angelina French.

Court records in Fairfax, Prince William, Stafford, Spotsylvania, King George, Westmoreland and Richmond Counties during the period prior to 1800 reveal no evidence of an Angelina French or of a William Moore who had a wife named Angelina French, or of any early Moore who can be definitely connected with Jeremiah, but many records in these counties were destroyed or lost during the War between the States and there is little left.

 

 

II.

 

THE MOORES OF TIDEWATER.

 

There is no known record to prove that Jeremiah Moore, of "Moore-field," in Fairfax county, was descended from John Moore, who came to Elizabeth City county, Virginia, in 1620, but this tradition has been handed down in one branch of the family, and a definite statement to this effect is contained in a letter to the writer from Mrs. Charles A. Ritchey, of New York, a great, great granddaughter of Jeremiah.  Mrs. Ritchey states that her grandfather, George Washington Hunter Smith (1812-1896), who spent the last years of his life in her father's house, frequently spoke of his family and his Moore ancestry, and that she made notes at the time of what he said. He told her that his grandfather, Jeremiah Moore, was the son of William Moore and Angelina French Moore and that William Moore had a brother Daniel and a sister Martha, who married a Dixon, and that he thought that they were the children of Augustine Moore and his wife Mary Woolley Moore, of Elizabeth City county.  Mrs. Ritchey's mother also told her that she remembered relatives named Dixon and some named Goodwin.  It is known that the above mentioned Au­gustine Moore had a sister named Elizabeth who married John Goodwin.

Mrs. Ritchey having heard these things from her grandfather, and seeing in the "Baltimore Sun," of May 27, 1906, an article by Jane Griffith Keys, on "The Moore Family in Virginia," in which the names William Moore, Daniel Moore and Martha Dixon, children of Augustine Moore and Mary Woolley Moore, of Elizabeth City county, occur with others among the descendants of a John Moore who came to Virginia in 1620, naturally concluded that Jeremiah was descended from this John Moore.

But it is certain that William Moore, the brother of Daniel Moore and Martha Dixon, and the son of Augustine Moore and Mary Woolley Moore, of Elizabeth City county, and a descendant of John Moore who set­tled in Elizabeth City county in 1620, was not the father of Jeremiah Moore, who was born in 1746, for this William Moore had another brother named Au­gustine, who died in 1737, who in his will written in 1736, proved in 1737, left property to a nephew and niece, children of "my brother William now deceased."

There are several mis-statements in the article by Mrs. Keys.  She calls John Moore, who settled in Elizabeth City county in 1620, "Captain," and states that he was Burgess for Isle of Wight in 1652-54, but John Moore, of Elizabeth City county is not known to have had a title and was an entirely different person from "Captain" John Moore, of Isle of Wight, who served in the House of Burgesses in 1652-54.

Mrs. Keys states also that Augustine More, who built the "Chelsea" house in King William county, was the son of Daniel Moore, son of Au­gustine Moore and Mary Woolley Moore, and a descendant of John Moore, of Elizabeth City county, and assumes that this John Moore was descended from Sir Thomas More, Lord High Chancellor of England, in the reign of Henry the Eighth, but there is no proof that John Moore, of Elizabeth City county was descended from Sir Thomas More, the Lord High Chan­cellor, and it is questionable whether Augustine More, who built "Chel­sea," was a descendant of John Moore, of Elizabeth City county, and it is certain that Augustine More, who built "Chelsea" was not the son of Daniel Moore, son of Augustine Moore and Mary Woolley Moore.

This Daniel Moore had a son named Augustine but this Augustine, the son of Daniel, was born in 1731, bought "Temple Farm" near York­town in 1769 from his brother-in-law, Robert Smith, and lived there until his death in 1788, while on reliable authority the Augustine More, who built "Chelsea," was born in England about 1685, came to Virginia about 1705, built "Chelsea" thereafter, living there to his death in 1743, and is buried there,

Dr. Lyon G. Tyler states that the Moore families of Elizabeth City, York and King William, in whom the name Augustine appeared to be a family name, were probably all descended from Augustine Moore who patented land in 1652, presumably the son of John Moore who came to Virginia in 1620. But Augustine (2), the son of this John and John's only son so far as known, had only two sons, so far as the record shows, Augustine, Jr., (3) and John (3). John (3) named no children in his will, proved Jan. 19, 1715-16, so apparently was childless.  Augustine, Jr. (3), the grandson of John, the immigrant, is the Augustine Moore who married Mary Woolley and they had a number of sons and among them a son named Augustine (4), the one who died in 1737. This Augustine (4) in his will proved in Elizabeth City county in 1737, named no wife nor children of his own, and must have been childless when the will was written.  So, clearly, unless Augustine (2), the son of John Moore the immigrant, had another son of whom nothing is known at this time, Augustine More, of "Chelsea," could not have been descended from him.

The descendants of Augustine More, of "Chelsea," claim that he was born in England and that he was sixth In descent from Sir Thomas More, the Lord High Chancellor of England in the reign of Henry VIII.  Sir Thomas More's home near London was called "Chelsea."  Hence the name "Chelsea" of Augustine More's home in Virginia.  This Augustine More's tombstone at "Chelsea," in King William County is said to have the coat-of-arms of Sir Thomas More engraved upon it.   Also Au­gustine More of "Chelsea" usually spelled his name with one "o' "More," as did Sir Thomas More.  Augustine More (4), of Elizabeth City county, who is descended from John Moore, the immigrant, in signing his will also spelled his name with one "o."  John Moore, the immigrant, named his only son Augustine and there were one or more Augustines in each of the next two or three generations, so it would look as if there may have been a relationship between this family and the family of Augustine More of "Chelsea," in King William county, as Doctor Tyler inferred, but, if so, It probably goes back to England.   Possibly they were both descended from a common ancestor there.  There were other Augustine Moores in Virginia in the early days, one who patented 650 acres of land on the "Peayanke-tank" river in 1652, who may or may not have been the son of John, the 1620 immigrant, and one whose inventory was recorded in Northampton in 1655.

Mrs. Keys evidently got some of her data on the Moore Family from the note on the "Moore Family" published in an article on "Old Kecough­tan," already referred to.  This note reads as follows:

 

"MOORE FAMILY.  The Moore family begins with John Moore, who patented 285 acres in Elizabeth City county in 1638.  He came to Virginia on the "Bona Nova" in 1620, at the age of thirty-six.  His wife, Elizabeth Moore, came in the Abigail in 1622.  They were living at Elizabeth City In 1625 (Hotten).  In 1676 Augustine Moore (2) of the Old Poquoson, Elizabeth City, patented the land formerly granted to his father, John.  He married, perhaps twice, first Annie, named in a land grant in I652 and second, Elizabeth, named in Elizabeth City county records.  Augustine Moore (2) died before 1688.  He had issue (1) John, (2) Elizabeth who married Captain John Goodwin.  (3) Capt. Augustine Moore, one of the justices of Elizabeth City county, who probably married Mary Wool­ley, since his wife, Mary, in 1677, in a deed in Lancaster county calls George Woolley "Brother."  (Edmund Sweeny, died 1698, calls Moore brother).  Issue of Captain Moore (3); John, Edward, Merritt, Daniel, Martha, married Dixon, Ann, William and Augustine.  Of these, Daniel Moore (4) lived in York county, married first, Elizabeth, daughter of James Selater, second, Mary, daughter of Anthony Watts and widow of John Lewellin, third, Mary Kerby, widow of Anthony Robinson, Jr.  Daniel Moore died in 1767, and his widow, Mary, and son, Augustine lived at the "Temple Farm" York county and were there at the time of the sur­render of Lord Cornwallis."

 

Reference to records in the State Land Office shows that a John Moore patented, July 3, 1635 (not 1638), 200 acres (not 285 acres) in Elizabeth City county on the Little Poquoson adjoining Thomas Bouldiug and Thomas Garnett, and running south into the woods towards the head of Broad Creek, and that Augustine Moore patented June 19, 1676, 285 acres in Elizabeth City county, at the head of the Little Poquoson creek, 200 acres of which land was granted to John Moore, father of the said Augustine Moore; by patent dated July 3, 1635, and the other 85 acres found within the bounds of the aforementioned tract.  A patent for 200 acres in Elizabeth City county was granted in 1638 to a Joseph Moore (not John Moore), and evidently the author confused the two.

Another note, seemingly on this Moore family, is contained in a footnote accompanying the article on "Temple Farm", previously referred to, which note reads as follows:

 

"Augustine Moore, patent June 29, 1652, headrights, Anne his wife, Augustine (2) his son.  Capt. Augustine Moore (2) lived in the "Old Pocoson" precinct in Elizabeth City county of which he was Justice, High Sheriff, &c., in 1697, probably the son mentioned in the patent above (June 29, 1652).  Daniel (3), probably the son of Augustine (2), lived in the "New Pocoson" in York county, was Justice, Sheriff, &c, will proved 16 March, 1767, m. first Elizabeth, d. of James Selater (and Mary Selater), son of Rev. James Selater; issue:

 

1.     Mary, b. Oct 27, 1729, will proved l9 Apr.,1790,

m. Edmund Tabb (will proved 15 March 1762, who had Elizabeth, m ___ Smith (issue:

Augustine and Fanny, m. ____ Powell).

2.     Augustine, b March 6, 1731, will proved 15 Sept, 1788.

3.     Martha, b. May 1734, m. ____ Sweny.

 

Daniel Moore; married, 2nd Mary, daughter of John Lewellin, who sur­vived him."

 

Then are several apparent discrepancies in the two notes on the Moore Family quoted above, but none except one of any particular importance.  In one note Augustine Moore; son of John Moore, of Eliza­beth City county, patents land in 1676, and in the other an Augustine Moore, seemingly the same Augustine, patents land in 1652.  The patent granted Augustine Moore in 1676 was for the same land on Little Poquoson in Elizabeth City county granted his father, John Moore; in 1635, and this certainly places this Augustine.  The patent granted Augustine Moore in 1652 was for 650 acres of land on the north-east side of Peayanketank river, in what was then Lancaster county now Middlesex.   And, among the thirteen headrights, all named in the record, are the patentee's own name, Augustine, and also the name of his wife, Anne, and of his son Augustine, Junior, so that it seems likely that this is another Augustine Moore, who had just come to Virginia, though from what follows in the text of the note just quoted it would appear that Doctor Tyler, who made this note, thought that the two Augustines were one and the same person.  Also, in one note Daniel Moore is credited with three wives in the other with only two, and in one Daniel's second wife is the widow of John Lewellin, in the other she is John Lewellin's daughter.

The records in the State Land Office show a number of patents issued in the early days of the Colony to persons named Moore or More, but only three others in Elizabeth City county, in addition to those previously mentioned, two to Joseph Moore, each for 200 acres on the old Poquoson river, one in 1636, the other in 1638, and the other to William Moore, son of Joseph, in 1656, for 200 acres previously assigned to his father. Joseph may or may not have been related to John. It is immaterial. There were a number of other patents issued in the name of John Moore, or More, particularly a John More in Isle of Wight, whose first patent was granted in February, 1632. He was evidently a wealthy man, was a member of the House of Burgesses, and was undoubtedly a different in­dividual from the John Moore of Elizabeth City county.  John More in Isle of Wight, and Augustine More in King William were by all odds the wealthiest and the most prominent of the early Moores in Virginia. The latter was granted his first patent in 1723, though he must have been in Virginia prior to that. Augustine is a frequently encountered given name among the Moores or Mores of that period, and, as Doctor Tyler says, they may all have had a common ancestor, and, therefore, have been related, though possibly remotely in some instances. Certainly Augustine, of King William, was a very different type of man from the Moores of York and Elizabeth City counties.

Both the "Moore Family" notes in the William and Mary College Quarterly, October, 1900, and in Mrs. Key's article in the "Baltimore Sun," May 27, 1906, give the same names to the eight children of Augus­tine Moore (3) and Mary Woolley Moore, of Elizabeth City county.  And the will of Augustine "More" (spelled with one "o"), which will was written in 1736 and admitted to probate in 1737, mentions a number of these children, namely, a brother John, a brother Merritt, a brother Daniel, a sister Martha Dixon, and a brother William, who is said to be "de­ceased," all of whom are mentioned in the Quarterly article, and in Mrs. Keys' Article, as names of the children of Augustine (3) and Mary Wool­ley Moore, but the will does not mention Edward or Ann, names of other children of Augustine (3), and Mary Woolley Moore, mentioned both in the Quarterly article, and in Mrs. Keys' article. Mrs. Ritchey had assumed that William Moore, the father of Jeremiah, was the son of Augustine Moore (3), but naturally, this William (4), who was dead in 1736 when the will was written could not have been the father of Jeremiah who was born in 1746.

Augustine' "More" (4) in his will mentions two children of this brother William (4), an Augustine (5), and an Elizabeth (5), but he does not men­tion a William (5), or a Daniel (5), or any other child of his brother William (4), or a child of any of his other brothers or sisters, though his brother Daniel had three children living at this time, and Augustine (4) may have had other nephews and nieces also living in 1735. The will of William Moore (4) is not in the Clerk's office in Hampton.

 

III.

 

THE MOORES OF CAROLINA.

 

Whether the paternal ancestor of Jeremiah Moore originally settled in South Carolina, or in Elizabeth City county, Virginia, or came direct to Prince William or Stafford county, is not definitely known.  The writer was informed many years ago by Miss Bettie Moore, of Berry­ville, Va. (1844-1930) and also by Mr. A. Moore, Jr., of Berryville (1846-1929), descendants of Jeremiah, that they had understood that Jeremiah was the son of a William Moore who had come to Virginia from South Carolina, and that William was the son of John and that there was a connection somewhere with a Governor of South Carolina.  Mr. James M. Engle (b. 1854) also a descendant of Jeremiah and of the same branch of the family as Miss Bettie Moore and Mr. A. Moore, Jr., in "A His­tory of the Engle Family in the Shenandoah Valley and Family Con­nections," says that the father of Jeremiah was William, the son of John Moore who came to America from the northern part of Ireland, and located in South Carolina and that James Moore, a brother of John, was governor of South Carolina in the early part of the eighteenth century.

In substantiation of this tradition it is found that a James Moore, who married Margaret Berringer (daughter by a former marriage of Lady Margaret Yeamans, of Barbados) settled in South Carolina and was in 1700 a member of the State Council. Upon the death of Governor Blake, Sept. 7, 1700, he was chosen by the Council to act as Governor and filled this office until June 18, 1702.  In another sketch of this James Moore it is said that he married the widow Lady Margaret Yeamans, herself, but this appears to be a mistake. It is said that this James Moore was born in Ireland in 1640 and immigrated to South Carolina about 1685. His will was proved Nov. 6, 1706.  He had five sons, viz: James, who was Gov­ernor of South Carolina, 1719-1721, Roger, who became very wealthy, built "Orton," and was known as "King Roger," Maurice, who in 1724 founded the town of Brunswick, N. C., on the west side of Cape Fear river, Na­thaniel, and John who married Justina Smith and lived on the Cape Fear.  In the will of this Justina Moore, proved August 20, 1743, in Philadelphia, where she died while visiting her daughter who was married and lived there, she describes herself as the relict of John Moore late of Cape Fear and mentions sons James and John, arid daughter Rebecca, but no other children.

Whether the elder James had a brother John who had a son named William has not been established by documentary proof, but some of Jere­miah's descendants were evidently under this impression. Nor is it known that any of James Moore's family moved to Virginia. They were an inter­esting and prominent family, active in South Carolina and North Carolina politics, and it would seem that their descendants and relatives would have been so proud of them that the fact would surely have been handed down.

If Jeremiah had been of this family, Francis, his son, in the sketch of his father, published shortly after his death, would hardly have been content to say only that the parents of Jeremiah were "respectable though poor". He would probably at least have mentioned these South Carolina, Irish connections, but Jeremiah may have been estranged from his parents and Francis may have been resentful.

There was a William Moore, of "Moore Hall," in Chester county, Pennsylvania, whose father was named John, and who was a prominent and conspicuous figure in Chester county.  This John is said to have come from England to South Carolina about 1680 and to have been Secre­tary of the Colony of South Carolina. It has also been stated that he was a brother of the first Governor James Moore of South Carolina.  He moved to Philadelphia about 1697 and became Collector of the Port of Philadelphia, which office he held for sometime.  His son William above-mentioned was born in Philadelphia May 6, 1699, and died at "Moore Hall" May 30, 1783. William had a number of sons but no son named Jeremiah. This John Moore, father of William Moore of Chester county, was clearly from England where he was born about 1658, and was promi­nently connected, whereas James Moore, the Governor of South Carolina in 1700, was clearly from Ireland.

It is certain, therefore, that John Moore, Collector of the Port of Philadelphia, and father of William of "Moore Hall", in Chester county, was not a brother of Governor James Moore, of South Carolina, and that William Moore of "Moore Hall" was not the father of Jeremiah Moore of "Moorefield" in Fairfax county, Virginia.

There was another John Moore in South Carolina at about this time who had a son named William, but whether this John was a brother of Gov. James Moore is not known. This John Moore died in 1735.  His will, dated Jan.27, 1735, was proved March 15, 1735, and mentions his wife Rachel, and sons, William and John, and daughters, Anue Ellory, wife of Thomas Ellory, and Elizabeth. John and Elizabeth were minors.

This John Moore's son William died in l736, so he could not have been the father of Jeremiah Moore.

Another Carolina possibility is found in a John Moore, of Northampton county, North Carolina, whose will, dated Sept. 1, 1753, was proved in November, 1753, and mentions sons: Mark, John, Isham, William, Na­thaniel, Richard; and daughter Sarah; and wife Tabitha. Jeremiah named one of his daughters Tabitha.

Roger Moore of "Orton," son of the first Governor James Moore, had a son named George, who lived at "Moore Fields" on the west side of the Cape Fear river.  The name of this plantation, "Moore Fields," attracts attention as being almost identical with the name of Jeremiah's home in Fairfax county, "Moorefield," but, of course, there is no connection between the two places.

A number of men named John Moore settled in South Carolina in the early days of the Colony, but nowhere has definite, documentary proof been found to show that the first Governor James Moore had a brother named John who was in South Carolina with him and whose descendants or some of them settled later in Virginia or elsewhere. The idea that Jere­miah Moore was the son of William Moore who was the son of John Moore, a brother of the first Governor James Moore of South Carolina is based purely upon a tradition handed down in the family of one of the sons of Jeremiah and Lydia Moore, and came to me from three separate and independent sources. It seems to me to be reliable.

Nowhere in the records have the names of William and Jeremiah Moore been found associated as father and son except in the tax lists of Lunenburg county, and there not until 1772, too late a day to be re­ferring to Jeremiah Moore, of "Moorefield," and his father.  Had Jere­miah's ancestors first lived in South Carolina, and migrated from there to northern Virginia, they may or may not have stopped in Lunenburg county on their way, but other members of the family may have done so. According to Torrence, no will in the name of Moore is recorded in Lunenburg prior to 1781, and wills recorded later than 1781 would contain no information bearing upon the ancestry of Jeremiah.

 

 

 


For more information on Jeremiah Moore, see:

·         Moorefield, Home of the Early Baptist Preacher Jeremiah Moore by Thomas V DiBacco, United Lithographic Services, Inc, Fairfax VA, November 1971.

·         Imprisoned Preachers and Religious Liberty in Virginia by Lewis Peyton Little, J.P. Bell Inc, Lynchburg, VA, 1938.

·         This was Vienna, Virginia – Facts and Photos by Connie Pendleton Stuntz and Mayo Sturdevant Stuntz.  Chapter 7 covers “Moorefield”.

·         Notes on Some Moore and French Families in Virginia and Carolina in the Colonial Period an article by (Dr.) William Cabell Moore in the William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine’s 2nd Series, Volume XVII (1937), pages 372-398.

·         Jeremiah Moore, 1746-1815, an article by Dr. William Cabell Moore in the William and Mary Quarterly, 2nd Series, Volume 13 (1933), page 23.

·         Fairfax County, Virginia – A History, 1978, page 233.

·         Virginia Baptist Ministers, 1760-1790: A Biographical Survey Volume I by William S. Simpson, Jr, Richmond VA, 1990.

·         Virginia Baptist Ministers, Series I by James B. Taylor, J.B Lippincott & Co, Philadelphia PA, 1859.

·         History of the Rise and Progress of the Baptists in Virginia by Robert B. Semple, John O’Lynch, Printer, 1810.

