Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

HOGG

 

Compiled by: Andrew L. Moore

Email: PAmoores@juno.com

Dated: 22 Sep 2015


 

 

 

Hogg

 

 

 

?John? Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

Samuel Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth

 

 

 

 

James Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John A Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hugh Watt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Watt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alexander White

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth White

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rachel Henderson

 

 

Calvin Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Samuel Irwin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Irwin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Margaret

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Irwin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James Thompson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Thompson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah Gilliland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert A Hogg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garret Voorhees

Andrew Voorhees / Jane Sutphen

 

 

Eleazor Voorus

 

 

 

 

 

Lavina Franscisco

 

Hendrick Voorhees / Jannetje Jensen

 

Andrew Voorus

 

 

 

 

 

Hon. Warner Miller

 

Garret Coerte VanVoorhees / Willemptie Luyster

 

Margaret Miller

 

 

 

 

 

Margaret

 

Hiram A. Voorus

 

 

 

 

Coert Stevense VanVoorhees / Marretje Couwenhoven

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Coerte VanVoorhees / Aaltjen Wessels

Hannah Tibbitts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dorothy Voorus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Watson, Jr.

Robert Watson, Sr. / Jane

 

 

Rev. James Watson

 

 

 

 

 

 

Margaret Henderson

/ Sarah

 

Robert M Watson

 

 

 

 

 

 

John McConnell

 

 

 

Susan McConnell

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah Gaston

 

 

 

Melvina Watson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Spangler

 

 

 

 

George W Spangler

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Pressler

 

 

 

 

Delilah Spangler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Cosper

Jacob Cosper

 

 

 

Rebecca Cosper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abigail St. Clair

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOGG

 

 

Part I Hogg Genealogy by Calvin Hogg (1883-1962), (Written in the 1950's).

 

Part II Your Ancestral Heritage by J. Bernard Hogg for his grandsons Brock and Brent, Shippensburg, PA 1981.

 

Part III The Genealogy of John Thompson Hogg by Esther Louise (Hogg) Houtz, 19 December 1968.

 

Part IV A Bit of True Americana Autobiography - The Autobiography of John Thompson Hogg compiled by Ester Louise (Hogg) Houtz and presented December 1968.

 

Part V A Trip to Ireland, from the personal diary of Beulah (Boulden) Hogg, 1908.

 

Part VI Hogg genealogy research by Andrew L. Moore.

 

 

 

 

P A R T I

 

HOGG GENEALOGY

by

Calvin Hogg (1883-1962)

(Written in the 1950's)

 

In 1790, four brothers and two sisters, Samuel, Robin, James, and William Hogg, docked in Philadelphia. Shortly afterward, they migrated to Milford Township, Mifflin County; Old Johnnie, Samuel's son used to say that they raised wheat rank enough to fence sheep.

 

In 1814 Samuel, our great grandfather, bought 200 acres from William Berkley and his wife, Mary Chambers Berkley, heir of John Chambers for the sum of four hundred dollars ($400.00) Quote from the original deed: "KNOW YE That inconsideration of the services rendered by John Chambers, private in the late Army of the United States and Pennsylvania, there is granted, by the said Commonwealth unto William Berkley and Mary, his wife Mary Chambers, heirs of John Chambers, a certain tract of land called "Friendship" situated in district No. 2, now Mercer County, free of all restrictions, excepting and reserving only the fifth part of Gold and Silver are for the use of this Commonwealth to be delivered at Pits mouth clear of charge, Signed, John Cochran, Secretary of the Commonwealth. The sixteenth day of May in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and nine,"

 

Quoted from the deed "THIS INDENTURE made the seventh day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fourteen between William Berkley and Mary his wife, of Milford Township, Mifflin County and the State of Pennsylvania of the one part and Samuel Hogg of the same place of the other part 200 acres of land lying in Butler County for the sum of $400.00."

 

signed: William Berkley

her

Mary X Berkley

mark

 

These deeds are in a safety deposit box in the Slippery Rock National Bank.

 

The taxes, county and road on December 10, 1814 were $4.80, paid in full at Mercer, signed John Wright, Treasurer. In the early summer of 1814, old Sammy and his children, John, James, our grandfather, Samuel and Mary pulled into the eastern part of the farm in a big wagon where Bernice Glover now lives. There were both a log house and a log barn here. Samuel died a young man. However, he lived long enough to become one of the original elders of Bethel Covenenter Church which was located in a built‑in corner of the old barn. However, in a short time a log church was built under the white oak tree still standing in the churchyard. When he died, he lay as a corpse. It happened that communion came at this time. They all locked the house and went to the services. This information came from Emma Hogg Bovard.

 

They arrived in time to plant garden stuff, such as beans, onions and a field of buckwheat. Grandfather said there were plenty of pigs in the woods for meat. Mary was the housekeeper (15 years old) Father used to quote his father James as saying "She was a wonderful girl."

 

Robin Hogg settled on 200 acres adjoining and south of Samuel's farm. However, it seems that Thomas Mifflin, father of the Thomas we knew, swindled him out of this by saying that he had been here before and had settled it. Old Thomas let him have 50 acres of the 200 acres on the south. Thomas, his son said "My father gladly let Robin have 50 acres for his own." Robin finally traded these 50 acres on some sort of a deal for 200 acres in Cherry Township just north of what is called Bovard now New Hope. He raised a large family. Some of the descendents are still living in that area.

 

The two sisters and two other girls from Ireland, by the name of Mackelwee, made their homes with Robin until they got married or died. One of the sisters married a Black and raised a family in Cherry Township.

 

Another married an Atwell and also lived in Cherry Township. One of the Mackelwee girls died and is buried in the old Harmony Cemetery. The other married old Bob McFate. He was so Irish and deaf that he could hardly talk. I remember him. He lived near Plumber, Venango County, until his marriage. In some way he got acquainted with Robin Hogg. Robin told him to come down and he would show him a nice girl. He left home one morning on horseback, telling his folks that he was going to see about getting a mare (wife). In a few days he came back with the Mackelwee girl on the horse behind him as his wife. Old Robin said afterward that he was joking when he told old Bob McFate to come down...Quote ‑ "I never thought of her marrying that dumb asslum."

 

Atwell was a sort of worthless fellow. He worked on a threshing machine. He started off one morning and his wife told him that there wasn't a pound of flour in the house for the children. He said, "Never mind, Martha, we'll live." He left and didn't come home till Saturday night!

 

William settled on a farm in Marion Township. He lived there for some time and moved to Mercer County near Fredonia and raised a family. One of his descendents Stanley Hogg, still owns and runs the farm. James kept on going west and finally landed in Texas. His son, James Stephen Hogg, (according to the Media Research Bureau of Washington, D.C.) (1851‑1906) became a lawyer and governor of Texas.

 

George was a great deal younger than his other brothers. He, sometime afterwards, came over with his Mother and they made their home with Samuel Weekly, on what is known as the Weekly farm, Thomas Brown farm and the Davidson farm. George inherited the Davidson farm. He was not disposed to hard labor, but was quick tempered. He was chopping down a maple tree in the spring to browse the cows. Samuel, his older brother came riding into the woods to see him about something. George said, "Keep back, the tree is about ready to fall," Samuel said, "Puh, you will have to work harder than I ever saw you work, or the tree will not fall today." George made the chips fly. The limbs of the tree hit old Sammy's horse. Sammy said that it was the first time he ever saw George work. According to Robert Weekly, George carried his farm home from Slippery Rock in a red handkerchief. He finally lost the farm, and wandered around with his family until his son Cyrus bought 15 acres of land south of Wick and built a cozy little house and barn on it where George and his wife Martha (I remember them both) both died.

 

Samuel was only 16 years younger than his Mother, and George was the youngest of the family. George was well up in years when Cyrus and his brother Samuel were born. Cyrus and Samuel were cousins of my grandfather James, and still about 15 years younger than my father, John. Cyrus lived in the house where his father died with his only daughter, Rosie Slagle., until be died 15 years ago. He was a member and faithful attendant of Bethel Church. He is buried in Meridian. Samuel, his brother, was a bookkeeper for most of his life in the Now Castle Dry Goods Store. He died in New Castle. He was a good violinist, playing in a theater in New Castle for years. He said that the music was handed to them one night and they had to have it ready for the next night.

 

Turning our attention to our direct ancestor, Samuel Hogg. The original farm consisted of what is now the Bernice Glover farm, Lottie Moyer lot, John Hogg farm, James McIntosh lot and Nan Allen farm. This totals up to about 190 acres. About 10 acres were appropriated by old Thomas Mifflin by moving the fence north (a trick of the early days) to get a piece of coal land. Jane Hogg, Ames' daughter‑in‑law, told Will Hogg, John Hogg's son, that old Sammy, the old coward, did not have enough spunk to stop him. The following information was given to our father by old Aunt Mary as she sat on an old rocking chair, crippled with a stroke. James Hogg, our grandfather was 10 years old when they loaded their big wagon with household goods, provisions, bedding, and tools, ready for the trip. Father did not seem to know what his grandfather worked at, but Aunt Mary said that he was a great worker. He said that after Aunt Mary's death, he wanted the chair but, Jane, the old devil, would not let him have it.

 

John, Samuel's son married Lizzie Slemmens and fell heir to 200 acres north and joining his fathers farm. He got into too big a business to be able to manage, and lost the farm. His wife could not write her name. He would bring home a note and have her put her mark, an X, on it, then he, in the presence of a witness, would sign her name. She did not seem to know what this meant. She always lamented the fact that she had been cheated out of her farm. After the sheriff's sale she would not leave. She had one daughter Jane, who married Jim Bell, with whom she afterwards made her home. The house stood vacant for sometime after the sale. The following information was gotten from Lewis Bell, her grandson. She would disappear and go over to the vacant house. They would find her in vacant room, looking at some old pictures, some of which Lottie still owns, and saying, "Oh my‑‑I have lost everything. They have taken all from me."

 

James Hogg, our grandfather, was ten years old when the family loaded up their big wagon with household provisions, bedding, etc. ready for the trip. Dad didn't seem to know what his grandfather did before he came over the mountains. Aunt Mary said that one end of the wagon was filled with provisions and pots and pans. Dad got most of his information from old Aunt Mary.

 

On their way they always stopped near a spring to eat, feed the horses, but always slept in the wagon. They tied the horses with a long rope at night to keep them from wandering off. On the journey one of the horses had a grey colt. The grey colt was a stallion and Sammy kept the stallion till he died. Aunt Mary used to tell Dad that her father (Sammy) would lead the stallion to the upping block house and the horse would stand still until the old man got on; then he would go.

 

Having the colt delayed the journey a day or two. They hauled the colt in the wagon for a day or two, taking it out to suck when the milk began to squirt from the mother. After this, they tied the colt to the mare, winding their way to the farm where we now live (where Bernice now lives). When anything was said about Aunt Mary, James (our grandfather) would say, "She's a great girl." She was about fifteen years old when they came from east of the mountains.

 

The family was raised on the hill in a log house where Bernice Glover lives. Johnie married Lizzie Slemmens the only daughter of the Slemmens who owned 200 acres north of and adjoining his father's (Sammy) farm. Two children, Jane and Orbison, were born as a result of this marriage. Lizzie's mother was commonly known as Granny Slemmens. My father and Harve remembered her as an old woman with a black bonnet and a clay pipe.

 

James was very careful not to insult people. When Harve and Dad were boys they liked to go down to old Johny Hoggs to play with Orbison, their cousin. Their father told them if they were invited to stay for a meal, to accept the invitation for fear of insulting the Hogg's and old Granny Slemmens was Johnie Hogg's mother‑in‑law; and if they happened to refuse the invitation, they knew they certainly wouldn't be allowed to go back. Old Granny liked pancakes and had them for nearly every meal. She would seat the boys at the table and grease the griddle and pour on the batter. As soon as the smoke began to fly she would turn the cakes and at the same time the spit dropping off her pipe onto the cakes. Calvin, "Did you eat the cakes?" Dad, "Golly, we had to."

 

Orbison died at sixteen as a result of the measles. Jane, his sister (spokesman for her parents), blamed Dad and Harve for going swimming with him too soon after the measles. Old Johny got big ideas in the sheep and coal business, and broke up. They lived on the farm till he died. Jane, his only daughter, married Jim Bell, and Bell took care of her the rest of her life. After Jim took her, the house stood vacant for some time. Old Lizzie would disappear, and Bell would go over and find her wandering about the farm buildings. Once he heard her saying "Oh MY!" He peeped in and saw her sitting on a chair looking at some old pictures that she had taken over with her. (Lew Bell, her grandson.) She never weighed over seventy five pounds and less than 5 ft high. Old Johny was big and a six footer. Some one said to her, "Aren't you afraid to marry that big fellow." She made some comparisons between a keg and a barrel. As a result of her daughter's (Jane) marriage with Jim Bell, a family of six were raised; Doc, Elmer, Lew, Charley, Laura and Lottie. Lottie Moyer is the only one living. She took care of her father and mother till they died during the fall of 1908 within a week apart. Lottie married Ed Moyer and had two daughters, Ruth and Helen. Ruth married Cornelius and has three boys and two girls at home. The oldest is twenty years old.

 

We will now discuss more in detail Samuel and his descendents. Samuel with his children pulled in off the road on the hill where Bernice Glover now lives. They moved into an old log house. The loft was used as an upstairs. The stairs were on the outside boarded in. The outside stairs might have been built later (Dad didn't know). This was 1814, at any rate he was required to pay back taxes on the farm for the amount of $1.13 before he got a clear deed. According to the gov't has the rights of the gold or silver if any. In 1814 the taxes were $1.16. The farm was bought from a Revolutionary war soldier, William Beale, who originally owned the land, granted to him for his services in the Revolutionary war. A tract of land was set aside in western Pa for this purpose. This land was known as Donation Land. (Donation Land or Friendship was land given to Revolutionary war soldiers for their services. General Irwin was the government agent for the Donation Land in the northern section of Butler County, know at the Alexander Tract, Section 2).

 

However, not many of the Scotch, Irish, and Scotch‑Irish did benefit from this grant. History tells us that they, in most cases, landed in Philadelphia and immediately crossed the mountains. They were not loyal to the cause. All they were interested in was getting possession of the land even if they had to slaughter innocent Indian families to do so. They did little to gain freedom from England.

 

Samuel Hogg Jr. died in his late teens. According to an old history of Bethel Church, he was an elder at 17. He lay dead in the old log house during communion. The family locked the house and went to church. (This information came from Emma Hogg Bovard.) She told me this when I was staying with Bob, her husband, one night, when he was on his death bed. Such ridiculous loyalty to the Covenenter church was the death knoll of the Covenenter church.

 

Later a frame addition was joined to the log house next the land where the house now stands. This house stood till after the war until Harve was married and built the house where Bernice Glover, Harve's granddaughter, now lives. This was built by James our grandfather, sometime between 1850 and 1860, after his wife died and he moved from the old log house across the road where our house now stands. In this house James, Aunt Mary and the two boys lived until he died shortly before the Civil War. Harve and Father were left with their Aunt and father. The former was stricken with palsy, now called a stroke. His father had been hurt by a team of colts in a wood sled going down the hill toward Bethel Church. The tongue came loose from the sled in the snow and the team ran off. He used a cane after this. The last 18 months of his life he was bedfast, leaving him and Aunt Mary under the care of father and Harve. In the absence of Harve, during the war, Dad took care of Aunt Mary and his father. She went around with a crutch. One of her arms was hanging at her side. Grandfather died before the war ended. Harve was in the war for nine months. He did not get into any engagements. He was discharged at Harrisburg June 1, 1863.

 

After considerable wondering now let us return to James our grandfather. Sometime about 1840 he married a tall red haired girl with high cheekbones, by the name of Elizabeth Watt. The family lived in a log house (I remember the roof caved in full of ground hog holes and two or three old apple trees at one end.) This house was located on the old Granny Slemmens farm, back over the hill from the Slemmens buildings. There were at least one boy and five girls. The Watt boy had two sons, James and John. John (who was killed by a train at Browntown crossing at work on the section) had a daughter and a son. The son married a Ritenour and raised a nice family, one boy and several girls. The boy married a Shull. He now lives at Forestville and is a good church worker. The daughter married a Simmons (he died young). They had one daughter, Kathryn, and a son. Kathryn now lives with her mother at Browntown and teaches school at Forestville. She is a nice looking tall slim black haired girl of about 40 years of age.