 

 

 

 

William Moore

Presumed father of

Jesse Moore and the Reverend Jeremiah Moore

 

A very informed and seasoned Moore researcher by the name of Joyce Browning of Reston, Virginia spent some time researching the three William Moore’s of Northern Virginia in an attempt to identify and separate each one.  Here is her summary of this research:

 

 

THREE EARLY WILLIAM MOORES OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA

By Joyce Browning (JBrown7169@aol.com) of Reston, VA

1999/2000

 

 

William Moore of Fairfax VA

[Appears to be the son of James Moore of Prince Georges County, MD]

 

The earliest William Moore received a Fairfax grant in 1724 for 480 acres on Pope's Head and the Accotink (present area of Fairfax City, a little west of the old courthouse).  He received a second grant for 110 acres about two miles away on Difficult Run which he soon sold, and purchased an additional 200 acres near his Pope's Head property. This William Moore married Mary Coffer and in 1733 leased land from George Mason in right of himself, his wife Mary, and his son James.   The William Moore family lived on this leased land which near the Potomac land of the Coffers and leased their home plantation from George Mason (III). 

 

About 1749 George Mason (III) completed a survey his Dogue's Island land (now Mason's Neck).  The plat includes the Coffer house, the Moore house, and the Bronaugh house. 

 

The Bronaughs occupied the old Mason home site. The sister of the George Mason (II) married Jeremiah Bronaugh. Their neighbor, Mary Coffer's mother, was Mary Hereford who married Thomas Coffer.  George Mason (III), author of the federal Bill of Rights, built his Gunston Hall Manor house on this neck of land.

 

In 1758, now in Fairfax County, William Moore transferred some of his Pope's Head grant to his son, James, and to his daughter, Sarah Littlejohn.  He died in 1769/70, naming children James, Samuel, Sarah Littlejohn and Mary Bucklin.  James Moore married the widow of his cousin, Francis Coffer, ca 1746.  Samuel Moore appears to have left the county.  This group of Moores is consistently associated with the Bronaugh, Mason, Withers, and Coffer families.  Much later, James Moore, with William and John Moore, are involved together in transactions as witnesses. William and John are probably sons of James, but are not searched beyond about 1785.  James Moore left a will in Fairfax Co.

 

Due to the association with the Littlejohn family in Fairfax County and to Moore/Littlejohn associations in Prince Georges Co MD, across the Potomac from Fairfax, it would appear that William Moore of Fairfax is a descendant of the Prince Georges Moore progenitor, James Moore.

 

 

William Moore of Cedar Creek, Prince William County VA

[Appears to be a descendant of Francis Moore of Essex County, Virginia, owner of the ship "Dublin Merchant."] (See the footnote following this section for information on Frances Moore of Dublin Ireland).

 

The second William Moore first appeared in 1740 when he acquired a 190-acre Northern Neck grant.  He, Harbin Moore, and Francis Moore all acquired Northern Neck grants at about the same time.   Harbin and Francis Moore are found later in the part of Prince William Co that became Fauquier Co.  This may be a 'harbin'ger of the direction to take in searching for the origins of William Moore of Cedar Creek.  Harbin and Francis Moore are clearly identified as sons of Francis Moore II of Essex Co VA.   

 

This William Moore's 1740 tract was on Cedar Run and he appears to be the William Moore who, with his partner Gabriel Moffit, built the new brick church at Cedar Run.  

 

Evidence supports that he is the father of Jesse Moore and Jeremiah Moore.

 

He moved to Craven County, SC before 1781  - probably in the 1760s.  His sons, Jesse and Jeremiah Moore remained in northern Virginia. Both William Moore and Jesse Moore gave testimony in a 1762 suit, William's age stated as 50-years, and Jesse Moore is reported to be  "of age."  Jeremiah Moore, as a young 16-year-old, was "Reader" at the Cedar Run Church built by his father, William.

 

Jesse Moore, was still resident in the area, but now living in Loudoun County, when he transferred administration of William Moore's estate to "my loving brother" Jeremiah Moore in 1782.  This document records that William Moore wrote his will in 1781 and died in Craven Co SC.

 

Jeremiah Moore became one of the great Revolutionary figures when he challenged the right of the Royal government to restrict religious freedom.   As a very young man he adopted and began preaching the Baptist doctrine in northern Virginia.  He was admonished for preaching without a license several times, and was finally jailed in Alexandria.  The tradition is that, while jailed, Jeremiah Moore stood at the lattice window of his cell and continued to preach, attracting great crowds.  Today, he is celebrated as one of the people who inspired George Mason and Thomas Jefferson to fashion the first amendment of the Constitution.  He is recognized as the founder of the Baptist Church in Northern Virginia and Washington DC.

 

William Moore of Dumfries VA

[Appears to be the son of James Moore (II) and wife Agnes of King and Queen County, Virginia.]

 

In 1759 a third William Moore appeared in Prince William County when he purchased lot No. 44 in Dumfries from the developers of the new port town of Dumfries. Later the port became so heavily silted that it was virtually unusable.  Bell Haven, now part of Alexandria, replaced it.  Lot No. 44 is still quite visible in old Dumfries Town, but no structure remains on the property.

 

It is not known where this William Moore was before he moved to Dumfries in 1759; and it does not appear that he remained in Dumfries for very long.   William Moore and his wife, Margaret Ewell Moore, sold their Dumfries property in 1765, and left the county.

 

William Moore of Dumfries is involved with the Gallahues and Ewells of Prince William County during his brief residence.  Both are French Huguenot families.  It is probably this William Moore who in 1761 signed as counter security on William Gallahue's estate administration when the original securities petitioned for relief.  William Gallahue died in the early 1750s and the estate was still unsettled in 1761.  Richard Kenner, one of the original securities did not resign as security.  It is believed that he was the father of William Gallahue's wife, Ann Kenner. 

 

George Rowland and his wife, Ann (Kenner) Gallahue, left Prince William County in the mid 1760s when they moved to Pittsylvania County, Virginia. Because the Rowlands moved to Pittsylvania County, Virginia (later Henry), it can be conjectured that William Moore of Dumfries is the William Moore who purchased land for his son Alexandria near George Rowland in 1779 in Pittsylvania Co.   In 1769, his son, Rodeham Moore, married the stepdaughter of George Rowland, Elizabeth Gallahue.

 

 

The children of (presumably) William and ____ Moore were:

 

1.     Jesse, born circa 1740, married (probably) Mary (aka Molly) Milton and presumably died circa 1815.

2.     Jeremiah, born 7 June 1746 Dumfries, Prince William Co VA, married Lydia Reno on 01 Nov 1765 in Prince William Co VA, died in Fairfax Co VA between 1 Aug 1814 (will written) and 20 Mar 1815 (will probated), buried Moorefield, Fairfax Co VA.  Jeremiah and Lydia (Reno) Moore had the following 11 children:

1.     Jesse, born 4 Sep 1766, married Catherine Brent, died 26 Sep 1853.

2.     Francis, born 18 Sept. 1768, married Sarah Allnut 9 Nov 1792, died 5 Feb. 1831.

3.     John, born 14 Nov. 1770, married Mary Hawley, died July 1831.

4.     Angelina French, born 6 Sept. 1772, married George W. Hunter, died 23 Jan. 1856.

5.     Tabitha, born 18 Sept. 1774, died 20 Aug. 1778.

6.     Elizabeth French, born 26 May 1777, died 18 Dec. 1777.

7.     Ammishaddai, born 3 Dec. 1778, married Susan Lindsey, died Aug. 1861.

8.     William French, born 1 May 1781 Fairfax Co Va, married Mollie Reno.

9.     Margaret French, born 18 May 1783 Fairfax Co VA, married James Smith 1804 VA, died 7 Sept. 1853, Washington, DC.

10.  Betsy L, born 23 Oct. 1785, Fairfax Co VA, died 16 Dec. 1851.  Unmarried.

11.  Nancy P, born 20 Jan. 1789, Fairfax Co VA, died 22 Aug. 1852.  Unmarried.

 

 

Jesse Moore

 

Jesse was born circa 1740 (see 1762 court deposition below in which is states he is of full age), married (probably) Mary (a.k.a. Molly) Milton, and is presumably the Jesse Moore whose death and estate administration are mentioned in Washington Co KY Record Book on 8 May 1815.  Molly was the daughter of Richard Milton Jr and Margaret Ross.  See the Milton chapter for more information on this surname.

 

The following biographical sketch appears in the Kentucky, A History of the State, 4th Edition, by Perrin, Battle, Kniffin, 1887, page 951.  This paid sketch (most County and State “History” books prior to the turn of the 20 century and possibly afterwards) were not compiled by true researchers per se, but rather by travelling book editors/salesmen who would include, for a small fee, a biographical sketch of a family in a upcoming County or State “History” book.  It was in such a book that Henry B. Moore, one of the grandchildren of Jesse Moore, mentions who Jesse was for the first time (at least to my knowledge).  The following biographical sketch is not completely accurate – amplifications and/or corrections are noted in [ ].

 

Henry B. Moore was born December 11, 1826.  His paternal ancestors came from Virginia and were of English descent.  His grandfather, Jesse Moore came to Kentucky in an early day by flatboat, and landed on the present site of Louisville, when there were but few cabins in that now flourishing city.  He settled near the Chaplin River in Nelson County, was a farmer, and died a number of years before H.B. Moore’s birth.  John R. Moore [son of Jesse] was born in Virginia [Fairfax Co VA] about 1785, and was brought to Kentucky in his infancy [in 1789/1790 – John would have been five years old].  He settled in Washington County in early manhood and engaged in farming in what is now the Glenville Precinct, where he acquired a large estate.  He was a soldier in the Indian war of 1811-12, serving under Gen. Anthony Wayne [John did serve in the War of 1812, but not under Gen’l “Mad” Anthony Wayne – the General died 15 Dec 1796.  John served in Captain Caleb Hardesty’s 2nd Regiment KY Mounted Militia] and in 1845 was elected to represent Washington County in the State Legislature [incorrect – a Dr. Robert C Palmer served in the Washington Co KY Senate from 1841-1845, a George C. Thurman served there from 1845-1849.  A “Jesse Moore” served in the Washington County House of Representatives during the 1845 term.  This Jesse is most likely John R. Moore’s son]; was magistrate for a number of years under the old [KY] Constitution [Kentucky had four constitutions: 1792, 1799, 1850 and 1891.  The term “Old Constitution” was typically referring to the 1799 Constitution], and died in Bloomfield, Nelson County, in 1858.  His wife was Martha Bayne, daughter of Walter Bayne, who came to Kentucky before the organization of the State.  He was a native of Virginia, located near the Moore settlement on Chaplin River, and there died.  Mrs. Moore was born in Virginia, was brought to Kentucky, when quite young and died in Washington County in 1854, aged sixty-five years.  The children of Mr. and Mrs. [John R.] Moore were the following: Jetson, W.H., Walter B., Jesse, Milton, James F., Henry B., Susan (Hill) and J.R. Moore.  Henry B. Moore was born and has lived all his life in Washington County.  He was reared to agricultural pursuits and received a fair English education in the country schools which he attended until twenty years of age.  At the breaking out of the Mexican war he enlisted in the Fourth Kentucky Infantry with which he served from September, 1847, until July of the following year, his regiment remaining in the City of Mexico the greater part of that time.  He returned to Washington County after the close of the war, and in 1852 purchased his present farm in Glenville Precinct, nine miles north of Springfield, where he has since resided.  His 400 acres are all under cultivation.  He engaged in the distillery business about 1852, and for twenty years thereafter did a thriving business, manufacturing the Moore and Grigsby brand, which achieved a noted reputation.  Mr. Moore was married June 29, 1852, in Washington County, to Miss Jane M. Pile, daughter of Benjamin and Rhoda (Weathers) Pile, of the same county.  Benjamin Pile was born in 1801, and is one of the oldest living settlers of Washington County.  Mrs. Pile was the daughter of James and Margaret (Cutsinger) Weathers.  She was born in Washington County, and died in 1851.  Mr. And Mrs. [Henry B.] Moore have had eight children, namely: Mary E. (deceased), Lucas, Victor C. (deceased), Luther, (deceased), Lulu B. (wife of Isaac Breeding), J.R., Mary W. and an infant (deceased).  Mr. Moore is a Democrat in politics, and, with his wife, belongs to the Christian Church, with which he has been identified twenty-five years.

 

Excerpted from Kentucky, A History of the State, 4th Edition, by Perrin, Battle, Kniffin, 1887, page 951.

 

 

 

Chronology of Jesse Moore

 

5 Aug 1762 Prince William Co VA Deposition, Deed Book P (1761-1764), Pg. 233: “Jesse Moore of full age, deposeth that he worked at Rachel Spiller’s sometime before and after the Testator (William Spiller, deceased) made his will that this Deponent was called upon to be a witness to the same and believes the Testator signed the same (will) freely and voluntarily without being influenced by any as appeared to this Deponent and this Deponent saith that he at the request of the said Testator frequently rode by him. She (Testator’s wife) was attentive and this Deponent believes that the said Testator and his wife were well reconciled and she was very tender and kind to him and that the said Testator was sober and sensible when he signed and acknowledged his said will. at Rachael Spiller’s sometime before and after the Testator [William Spiller] made his will."  This deposition indicates that Jesse, of “full age” in 1762, was at least 18-20 at the time, hence he was born no later than 1740, possibly earlier.

                                     

1765 Prince William Co VA Tithable List.  A total of 5 tithables (individuals over 16 years of age) are mentioned in this group: “William Moore, Jesse Moore, Wm Northcutt, Negroes Judy and Leister”.  “190 acres” is listed beside this entry (the original 1740 land grant to Wm Moore).  The next entry lists Thomas Reno and William Reno.

 

6 Feb 1769 Prince William Co VA Deed Book R, page 62: William Tackitt, Grantor and Executor of the estate of William Spiller, deceased, deeds to his brother in law Moses Jeffres and Rachel his wife (and William’s sister), and upon their death to Elizabeth Reno/Renno (wife of Lewis Reno/Renno “Younger” and William’s daughter), and upon her death to Sarah Reno (William’s granddaughter and daughter of Lewis and Elizabeth Reno) a parcel of land called Felkins Mill Run where William Spiller Jr, deceased, lived (being a part of the land that William Spiller Sr. purchased from Henry Halley) for 50 pounds.    Jesse Moore witnessed the transaction.

 

3 Oct 1769 Prince William Co VA Will Book G: William Moore and Jesse Moore are listed as appraisers of the estate of Thomas Reno.

 

9 Nov 1771 Prince William Co VA Dettingen Parish Vestry Book, page 46: Jesse Moore & Jeremiah Moore are listed as 'Readers' at the Slaty (a.k.a. Slate) Run Church.  The church is located south of Manassas, Prince William Co VA near Brentsville/Nokesville (Broad Run).  Another name for the church was 'Church at Redmans'.

 

1773 Loudoun Co VA Tithable List: Jesse Moore.

 

01 Feb 1779 Prince William Co VA Will Book 1778-1791, pg. 32: Jesse Moore is listed as a witness to the will of Margaret Suel.

 

1775 – 1781 Loudoun Co VA Tithable List: Jesse Moore is listed in the Tithables of Loudoun County VA under Mann Page – presumably meaning that Jesse was a renter of Mann Page.

 

13 Oct 1782 Loudoun Co VA Orders Book “G”, Part II, page 455: “On the motion of Jeremiah Moore who made oath according to Law and together with William Peyton and Jonah Thompson his securities entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of three hundred pounds conditioned as the law directs.  Certificate is granted them for obtaining Letters of Administration on the Estate of William Moore deceased in due form – Jesse Moore the Heir at Law having first under hand and seal relinquishes in his favor-which said relinquishment was proved by the witnesses subscribing thereto and order to be recorded.” 

                                   

14 Oct 1782 Loudoun Co VA Court Order Book N, Number II, page 377-378 (may also be known as Deed Book N, pages 377-378): Jesse Moore petitions the court in regards to the last will and testament of his father, 'To All To Whom these presents shall come Whereas by the Last Will and Testament of my Father William Moore, of the State of South Carolina and Craven County, SC, deceased he did dispose of all his real and personal estate as in the said will bearing date the twentyeth day of November One Thousand seven hundred and eighty specified, This Shall Certify that I have and do hereby acknowledge the Validity of the said Will and that the same shall be committed to record in any Court of Record in the said State of South Carolina or Commonwealth of Virginia and the same is hereby acknowledged to be binding on me and my heirs forever Notwithstanding any Law, custom or usage to the contrary and furthermore that whereas by the neglect of the Executors nominated in said Will the Estate therein devised doth still remain unsettled, I do hereby resign all right and Title to the Administration of the said Estate vested in me as heir at Law to the same into the Hands of my Trusty and well beloved brother Jeremiah Moore, he first complying with the custom and wages as in such case by Law directed.  Given under my hand and seal this twenty ninth day of September one thousand seven hundred and eighty two.  Signed, sealed and delivered in presence of Thomas Humphrey, Jno Thompson, W. Peyton, Francis Peyton Jr. 

Jesse Moore

At a court held for Loudoun County the 14 day of October 1782.  This relinquishment of the Right of Administration of Estate of William Moore deceased by Jesse Moore the Heir at Law in favor or Jeremiah Moore was proved by the witnesses subscribing thereto and ordered to be recorded.

 

11 Nov 1782 Loudoun Co VA Orders Book “G”, page 457: Jesse Moore in a list of tithables of Ann Peyton – presumably meaning that Jesse was a renter of Ann Peyton.  “On motion of Mrs. Ann Peyton ordered that her titheables ???? William Peyton, Jesse Moore, negroes Dick, Melford, Tom, Sam, John, Frank and Pete, be added to list of Shelbourne Parish.”

 

1782  - 1787 Loudoun Co VA Census Records: Jesse Moore is listed in Loudoun County VA Census with one slave.

 

12 Jan 1785 Fairfax Co VA Deed Book Q, page 157: Robert Sanford of Fairfax Co VA (Lessor) leases some land to Peter Dow of Fairfax Co VA (Lessee).  Jesse Moore and John McIver witnessed the lease. Note: This Jesse may be Jeremiah’s son Jesse who born in 1765.

 

17 Sep 1787 Fairfax Co VA Deed Book Q, page 470: Elisha S. Dick of Fairfax Co VA (Lessor) and Jeremiah Moore “of Fairfax Co” VA (Lessee) enter into a 19yr/5mo lease for a parcel of land “bounded beginning at the Great Road leading from Alexandria to Leesburg at a red Oak corner to a Spanish Oak on Wolf Trap another corner of J. Moore…..to the beginning containing 18.75 acres” for a fee of 4 shillings per year.  Jesse Moore, Jeremiah Moore, Francis Moore, John Moore and James Hall witnessed this lease. Note: This Jesse may be Jeremiah’s son Jesse who born in 1765.

           

1787 Fairfax Co VA Tax Lists: Jesse Moore is listed in the Fairfax Co tax lists as having his tax paid by Jeremiah Moore, and with no listed holdings or other family members.  Son John R. would have been two years old then.

 

1789 Loudoun Co VA, Personal Property Tax List: Jesse Moore Sr.  This “Sr” designation may have been included on Jesse’s part to differentiate him from Jeremiah’s son Jesse, born circa 1766.  According to Robert P. Moore, a current day Moore researcher, listed next to Jesse Moore on this Tax List is Burgess Mason, who also migrated to Nelson Co KY.

           

24 Oct 1789 Nelson Co KY Citizen Petition:  "Petition of inhabitants of Nelson Co, KY that they are very inconvenient to an inspection and from the badness of the roads labor under many inconveniences in carrying the produced to market.  They ask that an Act to establish a warehouse and inspection on the Beech Fork at the mouth of Cartwright's Creek on the land of Richard Parker."  This early Nelson Co KY petition is signed by dozens of individuals including Jesse Moore, Moses Milton Jr and Moses Milton (Sr).  It is interesting to note that in the 1850 and 1960 federal census, the Post Office location of our direct ancestor John R. and Martha Moore is “Beech Fork”.

 

1790 Nelson Co KY Tax Lists: Jesse Moore.

 

1791 Nelson Co KY Tax Lists: Jesse Moore.

 

9 Feb 1791 Nelson Co KY Court Records, page 357:  On the motion of Tardiveau Brothers by their attorney to obtain a judgement against Jesse Davis and Jesse Moore for failing to deliver property taken by the Sheriff on an execution against the said Davis, and the defendants not appearing, plaintiffs are to recover 2 pounds, 11 shillings, 3 pence and costs.”  No idea what this is all about!  Appears on page 180 of Nelson Co Kentucky Records, Vol. III.

 

17 Jan 1792 Fairfax County Will Book F, page 56: Jesse Moore and others were firmly bound to Wm. Payne and William Herbert for the sum of 1000 pounds (the British pound sterling was the accepted form of currently until approximately 1800).

 

1792 Nelson Co KY Tax Lists: Jesse Moore (and noted as in 'East Central Nelson County).

 

Dec 1797 - Nelson Co KY Will of Richard Milton (Sr), mentions wife Peggy, sons William, John, Moses, Elijah, daughter Nancy Davis, Frances Davis, son-in-law Rawleigh Chinn, son-in-law James Davis. At the end of the will is a short codicil: “For sundry reasons, testator gives to his grandson James Moore one negro girl named Lucy, and he is to let his mother Molly Moore have the use of said negro so long as she shall live, and after her death, if the said negro should have increase, to be equally divided between his brothers and sisters then living”.  Richard’s will was probated in Nelson Co KY on 11 May 1801.  It is presumed that Jesse’s wife was Molly (Mary) Milton Moore, daughter of Richard Milton.  No document has been found to date verifying this presumption.  This may imply that there were poor relations between Jesse Moore and the Miltons.

 

1800 Nelson Co KY Tax Lists: Jesse Moore.

 

1810 Nelson Co KY Federal Census: Jesse Moore.

 

13 Jun 1814 Washington Co KY Court Order Book B, page 322: “It appearing to the Court that Jesse Moore who was appointed a Commissioner of the Tax for the present year in this County within the bounds of Captain Phillips Company hath departed this life; John Simpson is appointed in his place”.

 

8 May 1815 Washington County KY Order Book B, page 384: "On the motion of Harbin Moore he having made oath and with Morgan Wright and William Wright his securities consent? and acknowledged bond in the property of $300 conditioned do the ???? administration of the estate of Jesse Moore deceased.  Ordered that William Moore, Bernard Moore, William Branham and Allen Stephens or any three of them being first sworn do appraise the slaves if any and personal estate of Jesse Moore and make report".  Note: Unfortunately no appraisal report can be found.  This is the first and only reference to the death date of Jesse – and the first of two references that seem to link Jesse to the well known Culpeper Co VA family of Harbin Moore (Jr).  See the Section below entitled “Culpeper Co VA and Harbin Moore Information” for more information on Harbin Moore.

 

19 Dec 1815 Washington Co KY Will Book B, page 45 (or 526): Will of Harbin Moore (Jr) mentions daughters Nancy Wright, Sally Clark, Franky Sims formerly Franky Moore, Patsy Springer, sons William and Bernard, brother Reuben, grandsons Harbin Spanger & Henry Spalding.  In addition Harbin also states: "I also leave unto the above mentioned grandson (Henry Spalding) my two year old colt, saddle and bridle formerly belonging to Jesse Moore deceased, also one hundred dollars in silver, one bed and furniture formerly belonging to the above Jesse Moore deceased". See the Section below entitled “Culpeper Co VA and Harbin Moore Information” for more information on Harbin Moore.

 

The book Some Virginia Families by Hugh Milton McIlhany, Jr, 1903, Stanton, VA, Stoneburner & Prufer Printers, page 214 refers to the children of Richard and Margaret (Ross) Milton, son of Richard and Eliza Milton, specifically an unnamed daughter: "_______ MILTON, married a Mr. Moore, they lived in Kentucky and had issue: Shadrack, Eben, and others."  This reference is the only source I have uncovered that mentions children other than James.  The fact that James is not mentioned leads me to believe that Mr. McIlhany did not know of Richard Milton’s 1801 Nelson Co KY will (otherwise he would have listed Molly’s first name as well as her son, and Richard’s grandson, James).  Unfortunately Mr. McIlhany did not list the source of this information – and no other researcher has uncovered any references to Shadrack and Eben.

 

 

The probable children of the probable union of Jesse and Molly (Milton) Moore are:

 

1.     John R, born 12 Mar 1785 Fairfax Co VA, married (1) Martha (Patsey) Bayne 22 on Feb 1810 Nelson Co KY, (2) Mrs. Nancy Harrell on 8 Oct 1855 in Washington Co KY, died 13 Dec 1858 Bloomfield, Nelson Co KY, buried with his first wife in the Mt Zion Methodist Cemetery, near Mooresville, Washington Co KY.  Martha was the daughter of Walter and Meek Ann (Wade) Bayne.  Nancy was the wife of the late Moses Harrell who died in 1851 at age 71 and is buried in the Camp Ground Methodist Cemetery, Bloomfield, Nelson Co KY.

2.     James, per Richard Milton Jr’s 1801 Nelson Co KY Will codicil only.

3.     Shadrack, per Hugh Milton McIlhany Jr's 1903 book “Some Virginia Families” only.  A Shadrack Moore (the same or different we do not know) died in Jessamine Co KY circa 1812 and left a will dated 1812.  It was probated in Nov 1812 (Will Book A, page 417) and mentions wife Rebecca, “three sons” Joel, Shadrack and Jeremiah and his “other six children” Polly, Betsy, Peggy, Susannah, Jency (Connor) and Martha (Davenport), Nancy Thomas and Susanna Young and Elizabeth Young – heirs of his now deceased daughter Nancy Young.  A Shadrack Moore fought in the same 2nd Regiment of the Mounted KY Militia as did Jesse’s other son, John R. Moore.  According to some internet sources (genforum web), the following information about a Shadrack Moore (relation unknown…listed here for informational purposes only) was located: A Shadack Moore was born about 1744 in VA, married a Rebecca about 1769 in VA.  They had the following children: Mary born 10 Apr 1770; Nancy born 8 July 1772; Thomas T. born 12 Nov 1774; Betsy born 12 Jun 1777; Peggy born 7 Oct 1780; Susanna born 27 Feb 1783; John born 17 Aug 1785 and Dianah born 6 Sept 1786.  Mary married a John Young in Fredricksburg VA - then they moved to Greenup Co KY.  Mary died in 1857, place unknown.

4.     Eben, per Hugh Milton McIlhany Jr’s 1903 book “Some Virginia Families” only.

 

 

John R. Moore

 

According to his Nelson Co KY marriage application with his second wife Mrs. Nancy Harrell, John R Moore was born 12 Mar 1785 in Fairfax Co VA.  He first married Martha (Patsey) Bayne 22 on Feb 1810 Nelson Co KY, and following her death, married 2) the widow Mrs. Nancy Harrell on 8 Oct 1855 in Washington Co KY.  John died on 13 Dec 1858 in Bloomfield, Nelson Co KY.  He is buried along side his first wife in the Mt Zion Methodist Cemetery near Mooresville, Washington Co KY.  All of John’s children were by his first wife, Martha (Patsey) Bayne.

 

Martha Bayne was the daughter of Walter and Meek Ann (Wade) Bayne.  She was born circa 1789/1791 in VA and died 17 Mar 1854.  For more information on the Bayne ancestry, please see the chapter by the same name.

 

 


The War of 1812

 

During the late 1700’s and early 1800’s, the Ohio River valley was the scene of many skirmishes between the Indian and the colonist.  As more and more colonists floated down the Ohio River from Pittsburgh to claim free land in Kentucky and later Ohio, the native Indian tribes stepped up their attempts to push the colonists eastward – hopefully back to and over the Allegheny and Blue Ridge Mountains. 

 

In 1812, a young Captain by the name of Zachary Taylor (who later became our 12th President in 1849) was in command of Fort Harrison – an outpost in the Indiana Territory near present day Terre Haute Indiana.  On Sept 3 a large contingent of Kickapoo and Winebagoe Indians peacefully approached the Fort asking to be admitted.  Captain Taylor refused.  The Indians loitered around for two days still claiming to be friendly.  On the evening of the 4th, the Indians set fire to one of the block houses.  At the same time, a large party of warriors emerged from the woods where they had been hiding and commenced firing on the fort – which returned fire.  They made several attempts to gain entrance into the Fort but were thwarted each time.  After the Indians withdrew from the immediate vicinity, someone from the fort was successful in reaching Vincennes (located on the Wabash River in southern Indiana) with the news. 

 

Presumably angry at their lack of success at Ft. Harrison, the Indians subsequently attacked some settlements in extreme southern Indiana and massacred 21 inhabitants, including women and children.  When news of these two events reached Governor Harrison who at the time was commanding the army northwest of the Ohio, he petitioned Governor Isaac Shelby, the Governor of Kentucky, for help in raising a local militia to strike deep into Indian territory and push back the Indians before the coming of winter.  Governor Shelby posted the following address throughout northwestern Kentucky (amplifications in [] ):

 

Frankfort [Kentucky], September 8, 1812

 

Fellow-citizens of Kentucky!

I have received information from his excellency governor Harrison, commanding the army northwest of the Ohio, dated the 5th inst. At Piqua [Ohio], that the British and Indians had besieged fort Wayne and perhaps had taken it:  that it was the object of the enemy to push on to fort Harrison [Indiana] and Vincennes [Indiana], and he has required of me to leave nothing undone to relieve those places.  In addition to this, information is also received, that the Indians have murdered twenty-one persons not more than twenty miles north of the Ohio!  And that a very extensive combination of savages, aided by the British from Canada, are momently expected on the frontier of Indiana and Illinois territories.

With this information before us, and the requisition of governor Harrison, that a number of mounted volunteers be requested to march to the aid of our suffering fellow-citizens, it is hoped that it will rouse the spirit and indignation of the freemen of Kentucky, and induce a sufficient number of them to give their services to their country for a short period on this interesting occasion.

It is proposed to accept the service of such a number of mounted volunteers as may be adequate to the defense of the said territories: and if necessary, follow the enemy, and carry offensive war into their country, and lay waste their towns.

The volunteers will rendezvous at Louisville [Kentucky] on the 18th day of this month, with at least thirty days provisions.  The whole will be commanded by major general Samuel Hopkins; an officer of great merit and experience.  Should any company of volunteers not be able to rendezvous on the day appointed, they can follow on and join the army on their march.

Kentuckians! Ever pre-eminent for their patriotism, bravery and good conduct, will I am persuaded, on this occasion give to the world a new evidence of their love for their country, and a determination, at every hazard, to rescue their fellow-men from the murders and devastations of a cruel and barbarous enemy.

 

ISAAC SHELBY [1st Govenor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky]

 

 

Over two thousand Kentuckians voluntarily responded to this plea – so many in fact that a number were turned back.  In addition to the dozens of other company’s being formed all over the state, a company of mounted men from Nelson County, headed by Captain Caleb Hardesty, was commissioned in Louisville KY on 18 Sep 1812.  Included in the 5th Company were privates John R. Moore, Shadrack Moore and Richard Milton.  This particular company was placed in the 2nd Regiment, Mounted, under the command of Colonel John Thomas.

 

This corps of approximately 2500 volunteers headed north and reached Vincennes over a two-week period.  The continued their march north and relieved Fort Harrison.  Unfortunately the expected supplies the army leadership had ordered were not delivered – and as a result each man was given much less than the 10-day supply they were to receive.  With inadequate provisions, the militia moved out, crossed the Wabash River and began heading north towards the Kickapoo and Peoria Indian villages on the Illinois River some 80 to 120 miles upriver. 

 

The guides leading the party began to display their ignorance and were suspected of less than honorable intentions.  Additionally, food was becoming extremely scarce and some lurking Indians set some of the nearby prairie grass on fire.  On Oct 18th, when the one-month term of enlistment for the men expired, the men broke into open mutiny and refused to march further.  As they were all very hungry and suspicious of the guides, the men turned and started for Vincennes…with a very dejected General Hopkins following his men.  Most of the men, including John R, Shadrack and Milton, were discharged on Oct 30, 1812 and returned to their respective homes on the frontier.

 

General Hopkins was successful in pressing his attack on the Indians before the close of winter.  He led three regiments of KY militia deep into Indian Territory in mid November and destroyed many Indian towns and villages that they had found deserted.

 

 

National Archives

John Moore Military Records

War of 1812

 

The National Archives has the following Payroll and Company Muster Roll Records for John Moore, War of 1812, 2nd Mounted Regiment, commanded by Lieutenant Col. John Thomas’:

 

Company Pay Roll Records

John Moore appears with the rank of Private on a Payroll of Capt. Caleb Hardesty’s Company, 2nd Regiment Kentucky, M.V. Militia, War of 1812:

Discharged: Oct 30, 1812.

Distance from the place of discharge to place of residence: 178 miles.

Rate per day: 20 miles.

Number of days: 8.

Pay per month: $6.66.

Amount of pay: $1.71.

Pay for use of horse at 40 cents per day: $3.20.

 

John Moore, Private, Capt. Caleb Hardesty’s Company, 2nd Regiment Kentucky, Mtd. Vol. Militia, War of 1812, appears on a Company Pay Roll for:

Commencement of Service: Sept 18, 1812

Expiration of Service: Oct 30, 1812.

Time paid for: 1 month, 12 days.

Pay per month: $6.66.

Amount of pay: $9.32.

Amount of allowance for use, &c, of horse, at 40 cents per day: $17.20.

Total Amount: $26.52.

 

Company Muster Roll Records

John Moore, Private, Capt. Caleb Hardesty’s Company, 2nd Regiment Kentucky, Mtd. Vol. Militia, War of 1812, appears on Company Muster Roll:

Roll Dated:  Buseson, ______ Oct. 30, 1812.

Term of Service: 42 days.

Distance from place of discharge to place of residence:  178 miles.

Present or Absent:  Present.

 

John Moore, Private, Capt. Caleb Hardesty’s Company, 2nd Regiment Kentucky, Mtd. Vol. Militia in Reg’t commanded by Lieut. Col. John Thomas, War of 1812, appears on Company Muster Roll:

Roll Dated:  Vincennes, ______ Sept. 28, 1812.

Commencement of Service: Sept 18, 1812.

Present or Absent:  Present.

Total am’t of valuation of private property:  $68.87.

Remarks:  On duty.

 

 

 


For those who wish to learn more about this period of early American history, I would suggest books by the author, Allan Eckert.  One book in particular is entitled “That Dark and Bloody River” and is a fascinating chronicle of the settling of the Ohio River Valley during the latter half of the 1700’s. 

 

 

 


Before John R. Moore married Nancy Harrell in 1855, they entered into the following prenuptial agreement:

 

Prenuptial Agreement between John R. Moore and Nancy Harrell

Nelson Co KY Deed Book 30, Page 324-325

October 1855

 

An article of agreement made and entered into between Nancy Harrell of the County of Nelson and State of Kentucky of the one part and John Moore of the County of Washington and State aforesaid of the other part,

Witnesseth, that whereas a marriage is contemplated and will shortly take place between the said Nancy Harrell and the said John Moore and whereas on account of their advanced ages and the other surrounding circumstances not necessary here to be mentioned are induced to enter into the following agreement as and for a marriage contract.

Wherefore in consideration of the agreement in relation to the aforesaid intended marriage it is mutually severally and jointly agreed with and between the said parties that this marriage shall not in any way whatever change the control and ownership of their respective property either real or personal or mixed, that they are owners of considerable property and mutually consisting of lands and slaves and personal property and mutually desire and agree that all this property both real and personal shall stand be claimed and owned just as if this marriage now contemplated and agreed upon had never taken place, that each party shall pay there respective debts heretofore contracted out of their own respective means and funds, that they reserve the right to control here after the profits of their respective estates in the way of paying necessary expenses of their family as may seem to them just and right under their own control and management but it is clearly and distinctly understood between these contacting parties that they reserve and shall have and at all times enjoy the right to sell and convey by last will and testament or otherwise all and singular their respective land and slaves or any other personal property whatsoever in the same way and manner and with as full as much authority as they might or could do if this contemplated marriage had never taken place.

 

In testimony whereof we hereunto set out hands and seals this ?? day of October 1855.

                                                            John Moore

                                                            Nancy Harrell

Witness: John Moore, G C Jones

 

State of Kentucky, Nelson County

            I F. Darwin Elliott clerk of the Nelson County Court do certify that on the 21st day of May 1857 the written agreement was proved before me by the oath of G C Jones subscribing witness thereto to be the act and deed of John Moore and Nancy Harrell who also testified that John Bayne the other subscribing witness signed his name in his presence.  Whereupon the same together with this certificate has been recorded in my office.  Given under my hand this 12 day of June 1857.

                                                            J Darwin Elliott, Clerk

                                                            T H Miles, DC (District Court?)

 

 

 

 


Will of John R. Moore

Nelson Co KY Will Book 9, pages 428-429

Written 15 Jun 1857, Probated 27 Dec 1858, Recorded 4 Jan 1859

(Spelling errors NOT corrected)

 

I sit down this day to make this my last will and testament being convinced of the uncertainty of life and the certainty of death and for advanced in life but sound in mind and will to do justice to all of my beloved children.

 

1st after my death my desire is that sole may return to its author and my body to be interd to its mother earth according to the customs of our people and after all my just debts is paid the residue to be disposed of as this will is directed.

 

2nd I will and bequeath to by granddaughter Susan Moore daughter of my son James F. Moore a certain negro girl Lucinda with the request the her father should have the use of her so long as he may live then to be hers.

 

3rd I will and bequeath to my grandson Edward Moore son of James F. Moore a certain negro boy named Dade to be his with the cimalar request that his father have him and the use of him so long as he may live then to be his property.

 

4th I consider that I no that I hold receipts from my children for the sum of twenty five hundred dollars except John Robert and my daughter Susan which I hold her receipt for one thousand and John Robert for eleven hundred wich is my desire that they shall be made up equal.  I am going to start this day to Missouri this day with means sufficient to make Susan up equal if I should succede in getting there I leave In my hands of my son Henry nine hundred which is to be brought into my estate I leave also notes with my present wife and my two sons Jetson and Milton for eight thousand dollars which is to be divided equally with all after I am gone.

 

5th I will and bequeath to my present wife if she should be the longest liven my buggy horse to be hers as her own property.

 

6th noing and believeing that my present and beloved wife is in possession of a suficiency I desire that she should have the use and benefit of a negro man of mine by the name of John one year then to be returned to my estate as my property signed sealed in presence of this 15 June 1857.

                                                                                    John Moore

 

NB  I further request that my youngis sone John Robert and my son James is to se this will is crried out and hope it may be done with out charge. 

Attest

T.H. Miles

N.B. McClaskey

 

February 5 1858  Having lived up to this date I ad to this as a codicil with no alternation except that my youngest son John Robert is to have four thousand dollars out of the residue of my estate to be his own property in addition to the receipt I hold against. 

                                                                                    John Moore

In presence of

C.J. Constaintine

T.H. Miles

 

At a call term of the Nelson County Court held at the courthouse in Bardstown on the 27 day of December 1858.  This paper purporting to be the last will and testament of John Moore Dec’d was produced in court and by the Oath of T.H. Miles the same was duly proved to have been signed and delivered by the said Mr. John Moore as for his last will and testament with the codicil ann???? Also that the said T.H. Miles and N.B. McClaskey the other subscribing witness signed the same in witness as the request of said John Moore dec’d and the same is ordered to record given under my hand this 4 day of January 1859.

                                                                        George W. Moore, Clerk

 

 

 

 


Analysis of John R. Moore’s Will

By William B. Moore, 12/1999

 

The Will

Nelson County, KY records, Will Book 9, Pages 428/429, grants as follows:

 

June 15, 1857

• To Susan [granddaughter], daughter of son James F.   - Negro girl named Lucia.

 

• To Edward [grandson], son of James F.                      - Negro boy named Dade.

 

• To each of his children he has already given [and has receipts for] the following:

Jetson              Age      47         $2500

Wade H.                       44         $2500

Walter B.                       40         $2500

Jesse                           39         $2500

Milton                           36         $2500

James F.                      32         $2500

Henry B.                       31         $2500

Susan                           26         $1000

John Robert                  23         $1100

 

He is leaving later this day to travel to Missouri! [No person or place there named] and with 'means sufficient to make Susan up equal' [and presumably all others - see below]

 

• He left the following money and instructions if he should not return alive:

- with Henry                               $0900  *            to 'go into his estate'

- with Jetson and Milton             $8000  *            to be divided equal 'after I am gone'

 

• To his present and beloved wife [whom he said was in 'possession of a sufficiency'], his horse and buggy and the use of a male Negro slave for one year. John's first wife, Martha Bayne, died 3/17/1854. On 10/8/1855 he remarried, at age 68, to a widow, Nancy Harrell, age 57.

 

• He named 'his youngest son, John Robert and son, James, 'to se[e] that this will is carried out', and he 'hoped this could be done without charge'.