 

James married a McFate. He moved from place to place, then to New Castle. His family seemed to be tubercular. The family moved to Denver. Several of them are still there. Another girl, Martha Watt, married Bob Weekly. Bob would come down to Aunt Mary's place on the hill. (Always had his coon dog along) and he and James would start over the hill to see the Watt girls. The dog often struck a coon track. Bob would follow the dog and wouldn't see Martha that night. He would excuse himself by saying, well there would be enough fellows there without him. Five girls and the fellows came Saturday night. Martha and Bob had a large family. They all died before they got out of their teens except Alex, Martha, and John. They are all buried in Harmony except John and Martha, who are buried in Slippery Rock.

 

Two of the Watt girls married Browns, big Naze and little Naze. Ed Brown and George were sons of little Naze. Ed and Dad were close friends. Ed's mother died when he was a young fellow in his teens. They lived in the Browntown area. Naze got married again, but Ed didn't seem to stay at home very much. He spent a good bit of his time on the hill with James, Aunt Mary, Harve, and Dad till he was married. His mother being a Watt accounts for our relationship with Clare Brown, Blanche Orr and the Bartleys. The Bartley's mother is Hattie Brown, Ed's daughter. Big Naze married another Watt. She soon died and he married Suzan Love and they moved West to Colorado. Suzan Love used to work at times when Aunt Mary was sick.

 

John married Olive Atwell from near Clintonville. John and Olive had two children: Mary and Gertrude. They died in their teens and are buried with their parents in Slippery Rock. Martha (commonly called Maas) lived with her mother in the old house with her father and mother till they died, I remember Aunt Martha. She died about 1895. Bob died about 1885. He was a great hunter especially of Coon and Fox. He also kept a lot of bees. He would go to the edge of the woods and stop a few minutes and could tell how the hunting was. He had a great knowledge of nature. Sometime after Aunt Martha died, Maas married James Kerr, a veteran of the War of 1845. He soon died, then she married a McClymonds. (no children).

 

Alex, a great friend of Dad and Harve, was a great deal like his father, Bob. Dad said he could get almost as many foxes and squirrel as his father. He was tall and slim and hollow chested and was not strong. He went to the Civil War, was captured and spent 18 months in Andersonville. He stood the hardships better than most of the strong fellows. When he was captured, he took the top off of a big button and concealed a $5 bill in it. After he was released he bought and ate a mince pie. He was found dead in his bunk the next morning. He was brought home and buried in Harmony Cemetery. He had his thumb shot off with a revolver. When he was brought home, his Mother looked at him and said, "It isn't Alex." They showed her his hand and she said, "It's Alex."

 

Coming back to the Hoggs‑‑Samuel our great‑grandfather lived on the hill with his family. Samuel, his son, died when young, less than ten. Dad didn't seem to know much about him. Samuel our great‑grandfather after his two sons, John and James were married, lived on the hill with old Aunt Mary. These two lived together for about ten years. Samuel brought the cows down the hill and up the Fielding Lane and opened swinggate balanced with a rock. He was closing the gate when it fell on him. He was hauled back home on a sled and died shortly afterward. He is buried in Harmony. The old gate was under the chestnut tree which is still there now fallen with chestnut blight. Our father remembered of them hauling him home on a sled. He thought he was about five years old. This would be 1850.

 

James, our grandfather, married Elizabeth Watt and moved down into the old log house and had three sons: Harvey, John Alexander, our father, and Calvin, who died when a small boy. Alexander White was a Revolutionary War soldier. He came to Pine Twp., Mercer Co. in 1798. Elizabeth White, Alex's daughter, married Hugh Watt, our father's grandfather on his mother's side. He was not ordained, but spent a part of his time as a circuit preacher. This accounts for John Alexander Hogg, Alex Watt, and Alex Weekley.

 

Hugh Dillinger was also a grandson of Hugh Watt, hence the name Hugh. Elizabeth also accounts for our grandmother, Elizabeth Watt on our father's side.

 

James started to build a house when his wife died in 1851. Old Aunt Mary, who was living alone came down and said, "Now James, you must bring those boys up and we will all live together." He did so. Grandmother died when the roses were in bloom according to old Aunt Mary.

 

She had a dog (Scotch Kerr) Carlo. Aunt Mary thought that Carlo would bite the boys and said, "Now James, you must kill that dog before he bites the boys." Old Carlo was a good coon dog. He did not bark on the track; consequently, he would be on the coon unexpectedly. When he got old, Aunt Mary opposed Bob taking him out at night. Bob would slip up above the house and whistle on his hands to call the dog. Sometimes old Aunt Mary would hear him and would call James, and say, "Now James, put Carlo under the stairs. I hear Bob Weekley whistling."

 

James didn't shoot the dog, but shut the dog under the stairs for a few days. The stairs led up to the second story (outside of the house), which was not much more than a high attic; but Dad and Harvey slept in it till their Dad put a frame addition in front of the log house.

 

One day James let Carlo out but watched him pretty carefully. Dad said that it wasn't long till they were riding on his back. When Carlo got tired, he would sit down and slide them off.

 

Finally, old Carlo died. Aunt Mary helped the boys put Carlo on a sled and the three hauled him up on the hill along the fence row and buried him. They covered him with straw and put him in a hole that Carlo had dug while hunting groundhogs. This was between the Nan Allen farm and the old Johnny Hogg farm.

 

Our grandfather James moved the furniture up on a wood sled. He left the old corner cupboard in the old log house. It stayed there until Dad was married to Elizabeth Irwin in 1870, a period of 19 years. Then Dad moved it across the road in the one story house where our garden now is. Our grandfather had started to build this house when his wife died. He afterwards completed it, but never lived in it. An old shoemaker lived in it until he died then little Tom Barnes lived in it till Dad was married and moved in. The back of the house was a short distance from the spring. The end of the house was about 20 feet from our cement walk. They lived in this house till they built this house in 1881 where we now live. Jim, Martha, Mary, Eva, Will, and John were born in the old house. Calvin, Arthur, and Edna were born in the new house where we now live.

 

---------------------------------

 

The early record of the Hogg family was written by Calvin Hogg who lived all his life on the Old Homestead, Slippery Rock, R. D. 3, until his death in May 15, 1962. He always had keen interest in the folk‑lore of the family and several instances of personal interest are recorded.

 

The record beginning with James and Elizabeth Watt Hogg, and John and Elizabeth Thompson Irwin were collected and compiled by John T. Hogg, with the assistance of many family members. There are, no doubt, errors of omissions and dates, and we beg your indulgence in our effort to have a brief record of the John A. Hogg and Elizabeth Irwin Hogg, and John Irwin and Elizabeth Thompson Irwin ancestry and descendants.

 

You will note that no mention has been made of pre‑American ancestry or the occupations and professions of family members. If anyone should be sufficiently interested in this share of the record, it would be a pleasant project. We will however, give a brief account of the activities of the nine children of John and Elizabeth Hogg:

 

James was a carpenter on his own for a number of years until he became affiliated with the maintenance department at Slippery Rock College until his retirement.

 

Willis graduated from Slippery Rock, Franklin College, and McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago. He served pastorates in Pennsylvania, Illinois and Michigan until his retirement.

 

John; AB degree from Otterbein College and M.A. degree from Pitt University. Taught in Butler High School from 1912‑1950 at the time of retirement.

 

Calvin; Graduate of Slippery Rock, AB degree from Grove City, and M.A. degree from Pitt University. He taught in Karns City, was principal at Harrisville and Evans City, and served as Assistant Supt. of Butler Co. Schools until his retirement in 1953.

 

Arthur; a graduate of Slippery Rock and Grove City College. He taught school in Petrolia, Evans City, Mars, Dayton and Rural Valley. He was principal at Mars and Rural Valley.

 

Martha and her husband, Will Smith, and family were living in Conway, Mo., at the time of their death, where their son Carroll now lives. Will followed the oil fields in Illinois, Missouri and Kansas.

 

Mary, wife of James Kerr, lived her entire married life in Slippery Rock.

 

Evalyn, who married Charles Ifft, has also been a life‑long resident of the district, on a farm at Forestville.