 

So, if we subtract, from $8900, the $2900 needed to make Susan and John Robert equal, there would have been about $6000 remaining to be distributed to all of the nine children, if he did not return alive from Virginia. But he did, and on:

 

February 5, 1858 he added a witnessed codicil granting:

• to 'his youngest son John Robert [now age 24] $4000 'out of the residue of my estate to be his property in addition to . . .'.

 

December 13, 1858

John R. died at age 71, at the end of the same year of returning successfully from MO.

 

December 27, 1858

The will, including the codicil, was decreed this date, and recorded January 14, 1859.

 

So, the family seemed to have a problem now. One can reasonably assume that:

·         co-executor James F., and all of the other siblings, were wondering what John Robert had done to deserve $4000 out of the remaining $6000.

·         but, between them, Henry [$900 in cash ?], Jetson, and Milton [$8000 in writing per the original will]  had the written representation or the actual money in their possession.

 

March 28, 1861  Settlement Agreement

On this date, twenty seven months after John R's death, his son James F. Moore, [named as the qualifying executor, at the request of the Judge of the Nelson County Court], filed the Settlement Agreement, consisting of the follow documents (all listed below in detail):

A.         The will of John R. Moore, deceased.

B & C.  Contract of Compromise between the Heirs [dated 1/27/1859]

D.         Voucher of Debts

E.         History of the manner in which the business was closed.

F.         An appric ? ? ?   [can't read this word . . . . .not included ? ? ?]

and noting that: “the parties have undertaken to settle up the business of the estate among themselves” [and some other statements that I can not read all of].

 

Here is the sequence as best that I can follow it.

 

January 27, 1959

The Compromise Contract was signed by all of the brothers granting the following:

            These two waive all further rights against the estate or the other heirs;

            To James F.                  $0500.00                      

            To John R.                    $1300.00           [not the $4000 granted in the codicil], and to

                                                                        paid as 'rent' on March 1, 1960

            And then payments of/to;

            Misc. debts                   $0362.97           Attested by a T. H. Miles, one of the original     

                                                                        witnesses to John R.'s will.

            A. J. Davis                    $0045.00           Burial expenses

            Go?? & Berkley             $0007.50           Dental/Doctor bills

            Philip Fitspatrick           $0003.25           Balance of a Bloomfield/Springfield Turnpike                                                                             Subscription.

            J. F. Watson & Co.        $0010.00           Shingling the house

            Total, about                  $2229.00

 

August 4, 1859  [this maybe should be 1860, see below]

Walter B. acknowledges receipt of $994 from his brothers, Jetson, Wade, Jesse, Milton and Henry. [This is probably the $900, plus interest, that John R. gave son Henry to hold before he (John R.) left to go to Missouri.]

 

August 13, 1860            [in Jefferson County KY]

Jetson passes the above $994 to a county clerk, G. W. Hill, who confirms receipt of a note for $994 dated August 4, 1860.

 

So, of the         $8994   in the estate after John R.'s death [8000 + 900 + 94 interest], there was

$6765   to be divided between seven heirs, the five brothers who attended the

Settlement meeting, and W. B. [Walter], and sister Susan [now Hill].

[James F. and John Robert waiving this.]

i.e., about         $0966   each.

 

 

 


John R Moore Estate Settlement Papers

Nelson County Courthouse

Nelson Co, KY

 

The following is a complete abstract of all the papers relating to John Moore’s estate settlement.

 

John Moore Estate Settlement

Nelson Co KY Will Book 11, page 20

Spelling errors not corrected

 

James F. Moore, Executor of John Moore being required by the Judge of the Nelson County Court to settle his accounts, none of the heirs residing in Nelson County.  On this the 28th March 1861 presented the papers herein after referred to and claimed a discharge as Executor.

 

First a copy of John Moore's will marked A.

Secondly a contract of Compensation? Between the heirs marked B plus one marked C.  Together with accounts in B.  Also paper D with voucher for debts paid, then paper E giving a history of the measure in which the business has been closed, also F an apprasment?.  After carefully examining all three papers, the Judge is satisfied that the parties have undertaken to settle up the business of the estate among themselves and have although being impersonally (or informally?) effected the same and from all the showings in the papers that the executor should not be held longer responsible to the heirs, but only for debts if any be outstanding. 

 

And to that end this is made a settlement with the Executor to show that he has made full distribution and as such with the exhibits it is now reported for record (or accord?).

 

Given under my hand this 28th March 1861

T[homas] P[ranther] Linthicum

 

Judges file for this suit $1.50 paid by T.H. Miles agent for the parties. 

                                                T[homas] P[ranther] Linthicum

 

 

Papers from John Moore's Estate Box #38

Nelson County Courthouse

Nelson Co KY

Amplifications or questions in ( )

Spelling errors not corrected

 

-------------------------------------------------

John Moore Heirs Agreement "B"

 

We the undersigned heirs and (?, maybe legalees?) of John Moore dec'd having met for the purpose of setling up the estate of said decedant, and being of age and fully compentent to act for ourselves, have come to the following agreement;

 

Said decedant died and left a will which is recorded in the Nelson County Court clerk's office.  Said will gives to the two children of James F Moore a negro girl named Lucinda and a boy named Dade which (we) desire is to stand unattined (meaning uncontested I believe).  It (the will) specifically gives to John R Moore a certain amount of money which has been comprimised and the said John R Moore signs this as an evidence of his satisfaction.  James F Moore who qualified as Executor under said will hereby transfers to the remainder of the heirs of said decendant all the interest which he has in said estate by will or otherwise as an individual and heir, For the consideration of five hundred dollars as evidenced by note and the undersigned Jetson Moore, W H Moore, Jesse Moore, Milton Moore and H B Moore who are also heirs of said estate having bought the two above named interest hereby obligate themselves to pay off all the debts owing by said estate and release the executor from any responsbility whatever and pay to W B Moore and Susan F Hill the two remaining heirs what is due them under the will.  Upon application, having had turned over to share the effects of said decedant the receipt wherof is hereby acknowledged witness our hands this 27th January 1959.

 

                                                                                    J F Moore

                                                                                    Jno R Moore

                                                                                    W H Moore

                                                                                    Jesse Moore

                                                                                    Henry B Moore

                                                                                    Jetson Moore

                                                                                    Milton Moore

 

-------------------------------------------------

John Moore Heirs Agreement "C"

 

Whereas John Moore departed this life in December last after publishing his last will and testament leaving James F Moore and John R Moore his executors, James only qualifying - and the undersigned heirs of said John Moore being of age and fully competent to act for themselves having met for the purpose of settling up the affairs of his estate free of cost and change have agreed to pay to John R Moore in satisfaction of his devise under the will he being present and consenting thereto the sum of thirteen hundred dollars esclusive (sic) of the receipt held by the estate against them and he hereby signs this as a ???? in full of al claims or demands against the ???? or heirs of said estate.  This 27 day of Jan 1859.  It is understood that the sum for which this is a re?? Is to be paid the 1st day of March next as evidenced by note executed to said J R Moore now delivered to him - signed by Jesse Moore, Henry B Moore, Jetson Moore, Wade H. Moore and Milton Moore it is further understoodby and between the parties that said J R Moore is to claim no further part of said estate under any circumstances whatever.

 

                                                                                    John R Moore

                                                                                    ~~~~~~~~~~~

                                                                                    Jesse Moore    ----

                                                                                    Henry B Moore      |      

                                                                                    W H Moore           |  Heirs

                                                                                    Milton Moore         |

                                                                                    Jetson Moore  ----

           

-------------------------------------------------

Receipt

 

Jefferson Co KY August 13 1860

 

Rcvd of Jetson Moore, Wade H Moore, Jessie Moore, Milton Moore and Henry B Moore Nine Hundred and Ninety Four dollars in a note executed to me by Jetson Moore bearing date of August 4th 1860 which note has interest from date, the said note embracing my portion of the estate of John Moore dec'd, as (?, maybe "approved") due me on 3 sentences of his heirs, out of the cash notes of ????????.

                                                            G.W. Hill

 

-------------------------------------------------

Receipt

 

August the 4th 1859

 

Received of Jetson Moore, Wade H Moore, Jessie Moore, Milton Moore and Henry B Moore Legalees of John Moore dec'd Nine Hundred and Ninety Four dollars it being my portion of the (?, maybe "amount") of the notes found due the dec'd at the time of his death.

                                                            Walter B Moore

 

------------------------------------------------

Doctor Bill

 

John Moore to Geo Berkley (a doctor)

 

Oct 14 1857

To evaluate negro woman, 50c   Dec 7 Exctracting tooth 50c

1.00

Feb 7 1858

Visit 4 times + med(ication) today and night

3.00

Mar 14 1858

Extracting 2 teeth negro woman

1.00

Sep 30 1858

Turnine (sp?) pill 50c, Dec 13 attention self $2

2.50

 

 

7.50

 

 

State of Ky - County of Nelson

 

This day personally appeared before me a notary public for said county Joshua Gore and made oath that the above account is first due and unpaid. That there is no offset against the same or any usury embraced therein.  

Joshua Gore

 

Mrs. Nancy (Harrell) Moore also makes oath that the account is just and true.

Nancy Moore

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this the 17 day of September 1859. 

T H Miles, NPNC (Notary Public Nelson County)

 

Received of James F Moore, Executor for John Moore dec'd seven dollars and fifty cents in full of the above account January 6th 1860. 

Geo Berkley

 

------------------------------------------------

Funeral Bill

 

John Moore to A.J. Davis (probably a mortician/funeral director)

 

Nov 18 1858

2 hands (2 workers) Shingling H(ouse) 1 day $1.50

3.00

Nov 19 1858

2 hands (2 workers) Shingling H(ouse) 1 day $1.50

3.00

Dec 14 1858

1 fine coffin

20.00

Dec 14 1858

1 Vault for same

5.00

Dec 15 1858

Hearse Hire H(and)

10.00

Dec 23 1858

2 hourses 1.5 days Shingling H(ouse)

4.00

 

Total

45.00

 

State of Kentucky, Nelson County

 

This day came before the undersigned Notary Public A.J. Davis and made oath that the above account is just due and unpaid that there is no just offset or discount against the same or usury embraced therein. 

                                                            A J Davis

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 19th of February 1859.

                                                            T H Miles, NPNC (Notary Public Nelson County)

 

Mrs. Nancy (Harrell) Moore says she knows the above account to be just and true.

Nancy Moore

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 9th day of March 1859.

                                                            T H Miles, NPNC (Notary Public Nelson County)

 

Received of James F Moore, Executor of John Moore dec'd forty five dollars in full of the above account January 6th 1860. 

A J Davis

                                                           

------------------------------------------------

Another Funeral Bill

 

Bloomfield KY   December 7 1858

John Moore to J.H. Watson & Company (probably transported John's body)

 

7 Dec 1858

To Shingling House (probably transporting John's body)

10.00

 

State of Kentucky, Nelson County

 

W H Perry states an oath that the above account of ten dollars of John Moore with J F Watson also is just.

                                                            William H Perry

 

Subscribed and sworn to and subscribed before me a justice of the peace for said county this 8th day of December 1859.

                                                            Chas Z Duncan JPNC (Justice Peace Nelson Co)

 

N G Wootten of the firm of J F Watson also states an oath the account aforesaid is just and unpaid that there are no offsets to any part thereof and that it contains no usury.

N G Wootten

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me a justice of the peace for said county this 8th day of December 1859.

                                                            Chas Z Duncan JPNC (Justice Peace Nelson Co)

 

------------------------------------------------

Bloomfield-Springfield Turnpike Subscription

 

John Moore to Philip Fitspatrick

 

Nov 1858

Balance on Turnpike subscription to the Bloomfield (KY) -Springfield (KY) Road

3.25

 

State of Kentucky, Nelson County

 

This day came before the undersigned Notary Public Philip Fitspatrick and made oath that the above account is just due and unpaid that there is no just offset or discount against the same or usury embraced therein.

                                                            Philip Fitspatrick

 

Garrat Fitspatrick says he knows the above account to be just and true.

                                                            Garret Fitspatrick

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 4th day of February 1859.

                                                            T H Miles, NPNC (Notary Public Nelson County)

 

Received of James F Moore, Executor of John Moore dec'd three dollars and twenty five cents in full of the above account January 6th 1860. 

Philip Fitspatrick

 

 

 

 


Nelson Co KY Common Law Suits

Involving

John R Moore’s 2nd wife Nancy (Harrell) Moore

 

March 1860: Nancy Moore vs Harrison Crume.  John R. Moore’s 2nd wife Nancy sued a Mr. Harrison Crume for failure to pay a $94.95 promissory note dated 13 Dec 1859 “for value received”.  Crume paid the note on 31 Dec 1859.

 

March 1863:  Nancy Moore vs W.L. Willett & Joshua Gore.  John R. Moore’s 2nd wife Nancy sued Willett and Gore for failure to pay a $152.05 promissory note one year after it was dated (which was 31 Dec 1859).  There is no record that they paid the note.

 

 

 


Nelson Co KY Deed Records

involving John R, Patsy (Bayne) or Nancy (Harrell) Moore

 

Grantor

Grantee

Bk/Pg

Dated

Description

John & Patsy Moore

Elias Kinchloe

17/486

8 Apr 1828

Patsy (Martha Bayne Moore) and her surviving siblings (Sally Gergory, Thomas Bayne and Nancy Marshall) sell all most of the land that their father Walter Bayne owned when he died intestate.

Nancy Moore & John, her husband

Robert C Harrell

30/48

11 Mar 1856

Nancy, late wife of Moses Harrell, sells her share in Moses’ farm to R.C. Harrell (son?) for $1700.

Thomas Hobbs

Nancy Moore, 2nd wife of John R. Moore

30/266

26 Feb 1857

Nancy buys a 3-acre plot in the town of Bloomfield for $3000 ($1500 down and $1500 owed).

 

 

Washington Co KY Deed Records

involving John R, Patsy (Bayne) or Nancy (Harrell) Moore

 

Bk/Pg

Date

Description

F/427

20?? 1820

John and his wife Rebecca Moore of Wash Co deed 114 acres of land to John Moore(*) of Wash Co for $500.  Land bounded by Harbin Moore Jr deceased land and Hardins Ck waters.

P/110

22 May 1843

Asher Bodine and wife Frances F, late Hindley, his wife of _____Co a deed of conveyance in Washington Co to John Moore(*) for 5 shillings.  Frances was one of the heirs of Anthony Hindley, deceased.  The original, unrecorded deed was dated 8 Feb 1819 by the heirs of Anthony Hindley to John Moore. 

P/408

1 Apr 1843

John Moore(*) and Martha his wife of Washington Co deed two tracts of Wash Co land to Wade H Moore for $100: a) 75 acres on Chaplin’s Fork of the Salt River—originally conveyed to John Moore(*) by Anthony Hindley’s heirs and  b) 50-60 acres on the waters of Long Lick.

P108

20 May 1843

Sherwood W Hundley and Julia his wife of Nelson Co KY a  deed of conveyance for 75 acres in Washington Co to John Moore of Washington Co KY for 5 shillings. The original, unrecorded deed was dated 8 Feb 1819 by the heirs of Anthony Hindley to John Moore(*).

P150

24 July 1843

William H Hindley and Louis his wife of Hickman Co KY a  deed of conveyance of 75 acres to John Moore of Washington Co KY for 5 shillings. The original, unrecorded deed was dated 8 Feb 1819 by the heirs of Anthony Hindley to John Moore(*).

Folder#9 (possibly deed Q/204)

9 Apr 1851

John Moore(*) and Martha his wife of Washington Co, “having failed to convey to said Bishop the house and lotts adjoining the ??mitt tract” deed to Daniel Bishop of the same county four acres for $1.  This is an unrecorded deed located in “Folder #9”.  It appears similar to the indexed Deed Q/204.

 

 

 

 


The children of John R. Moore and Martha Bayne Moore were:

 

1.     Jetson, born 30 Nov 1810 Washington Co KY, married Margaret P. Gregory 27 Oct 1834 Washington Co KY, died 23 Jul 1861 Washington Co KY, buried in the Mt. Zion Methodist Cemetery, Washington Co KY.  According to the 28 Nov 1857 Bardstown Saturday Gazette (“A Paper for the Independent, but Not Neutral; American but Know-Nothing; Conservative but not Old Fogy”), Jetson was elected as a Magistrate for District 2 on 5 May 1855.

2.     Wade Hampton, born circa 1813 Washington Co KY, married Elizabeth Rudledge 22 Dec 1836 Shelby Co KY.  Acquired the Washington Co Walton House Farm (a.k.a. the “Pope Place”) from the estate of Dr. Jackson during a Commissioner’s Sale in 1864, paying $26.50/acre for 547 acres.  Wade sold it two years later to P.S. Barber for $27.92/acre.

3.     Walter Bayne, born circa 1817 Washington Co KY, married Marion L. Pope 4 Feb 1842 Spencer Co KY.

4.     Jesse, born circa 1817 Washington Co KY, married Sarah Margaret Weathers 1 Mar 1842 Nelson Co KY.  Jesse served in the House of Representatives of the Kentucky Legislature as a Representative from Washington County in 1845.

5.     Milton, born 6 Jan 1821 Washington Co KY, married Elizabeth L. Lewis 21 May 1854 Washington Co KY, died 2 Jan 1880 Washington Co KY, buried Mt. Zion Methodist Cemetery, Washington Co KY.

6.     James Franklin, born May 1824 Washington Co KY, married Nancy Ashley Jones 4 Nov 1849 Washington Co KY.  In the 1900 Washington Co KY census, James is living in the household of Mattie Sea Gist.

7.     Henry Bayne, born 11 Dec 1826 Washington Co KY, married (1) Jane Mariah Pile 29 Jun 1852 Washington Co KY (they lived in Mooresville, Washington Co KY), (2) Eliza B, and died 25 Apr 1896 Washington Co KY, buried Moore-Pile Cemetery, Washington Co KY.  Jane was born 29 Dec 1835 and was the daughter of Benjamin Pile Jr and Rhoda Weathers.

8.     Susannah, born circa 1831 Washington Co KY, married Mississippi Riverboat Captain Granderson Winfrey Hill 23 Nov 1853 Washington Co KY.

9.     John Robert, born 23 Nov 1833/1834 Washington Co KY, married Elizabeth Godby 6 Aug 1861 Bloomfield, Nelson Co KY, died 2 Jun 1918 Fern Creek, Jeffersontown KY, buried Jeffersontown KY.  Elizabeth was the daughter of Jacob Godby.  Her mother died when she was about 9.  John and Elizabeth had at least one child, a son, Thomas Jefferson Moore, who was born 4 Jan 1873 in Shelby Co KY and died 20 Apr 1960 in West Palm Beach FL.  The descendants of this family (Cindy Reidhead, POBox 23, Glencoe NM  88324, email as of 1/17/2006: sjreidhead@valornet.com) believes that John Robert’s father was not named John R. Moore but John Washburn Moore.  This family also has records that state that John (“R” or “Washburn”) Moore was a son of one of four brothers who came over from England.  The eldest of these four brothers was named John Barnett Moore and he managed to get all the family money that belonged to the other three – which caused a split up and they all left for different directions.  This John Barnett Moore died a wealthy bachelor in New York state – and that the state of New York received his estate.

 

Milton Moore

 

Milton was born 6 Jan 1821 in Washington Co KY.  He married Elizabeth L. Lewis on 15th or 21st  May 1854 Washington Co KY and died 2 Jan 1880 Washington Co KY.  Milton is buried in the Mt. Zion Methodist Cemetery, Washington Co KY.  Milton Moore, farmer, age 42 of Washington County, is listed in the 1863 Civil War Draft Registration Records.  Milton is also listed on page 1042 of the 1880 KY Mortality Schedules as follows:

            Moore, Milton—Record 1104

Male, 58 years, widowed

            Born—KY

Father Born—KY

Mother Born—KY

Occupation—Farmer

Died—Washington Co., Jan 1880

Residence in County—58 years

 

           

Elizabeth L. Lewis was the daughter of Berry and Mary (Hays) Lewis.  She was born 26 Mar 1833 in Washington Co KY.  Reports of her death date (either 22 Sep 1864 or 22 Sep 1904) are reported by various researchers but no listing of her death is found in the Mt. Zion Methodist Cemetery records.  As Milton is listed as a widow in 1880, Elizabeth had to have died prior to 1880.  Note: For more information on the Lewis and Hays surnames and ancestry, please see the chapters so entitled.