 

Edna became a nurse and was employed in the Harmarville Convalescent Home until her retirement. She is now living in a new home built on the old homestead, with Arthur and Bess.

 

 

The immediate ancestry of John A. Hogg and Elizabeth Irwin Hogg is:

 

Father‑‑James Hogg

Mother‑‑Elizabeth Watt Hogg

Children‑‑ Harvey

John

Calvin

 

Father‑‑John Irwin

Mother‑‑Elizabeth Thompson Irwin

 

We now record the names and dates of the birth of John A. Hogg and Elizabeth Irwin Hogg, and their descendants.

 

Our father, John and mother, Elizabeth were married in Harrisville in 1870.

 

John A. Hogg, born January 11, 1845, died January 6, 1924

Elizabeth Hogg, born June 4, 1846, died October 21, 1896

 

To this union were born the following children:

 

James I. Hogg Born July 9, 1872 Died Feb 13, 1966

Martha E. Hogg Born July 26, 1873 Died Nov 25, 1953

Mary S. Hogg Born Jan 11, 1875 Died Nov 1,1959

Evalyn Hogg Born Nov 13, 1876 Died Aug 24, 1968

Willis Z. Hogg Born Mar 15, 1878 Died Nov 3, 1965

John T. Hogg Born Jun 26, 1880 Died July 13, 1975

Calvin Hogg Born Mar 10, 1883 Died May 15, 1962

Arthur J. Hogg Born Mar 02, 1887 Died Jan 29, 1969

Edna L. Hogg Born July 25, 1889 Died Aug 19, 1987

 

 


 

P A R T II

 

Your Ancestral Heritage

by

J. Bernard Hogg

For his grandsons Brock and Brent

Shippensburg, PA 1981

 

In 1790 the "Widow" Hogg and her four sons left the village of Ramelton, Northern Ireland and landed in Philadelphia. Earlier the Hoggs had been a part of the Scottish emigration from Scotland to Northern Ireland where the English king wanted more loyal subjects. There the Scotch‑Irish established a thriving linen and cattle trade only to have it ruined by English laws that denied them English market. Coming late to America, the Scotch‑Irish, including the Hoggs, moved into the back country of Pennsylvania where land was plentiful and cheap.

 

One of those sons, Samuel, purchased 200 acres in Juniata County, PA. He married and reared a family. In 1814 his wife died, and he decided to move into Western Pennsylvania where land again was cheap. He sold his 200 acres for $2000.00 and bought 200 acres in Butler County, PA for $400. This was land that had been given to a Revolutionary War soldier as a bonus for his services and is known as Donation Land. Eventually these 200 acres was divided and my grandfather received one half of it. It is still in possession of my cousin, Theodore Hogg and is located on Route 108, 2.5 miles north of Slippery Rock. Thus this farm has been in possession of one family for 165 years.

 

Of Samuel Hogg and his son, James, I know very little. These are two dark rooms in the family history. My grandfather, John T. Hogg, married Elizabeth Irwin who was reared on a farm near Branchton, a few miles away. She also was of Scotch‑Irish descent. I knew Grandfather Hogg quite well in my youth and his old age. He was a farmer and also a teamster. He hauled freight from the railroad into Slippery Rock. My brother sometimes went with him and I understand a box of candy never arrived intact.

 

These grandparents had nine children, five boys and four girls. My father, James Hogg, who was your great grandfather, was the oldest of these and he became a carpenter. The other four boys all received college educations, three becoming teachers and one a Presbyterian minister. Education of the boys was a tradition with the Scotch‑Irish. None of the girls went to college.

 

Grandfather Hogg was the only one of my four grandparents that I remember. By contrast you know three of yours which tells you something about life expectancy and medicine.

 

About 1830 the Schramm and Plugth families emigrated from Germany to America landing in Baltimore. The Schramm family came from HesseDarmstadt which is now a part of Germany. The Plugths came from Lorraine now a part of France. Both were of German extraction and German was spoken in the homes. My mother spoke German until World War I when I made her stop because it was not patriotic.

 

Both families settled in southern Butler County south of Zelienople. Jacob Schramm married Amelia Plugth and to them were born eleven children, 3 boys and 8 girls. My mother, Linda, was the fifth child. I never knew these grandparents. You can see that you truly are products of the melting pot‑‑Scotch‑Irish‑German and your grandmother Hogg (Coyle) added some Irish.

 

Longevity was a characteristic of these ancestors of yours. My mother and father each lived to the age of 94 and a high percentage of that generation lived into the nineties. At this writing (1981) two are still alive. Aunt Ella Brenner is 97 and Aunt Edna Hogg is 91.

 

Of those two generations, my grandparents and uncles and aunts, some comments are in order. They all were born and grew up on farms. With the exception of Aunt Eva Ift, all of the Hoggs left the land and went into education, the ministry or trades.

 

In contrast, the Schramms stayed on the land and it was not until my generation that they left farming. To the best of my knowledge only two are still farming. The original Schramm homestead is still in the possession of a Schramm.

 

They also differed in education. In 1979 I attended a family reunion to honor Aunt Edna Hogg on her 90th birthday. I doubt if there was an adult there without a college education and quite a few had at least two and sometimes three degrees. This was the Scotch Irish Presbyterian belief in education.

 

On the other hand the Schramms of Germanic and Reformed Church descent never went into higher education. I know of only one of my Schramm cousins who graduated from college. Only now in the generation after me are they beginning to acquire formal education.

 

Another difference, minor in nature, but interesting is that the Hoggs were rather formal and reserved. When I went to that reunion, I saw nobody kissing. At a Schramm reunion you get kissed all over the place. And the Schramms had a lot of fun and plenty of tricks. Ask your mother if she remembers the day I had a shirt torn off my back at a family reunion.

 

These ancestors were born in the last half of the 19th century. It was a poor world by present day standards. You are living in the age of affluence. They were poor but not poverty stricken. They were adequately clothed and fed. I have only glimpses of their lives from questions I asked my parents. I am sorry I did not ask more. I asked my father how much money they had back on that farm. The answer was very little and what came in went into a vase on the mantle to pay the taxes. I suspect they traded farm products at the store for clothing and other necessities. What did he get for Christmas? An orange or stick of candy. They went "over the hill and through the woods" to one room country school and in those woods can still be seen initials carved on a birch tree. The school term began in the fall when the corn was husked and ended in the spring when plowing began‑‑about six months.

 

My mother told me of her mother doing the week's baking in an outdoor oven. In early morn a fire was built to heat the oven. Then the bread was baked with home grown hops for yeast. This was followed by the cakes, pies and cookies. My mother baked our bread all through my childhood. It was wonderful bread, but by the end of the week it was rather dry. She also remembered going out to the pasture in the fall in her bare feet. When a cow got up, she put her feet where the cow had been to get them warm. of course, they made their own butter and the surplus was traded for other necessities. Skimming the cream from the milk, letting it sour and then churning the butter was a process I well remember and that must have been about 1923 with my Aunt Edna.

 

It is that sort of thing that I wish I knew more about because that America passed with them. I remember going to the cider mill with a wagon load of apples and coming back with a barrel of cider for vinegar. Then you drank it through an oats straw until it got "hard."

 

Theirs was a small, local world; a self sufficient life and the land produced almost all of their food. They were not more than one generation away from the frontier and it reflects in the tales my father told me. They were of strong men, of physical courage and a lot of fighting to prove you were strong. of the strong man in one area who went looking for the strong man of another area to engage in physical combat just to see who would win. We no longer worship physical strength because machines have given us all the same strength.

 

That generation also gave me something a little more difficult to analyze, especially the Hoggs. Being Scotch‑Irish and poor they had to be thrifty. And I admit to that fault or virtue, depending on the way you look at it. If I needed something I got it, provided it was within my means. But the rule was that I needed it, not wanted it. (Remember the old El Camino truck?) Eat up, wear out or go without. The trait of being thrifty was probably due to environment.

 

The other trait was probably hereditary. Your ancestors were not aggressive. There was no competitive urge to rise to the top‑‑to be the best. You might say they did not have the killer instinct. They were perfect examples of Leo Durocher's "Good guys finish last." But they were all very much respected. Many people have told me of the respect they had for my uncles and my father.

 

One last trait. They loved their home and never traveled very far from it. My father and mother traveled as far as Chicago where I took them to the World Fair. my brother traveled as far as Texas but bated the trip. I never got him to stay overnight in Shippensburg. I tried to get Aunt Edna to visit in Shippensburg and Florida. She refused because she had to take care of her home. She simply did not care to travel. While I have visited Europe, Mexico and Central America, the best part of those trips was getting home. Nor were they great Joiners of organizations, fraternities or associations. They were sufficient unto themselves.

 

My Life

 

I was born on February 3, 1908 on Elm Street in Slippery Rock. My mother was greatly relieved when February 2 had passed. You figure that out. I was the second child. My brother Kenneth was four years older than I. He teased me constantly until I was old enough and big enough to fight him to a draw. Then he stopped. Shortly after I was born we moved to 240 Maple Street where my father, who was a carpenter and building contractor, had built a home. I lived there until 1928 when I left for my first teaching position. Father and mother lived there the rest of their lives. They both lived to be 94 years of age.

 

Slippery Rock was a small residential town of about 700 in population. A Normal School for training teachers was there which probably determined why I became a teacher. The town was isolated by a lack of transportation facilities so common to America of that day. There was one improved street. The rest were dirt, which meant dust in summer and mud whenever it rained. Nor were there any improved roads into town and the nearest railroad was at least five miles away. My world was a very small world, but in my ignorance of the larger, I was quite content. Transportation was by horse and buggy, which my father had for his work. In that small rural town, many people raised chickens, some cows and, of course, horses which meant flies. The alleys were lined with barns and I suspect still are. My early world was limited to a distance of two and a half miles to my grandfathers and to Aunt Amanda West on the same road.

 

Thus I started in the horse and buggy days. I can remember the first automobile and when one entered town, the first kid to see it announced it with a yell and the rest of the kids ran to the center of town to see. When my father got his first Model T Ford, he steered, my brother fed the gas which was a lever on the steering wheel and I blew the horn. My father never really learned to drive. I learned to drive a Model T. You pushed it up the hill with your left foot and used either the brake or the reverse pedal as a brake. Since the gas tank was under the front seat, if your gas was low you backed up a steep hill. Quite the car and I did repair one with a hair pin. If you could make a certain hill in high gear, you had a good car.

 

Speaking of cows, a neighbor had a cow and he hired me to milk it twice a day. And cows and barns meant rats. The local branch of the Civic Club started a campaign to get rid of the rats by offering a nickel for each rat tail. I caught enough to buy a victrola record for 95 cents. It was "Whispering" and I can still hear it.

 

I also remember the first radio I ever heard. It was about 1922 and earphones were placed in a clay vase which acted as a speaker. "WOC Davenport, Iowa where the tall corn grows." When we got a set it was a favorite indoor sport to sit up late at night and see what distant station could be picked up. If you could get California you boasted of it. That was before the organization of networks or any real control of broadcasting.

 

In the same way came the first airplane after World War I. That, too, brought everybody into the streets. Barnstorming pilots came and took venturesome people for a ride for a fee. My first flight came much later.

 

Someone usually was running a movie house in town. That early classic, "The Birth of the Nation," about a part of the Civil War so frightened me that I wanted to crawl under my seat. Those were silent film and a player piano provided an accompaniment.

 

Since we lived in town we had gas lights and also gas for cooking. In winter time the gas pressure got low and the kitchen stove was heated with coal. But when I went to Grandfather Hogg's or to Aunt Amanda Wests it was an oil lamp for lighting and coal stoves for heating. The old "slack burner" coal stove has now reappeared as a wood burner. The tub in the kitchen, the outdoor privy and the Sears and Roebuck catalogue were a standard part of living.

 

I mention these things because I lived through the great industrial and scientific revolution of the 20th century. From the horse and buggy to a man on the moon in one lifetime. Now I think I have seen it all. But you will probably see more and greater changes which I cannot possibly imagine at this time.

 

My youth was a happy one. Sled riding (which the automobile ruined by plowing the streets) baseball, football, basketball and tennis, although there were not organized sports as today. When father sold his horse and got a Model T Ford, the hay loft in the barn became a basketball court. You wouldn't recognize the game because we played it with a football. That loft was the scene of another sport. We would collect corncobs and break them in two pieces. one side would be in the loft which had a large door. The other side was on the ground. The object ‑ ‑ to hit somebody with a corn cob. It was painful, but for‑ our aim was seldom true.

 

One of my tasks at home was to help Mother with the washing. That was the day of the boy propelled washing machine. It wasn't hard work but it interfered with play. So I pestered her with "Are these done now?" She rubbed the clothes on a wash board and I also put them through the rinse and the hand operated wringer. It must have been a relief to Mother when she got an electric washer and she did not have to put up with my complaining. With no girls in the family, washing and drying dishes was also a regular chore. When my brother entered 9th grade and began Latin he announced he was through drying dishes. When he graduated from high school the same announcement. The same story on graduation from college. On the day he received a Masters degree he took mother and Dad home and dried the dishes. To this day, I am a good dish washer and like it.

 

Another chore of mine was beating carpets when spring house cleaning cam around. The carpet sweepers of that day consisted of a revolving brush which picked up lint but very little dust. So all the rugs were taken outside and beaten with a carpet beater either on the ground or over the clothes line. The dust really flew and you beat the carpet until little dust was seen. It was a monotonous job.

 

Another more pleasant task was making ice cream. In those early years we had ice cream only in winter. No refrigeration and no ice in summer. So up to the town water tank I went and threw a hatchet up to knock down large icicles. Then home to crack the ice and turn the crank to freeze the ice cream. Whoever turned the crank got to lick the dasher.

 

Slippery Rock Creek was about two miles from town and that is where I learned to swim. I learned by jumping in and paddling out, so I never really learned. That also was a good place to canoe and still is.

 

Another of my favorite pastimes was nutting. Come fall and the first frost and I was off to the woods. Before the chestnut blight killed the trees, one could pick a bushel of nuts in no time. It was sore fun to climb the trees and shake down the nuts. Hickory trees were also plentiful and I had all the good trees spotted in advance. Walnuts and butternuts could also be found, but they certainly stained the hands. That is where I began to love the woods.

 

Quite early I went with my Mother to visit her brothers and sisters who all lived on farms. So I became acquainted with hoeing corn and other farm work. A neighbor had a farm and when I was about ten or twelve I hoed corn for him, wages probably 50 cents a day. Then when I was twelve I began spending the summers at Uncle Clint West's. He had a large dairy farm and that was my first real job. I hoed corn, shocked wheat, oats and buckwheat, drove the horses and wagon when loading hay, delivered milk in a horse drawn wagon into Slippery Rock and milked cows twice a day. If I remember correctly I got five dollars a week. But it was pleasant work and out of doors.

 

One thing I do remember well. The West home was a large house built by my father and is still standing. There were five West boys, my cousins and all older than I. All of us slept in a large attic room in the third floor. Uncle Clint slept in a bedroom at the foot of the stairs. Each morning at six a.m. he called each boy by name. If he heard five come down the stairs, he went back to sleep. If not, he started all over until he heard all five. They went out to the barn and did the milking. It was a proud day in my life when he added my name to that list. I was then a man.

 

In 1922 Slippery Rock installed a sewer system. I was only fifteen, but I applied for a job and got it. Almost all the workers were immigrants from Europe‑‑Poles, Italians, etc. We worked ten hours a day, six days a week and I got five dollars a day, a very high wage at that time. It was all pick and shovel work and I did a man's work. Late in the summer, the contractor was losing money and to avoid bankruptcy he cut my wages to four dollars. It didn't work for he went bankrupt anyway. One day his timekeeper became ill and so I was made timekeeper. Why‑‑because I was the only one on the job who could speak and write English. That gave me two hours off to check on the workers. After ten hours of work with a pick and shovel, I was so tired that all I could do was go down town and treat myself to a pint of ice cream (15 cents) and then to bed. But I certainly saved money that summer.

 

The next summer I worked at the college, hauling coal, mowing lawns, painting and what have you. I did that all through college: three dollars per day.

 

 

 


 

P A R T III

 

The Genealogy of John Thompson Hogg

By

Esther Louise (Hogg) Houtz

19 December 1968

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

This book was prepared especially for my grandfather, John Thompson Hogg. Material was taken from my own larger files which have been compiled during the past five years and are still undergoing revision, additions and corrections.