 

 

 

 


Milton Moore Estate Settlement Papers

Washington County Courthouse

Washington Co, KY

 

Document

Will Book

Pages

Date

Inventory

R

338-341

Apr 26, 1880

Sale Bill

R

341-345

Apr 26, 1880

Admin Settlement

R

386-387

Aug 23, 1880

Admin Settlement

S

42

Nov 28, 1881

Admin Settlement

S

100-101

Mar 27, 1882

 

Listed, in the first two columns below, is the Inventory of Milton Moore’s personal property as found in Washington County KY Will Book R/338-341.  Listed, in the final two columns, are the Buyers of his assets and the price they paid.  This Sale information was obtained from R/341-345.  James B. Hays, Administrator, displayed the Inventory to three court-appointed appraisers: F.R. Neale, S.A. Bayne and F.D. Neale on Tuesday January 27, 1880.  The information below was transcribed exactly as found in the Will Books.  There are numerous, but consistent, spelling errors.

 

It appears as if the Administrator and at least one of the three appraisers are related to our family.  The Estate’s Administrator, Mr. James B. Hays, was one of 13 children of William Hayes, Jr and Eleanor Burcham.  This couple also had a Mary (Polly) Hays who married Berry Lewis in Washington Co, KY on March 8, 1821.  This couple had a number of children, including Milton’s wife Elizabeth Lewis.  Regarding the three court appointed appraisers, S.A. Bayne appears to be Stephen A. Bayne, son of John and Mary (?) Bayne.  John was the son of Walter and Meek (Wade) Bayne....the same couple that also had Martha who married our direct ancestor John R. Moore in Nelson County in 22 Feb 1810.

 

 

Inventory

Appraised Price

 

Buyer

 

Price Paid

One Parlor Organ

100.00

B Murphy

101.00

One Centre Table

1.50

Geo Pile

3.50

One Small Square Table

.50

J P Comstock

.70

One County Map

1.00

J  B Hays

1.00

One Set Cain Bottom Chairs

3.00

B Murphy

2.10 (one lot @ .35 each)

One Set Common Chairs

2.00

J W Hawkins

2.50 (5 @ .50 each)

One Pair Dog Irons

1.00

 

 

One Parlor Carpet--on floor

6.00

B Murphy

3.75

One Folding Leaf Table

.25

 

 

One Rocking Chair

.25

J M Hawkins

.25

One Mantle Clock

8.00

B. Murphy

5.50

One Bureau (desk)

1.50

Alex Sutton

1.60

One Rag Carpet--on floor

2.00

H McClasky

3.25

One Lounge

2.00

Will Hays

.80

One Bedstand and two beds

6.00

 

 

One Tub up stairs

.50

Jas Cammack

1.00

One Side Board

1.00

Jno Curtsinger

.55

One Bureau & Cupboard

1.50

Bud Selecman

.50

One Looking Glass

.50

Jno Curtsinger

.35

One Shot Gun

5.00

Jas Ewing

3.75

One Dining Table

.50

 

 

         Amount Brot over

144.00

 

 

Lot of Cupboard ware

2.00

see below

 

One Doz Silver plated forks

6.00

see below

 

One Set of table knives

1.00

Jno Curtsinger

.40

One set Silver Table spoons

5.00

see below

 

One coffee mill & sifter

.25

Boon Murphy

.20

2 milk pans

.60

 

 

One Kitchen safe

1.50

Wm Montgomery

1.20 (strecher safe)

One Cook stove and vessels

3.00

Ben Murphy

9.00

One pair Flat Irons

.50

Bud Selecman

.80

Two water buckets

.20

 

 

One pair Fire Irons

.50

B Murphy/Jas Anderson

.70/.30

Lot of Old barrels &c(&cetra)

.25

Joe Hall

.15 inc half bus measure

One Large Spinning wheel

.25

James B Hays

.25

Two 5 gallon jars

1.00

Jas Hall/Cor. Wickam

.30/.35

One Churne

.50

John Bishop

.15

Tea Kettle and oven

.50

Jas Cammack

.30

One 2 gallon jug and jar

.50

A Speaks/Bud Selecman

.20/.15

One pair Steelyards(stilyards?)

.25

Wm Ray

.20

One Lot of Old Irons

2.00

Geo W Southerland

1.05

One Grindstone

.25

Jas Cammack Sr

.90

One New Wheat Fan

20.00

M (T?) Murphy

20.00

One hand saw

.50

James Cammack Sr.

.45

One Hatchet

 

Wm Ray

.30

Three Pitch Forks

1.50

(see below)

 

Old Buggy Harness

.50

James Hall

.15

One Maul

.20

 

 

One 10 Gallon Kettle

.50

Dal Murphy

1.00

              Amt brot down

$194.25

 

 

One 30 Gallon Kettle

3.00

Jno W Hays

3.50 (but 20 gallon)

Five Bee Hives and Bees

25.00

see below

 

One Choping Ax

.75

Eli Hobbs

.95

One Lot of Lumber

3.00

Jna A Bishop

4.90 @ .80 per hundred

One Wire clothes line

.50

 

 

Shingles

10.00

Jno W Hays

9.54

One old Table

.25

Squire Male

.25

Lot of Meat about 1000 lbs

70.00

 

 

One Cider Mill

5.00

Jas Cammack

1.55

Two Oil cans

.50

Jas Ewing

.10

Two Barrels Apple Vinegar

10.00

Jas Holloway/Tho Briggs

2.05/4.00

One half Bbl lime

.50

Jno Reynolds

.60 (says 2 bbls lime)

One Stand Lard

12.00

Boon Murphy/

6.25 (1 bbl)

Half Bbl Sorghum

6.00

Boon Murphy

3.75

Meat box on Trough

2.00

 

 

Lot of Old Barrels

.50

Chas Selecman

.10

Lot of Wheat in Granary

100.00

see below

 

Slide & Mash tub

1.50

 

 

Lot of (Oak) Fencing Post

.80

Jno Reynolds

.80

One Shovel Plow No 1

.50

W B Moore

.40

One Shovel Plow No 2

.50

W B Moore

.50

One Pat Plow No 3

4.00

W H Brown

3.60

One Pat Plow No 4

4.00

 

 

One Broken Plow No 5

.50

 

 

One Rounder Plow No 6

.50

 

 

One Left Hand Plow No 7

2.00

 

 

One Double Shovel No 8

1.50

Dick Murphy

.40

One Single Trus & c(&cetra)

.25

R H Dugan

1.50

        Amt brot over

$459.30

 

 

Harrow & Hay Rake

5.00

Boon Murphy

4.50

Two old Wagon frames

.50

 

 

Log Chain Stechers &c(&cetra)

1.00

W M Cheser

1.20

One Lot of Boards

1.00

Jas Cammack

.70 @ .35 per HD  200

Old Wagon Wheels Tires &c

2.00

 

 

Post Hole Auger

1.00

J D Neale

.35

Grubbing Hoe, Brier Leythe &c

.50

J M Hawkins

1.00 (crop cut saw)

Two Buckets

1.00

 

 

One Two Horse Wagon & bed

50.00

W B Moore

50.00    4 horse wagon

One Extra Wagon bed

8.00

F R Neale

2.50

One Combined Reaper & Mower

75.00

W B Moore

50.00

Four pairs of Harness

12.00

see below

 

One Cutting box

5.00

Willie Cammack

4.00

One lot of Gate Stuff

2.00

Wm Eddleman

1.35 (gate lumber)

One Yellow Mare   Dolly

20.00

Thos Walls

41.15

One Bay Mare    Kit

100.00

Thos Briggs

131.25

One Bay Horse    Davy

100.00

Boon Murphy

101.00 (grey horse)

One Suckling Clot

20.00

see below

 

2 Yearling colts

60.00

see below

 

Three Stacks Clover hay

18.00

see below

 

Four Stacks Timothy hay

24.00

see below

 

Fifty Shocks Fodder

5.00

W B McMakin

2.00 (for 30@ 6.5/shock)

Thirty Shoats (young hogs)

60.00

E G Shirley

68.85 (for 27)

Three old Sous (sows; cows)

30.00

SD Hinkle/D Cokendolfther/J W Hays

7.00/8.05/9.00

Five head Cattle

75.00

 

 

About 1100 Bus corn in crib

440.00

see below

 

One Spring Wagon

(left blank)

Bredirick (could be a store)

10.00

Cash on Hand

37.80

 

 

           (Total Inventory)

$1613.10

 

 

 

This concludes the inventory of Milton Moore.  The following is a list of items sold that I could either not find an exact match for in the inventory above or the line item was of multiple items and bought by several people (individually listed below).

 

Items Sold That Were not Listed in the Estate Inventory

Appraised Price

 

Buyer

 

Price Paid

Featherbed

 

Alex Sutton

3.00

Bedstead

 

Wm Cheser

1.10

Small Spinning Wheel

 

Wm Ray

.35

Pitchfork

 

W B Moore

.50

Pitchfork

 

Boon Murphy

.60

Pitchfork

 

Thomas S Briggs

.10

One Basket

 

W B Moore

.45

Crocks

 

Bud Silverman

.20

Two old chairs

 

Bud Selecman

.20

One sifter

 

Jas Cammack, Sr

.15

B Bland trash wheat &c

 

Jno Brewer

2.05

One Old Kettle

 

J W Hays

1.25

1/4 interest in corn (or cain?) mill

 

J W Hays

3.75

Brunley Plow

 

Ben Toon

3.85

Brunley Plow

 

Jas Gribsby

3.80

One Plow

 

J W Hays

1.75

One Plow

 

Jas Anderson

.85

One two horse plow

 

Do Cheser

.30

Old Wagon and Irons

 

Jno Reynolds

2.00

Kettle & Grease

 

W Ray

.60

Scoop & hammar

 

John Hardesty

.40

One Barrel

 

Ben Hale

.15

Soap grease & kegs

 

Boon Murphy

.25

Salt & bbl

 

Jno Brewer

.70

Soap & bbls

 

Boon Murphy

.25

Soap & bbls

 

Peyton Briggs

.25

One red Cow

 

D Cokendolfether

18.05

One small red Cow

 

T K Pulliam

25.50

3 calves

 

S O McMakin

42.15

Hay (Timothy) first Choice

 

F.R. Neale

9.00

Hay (            ) secd   

 

Boon Murphy

9.25

Hay (            )  third  

 

H B Moore

8.25

Hay (            ) fourth “

 

F R Neale

7.85

Clover Hay first Choice

 

Boon Murphy

4.50

                secd   

 

H B Moore

4.00

                third  

 

Jno W Hays

3.25

200 Bus Corn @ .42

 

Boon Murphy

84.00

400              @ .40

 

Jno Bush

160.00

269              @ .40

 

Jas Grigsby

107.60

50 Bus Wheat @ $1.16

 

Geo W Southerland

58.00

Remainder (of wheat) @ $1.10

 

Geo W Southerland

52.75

One Dish

 

Joe Hall

.45

One Dish

 

Jas Collins

.40

One Bowl

 

Wm Eddleman

.10

One Dish

 

Jas Montgomery

.30

One Pitcher

 

Jas Collins

.40

Dishes

 

Lottie Pile

.40

One Lot plates

 

A Higgins

.35

?? Glass gobletts

 

Jas Grigsby

.65

Preserve Stand

 

Henry Neale

.10

Knives

 

Jno Curtsinger

.40

Cups & Sausers

 

J C Warford

.35

Plates

 

Will Hays

.50

Plates

 

Bud Selecman

.35

Set of Forks

 

J W Shirley

1.10

Silver Table Spoons

 

Ben Murphy

2.00

Four silver tea Spoons

 

Ben Murphy

1.25

Irish potatoes @ $.35

 

J L Moore (no idea who)

2.00

One Stand Bees

 

Thos Williams

5.00

One Stand Bees

 

J W Hays

2.00

One Stand Bees

 

J L Moore

3.00

One Stand Bees

 

J W Hays

1.05

One Stand Bees

 

Thos Williams

4.30

Basket

 

F Goathey

.50

Meat of 10 hogs .0625 per lb

 

D B Murphy

19.37 1/2

        remainder of meat .0625 lb

 

D B Murphy

28.76 1/4

One slide

 

Peyton Briggs

.25

One pen of corn

 

Thos Briggs

50.00

One Pr Plow gear

 

Wm Cammack

1.30

One Horse Collar

 

John Brewer

.85

One Horse Collar

 

C Nickham

.90

One Horse Collar

 

Sam Cheser

.10

One Pr Breeching

 

W P Hays

5.00

One Plow Gear

 

Jas Hall

1.15

One Horse Collar

 

Bill Dorsey

.35

One single tru (truss)

 

Boon Murphy

.40

One Blind bridle

 

John Bishop

.10

One Blind bridle

 

Boon Murphy

.60

One Blind bridle

 

Boon Murphy

.40

One back Band

 

John Bishop

.10

One Clivis??

 

Jas Hale

.10

One Bay Filly

 

Eli Hobbs

25.25

One Sorrel? colt

 

C B Thomas

11.00

 

 

Total amount of sale

$1532.60

 

Explanation of Relationships

1) W B Moore would be William Berry Moore, Milton’s son and our direct ancestor.

2) Boon Murphy and D.B. Murphy would both be Daniel Boone Murphy, husband of Sara Ellen Moore, one of Milton’s daughter.  W B Moore lived with Daniel and Sara following their father’s death and moved with them to Kansas between 1880 (when they all appeared in the Washington Co KY federal census) and March 1884 (when Daniel and Sarah purchased Reno Co KS land).

3) H B Moore would most certainly be Henry Bayne Moore, another son of Milton’s and the person who, through his biographical sketch in the History of Kentucky, Illustrated, provided us with the bulk of our early Moore information.

4) J L Moore....no idea who this person is.  Jetson Moore, another son, died in 1861.  Milton had a son named J.R. (probably John R. after his grandfather).  Could be a wife of one of the Moore boys in the area.  A more likely possibility is that it was James Lucas Moore, son of Jetson Moore, who was born in 1862. He lived and died in the area (is buried in the Mt Zion cemetery where John R and Milton are buried).

5) All the Hays’ are most likely related to the family via William Hercules Hays, the great grandfather of Elizabeth Lewis, Milton’s wife. 

6) John Hardesty could be a descendant of Capt. Caleb Hardesty who led the 2nd Regiment, Mounted Kentucky Volunteers.  This Regiment was involved in the Indian Wars of 1812 and was primarily staffed by Nelson Countians....one of whom was Milton’s father John R. Moore. 

7) George Pile, who bought a centre table for $3.50 (second item sold), is probably related to Henry Bayne Moore’s wife, Jane M Pile.

  

Following the sale, there are several other court documents (in Washington Co KY Will Books R & S) that record the satisfying of creditors to whom Milton Moore apparently had outstanding bills with.  In the final court document (S/100-101) dated February 28, 1882 (almost two years following Milton’s death), it appears as if all creditors have been paid and that the Court Appointed Estate Administrator, James B. Hays, has in hand $39.60.

 

It appears as if Milton Moore did not own any real estate as it was not part of the sale.

 

It would be interesting to review the local Springfield, KY papers of the day (certainly on microfilm) for a notice of the pending “Auction” of Milton Moore dec’d Estate.  It probably appeared a few weeks prior to the sale.  The appraisers apparently took the inventory on Jan 27, 1880.  Both the inventory and sale were recorded at the courthouse on the same day: April 26, 1880.               

 

 

 


The children of Milton and Elizabeth (Lewis) Moore were:

 

1.     Mary Martha, born 12 Mar 1855 Washington Co KY, married Peyton Briggs 6 Mar 1873 Washington Co KY, died 1 Jul 1921, buried Bardstown Cemetery, Bardstown KY.

2.     William Berry, born 6 Oct 1856 Chaplin, Nelson Co KY, married Annie Lovena Sorency 28 Sep 1887 Elmer, Reno Co KS, died 8 Aug 1922 Arlington, Reno Co KS, buried Pleasant View Cemetery, Darlow, Reno Co KS.

3.     Sarah (Sallie) Ellen, born 6 Sep 1858, Chaplin, Nelson Co KY, married Daniel Boone Murphy 9 Sep 1878 Bardstown, Nelson Co KY, died 17 Jan 1937 Grace Hospital, Hutchinson, Reno Co KS, buried 19 Jan 1937 Mt. Hope, Sedgwick Co KS.  Daniel Boone Murphy was the son of Elisha Edwards Murphy and Caroline Milton Murphy.  They were married 26 Dec 1834 in Nelson Co KY.  Caroline is a descendant of Moses Milton, the son of Richard Milton, Jr.  Daniel Boone and Sarah (Moore) Murphy purchased 160 acres of Reno Co KS land (SW¼, Section 32, Twp 24, S of Range 6 West) on 17 Sep 1884.

 

Letter from Sarah (Sallie) Moore Murphy of Hutchinson KS to Miss Lulu Neal of KY
courtesy of Mr. Robert P. Moore of Lexington KY

 

Hutchinson, Kansas, July 26, 1885

 

Miss Lulu Neal

 

Dearest Lulu, I believe I owe you a letter but it has been so long, I have almost forgotten but never-the-less I will try to write to you this afternoon.  I will not promise that it will be very interesting as I have no news worth relating, only that we are having some very warm weather at present, and another thing I ate so much dinner that I am really uncomfortable.  We are all well at this time.  I was real sorry to hear of your trouble with your throat.  Hope it will soon be well.  I never had any experience in a thing of that kind though I imagine it must be very unpleasant.  I would love so much to see you all and have a talk.  I feel as though I would never get through talking to you all.  I could talk so many things that I can't write.  I have lots of nice vegetables and we enjoy them so much.  I haven't very many chickens.  I did not try to have many as I was not very well fixed for it.  What I have are real nice.  They are Plymouth Rock.  We are raising hogs this year instead of chickens.  We have so many pretty pigs.  Everything is in a flourishing condition now.  I never saw corn look better than it does now, but we will not have any fruit much this year, that is, in this country.  And what they ship here is so high that we can't afford to buy much.  I think it will not be so high after a while.  We have lots of nice plums.  They are just getting ripe now.  We will have lots of ripe watermelons by the first of next month.

I suppose you have all saw Bettie Brown before this time.  I think the Dr. is getting tired of keeping house.  I hope your Grandma will come out with her when she comes home.  I don't see why she could not.  Well changing the subject, I suppose you are having lots of weddings back there from what I can hear.  They have had several picnics in our neigh-borhood lately, but I did not attend any of them myself.  Well, Lulu your Uncle Boone is lying on the floor asleep.  I have been trying to get him to help me to fill out my letter.  All I can get out of him is tell her not to love the boys too hard and write him a long letter, and tell him all you know.  I spent the day with your Aunt Mattie one day last week.  I saw your Uncle Will yesterday.  They were all as well as usual.  Tell Bob, Ernest is getting lazy.  I don't know what I am going to do with him.  Him and Ben is a good deal alike in that respect.  The baby was right sick last week but is about well now.  He is cutting his teeth all at once.  Sallie Hooper is talking something of going back on a visit this summer, but I hardly think she will, she is looking badly this summer and having bad health.  We intended going over there today but it looked so much like rain we gave it out.  I get to like raisins better every day.  I feel as independent as you please sitting back with my Mother Hubbard on.

Well I see some company coming.  Will bring my letter to a close.  You must write me a long letter right soon.  I do love to hear from you all.  Give my love to all the family and also your Mama.  I heard Courtney was going to get married.  Is it true or not?  Ernest and Sis says kiss Aunt Sue and Uncle Dock for them. Bye bye from your loving Aunt Sallie E. Murphy

 

Identities of those mentioned:

Betty Brown, Sallie Hooper, unknown

The Dr./Uncle Dock - Dr. Franklin C. Marshall, whose wife, Aunt Sue, was Susan Mary Murphy, sister of Will and Boone Murphy and of great grandmother, Kate Murphy Neal

Aunt Sue - as above

Your grandma - Caroline Milton Murphy

Uncle Will - brother of Boone, Susan, Kate and deceased Alice Murphy Wood

Aunt Mattie - wife of Uncle Will.  Her maiden name was Pinkston, a Washington Co. family

Bob - Robert Wood, son of Alice Murphy Wood.  Bob, his sister, and my grandmother were raised by Uncle Doc and Aunt Sue, all of whose children had died in infancy.

Courtney - Courtney Neal, my grandmother's brother

Ernest - Boone and Sallie's eldest son

Ben - Boone's cousin, son of Uncle Will Murphy

Other Murphy siblings of Boone, who were not mentioned in this letter:  Richard, Nan, Dallas.

 

 

Obituary of Daniel Boone Murphy

Volume XLV (presumably the Hutchinson (KS) News)

 

Daniel Boone Murphy was born in Nelson County, Kentucky, March 7, 1851, and died at Grace Hospital, Hutchinson, Kansas, on July 3, 1930, after an illness of one week. 