 

As this is intended to be history of John Thompson Hogg's ancestors, the data given on the other family branches will be either brief or not included at all. It is hoped that the future will bring to light additional ancestors, more knowledge of the presently known ancestors and funds for the publication of a book which will include all descendants from all ancestors.

 

As in all genealogies, there will be errors. Family traditions must be sifted, facts must be documented whenever possible, and the compiler must be objective. To date, this is the most authentic family history I can offer.

 

It is with great pride that I now present "The Genealogy of John Thompson Hogg".

 

Esther Louise (Hogg) Houtz

December 19, 1968

 

References:

 

"The Hogg Family" written and compiled by Calvin and John Thompson Hogg.

Census records: 1800, 1810, 1820, Mifflin Co., Pa.

1800, 1810, 1820, 1830, 1890, Butler Co., Pa.

Interviews with John Thompson Hogg, Edna Louise Hogg and Arthur Hogg.

Letters from John Thompson Hogg ‑ autobiography and personal knowledge.

"James Stephen Hogg, a Biography" by Robt. C. Conter.

Deed Apr 7, 1814 ‑ recorded Mifflin Co., Pa. courthouse.

Diary of Beulah (Boulden) Hogg written on trip to Ireland 1908.

Letter from Samuel Fleming of Letterkenny, Ireland (his mother was a Hogg) Aug 1968.

Gravestone records Slippery Rock, Pa.

Bapt. records of Old Harmony Church from Harmony U.P. Church, Grove City, Pa.

Letter from Rev. A.E. Scott ‑ 1st Presby. Church, Ramelton, Ireland.

Quitclaim deed June 5, 1814, Mifflin Co., Pa.

Deed May 6, 1814, Mifflin Co., Pa.

Family history by William Wallace Irvin in possession of Edna Hogg.

Census records: 1810, 1800, 1820, 1830, Mercer Co., Pa.

Rev. War records from Wash. D.C. Archives ‑ of Alexander White.

Will of Samuel Irvin recorded 1847, Westmoreland Co., Pa.

Will of James Thompson dated Jan 7, 1861, Butler Co. Pa.

Deeds X‑121 and X‑129. 1857, Butler Co., Pa.,; deed June 30, 1860, Butler Co. Pa.

to Elizabeth Irvin from James Thompson, Jr. and wife Ann.

Material from Mrs. D.C. Stewart, Historian of Butler Co., Pa.

Records of Mrs. Ernestine Van Fleet Cover of Cleveland, Ohio.

Will of Joseph Billingsley ‑ Will Book 1, pg 260 ‑ 1885.


HOGG

 

The name Hogg has been variously spelled on census records and deeds. To date it has been spelled in documents: Hogg, Hogs, Hoge and Hoggs, in regard to our own direct line. Members of other branches are known to have used the spellings of Hogue, Hoog and Hogge.

 

In some dictionaries of names the name Hogg is said to mean "Hog‑like, piggish or glutton" and indicating that the ancestor who assumed the surname either resembled a hog in appearance or manner or else raised hogs for a living. However, as will be shown, the name Hogg is of Scottish origin and "In the ancient language of the Scots, 'Hog', 'Hogg', 'Hogge', 'Hoge' and 'Hoag', were variations of the same name which meant 'a young sheep less than a year old'". (from "James Stephen Hogg, a Biography" by Robt. C. Conter). "Dictionary of American Names" by E.C. Smith: "Hogg: Dweller a the sign of the hog or young sheep; descendant of Hohu (careful or prudent).

 

A distant cousin living in Ireland wrote that the Hogg families of the Ramelton, Ireland area came from Scotland many years ago and that those still living in the area still speak with a distinct Scottish accent.

 

From "James Stephen Hogg a Biography": "Mentions of the name, in one form or another are found in early Scottish documents. The movements of the Hogg family from Scotland to Ireland to America tend to illustrate what has been referred to as 'phases of the border Scottish Odyssey'. Throughout the Middle Ages, men by the name of Hogg dwelt in the frontier lands, the fought‑over lanes of Lathian. They lived between the English and the Highland Scots ‑ from the Firth of Forth to the River Tweed. The Hoggs early embraced Calvinism and were swept along in English plans to subdue Ireland. On the new frontier in Ulster, they became known as Scotch‑Irish.

 

They were 'frontier men' in spirit and as such, sure to be among those who would strike out again and again for new lands where they could find what they deemed liberty. James Froude has described causes for the 18th century general exodus from northern Ireland: 'Men of spirit and energy refused to remain in a country where they were held unfit to receive the rights of citizen... Vexed with suits in ecclesiastical courts forbidden to educate their children in their own faith, treated as dangerous in a state which, but for them would have no existence, and associated with Papists in an Act of Parliament which deprived them of their civil rights, the most earnest of them at last abandoned the unthankful service. They saw at last 'that the liberties for which their fathers had fought were not to be theirs in Ireland.' ‑‑ James A. Froude, "The English in Ireland in the 18th Century'."

 

 

 

I. ___________HOGG married Elizabeth __________ (born either ca 1763 or 1768, probably Ireland)

 

Elizabeth was said to have been only 16 years old when her oldest child. Samuel, was born (see Samuel for further explanation).

 

Family tradition says that Elizabeth (_______) Hogg, recently a widow, came to America to join her older sons; she brought George, said to have been only two years old, and the youngest child; she also probably brought her two daughters with her. "The Hogg Family" states that she was listed as a "spinster" on the ship's passenger list. It also states that four brothers and two sisters docked in Philadelphia (except George) and shortly migrated to Mifflin Co., Pa. Elizabeth and George made their home at first with Samuel Weakly, on what is known as the Weakly farm, the Thomas Brown farm and the Davidson farm. Data from Mrs. Iris A. Nielsen of West Jordan, Utah shows a Samuel Weakley (born 1787) who married a Sarah Hogg. Samuel was the son of Robert Weakley who married Elizabeth Barr and was of Cumberland Co., Pa. Elizabeth Barr Hogg died in Butler Co., Pa.

 

Elizabeth's name. does not appear on the 1800 census for Mifflin Co., Pa. Her name does appear in the 1810 census for Milford Twp., Mifflin Co., Pa ‑ directly under the household of Samuel "Hoge".

 

1810 census, Milford Twp., Mifflin Co., Pa.:

"Elizabeth Hoge", head of family.

1 male under 10 years; 2 males 16‑26 years; 1 female under 10; 1 female 10‑16; 1 female 16‑26; 1 female 26‑45; 1 female over 45 years; 40 woolen cloth; 22 flaxon; 24 cotton; no hempen; 2 spinning wheels; 4 Gammon sheep; 2 horses; 2 cattle; 1 loom; no hand cards.

 

Children:

1-     Samuel.

2-     James, came, apparently, with Samuel, William and Robert to America. A James "Hogs" appears consistently on the Butler Co. census records in Slippery Rock Twp. In 1850 a James appears age 54 and with wife Margaret; also children Martha, Thomas, Elizabeth, Sarah and John. IF the James on the census is the same, he would have been too young to have come to Pa. with Samuel and would have been born after William.

3-     Daughter, married ______Black; said to have lived with her brother Robin until her marriage; raised a family in Cherry Twp., Butler Co., Pa.

4-     Daughter (perhaps Martha or Margaret?), married _______ Atwell: made her home with brother Robin until marriage; raised a family in Cherry Twp. "The Hogg Family" quotes Atwell as calling his wife "Martha". The 1850 census of Mercer Twp., Butler Co. shows a Margaret Atwell, age 74, living with the family of William McFate, age 25 and his wife Isabella, age 20. A Stinson Hogg, age 12 is also a member of this household. "Hogg Family'' states: "Two girls by the name of Mackelwee, made their homes with Robin Hogg. One married Bob McFate".

5-     Robert (Robin), (born ca. 1788, Ireland; died 1852; buried Old Harmony Cemetery, Butler Co., Pa.) Came with Samuel from Ireland and settled on a farm adjoining that of Samuel's In Butler Co. His name appears on the 1820 and 1830 census of Slippery Rock Twp., Butler Co. and on the 1850 census in Cherry Twp., Butler Co. Children: Robert, Jr., James, Samuel, John, Elizabeth and Isabell. (from census records, "Hogg Family" and Baptism records).

6-     William, from Ireland with brother Samuel; Had sons James and William.

7-     George, married Martha __________. Had sons Cyrus and Samuel.

 

 

 

II. SAMUEL HOGG (born ca. 1783 Ireland; died ca. 1846, age 67 (probably 63), Slippery Rock Twp., Butler Co., Pa.; buried Old Harmony Church cemetery in Harrisville PA). (Age determined by census records). Married Jean ________ (probably died shortly after May 1814.)

 

"The Hogg Family'' states that the Hogg family came to America in 1790. This is probably not correct. Records from the diary of Beulah Hogg's mother, written on a trip to Ireland show that Samuel was a member of the Presbyterian church in Ramelton, Ireland in 1791. The next record we find is June 5, 1804, when Samuel purchased land in Milford Twp., Mifflin Co., Pa. (now Juanita Co.) Samuel's name does not appear on any census record before 1810. The brothers then came to America between 1791 and 1804 ‑ probably just prior to June 1804.

 

In May 1814, Samuel sold his property in Mifflin Co. His wife was still living at that time and was named in the deed transfer. In April of 1814, Samuel had purchased 200 acres of land In Butler Co., Pa. Taxes were paid on this land Dec 10, 1814. "The Hogg Family" indicates that the family came to Butler Co. early in the season ‑ "in time to plant the garden". It is not known exactly when Jean Hogg died, but the family history indicates that Samuel came to Butler Co. as a widower.

 

From "The Hogg Family" by John T. and Calvin Hogg: "The original farm consisted of what is now the Bernice Glover farm, Lottie Moyer lot, John Hogg farm, James McIntosh lot and Nan Allen farm. This totals up to about 190 acres. About 10 acres were appropriated by Old Thomas Mifflin by moving the fence north (an early trick) to get a piece of coal land."

 

"The family came over the mountains in a wagon filled with provisions, pots and pans. On their way they always stopped near a spring to eat, feed the horses and always slept in the wagon. On the trip, one of the horses had a grey colt which Samuel kept until he died. The colt was carried in the wagon for the first few days and than tied to its mother for the rest of the journey."

 

"The family moved into an old log house. The loft was used as an upstairs. The stairs leading to the loft were on the outside of the building and boarded in. The outside stairs might have been built later. A frame addition was joined to the log house later. This house stood until after the Civil War when Harve Hogg married and built the house where Bernice Glover now lives."

 

"Samuel ‑ ca. 1846 ‑ had brought the cows down the hill from the house and up the "Fillding" Lane; he opened the swinging gate which was balanced with a rock, and when Samuel closed the gate, it fell on him. He was taken home on a pled and died shortly afterward."

 

Samuel's birth date has been difficult to figure. One record stated that he died in 1846, age 67; census records show him to be over 45 years in 1810 and 1820 and between 60‑70 years in 1830. His name does not appear in 1850. The birth and death dates above may prove to be incorrect, but until a reliable proof comes to light, we use the above.

 

Children:

1-     Mary, (born ca. 1805) appears on the 1850 census, age 45; had a girl living with her by the name of Mary L. Love, age 22. Mary never married and after James' wife died, invited the family to live with her. John A. quoted his father as saying "She's a great girl" or "She's a wonderful girl" about his sister.

2-     James, (born ca. 1808; died "about the time of the Civil War").

3-     Samuel, It is thought that he died before age 20 ‑ one record states he was just 17 or a little older.

 

 

 

III. JAMES HOGG (born ca. 1808, Milford Twp., Mifflin Co., Pa; died 186__ ("about the time of the Civil War"; "before the end of the Civil War") Slippery Rock Twp., Butler Co., Pa. Married ca. 1840 Elizabeth Watt (born ca. 1820; died ca. 1851) (daughter of Hugh Watt and Elizabeth White) (see Watt records).

 

James came with his family as a young boy to Butler Co., Pa. where he became a farmer. "James and Elizabeth lived down in the old log house. James started to build a house just before Elizabeth died. He later completed the house, but never lived in it. The house is still standing (in 1968) and is the home of Ted Hogg, great grandson of James."

 

After Elizabeth died, James and his sons lived with James' sister, Mary. James became stricken with palsy, now called a stroke. He had been hurt by a team of colts ‑ while going down a hill toward Bethel Church in a wood sled, the tongue came loose from the sled and the team ran off. James used a cane after this. The last 18 months of his life he was bedfast. Harvey had gone to the Civil War and John A. took care of his father and Aunt Mary. James apparently died before the end of the war. The farm was divided between the two living sons.

 

1850 census, Slippery Rock Twp., Butler Co, Pa.:

Hogg, James, age 42, born Pa.; Elizabeth, age 30, born Pa.; James H., age 7, born Pa.; John A., age 5, born Pa.

 

Children:

1-     Calvin (born 1841; died 1845).

2-     James "Harvey", (born ca. 1843, Slippery Rock Twp., Butler Co., Pa.). Married Jane Billingsley. "Harvey" was in the Civil War; saw no action; discharged Harrisburg, June 1, 1863. Children: Emma Hogg.

3-     John Alexander, (born Jan 11, 1845; died Jan 6, 1924).

 

 

 

 

IV. JOHN ALEXANDER HOGG (born Jan 11, 1845; died Jan 6, 1924, Slippery Rock Twp., Butler Co., Pa). Married 1870, Harrisville, Pa. Elizabeth Irwin (born June 4, 1846; died Oct 21, 1896) (daughter of John Irwin and Elizabeth Thompson) (see Irwin records).

 

John and Elizabeth lived in the house that James had built. The back of the house was a short distance from the spring; the end was about 20 feet from the present (1968) cement walk. They lived in this house until they built the house now standing, about 1881. Jim, Martha, Mary, Eva, Will and John were born in the 1st house; Calvin, Arthur and Edna were born in the "new" house.

 

This family was fond of hunting ‑ especially raccoons. Some stories are to be found in the autobiography of John Thompson Hogg.

 

Told by Arthur Hogg: "Dad saw a wolf onetime ; he worked him in a circle and finally got the wolf in his sights. He pulled the trigger, but the gun didn't go off." "Calvin and I went after a coon that was the biggest I ever saw! It was up in a chestnut tree, so we cut the tree down to get at him. Well, Dad found out about it and intending for us boys to pay for the cut tree, went to the owner, Clint West. Clint said that he needed fence posts anyway and we didn't have to pay."

 

John T. used to go out coon hunting at night. He sold the pelts. He said that the fun of it was waiting for the moment when the dog got the scent. Arthur recalled: "I can just see the nose of those coons. John climbed up the tree and shook it. The coons fell off into the creek and the dogs went into the creek after them and got them one by one."

 

John, Arthur and Edna recalled that their mother used to read to their father a good deal. He could read, of course, but eventually some joke would come up about his reading and they would both just laugh. The family didn't have too many books, so when they did acquire one, it was read over and over until they had it practically memorized. This experience had its advantages, for John related that the pronunciation of a difficult word came up in school one time and he was the pupil who was able to give the correct answer.

 

Elizabeth died at the old house. The family had contracted typhoid fever. Elizabeth went to help with the nursing, caught the disease and died.

 

For additional stories and complete list of children, see "The Hogg Family" and autobiography of John Thompson Hogg.

 

 

 

V. JOHN THOMPSON HOGG (born June 26, 1880, Slippery Rock Twp., Butler Co., Pa.), married Aug 14, 1912, Angelica, N.Y., Helen Charlotte Osgood (born Jan 14, 1888, Angelica, N.Y.; died June 24, 1960, Hyde Park, N.Y.; buried Slippery Rock, Pa.) (daughter of Henry Harlow Osgood and Lena M. Blickwede).

 

Here, one could write a book ‑ perhaps someone this one will. Until then, we refer the reader to the most delightful autobiographies ever written ‑ that by John Thompson Hogg.

 

Biographies of descendants are pending unanswered requests for same.

 

I can only add that John T. (''J.T.'', "Pooey", "Grandad") and "Gammy" could have won the "Best Grandparents in the World" award any day!

 

Children:

1-     Calvin Henry, (born May 29, 1913, Butler, Pa.) married 1935, Esther Iona Cunningham (born Sept 16, 1913, East Millsborough, Pa.) (daughter of Jesse H. Cunningham and Elsie F. Davis).