Mr. Murphy was married September 9, 1878 to Sarah E. Moore, who survives him.  He also left six children, three sons, Ernest Murphy, of Hutchinson, Kansas; Guy C. Murphy of Haven; and Clarence F. Murphy, of Minneola, Kansas.  Also three daughters, Mrs. Lizzie Lamb of Cortex, Colorado; Mrs. Carrie Koontz and Mrs. Allie Kirkpatrick of Haven, Kansas.  Mr. Murphy came from Kentucky to Kansas in March, 1884 and settled in Reno county, which has been his home since that date, having moved to the vicinity of Mt. Hope in 1899, and having resided in that locality since that date.

Mr. Murphy united with the Methodist Church when a young man and remained in that faith to his death.  He followed the occupation of farming all his life and was always much interested in that work.  His sterling honesty and upright dealings made friends of all who knew him, and he will be greatly missed by his neighbors and associates.  He was laid to rest in the family lot in the Mt. Hope cemetery.

 

Obituary of Sarah Ellen (Moore) Murphy

18 Jan 1937 edition of the Hutchinson (KS) News

 

Mrs. Sarah Ellen Murphy, 78, of Mt. Hope, mother of Ernest Murphy of the J.N. Bailey and Son Co., died yesterday at a local hospital.  The funeral services will be held tomorrow from the Methodist church in Mt. Hope at 2 o’clock.

Mrs. Murphy, widow of Daniel B. Murphy came to Reno county in 1884 and homesteaded a claim.  She is survived by three sons, Ernest Murphy, Hutchinson; G.C. Murphy and C.F. Murphy both of Mt. Hope; three daughters, Mrs. Lizzie Lamb, Cortez, Colo.; Mrs. Carrie Koontz and Mrs. Allie Kirkpatrick of Haven.

 

4.     John Milton, born 12 Feb 1861 Washington Co KY, died 25 Feb 1885 Washington Co KY, buried Mt. Zion Methodist Cemetery, Washington Co KY.

5.     Edward/Edwin Rutledge/Rutherford, born circa 1864 Washington Co KY, married Sarah Neale (b 1865).  He was living in St. Louis, MO as late as 1922 as he is listed a one of the surviving siblings of William Berry Moore, his brother.  A check of St. Louis MO records indicates a “Edw. R. Moore, elect.” living at “4520 McKinley Ave” in the 1921 St. Louis MO City Directory…..but is not listed in the 1922 or 1923 directory.

 

 

William Berry Moore

 

William Berry was born on 6 Oct 1856 in Chaplin, Nelson Co KY.  He moved to Kansas in March 1884 with his sister Sarah Ellen and her husband Daniel Boone Murphy.  He married Annie Lovena Sorency on 28 Sep 1887 in Elmer, Reno Co KS.  William died on 8 Aug 1922 in Arlington, Reno Co KS and is buried in the Pleasant View Cemetery in Darlow, Reno Co KS.

 

Annie Lovena is the daughter of Silas and Martha Ann (Wilson) Sorency. She was born on 5 Oct 1855 in Pleasant Hill, Cass Co MO.  She died 18 Nov 1943 Arlington, Reno Co KS and is buried next to her husband in the Pleasant View Cemetery, Darlow, Reno Co KS.  The Sorency ancestry is fascinating.  For more information on this surname, please see the chapter by that name.

 

On 28 Sep 1887, Annie married William Berry Moore in Elmer, Reno Co KS.

 

The following is a chronology of land transactions involving Annie and/or William:

 

SouthWest Quarter, Section 21, Township 24, Range 6, Lincoln Twp, Reno Co KS

On 14 December 1883, Annie Sorency, listed as being “of Cass Co MO”, bought 160 acres of land (SW¼, Section 21, Twp 24, Range 6) in the Darlow/Elmer area of Reno Co KS from John and Grace Fahnestock (of Knox Co IL) for $1000. (Reno Co KS Deed Book #10, pg 348).

 

On 2 March 1889, “Annie L. Moore and Husband” of Reno Co KS sold the east half (80 acres) of the above SW¼ to William Arthur McGough of Reno Co KS for $1000 (Reno Co KS Deed Book #42, pg 371).

 

On 24 July 1905, “Annie L. Moore and William B. Moore, her husband” of Reno Co KS sold the remaining west half (80 acres) of the above SW¼ to Charles D. Evens also of Reno Co KS for $4000 (Reno Co KS Deed Book #86, pg 560).  Annie and her husband then purchased 160 acres of land approximately 5 miles west of Arlington in Langdon Twp, Reno Co KS (see below).

 

SouthWest Quarter, Section 2, Township 25, Range 9, Langdon Twp, Reno Co KS

On 24 Jul 1905, “Annie L. Moore and William B. Moore her husband” of Reno Co KS enter into an indenture (mortgage) with Andrew J Kelley and Mary his wife of Reno Co KS for the 160 acres, specifically the SW¼ of Section 2, Twp 25, Range 9) for $5000, initially putting $500 down (Reno Co KS Deed Book #86, page 559).  Annie and William together pay off this mortgage in 1909 (see next entry).

 

On 2 Jan 1909 “Annie L. Moore and William B. Moore her husband” pay off the 24 Jul 1905 mortgage in full (Reno Co KS Deed Book #100, page 98).  They now own the 160 acres out right.  We have a photo of who we think is Annie, William Berry and their son Claude standing out in front of this home – the only known photograph of William Berry with his wife Annie Sorency Moore.

 

On 10 Feb 1934 “Annie L Moore, a widow, of Reno Co KS” sells to her son “Claude S. Moore of Reno Co KS” the 160 acre SW¼ of Section 2, Twp 25, Range 9, better known as the  “Moore Quarter” (Reno Co KS Deed Book #221, pg. 127) for “for one dollar and other valuable considerations”.  Annie’s husband and Claude’s father William died some 12 years earlier.

 

William B. Moore’s obituary is located in Friday August 18, 1922 edition of the Arlington (KS) Enterprise:

 

William B. Moore

Passed away Tuesday, August 8, at Family home west of town

 

In the last week’s issue of this paper we gave a very short account of the sudden death of Mr. W.B. Moore, who lived a few miles west of this city in Langdon Township.  Mr. Moore had been in a very poor state of health for some weeks past, but apparently was improving and was able to be up and about the place.  In fact, he was in town but a few days before his death, but instead of growing better as the days passed, he became weaker and death claimed him.

William Berry Moore was born in Washington County, Kentucky, October 6, 1856.  Departed this life at the family home west of town on Tuesday, August 8, 1922, aged at the time of his death, 65 years, ten months and two days.

He moved to Kansas in 1885, settling near Darlow.  In 1887, he was united in marriage with Miss Anna L. Sorency, and to this union were born two sons, Berry Moore, who died at the age of eleven months, and Claude S. Moore of Arlington.

Seventeen years ago, he and his family moved to the present home where they resided until this time.

Mr. Moore was baptized in infancy and united with the church at an early age.  He will be especially remembered for his honest and upright associations with his fellow man, always looking to God, his Heavenly Father, for his salvation.

The funeral service was conducted from the home Thursday afternoon of last week by Rev. Wheat of Langdon, and the burial was in the Darlow Cemetery.

He leaves to mourn his death, his wife, Anna L. Moore, and one son, Claude S. Moore, of Arlington; one sister, Mrs. D.B. Murphy of Haven, and one brother, Mr. Ed Moore of St. Louis, besides other relatives and a host of neighbors and friends.

 

After William Berry Moore’s death, Annie prepared the following Public Sale announcement and placed it in the same Arlington (KS) Enterprise edition that the obituary (above) appeared! 

 

 

PUBLIC SALE

 

I will sell at public auction at my residence 5 miles due west of Arlington; 3 miles north and 3 east of Langdon on WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 23 1922 Beginning at one o’clock p.m., the following described personal property, to-wit:

4 Head of Horses – 1 brown mare, with mule colt by side;  1 bay mare, 9 years old, weight 1300 lbs.;  1 black gelding, coming 4 years old, weight 1100 lbs., well broke;  1 black mare, coming 4 years old, weight 1200 lbs., well broke.

7 Head of Cattle – 1 red cow, 7 years old, just fresh;  1 black cow, 7 years old, coming fresh in October;  1 Jersey cow, 6 years old, has been fresh but a few weeks;  1 Jersey cow 6 years old, to be fresh in September.  The foregoing cows are all carefully selected and are extra good milk cows.  1 heifer calf, 7 months old;  1 heifer calf, 3 months old;  1 young bull calf.

8 acres extra good growing corn.  1 ½ tons good prairie hay in mow.

Farm Implements – 1 International farm truck, 1 Rock Island lister, 1 International single row cultivator, 1 two-section harrow, 1 single row ridge buster, 1 ten disc Van Brunt wheat drill, 1 Moline 14-18 disc harrow;  1 Moline sulky plow, 1 Deering mower, 1 five tooth cultivator, 1 buggy, 1 set work harness, 1 set single driving harness.

Household Goods, etc, - 1 No. 42 Beatrice cream separator in good condition, 2 five gallon cream cans, 110-egg Old Trusty incubator, 1 4-hole cook stove, 1 three burner New Perfection oil stove, 1 folding bed, miscellaneous articles, too numerous to mention.

2 Hogs, weight about 140 lbs., and ideal for fall butchering.

 

TERMS OF SALE – All sums of $10 and under, Cash.  On sums over $10 a credit of four-months will be given on approved security with no interest if paid when due.  If not paid when due to bear 10 per cent interest from date of note.  A discount of four per cent will be given for cash on sums over $10.00.  No property to be removed until terms of sale are complied with.

ANNA L. MOORE

H.G. Bodwell, Auctioneer.

Joe Trembley, Clerk.

 

 

Anna L. Moore’s obituary is located on the front page of the Friday November 26, 1943 edition of the Arlington (KS) Enterprise:

 

Mrs. Anna L. Moore, departed this life, after a lingering illness of a number of years, and for a long time she had been confined to her bed, at the home of her son, Claude S. Moore.  She died Sunday morning, November 21, at 11:30.

She was born October 5, 1855, aged at the time of her death, 88 years, one month and 16 days.

Mr. and Mrs. Moore came to Arlington community many years ago, and located on a farm west of Arlington.

Following the death of her husband, Mrs. Moore moved to Arlington and since that time has resided with her son and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Claude S. Moore.

The funeral service was conducted from the Arlington Methodist church Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 with Rev. M.J. Alexander and Rev. Lester P. Snare in charge of the service.

She leaves to mourn her departure her son, Claude S. Moore, and three grandchildren, other relatives and a host of friends.

The burial was in Pleasant View cemetery, Darlow, Kansas.

 

 

The children of William Berry and Annie Lovena (Sorency) Moore were:

 

1.     Berry Lindsay, born 1 Aug 1889 Darlow, Reno Co KS, died 10 Jul 1890 Darlow, Reno Co KS, buried Pleasant View Cemetery, Darlow, Reno Co KS.

2.     Claude Sorency, born 14 Feb 1894 Darlow, Reno Co KS, married Barbara Morma Mitchell 25 Dec 1921 Arlington, Reno Co KS, died 27 Aug 1978 Hutchinson, Reno Co KS, buried Arlington Cemetery, Arlington, Reno Co KS.    

        

 

Claude Sorency Moore

 

Claude Sorency was born on 14 Feb 1894 in Darlow, Reno Co KS.  He married Barbara Morma Mitchell on 25 Dec 1921 (Christmas Day) in Arlington, Reno Co KS.  Claude died on 27 Aug 1978 in Hutchinson, Reno Co KS and is buried in Arlington Cemetery, Arlington, Reno Co KS.  Claude was the principal of the Arlington Grade School from 1930-1936 and from 1941-1943.

 

Claude’s wife was Barbara Morma Mitchell, the only child born to Carl and Lucy Mary (Bracken) Mitchell.  She was born on 5 Jun 1896 in Arlington KS and died on 8 Feb 1993 in her room in Wesley Towers, Hutchinson KS.  She is buried next to her husband in the Arlington Cemetery.  Please see the MITCHELL chapter for more information on the ancestry of Barbara Morma Mitchell.

 

Barbara Mitchell and Claude Moore were married in the living room of her house on a Christmas Sunday afternoon after each had attended their Sunday morning responsibilities at church. Barbara played the piano for services and Claude taught a Sunday School class.  They had been dating for literally several years, but made no announcement of the wedding plans. They even went to Wichita for the marriage license, for whatever other reasons, so that presumably no one in Hutchinson or Arlington would know of their plans. The wedding, officiated by Reverend J.W. Jones, the Pastor of the Arlington Methodist Church, was attended only by a very, very few close friends (Guy Cushman was one) and the two grandmothers, Lucy (Bracken) Mitchell, Barbara’s mother, and Annie Lovena (Sorency) Moore, Claude’s mother.  They flagged the late afternoon passenger train from the west [otherwise it did not stop in Arlington], went to the Bisonte Hotel in Hutchinson for the night and then on to the Muehlbach Hotel in Kansas City for a few days.

 

The following is a chronology of land transactions involving Claude and/or Barbara:

 

East Half of the SouthEast Quarter, Section 2, Township 25, Range 9,

Langdon Twp, Reno Co KS

On 21 Jun 1918 “Claude S Moore of Reno Co KS” enters into a mortgage to purchase the 80-acre East ½ of the SW¼ of Section 2, Twp 25, Range 9 from John and Anna Gorges also of Reno Co KS (Reno Co KS Deed Book #113, pg 209). 

 

On 8 Jul 1918 “Claude S Moore, single, of Reno Co KS” enters into a mortgage for the above 80 acres for a total cost of $700 (a 5 year, 5.5% note, payable semi-annually). (Reno Co KS Deed Book #128, pg 320).

 

On 10 Dec 1926, “Claude S Moore and Barbara Moore-Husband and Wife-of Reno Co KS  sell the above 80 acres to Guy Clark for $1 and the assumption of a $2500 mortgage. (Reno Co KS Deed Book #175, pg 52).

 

SouthWest Quarter, Section 2, Township 25, Range 9, Langdon Twp, Reno Co KS

On 10 Feb 1934 “Annie L Moore, a widow, of Reno Co KS” sells to her son “Claude S. Moore of Reno Co KS” the 160 acre SW¼ of Section 2, Twp 25, Range 9, better known as the  “Moore Quarter” (Reno Co KS Deed Book #221, pg 127) for “for one dollar and other valuable considerations”.  Annie’s husband and Claude’s father William died some 12 years earlier.

 

 

 

In the 1980’s, Barbara wrote an extensive family history narrative on the ancestry of both the Moore and Mitchell lines.  I have included that part that deals with the Moore surname below.  The entire narrative, including the Mitchell section, can be found in the chapter by that name.

 

 
OUR FAMILY HERITAGE

RECORDED BY BARBARA MORMA (MITCHELL) MOORE

1980’s

Corrections/Amplifications added in [ ]

 

            For my children, grandchildren and great grandchildren, I record the following narrative that you may know something of your family background.

 

            At this time, we divert back to relate what we know of the early life of Claude's parents.  His father, William Berry Moore, was born at Bardstown, Kentucky in 1856 and his mother Annie Sorency was born October 5, 1855 in Kentucky  [Incorrect.  Annie was born in Pleasant Hill, MO.  Her parents were Silas and Martha (Wilson) Sorency.] but do not know what part of the state.  Sometime in the early 1880s, they both were part of a large group of Kentucky folk that came to Kansas to settle near Hutchinson.  Also with them was a sister of Claude's father, Sally Moore and a friend Boone Murphy.  They later married [married in Washington Co, KY] and settled on a farm near Mt. Hope, Kansas.  Clarence and Ernest Murphy were two of their children.

 

            Records show that William B. [Berry] Moore and Annie Sorency were married on September 28, 1887 at the Elmer, Kansas Church by Rev. James McAllister.  This small town of Elmer was five miles south of Hutchinson just east of Junction K17 and K96.  After their marriage, grandpa and grandma Moore moved to an 80-acre farm they had purchased 3.5 miles west of Darlow, Kansas.  The farm only had a two room house in which to live.  Their first child, Berry Lindsay, was born September 1889 and died August 1890 less than a year later and was buried in the Pleasant View Cemetery near Darlow, one of the first few burials there at the time. Their second son, Claude Sorency, was born February 14, 1894. He attended the Red Rock Country School until he was 12 years old.  His parents, then anxious to acquire more land, sold their 80 acres near Darlow in 1906 and bought the farm 5 miles west of Arlington.  The house where they first lived stood on the south side of the present Moore quarter.  A few years later they built a house on the corner one-half mile east and moved to this location.  This continued to be their home until grandpa Moore died August 8, 1922 of a heart attack.

 

            Grandma Moore sold this home with the 80 acres and moved to Arlington where she lived 2 years in the Amanda Eaton home across the street.  In 1924, we finished the upstairs of our house into an apartment and this was her home for 19 years.  She died November 18, 1943 and was buried in the Pleasant View Cemetery at Darlow.  After Claude moved with his parents to the farm west of Arlington, he finished the 8th grade at the Clark Country School just northeast of their home.  He then enrolled at Nickerson High School where most of his courses were in the field of business or teachers training. he graduated in 1912 and taught his first term at the Maple Grove School 2 miles southwest of our Mitchell quarter.  His salary for the seven months school term was $50 a month.  By living at home with no expense, he waited until the end of school to collect his salary of $350.  He taught two other country schools and was principal at Langdon [Kansas] for four years before going to Arlington in 1921 to be principal.  This position also included teaching 7th and 8h grade of 35 to 40 pupils and coaching basketball.  He held this position for 15 years, retiring in 1936, then returning to teach two years during World War 2 when no principal was available.

 

            Claude and I had been engaged for sometime before he began teaching in Arlington.  A few months later, we were married December 25, 1921 at our home by Rev. J. W. Jones.  Only our parents and Guy Cushman were present.  Guy, my cousin, had come from Pocatello, Idaho to live with mother and I and attend high school.  Our marriage plans had been a well kept.  We attended church as usual where I was pianist and Claude was leader of the youth group.  After the 9:00pm ceremony we took the Rock Island train to Hutchinson then left the next morning for a week’s honeymoon in Kansas City.

 

                                                Written by Barbara Morma Mitchell Moore                                                           Arlington, Kansas

 

 

 

Several references to Claude were located in Arlington (KS) Enterprise newspapers (although there are surely more):

 

THE ARLINGTON ENTERPRISE

September 5, 1930    Front Page

88 ENROLLED IN THE GRADE SCHOOL

 

Grade School Started Last Monday Morning with Much Interest Shown by Pupils

School opened very pleasantly on Monday morning, September 1, with the following enrollment in the respective grades:

 

First Grade

10

Second Grade

12

Third Grade

11

Fourth Grade

14

Fifth Grade

19

Sixth Grade

12

Seventh Grade

10

Eighth Grade

9

Total Enrollment:

88

 

We think there are a few pupils yet to start, however our enrollment is smaller than usual.  This is occasioned by the large number of families who have moved out of the district during the spring and summer months.

Our faculty this year is as follows: Claude S. Moore, Principal, 7th and 8th grades; Sylvia Shackelford, 5th and 6th grades; Mayone Birket, 3rd and 4th grades; Ernestine Taylor, 1st and 2nd grades; Devonna Vogel, music and penmanship, Lood Powell is again custodian of the building.

 

 

THE ARLINGTON ENTERRISE

April 10, 1925    Front Page

CLAUDE MOORE ELECTED MAYOR

Biggest City Vote Ever Polled Was Cast at City Election Last Monday

 

The city election in Arlington, on Monday last, let the people know that we are still alive and on the map.  Ordinarily there is not much excitement in the issues before the people in city elections, but this year there were two candidates for mayor in the field, and the voting was very spirited and there was a full vote out at the polls. 

 

There were 225 votes cast out of a possible 230 which in itself goes to show that the people were somewhat interested in the election.

Mr. Claude Moore was elected mayor over R.M. Taylor, otherwise there was only one ticket in the field.  The vote cast was as follows:

For Mayor: Moore 122; Taylor 95

For Police Judge, C.H. Barrett, 130; scattering 20.

For Councilmen: L.M. Dunn, 181; M.H. Hemphill, 126; E.G. Mitchell, 172; Sam Paepke, 186; Bert Reynolds 185; J.J. Fowler, 42.

The Sunday baseball issue lost.  The vote being 113 against and 78 for Sunday baseball.

 

 

In the book “Arlington (KS) – The First One Hundred Years”, Claude is pictured with his 1925 Arlington High School 8th grade class (page 62) and with his 1944 7th and 8th grade classes (page 68).  An advertisement for the Trembley-Moore Motor Company is listed on page 67 of this same book.  Claude was co-owner of this business for some 25 years.  Claude is also mentioned as being appointed in 1923 to the chairmanship of the United Methodist Church building committee (page 77).

 

The following tribute to Claude Sorency Moore appeared on the front page of the October 15, 1965 edition of the Arlington Enterprise:

 

A TRIBUTE FOR LONG, FAITHFUL SERVICE

 

A man in any field who can instill enthusiasm in others, becomes a great leader.  May we take this means to congratulate our neighbors and friends, the Claude Moore’s, who have spent more than fifty years of faithful service to their Church and Community.

Some have known this couple many years, but for those who have not known them so long, let’s reminisce.

Claude was born at Darlow, Kansas, February 14, 1894.  He began teaching school in 1912.  He was a very efficient teacher, but when he snapped his fingers, all the students knew that he meant business.  Claude, being a very prudent man, discovered that a bachelor is a man who can pull his socks on from either end, so he decided to marry.  He and Barbara Mitchell were married December 25, 1921.

After they were married, they both continued to be active in Church and community work.  Barbara taught the intermediate Sunday School class for fifteen years.  She helped sponsor the Epworth League and the Junior League, was church treasurer for eight years.  She was Sunday School Secretary, Treasurer and Librarian for many years.  She has been active in WSCS and president as well.  She is also an accomplished musician and was Church pianist for forty-five years.

Claude was chairman for the building committee and the building fund during the building of the present Methodist Church.  He was Sunday School Superintendent for seventeen years, a Sunday School teacher for over forty years, and is still teaching.  In the early days, there were many duties to perform, people did not hold just one job or office in the Church.  It seems Claude was so efficient at stoking the furnace and pushing the broom that the janitor work was his project for many years without compensation.

They raised a family of three, two boys and a girl.  Children learn by example from those they love and by their guidance and standards, their children have always been active in church affairs.  While their family was in school, they or their children never missed a ball game.  They have always been active in community work.  They both belong to the Order of the Eastern Star, and Claude has been in the Masonic Lodge for forty-eight years.

These are just a few of the highlights of their life.  An invitation is extended to all their friends and neighbors to be present to honor them this Sunday, October 17, 2:00 to 5:00 p.m., at the Arlington Methodist Church.

Their daughter, LuAnn Logan and family, their son, Bud Moore and family of Kansas City, Missouri, will be present for this happy occasion.  Another son, William B. Moore and his family, of Kuwait, Arabian Gulf, will be unable to attend.

May your reclining years reach far and wide, and may the Lord’s richest blessings with you abide.

 

 

The following article appeared on the front page of the October 22, 1965 edition of the Arlington (KS) Enterprise.  It is a report on an open house that was held in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Claude Moore for 50 years of continuous service in the Methodist Church.

 

COMMUNITY GATHERS TO WISH MOORE’S HAPPINESS

 

A round table and two ladder backed chairs on a hooked rug, gave a homey atmosphere for the open house for Mr. and Mrs. Claude Moore, October 17 at the Methodist Church.  This was in honor of their 50 years of continuous service in the Church.

The Moore’s children, Mr. C.N. (Bud) Moore, Mrs. Jack (LouAnn) Logan and families from Kansas City, Missouri, shared the occasion.  Bud read a letter from another son, Mr. W.B. (Bill) Moore and family of Kuwait, Arabia.  Bill expressed regret that distance prevented their presence.

The gold and bronze chrysanthemum centerpiece on the tea table, and the bouquet of red roses, gave a warm touch from Bill, Bud and Lou Ann and families.  Barbara’s orchid and Claude’s boutonniere was a gift from the Church.

It was great fun when friends greeted friend, exclaiming over children and grandchildren.  Years melted in reminiscing as former pastors and friends recalled funny incidents and problems along the way.  Everyone enjoyed photographs of activities over the past 50 years.

Many local friends attended.  Out of town guests were Rev. and Mrs. Forest E. Rohl; Mr. and Mrs. Albert Ewy; Mr. and Mrs. V.J. Foster; Mrs. J.S. Trembley; Rev. and Mrs. Marion Alexander; Mrs. C.A. Boyd Hutchinson; Rev. and Mrs. Robert McClean, Wichita; Mrs. Ralph Wickham of California; Rev. and Mrs. A.E. Conard and Mark of St. John.

Mr. and Mrs. C.N. Moore and family and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Logan and family of Kansas City, Missouri; Rev. and Mrs. Paul Gilbert and family of Hoisington;  Mr. and Mrs. T.G. Ungles and son Tom of Satanta;  Mr. and Rrs. R.S. Estery of Langdon;  Mr. and Mrs. Edward Paepke of Halstead;  Mrs. Opal Bradford;  Mrs. Jennie Ellinger;  Mr. and Mrs. Dean Dellenbach;  Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Rumford of Abbyville, and Mr. and Mrs. Al Miller of Partridge.

“Blessed are they who have the gift of making friends, for it is one of God’s best gifts.”  T. Hughes

 

 

Claude’s obituary is located in the (presumably) Hutchinson (KS) News (date unknown):

 

Claude S. Moore, 84, Wesley Towers, died Sunday (August 27, 1978) at Wesley Towers.  Born Feb.14, 1894, at Darlow, he married Barbara M. Mitchell Dec. 25, 1921, in Arlington.  He lived in the Arlington community most of his life and was  principal of Arlington Grade School for 15 years.  He then was [co-]owner of Trembley-Moore Motor Co. for 25 years before retiring in 1959.  He was a member of the Arlington United Methodist Church; Cable Lodge no. 299, AF & AM; Wichita Consistory;  Reno Commandery;  Silver Leaf Chapter, OES.  Survivors:  widow, of the home; sons: William B., Reston, Va.; Claude N.,  Atlanta, Ga.;  daughter:  Mrs. John A. Logan, Dallas, Texas;  10 grandchildren;  two great-grandchildren.  Funeral will be at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at the church; the Rev. James Bush.  The Cable Lodge will conduct Masonic graveside services in Arlington Cemetery.  Friends may call 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday at Elliott Chapel.  The family suggests memorials to the church or the Good Samaritan Fund of Wesley Towers.

 

 

In the mid to late 1980’s, Claude’s name was submitted to the SW Methodist Conference by the members of the Arlington Methodist Church.  These members had to pick one person (deceased) who felt had done the most for the church both in service and devotion.  They picked Claude.  After the conference received all the reviews, they were then going to pick one individual out of all the names submitted.  It is not known whom they picked.  Barbara penned the following review of Claude’s church life for the SW Methodist Church Conference.

 

 

CLAUDE SORENCY MOORE

ARLINGTON, KANSAS

A REVIEW OF CLAUDE’S CHURCH WORK OVER A 50 YEAR PERIOD

By Barbara M. Moore

 

His involvement in church activity began with sponsorship of Epworth League on his coming to Arlington and grade school Principal in September of 1921.  We were married the following December 25th.  At that time, all church activities were being held in the present church basement and had been for a couple of years.  Here at this period, Claude encountered his first handicap of water coming into the basement from natural springs underneath.  Many Sunday mornings he had to call for help to form a line and bail out the water before Sunday school could be held.  Claude was always the first one to find this problem as he had finally volunteered to start the fire in the newly installed coal furnace, as there was no finances to hire a janitor.  This meant getting up at 5 a.m. every Sunday cleaning out the ashes, starting the fire, and making two or three trips back and forth before Sunday school to check on the furnace not getting too hot.  If necessary this had to be repeated during the week if a service had to be held.

What was expected to be a short time job lasted at least five years, as finances were slow to improve.  The situation was finally relieved when gas was brought into Arlington and a change over to gas was made in the church furnace.

Earlier in this period when it was thought advisable to start erecting the sanctuary, Claude was made chairman of the Building Committee.  He was already on the Board of Trustees, and all the decisions were left for him to make.  It was a hectic two years before the building was completed.  Very few, if any, have realized that when the Trustees signed the mortgage papers, Claude was the only one financially able for guarantee of the mortgage being paid, if the church could not have met the debt.  Of course they did succeed.  I remember when I reminded him of the risk he alone was taking.  His answer was, “I have the faith the Lord will find a way.”  This is just another example of his concern and dedication for the church.  He was quick in reminding anyone that next to his family, church came first.  Yet he found time to take a major role in all community projects.  Serving on the City Council and two terms as Mayor.  He served as church Treasurer for ten years. 

It was in the early years when it was a real problem to even get the Pastors salary (1200-1500) a year, much less the other apportionments.  More than once when the budget was not raised, Claude made up the difference, not always of a small amount.  Again, he had the church at heart.

In later years when our children became the age for Youth Fellowship, he felt it was our duty again to sponsor that organization.  This period covered six or seven years.

He was lay delegate to conference for eight years and also on the Pastor’s Relations Committee for as many years.  At one time he was Sunday school Superintendent for several years and at the same time teaching a Sunday school class.  In the later years of his past active life, he served on the Official Board for a long time, seven or eight years.  The teaching of an adult Sunday school class had the longest tenure of any one job.  This was the last service he gave up after thirty continuous years of teaching the class.

To sum up the above, I think the most outstanding legacy of his work is found in the church building at Arlington where he gave so much of the best years of his life.  No one has any idea how many hours of labor, money and worry that went into the building.  I will always think of it as a memorial to him.  Many times an order of material came in that couldn’t be paid for.  He took care of that.  The deficit on one of the four beautiful art windows in the sanctuary was met by him.  On and on it went.

 

 

 

Barbara’s obituary is located on page 2 of the Tuesday, February 9, 1993 edition of the Hutchinson (KS) News:

 

Barbara M. Moore, 96, of 3711 Asbury Place, died Feb. 8, 1993, at the Oliver and Helen Hester Assisted Living Center at Wesley Towers, Hutchinson.  She was born June 5, 1896, near Arlington, the daughter of Carl and Lucy Bracken Mitchell.  She was a graduate of Arlington High School.  A Hutchinson resident since 1977, moving from Arlington, she was a homemaker.  She was a member of the Arlington United Methodist Church and the Order of the Eastern Star, both at Arlington.  On Dec. 25, 1921, she married Claude S. Moore at Arlington.  He died Aug. 27, 1978.  Survivors include: two sons, William B. Moore, Denver, and Claude N. Moore, Phoenix; a daughter, LuAnn Logan, Houston; eight grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.  Funeral will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday at the Arlington United Methodist Church, Arlington.  Burial will be in the Arlington Cemetery.  Memorials may be sent to the church in care of Elliott Mortuary, Hutchinson.

 

 

The children of Claude Sorency and Barbara Morma (Mitchell) Moore are:

 

1.     William Byron (a.k.a. Bill), born XX/XX/XXXX Hutchinson Grace Hospital, Reno Co KS, married (1) Carol Carson Brown 2 Feb 1947 at the Pittsburg Christian Church, Crawford Co KS, (2) Maureen Dunaway Weimer 6 Jun 1979, Lake Anne Presbyterian Church, Reston, Fairfax Co VA.

2.     Barbara LouAnn, born XX/XX/XXXX at her parent’s home in Arlington, Reno Co KS (delivered by the local Arlington physician Dr. Mallory), married John Allen Logan 19 Aug 1950 in her parents home in Arlington, Reno Co KS  (standing in the same spot where her parents were married some 29 years earlier).

3.     Claude Neil (a.k.a. Bud), born XX/XX/XXXX at his parent’s home in Arlington, Reno Co KS (also delivered by the same Dr. Mallory), married Nancy Jim Smart 14 Jul 1951 Country Club Christian Church, Kansas City MO.

 

 

William Byron Moore

 

William Byron (a.k.a. Bill) was born on XX/XX/XXXX in the Hutchinson Grace Hospital, Reno Co KS.  He married (1) Carol Carson Brown on 2 Feb 1947 at the Pittsburg Christian Church, Crawford Co KS, and (2) Maureen Mae Dunaway Weimer on 6 Jun 1979 at the Lake Anne Presbyterian Church, Reston, Fairfax Co VA.

 

Bill's first wife, Carol, was born 18 Dec 1926 in Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS and died 19 Jan 1978 in Fairfax Hospital, Fairfax Co VA.  She is buried in Memorial Gardens, Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS.  She was an alcoholic for the last twelve years of her adult life and died of liver failure due to

advanced chirrosis of the liver. Medical assessment suggests she suffered from a degree of schizophrenia prior to the alcoholic period. Repeated exposure to specialty treatment and rehabilitation facilities was not successful in helping her change the course of events. She is the daughter of Henry Clifford Brown (born 18 Feb 1902 West Mineral, Crawford Co KS, died 13 Oct 1987 Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS) and Mary Ann Carson (born 27 Oct 1905 Cherokee, Crawford Co KS, died 29 November 2002 Phoenix, AZ).  For more information on the Brown and Carson surnames, please see the chapters so entitled.

 

Biography Summary of William B Moore

by William B. Moore

Spring 2000

 

XXXX               Born Hutchinson, KS Grace Hospital

 

1931 / 1943       Primary / Secondary Education

Grades 1 through 8        Arlington, KS Grade School

Grades 8 through 12      Arlington High School

 

1943                 Enlisted in the Naval Air Corp., initially in the V-5 Pilot Training Program.

 

1943 / 1944       Navy V-5 Program Pre-Flight Preparatory at Pittsburg [KS] State Teachers

College.

 

1944 / 1946       Navy V-12 Program, Officer Training at The University of Colorado at Boulder.

Graduated June 1946 with a Bachelors Degree in Aeronautical Engineering-Engines; Commissioned as Ensign, US Navy and Honorably Discharged 

[All in the same day as World War II was over and the programs and need for officers had ended, after a two year, eight month education]

 

8/46 to 7/47       Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Co., Hartford, CT

            Jr. Test Engineer, Test Engineer [Engines]

 

2 Feb 1947        Married Carol Carson Brown, Pittsburg KS Christian Church

 

1947 / 1953       Spencer Chemical Company, Pittsburg KS

            Jayhawk Works Ammonium Nitrate Fertilizer Plant

            Draftsman, Jr. Engineer, Engineer

 

1953 / 1958       Spencer Chemical Company, Kansas City MO

            Project Engineer, for Ammonia related and Nitric Acid Plants.

            - First European business trip related to a High Density Polyethylene production.

            - Six month temporary residence in late 1957 in Houston for the design phase of             Spencer's new HD Polyethylene plant to be built in Orange, TX.

 

XX/XX/XXXX    Adopted twin boys, Byron Carson & David Sorency.

 

1958 / 1964       Spencer Chemical Company, Orange TX

Engineering Mgr, Engineering & Maintenance Mgr., Production Area Manager

 

XX/XX/XXXX    Birth of Andrew Lindsay, at Orange Memorial Hospital, Orange TX.

 

1964 / 1965       Gulf Oil Co. [acquired Spencer Chemical Co.],     London, England office,

                        Project Manager, Kuwait Chemical Fertilizer Co.

[Gulf Oil had acquired Spencer Chemical. To enhance their crude oil production positions in Kuwait, Gulf and their oil partner, British Petroleum each took a 25% stake and the management leadership in a new plant to be built in Kuwait.]

- Residing in Ashford on Staines, SW of London near Heathrow Airport for the nine months required to design [Foster Wheeler London]  the plant and to commence recruitment of key Arabic personnel who speak English and who had ammonia plant experience.

 

1965 / 1970       Kuwait Chemical Fertilizer Co. [KCFC], Kuwait, Arabian Gulf

Operations Manager.

KCFC produced 4 products: The first one, Ammonia, was produced from natural gas [Ch4] and air [O] and was the basis for all others. It was exportable only under high pressure - expensive.  The second product, Urea, is a derivative of Ammonia when combined with CO2 and was exportable as a granular fertilizer product.  The third product was Sulfuric Acid, which was exportable only as a very corrosive liquid, was used to make the fourth product.  The fourth and main product, Ammonium Nitrate, [Ammonia and Sulfuric Acid] was what Russia bought.  It was exportable as a granular product packaged in jute ("gunny sack) bags.

 

1970 / 1971       Iberian Gulf Co., Madrid, Spain

            Chemical Operations Manager in a Gulf Chemical Co. Spanish subsidiary

 

1971 / 1972       Gulf Oil Co., Houston, TX

            Project Manager, Gulf Chemical Co., Central Engineering Dept.

 

1972 / 1980       Gulf Reston Company,  Reston, VA

            Construction Manager

                        VP Construction and Property Management developing the 'new town' of Reston

 

14 Jan 1978      Death of wife, Carol Brown Moore

 

6 Jun 1979        Remarried to Maureen Dunaway Weimer, in Reston, VA at the Lake Anne

Presbyterian Church

 

1980 / 1982       Gulf Oil Real Estate Development Co.    Pittsburgh, PA

            Project Manager

                        Gulf Co. related real estate needs nationally and internationally [Africa].

 

1982 / 1984       Gulf Oil Real Estate Development Co., Denver, CO

            Project Manager - Regional headquarters buildings in Denver & Midland, TX.

            Retired by Gulf

 

1984 / 1990       BetaWest Properties, Inc.

            VP Design and Construction

            The new real estate development subsidiary of US West Communications

            Retired when US West sold the company.

 

1990 / 2000       C4 Imaging Inc. [later Visual Edge Technology d.b.a. C4 Imaging Inc.]

            Marketing Consultant and minority owner of the original company.

                        Consultant to subsequent ownership entities, managing the communication

                        software segment of the business.

 

 


Moore Family Returns to Far Off Land Where Water More Precious Than Oil

Pittsburg (Kansas) Headlight - Tuesday 12 July 1966

By Martha Hand

 

The Moores of Kansas took off from Pittsburg Municipal Airport Tuesday in a chartered plane on the first leg of a trip to their home in the tiny Moslem nation of Kuwait on the Arabian Gulf.

After a few days in Geneva and a few more in Istanbul, Turkey (where Europe ends and Asia begins) they'll be back in the strange and exciting world which is their temporary home.  Kuwait is a land where water is more precious than oil, where weekends come on Thursday and Friday, where there are no taxes, there is no booze, and there are free schools and free hospitals in a welfare state paid for by the government from its enormous national income from petroleum.

Here under the long shadow of Russia and Red China, the little country of less than 6,000 square miles is the world's second largest exporter and fourth largest producer of crude oil.

Former Carol Brown.  It has been the home for more than a year now of Mr. and Mrs. William B. Moore and sons, Andrew, five, and Byron and David, 8 year old twins.

Mrs. Moore is the former Carol Brown, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Brown of 1702 South College where the Moores have been making headquarters since they arrived in Pittsburg June 21.

Moore is operations manager of a project at Kuwait where he is on loan from Gulf Oil to the Kuwait government to build an ammonium sulfate fertilizer plant. Gulf owns 20 percent of the plant, British Petroleum Company another 20 percent, and the Kuwait government the remaining 60.

Working with Moore is another former Pittsburger, John Woodside, production superintendent who with his wife, Donna, lives in Kuwait.

Moore and Woodside are doing their part to see that in their part of the world "The Ugly American" is a myth.  "Do all Americans work as hard as you two?" they frequently are asked by the Kuwaiti people.

Like Americans.  The Moores find that these people like Americans and want to pattern their government and way of life for America.  Many of their students come to American universities--all who are in the top 80 percent of their classes can do so with the tab picked up by their government.

Right next door to the Moore's home is the American Embassy and each morning they watch with pride Old Glory being raised.  Our ambassador, Howard Cottam, is popular, said Mrs. Moore.  Also effective are U.S. commercial attaches who are working hard to increase American imports in that part of the world.  Red China and the USSR export much to Kuwait but Carol Moore looks at the labels on all her purchases to be sure they are from home.

"Beef, good beef, is the thing we miss most," said Mrs. Moore Monday. "We get Australian beef and it leaves something to be desired. We're really stuffed on hamburgers, beef roasts, steaks, and even farm fresh chicken while we've been in Kansas.

The family food budget runs some five times above that stateside.  But all American food is available, except beef.

"Food is very expensive. All imported.  Eggs, fruit, fresh vegetables are flown in from Lebanon. Only domestic help is cheap.  We have two male servants. They like to eat. And this increases the food budget, of course.

128 in the Shade.  "Air conditioning is a necessity. It was 128 degrees the day we left in the shade, between 150 and 160 in the sun.  We're only two minutes from the beach but the sand is too hot to put your foot on except in winter."  Winters are delightful, savs attractive Mrs. Moore. "We grow tomatoes, lettuce, even parsley in winter."  Terrific sandstorms blow in during parts of the year and often last seven days.

But it is water that creates a problem.  Water is precious.  All the water is distilled from the sea.  Two huge water conversion plants make the seawater palatable. It isn't piped. It is delivered in trucks every two days and pumped into big tanks on rooftops, And it cost $4,50 a load, or about $50 a month.  Meanwhile gasoline sells for 15 cents a gallon and cigarettes for about 13 cents a pack.

Liquor of any kind is forbidden. It is against the religion of the country. Customs officers carefully search for bottles. The half million natives and the foreigners do without.

Ruled by a King.  An amir (king) from the asSabah dynast rules. The country, once a British protectorate, is independent, a member of the Arab League, very friendly with neighboring Saudi Arabia and small countries down the southern coast of the Arabian Gulf (once called Persian Gulf) ruled by shaikhs (not sheiks anymore).

Kuwait is a member of the UN, a friend of America, and as well as the traditional amir, has a 50 member National Assembly.

Only Turkey and Iran stand between the little country and the USSR border.  Yet, says Mrs. Moore, the people show no fear of Russia, of Red China or of being over powered or losing their vast oil wealth to greedy Communists.

Russian and Red Chinese students don't attend the international school next door to the Russian Embassy.  Children of 17 other nations, including the Moore children and other Americans, do. The school has an all-American staff and is administered by an American from the Chicago public school system. Eight of its high school graduates this year, the entire class in fact, were eagerly accepted by choice stateside universities who rated the graduates as top students.

The Moores attend the American Mission church, a Dutch Reform church with its own hospital next door.  But they must attend on Sunday nights because Sunday in Kuwait is a workday. The Moslem weekend is Thursday and Friday.  School starts on Saturday and also is "blue Monday" for all who work.

Episcopalian, the Moore family also attends services once month when the rector from church 25 miles away comes to town.

It was damp and cold most the year the family spent in London waiting for the engineering work on the plant to be completed. Warm Orange, Texas, where they had been with Gulf after leaving Kansas, seemed more attractive to them.

Liked it Anyway.  But they liked Kuwait, heat, sand storms, no water, and all from the minute their plane touched down.

Since arriving in America on vacation June 19, they have shopped for a 2 year supply of clothing, cosmetics, even chili mix to take back with them.  They shopped while visiting his brother and sister, Claude N. Moore and Mrs. John A. Logan in Kansas City.  Thev shopped while visiting her sister, Mrs. John A (Jackie) Bertoncino, at Iola; and while visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Moore of Arlington and hers, the Browns, in Pittsburg.

Then getting home became a problem when the airlines were struck.  Chartering a twin Beech for Tuesday finally proved a solution. They were to land at Chicago, take a BOAC to London, then on to Geneva and five days of fun there, then four days at Istanbul (which touches Russia) before the flight home to Kuwait.

 

 

 


My father provided me with the following in late 1999 – an interesting overview of his life during World War II:

World War II Influences

By William B. Moore

September 23, 1999

 

On a Sunday afternoon, December 7, 1941 I was returning from a State High School Band Conference in Topeka, Kansas with the other band member who had been invited to participate. Over his mother’s car radio came the surprising news of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Even as only a sixteen year old sophomore I knew this would affect me at the draft age of eighteen as it would more immediately affect older young men.

This event would impact everyone of every age, whether or not they were to participate in it.

I had no real idea at that time and age what I would study as a life’s work. The Arlington Kansas High School, with no Chemistry, no Mathematics beyond Algebra and maybe an introduction to basic trigonometry, did not present any big counseling opportunities. [It was also not a very good background for the educational challenges to follow]

My favorite class was Drafting so maybe I would have gotten to Engineering or one of the sciences in any case. That I would go to college was kind of an unspoken assumption - probably KU or K-State. But who knows.

My dad took me and a classmate to Hutchinson on our mutual eighteenth birthday, April 18, 1925, to register for the draft. The other boy was later drafted into the Army.

I decided to improve my chances, not so much for survival but for quality of life betterment, by exploring my boyhood fascination with airplanes by trying for the Naval Air Corp. I had built and flown many model airplanes, knew the theory of flight, and could name and identify all of the WWII planes.

I applied, was accepted for evaluation, and Dad took me to Kansas City. After two days of tests involving being whirled in a chair, poked and prodded, and given written and oral examinations, I was one of five of fifty or so candidates in that test group who were accepted.

So instead of a probable standard entry into college, I was ‘set’ for an ‘exciting, planned’ career in aviation. Well, at least that is what I thought.

After high school graduation and waiting to be called, I did another activity that was interesting and related - working the 4-12 shift in an airplane factory in nearby Hutchinson. This is something I probably would not have done in the course of normal events.

I also watched with envy the many yellow Stearman two winged planes that flew all summer over our area from a Naval Air Training Station near our little town. I was ready for that!

The first phase of Naval Air training was three semesters of college education. I was assigned to Pittsburg [KS] State College, one of three Kansas schools mainly intended originally for teacher education.

When my parents put me on the bus in Wichita for the 200-mile trip to southeastern Kansas, they must have been suffering even more trepidation than I was. Except for one week for two summers in a Boy Scout camp only twenty miles from home, their oldest had never spent a night away from them.

But here the changes start and multiply. For instance I was to meet a girl whose family had resided in the area for two generations. We were to marry some three years later.

 

So already we can note that, without the event and effect on my life of WWII:

- there would have not been an Andrew, and a pair of twins would have been raised by someone else.

- I would maybe not have gone to work for the chemical company that I did and therefore

- I would not have experienced working a chemical plant through a major hurricane in Orange, TX

- I would probably not have gained the pertinent experience and been with a successor company that

- caused us to live in England, Kuwait, and Spain

- I would not have experienced the challenges and unforeseen affects of being close to an alcoholic.

- I would not have ever lived in Reston, VA, helping to build a new city, and meeting a second marriage partner.

 

I suppose that everything that happened to me would surely have been different were Pearl Harbor not to have happened.

 

But, let us return to the story of its immediate influence on me and to Pittsburg State, which was a relatively easy school in a small town environment – a good transition for a boy from an even smaller town.

In the third of the three intended semesters that were already only delaying our entry into the sky, the devastating news was dropped [on we prospective hot pilots], that we were not going to be needed as aviators. Wow! What a blow.

The war in Europe against Germany was over a year earlier. The war in the Pacific against the Japanese was going well. Not may pilots were being lost. Replacements were available ahead of us. We were not to be needed.

How disappointed we all were not to be able to risk our lives trying to land on a rolling postage stamp in the middle of an ocean. OK, so one is not as smart at age nineteen.

The choice for most of the 250 classmates at Pittsburg was Navy Boot Camp in the cold of Chicago.

But about fifty of us with some better grades [thanks to the not too demanding curriculum] were offered the opportunity to go to a Naval Officers Training School, at several universities around the country.

I think I would have made the correct and obvious decision even on my own to jump at the offer of a free education and in a relatively safe environment. But in telephone discussions with my parents, my Dad made a suggestion than clarified my choices.

Never mind that he may well have sensed that a free education would save him a lot of money. His offer resulted in an unforgettable experience that I probably would never have had – a solo flight.,

I was to be posted to the University of Colorado at Boulder. Dad suggested that when I got there, and as time was available, he would pay for some private flying lessons. This was a very significant offer, more so than I probably realized at the time, coming from a man who had at least one cent of the first nickel he ever saw.

This would be a few to several thousand dollar value today. And the actual $300 or so that I remember it was then, was the equivalent of much more relative to that era.

So, off I went to Colorado, with three semesters in hand and five more to go. [This program was non-stop education – twenty hours curriculum per each of eight semesters for an engineering degree in 2 years & 8 months.]

I guess that I enrolled at the local flight school almost as soon as I arrived.[I really don’t remember the timing for certain, but my flight log book will confirm that]. In any case I walked the 2½ miles to the little local airport east of Boulder about every other Saturday.

On the seventh Saturday, after his being with me for about fifteen minutes and a couple of landings and takeoffs, the instructor jumped out of the back seat of the little Piper Cub and told me to go.

I actually just now got a tightness in my throat again as I recall the events.

I slowly advanced the throttle, applied some right rudder [a single engine plane’s torque causes it to veer left if not compensated for] and took off.

A solo flight requires, then at least, three landings and takeoffs. That seemed to take only a few minutes when the instructor was behind me. It seemed like hours when I was alone.

The plane was relatively quiet when he was present. But my ‘solo’ ears heard creaks, groans, and rattles that the plane had never revealed to me before.

There was a small lake at the western end of the east / west runway. As one made the final turn to line up for approaching the runway for a landing, [with the engine idling and the plane in a steep glide] that banked turn looked right down on that ‘little’ lake. It suddenly became the size of Lake Michigan.

After soloing and one more orientation flight, I decided I had spent enough of Dad’s money. I had the ‘challenge of flight’ out of my system, and could see that pursuing a license would require lots of time and money.

My lack of high school academic preparation and the relative ease of the Pittsburg educational experience was beginning to take its toll on my grades. Calculus, and every other subject, at Boulder was DIFFERENT, especially when combined with a twenty hour academic schedule.

However, in June of 1946 I left Boulder with a degree in Aeronautical Engineering, an Ensign’s commission in the Navy, and a simultaneous Honorable Discharge from the service.

One must acknowledge that little of what had happened to that date, and little of what followed, would have been duplicated had there not been a World War II. I was lucky to have had experiences I could survive.

The boy I was riding in the car with on Pearl Harbor day avoided the draft, pursued a career in professional music and drugs, and died of excessive consumption.

The boy of my same birth date, who accompanied me to register for the draft, was killed in the Pacific area in less than a year after being inducted.

Everyone, everyone in those years of unusual events was affected in some way . . . . everyone.

 

 

 

 

 


Bill and Carol had three children: Byron Carson and David Sorency (adopted twins), and Andrew Lindsay.

 

Bill’s second wife, Maureen Mae Dunaway, was born Feb 10 1937 in Connellsville, Fayette Co PA.  She first married Clarence David Weimer, Jr on 15 Aug 1958 in the University of Pittsburgh Chapel (Heinz Chapel), Oakland, Allegheny Co PA.  She is the daughter of Charles William Dunaway (born 11 Dec 1910 Dunbar PA, married 18 Jun 1934 Connellsville PA, died 08 Oct 1852 Pittsburgh PA) and Inez McCahan (born 02 Jun 1911 Fairfax WVA, died 5 Nov 1986 Butler PA).  Both are buried in the Mt. Auburn Cemetery in Dunbar, Fayette Co PA.

 

Clarence David and Maureen had three children: Darin, C. David and Diana.

 

 

Barbara Lu Ann Moore

 

Barbara Lu Ann was born XX/XX/XXXX at her parent’s home in Arlington, Reno Co KS (delivered by the local Arlington physician Dr. Mallory).  She married John Allen Logan on 19 Aug 1950 in her parent’s home in Arlington, Reno Co KS  (standing in the same spot where her parents were married some 29 years earlier).

 

John Allen (a.k.a. Jack) Logan was born XX/XX/XXXX in Kansas City, MO.  He is the son of Glenn W. Logan Sr. (born 19 Sep 1899 Shawnee, Oklahoma Territory, married 21 Feb 1921 Kansas City MO, died 11 Nov 1977 Riverside MO) and Grace Stephenson (born 7 Sep 1901 Kansas City MO, died 26 Nov 1970 Kansas City MO).

 

Jack and Lu Ann had three children: Denise Stephanie, Jon Mitchell and Linda Ann.

 

 

Biographical Summary of Jack and LuAnn Logan

by Jack and LuAnn Logan

Spring 2000

 

John Allen Logan (Jack) and Barbara Lu Ann Moore (Lu Ann) met at Kansas State University (Manhattan, Kansas) in a speech class in the fall semester of 1948.  She was a KKG and Jack was an SAE and they were pinned at the Kappa house one-year later.

 

Jack was born and had his early education in Kansas City, Missouri. He majored in Business Administration with a minor in Accounting at Kansas State and Lu Ann majored in English. Lu Ann graduated in June of 1950 and Jack graduated one year later in 1951. We were married on August 19, 1950 and during that first year of marriage we lived in Junction City Kansas where Lu Ann taught school at Fort Riley and I attended my final year of school.

 

We then moved to Kansas City in June of 1951 after graduation and Lu Ann continued teaching and Jack went to work for Firestone Tire and Rubber Company. Within 6 months I joined the Navy during the Korean War and in April of 1952 was transferred to Pearl Harbor Naval base in Hawaii where Lu Ann joined me. Early in 1953 I was discharged and returned to Firestone working in the accounting department in KCMO. In April 1957 I left Firestone to join the Independence, Missouri Power and light Company for 4 year's as Controller.

 

In 1961 I left the power company to join IBM as a sales trainee in KCMO. I continued to work for IBM for the next 31 year in various sales capacities with location's in St. Louis MO, White Plains NY, Dallas TX and Houston TX. In 1974 we moved to Dallas where I became the Branch Manager for the Data Processing Division (large computer sales) where I remained for 5 years. In 1979 I became the Account Executive for General Dynamics in Fort Worth, Texas (didn't have to move - just commuted) for 7 years and finally ended my career in Houston Texas where we moved in 1987 to become Account Executive for Exxon, Corporation. I retired in January 1992.

 

Lu Ann continued to substitute years but she spent most of her life raising our 3 children and supporting our marriage as we moved from point to point.

 

 

Claude Neil Moore

 

Claude Neil (a.k.a. “Bud”) was born XX/XX/XXXX at his parent’s home in Arlington, Reno Co KS (also delivered by the same Dr. Mallory).  He married Nancy Jim Smart on 14 Jul 1951 at the Country Club Christian Church in Kansas City MO.

 

In the Friday October 23,1936 edition of The Arlington (KS) Enterprise, there is a reference to Bud (Buddy) Moore, son of Claude and Barbara (Mitchell) Moore:

 

“GRADE SCHOOL NOTES.  In the last weekly spelling test, Vaneta Beck, Erma Hemphill, Dorothy Mathias, Ida Jean Matz, Buddy Moore and Gene Wright made one hundred.   Vaneta Beck, Erma Hemphill, and Buddy Moore have perfect spelling records for the past six weeks.   Dona Sivils, Keith Stull, Vaneta Beck, Erma Hemphill, Dorothy Mathias, Ida Jean Matz and Buddy Moore are in the "Honor Zone".

 

Nancy Jim Smart was born on XX/XX/XXXX at St. Lukes Hospital, Kansas City MO.  She is the daughter of David Laudeman (born 25 Feb 1901 Kansas City, Jackson Co MO; married 10 May 1922 ???; died 20 Jan 1959 Kansas City MO) and France Helen Williams (born 12 Feb 1902 Kansas City, Jackson Co MO; died Easter Sunday 1955).  Both are buried in the Mt. Washington Cemetery, Independence MO.

 

Bud and Nancy had four children: Jennifer Anne, Sarah Frances, David Byron and Paul Neil.

 

Below is a short autobiography that Nancy and Bud prepared outlining their courtship, marriage, employment and movement around the country.

 

 

Biographical Summary of Bud and Nancy Moore

by Bud and Nancy Moore

Spring 2000

 

I (Nancy Jim Smart) was born on XX/XX/XXXX. I was born with a hare lip and cleft pallet.  My grandparents were wealthy and told the doctors to get the best doctors there were anywhere.   It turned out that a Doctor Padgett was right there in Kansas City.  He invented the dermatone, which is still being used today for skin grafting. I had surgery that first day of my life and 7 in all.  I wore braces from age 8 to 18 to help with the teeth, one was missing and one was pulled down from the roof of my mouth.

I remember the dust bowl days when Kansas dirt came into Missouri – I lived one block from the State line.  I would walk home from school 3/4 mile in a dust storm with a wet hanky to my face.  It was pretty dark and a yellow look to the sky. 

I went to Southwest High School and one of my classmates was Jack Logan (the future husband of my husband’s sister).  We had Sororities and Fraternities at school, which had many dances at Christmas time and in the spring.  Mother made my formals and during the war years 1944-47 as material was hard to come by. She found that some drapery fabrics could be purchased and would work well.  Another social life activity at Christmas time was to have a Tea.  Most of the girls would have a fur coat and we dressed with hats, purses, shoes and gloves to match.  Only a few girls had their own cars but many families were beginning to have 2 cars in the family so it wasn't unusual to go to these functions in a car.  Our football games and basketball games were downtown and we often would take a streetcar or bus, which was perfectly safe to do.

I went to the University of Kansas and pledged Kappa Kappa Gamma, a sorority my sister belonged to but was no longer living in the house.  I loved being there and was majoring in Occupational Therapy.  I worked for a summer in a mental hospital in Connecticut for psychiatric training. My K.U. roommate dated a good looking guy named Bud Moore. She didn't reply to a summer letter of his, and I did, we dated and later married.  I left the campus my senior year to go to the K.U. Medical Center. I was allowed to go through the graduation ceremony as I only had a few clinical hours to finish.  I took some after our marriage but the next one was to be in another city and Jennifer, our first child, was on the way.

We were married in 1951 at the Country Club Christian Church about 60th and Ward Parkway in Kansas City MO.  The 6 weeks of rain prior to the wedding caused a great deal of concern. The day before the wedding my father's American Steel Tank Company was under water and Daddy spent the day in a boat going up and down the area of Southwest Boulevard.  Bud Moore’s folks lived in Arlington KS.  Because of the flooding they could not drive to the wedding and, as a result, took their first plane ride into the city.  The water in our house would not work and I had a swim in a very muddy pond for my bath that day. The church's electricity went out and we didn't think we would have organ music….but it came on in time.  A bird flew around the sanctuary during the service.  Instead of a reception at the Wind-n-Gale farm (my parents farm), we held one in the church’s basement.  A janitor stood close to the reception table and mopped the water from the area!  Mother made my dress – a design she copied from Harzfeld's store, which was on the property of my ancestor’s farm in downtown Kansas City.  It cost about $45 to make compared to the store's $200.00.

We lived in a trailer home behind my parent’s house for two months. We moved all our things to an apartment of the Country Club Plaza just a block away from Lu Ann (Bud’s sister) and Jack Logan. Then we moved to 32nd and Locust as Jennifer was on the way.  When we had Sarah 13 months later we moved into our first little house which cost $11,000.  We were back within walking distance of my parent’s Wind-n-Gale Farm. I will let Bud tell about the other moves as he climbed the ladder at General Motors.   I have learned that being able to "Bloom where planted" has been a good motto for us.  We would go to church the first Sunday after moving in.  We have felt blessed to meet so many wonderful caring people along the way.  I think our family was able to accept the hardships, loses and heartaches because we were a close family and knew that life would be ok again. 

I still keep in touch with high school friends, college friends and a few from each city we have lived in. General Motors has been good to us with many benefits. The pay was always good with our care and ability to save. We had many trips in and out of the States. The children learned to live with change and adapt to life.

 

Claude Neil Moore was called "Bud" even in the business world.  He graduated from Kansas University in June 1951 with a degree in Political Science. He applied to become a City manager but nothing developed and he took a job with Chevrolet Division of General Motors from 1951 to 1955.  After several years in the Zone office, he moved to Topeka, Kansas for two years.  Back to Kansas City and was an office manager before moving to Chicago in 1967 in the leasing and rental end of the business. 

In November 1968 he was transferred to the Detroit office of Leasing and Rental and we lived in Grosse Pointe. When asked to join Buick Motor Division, we moved to Flint Michigan in 1970.  We were then moved to LA area (Westlake Village) of California from 1970 to 1976 where Bud was a troubleshooter who turned some failures into stability. We were there for 5 years before being transferred to Boston, Mass in 1978.  We were there two years as a Zone Manager and then to Atlanta Georgia to be a Regional manager which meant a lot of weekly travel.  11 months later we were moving to Chicago for a second time but new location. Thirteen months later we were back in Flint Michigan.  Bud was chosen to be on a team to reorganize General Motors and drove to the Technical Center every day for over 2 years.  He then was transferred to Chevrolet for 11 months. Saturn was mentioned but before it was announced he was sent to Lansing Michigan to be General Sales Manager of Oldsmobile. We were there a short time with many trips out of the area in the company plane and then sent to the General Motors Building in Detroit Michigan where he became a Vice President in charge of Sales and Service.  In 1985 we moved back to Grosse Pointe for 5 years before retiring in 1991 with 40 years of dedication to General Motors.  We have since retired in Paradise Valley, AZ.  In all we had 18 different homes and he had 24 different jobs!

 

 

 


This concludes MOORE - Part 1 of 2: SUMMARY.  For detailed supporting documentation to this SUMMARY, as well as unrelated MOORE information, please see MOORE – Part 2 of 2: DETAIL.