Children:

i‑ Esther Louise Hogg (born July 4, 1936, Belfonte, Pa.) married Sept 14, 1956, Boulder, Colo., Jack Vincent Houtz (born Aug 3, 1929, Boulder, Colo.)

Children:

a‑ Calvin Vincent Houtz (born Feb 14, 1958, Denver, Colo.)

b‑ David Lawrence Houtz (born July 8, 1959, Denver, Colo.)

c‑ Ann Marie Houtz (born Apr 3, 1961, Boulder, Colo.)

ii‑ Helen Charlotte Hogg (born Dee 14, 1942, Denver, Colo.) married May 30, 1967, Idaho Falls, Idaho., Walter Frankin West (born June 1937, Livingston, Mont.)

2-     Edith Louise, (born Sept 1, 1914, Butler, Pa) married Mar 3, 1941, Butler, Pa., Clyde Moore Parker (born Apr 20, 1912) (son of Lem 0. Parker and Mary Rose Moore).

Children:

i‑ Brian John Parker (born Dec 12, 1942)

ii‑ Judith Lynn Parker (born Oct 14, 1950, Hyde Park, N.Y.)

3-     John Alexander, (born Nov 6, 1915, Butler, Pa.) married Oct 1, 1947, Mildred Hildemyer (born Sept 10, 1921).

Children:

i‑ Karen Hogg (born Sept 27, 1948)

ii‑ John Thompson Hogg (born May 5, 1950)

iii‑ Thomas Arthur Hogg (born May 14, 1953, Kalamazoo, Mich.)

 

 

 

ALEXANDER WHITE

 

"The Hogg Family": Alexander White was a Rev War soldiers Came to Pine Twp., Mercer Co., Pa. in 1789. Although not ordained, spent a part of his time as a circuit preacher.

 

The name of Alexander White appears in the 1810 and 1820 census of Wolf Creek Twp., Mercer Co., Pa. near the name of Hugh Watt.

1810‑Alexander White; 1 male under 10; 3 males 16‑26; 1 male over 45; 1 female 10‑16; 1 female over 45.

1820‑Alexander White; 1 male 16‑26; 1 m 26‑45; 1 m over 45; 1 female 10‑16; 1 female 26‑45.

 

A younger Alexander White also appears on the census in 1820, near the above. An Alexander White also appears in Connoqunessing Twp., Butler Co., Pa. in 1830. The younger one may be a son of the older Alexander.

 

The following is from the DAR Lineage Books Volume 145, pp. 141 & 144. This Alexander is not proven to be connected to us, but I present it here anyway. Alexander White (born 1748, Ireland; died Pine Twp., Mercer Co., Pa.) married 1774, Rachel Henderson. Alexander served as a private In the Continental Line. He had a son John White.

 

Children:

1‑ Elizabeth, married Hugh Watt (see Watt records).

 

 

 

HUGH WATT married Elizabeth White (daughter of Alexander White) (see White records).

 

"The Hogg Family": The Watt family lived in a log house located "on the old Granny Slemmons farm, back over the hill from the Slemmons buildings". John Thompson Hogg wrote: "the roof caved in after it was abandoned and it was full of ground hog holes. There were two or three old apple trees at one end".

 

Census ‑ Wolf Creek Twp., Mercer Co., Pa.

1810‑ Hugh Watt; 1 male 26‑45; 2 female under 10; 1 female 26‑45.

1820‑ Hugh Watt; 1 male under 10; 1 male over 45; 4 female under 10; 2 female 10‑16; 1 female 16‑26.

 

Children:

1-     Alex (born ca 1815/16) married Mary Atwell; children: John (married Myrtle Simmons), James, George, probably. other children. Alex was a stonemason.

2-     Hannah, married "Little Naze Brown" (Ebenezer) of the Browntown area; children; George and Ed Brown. 1850 census ‑ Mercer Twp., Butler Co., Pa. shows: Ebenezer Brown, age 33; Jane age 37; Hannah 8; Margaret M. 6. This family could be either Ebenezer Brown family.

3-     Jane, married "Big" Naze Brown (Ebenezer); she died soon after marriage and he remarried to Susan Love.

4-     Margaret, married George Dillinger; had son Hugh Dillinger.

5-     Elizabeth, (born ca 1820, Pa.; died ca. 1851, Slippery Rock Twp., Butler Co., Pa.) married ca. 1840, James Hogg (see Hogg records). Elizabeth is said to have been a tall red haired girl with high cheekbones.

6-     Martha S., (born Dec 27, 1816, Pa.; died Dec 24, 1892; buried Slippery Rock, Pa.) married Robert H. Weakley (Bob) (born 1816; died 1885). Bob was a fast friend of James Hogg and many stories are told of them in John T. Hogg's autobiography and "The Hogg Family". Children: H. Alexander (Alex), Hannah, Margaret, John and Martha.

7-     H(ellen), married John Orr.

8-     John (possibly).

 

 

 

I. SAMUEL IRWIN (d. between May 1846 and Apr 1852, No. Huntingdon Twp., Westmoreland Co. Pa.) married Margaret (_________)

 

Samuel came from County Antrim, Ireland to America about 1820, bringing his wife and five children. He settled In North Huntingdon Twp., Westmoreland Co., Pa.

 

Samuel Irwin's Westmoreland Co PA Will ‑ dated May 7, 1846; recorded 1847; proved Apr 3, 1852:

 

"I, Samuel "Irwins", being in good health of body and of sound and disposing memory (Praised be God for same) and being desirous to settle my worldly affairs while I have strength and capacity so to do, do make and publish this my last will and testament, revoking and making void all former wills by me at anytime heretofore made. And first and principally I commit my soul into the hands of God my creator who gave it and my body to the earth to be interred in the Brush Creek burying ground. And as to my worldly estates which it has pleased God to bestow upon me, I dispose of as follows: And first I give and bequeath of my personal goods and chattels, to my beloved wife Margaret to be disposed of and to whom she sees proper to wit: Two beds and bedding and bedsteads, all my household and kitchen furniture, one horse one cow and one side saddle. Secondly, I give and bequeath my real estate being the farm In North Huntingdon Township on which I now live to my three sons William Irwin, Nathaniel Irwin and James Irwin to be as equally divided amongst them as may be in quantity, and to their heirs and assigns forever, changeable nevertheless with the bequests and legacies hereinafter mentioned, as to the division of my real estate amongst my three sons William, Nathaniel and James. I hereby direct that it be so divided as that my dwelling house, barn and other out houses and garden belong to one share. that the still house be attached to the second share, the third share to be off that side of my farm now occupied by my daughter Jane Wilson widow of Robert Wilson. I give and bequeath to my grandson Samuel Irwin, son of my deceased son John, the sum of one hundred dollars. I give and bequeath to my three grand children John Irwin, James Irwin and Mary Jane Irwin, also children of my deceased son John and all now living in Butler County, Pa., the sum of fifty dollars each (or to their heirs) to be paid to them on their arriving at the age of twenty one years, or as soon thereafter as the same may be lawfully demanded, to be paid in equal proportions by my three sons William, Nathaniel and James to whom I bequeath my real estate as above mentioned, and my said real estate to stand chargeable with the payment of the same, provided that each share when divided is only chargeable with its rateable share of the above bequests to the above named grand children. I give and bequeath to my grandson Samuel Irwin Wilson that certain lot or parcle of land adjoining Duffs and lying on the right side of the road from Marryeville to Carpenters Mill and now occupied by my daughter Jane Wilson, and to his heirs and assigns from and after the death of his mother Jane Wilson. I give and bequeath to my daughter Jane Wilson during her natural life, the fields she now occupies and after her death to such of my sons and his heirs and assigns, as may become heir to the third share of my real estate as mentioned above. I further direct that my daughter Jane be enjoined not to clear any more land or cut green timber. I also direct that my son William have the first choice of my real estate when divided my son Nathaniel the second choice and my son James third choice. I also give and bequeath to my son William all my personal property of every kind and description, not otherwise bequeathed, in this my last will and testament. I also hereby direct that all my just debts and funeral expenses be paid in equal proportions by my three sons to whom I have in this my last will and testament bequeathed my real estate, as also all charges touching the proving or otherwise of this my will. I also hereby direct that my loving wife enjoy the occupancy of my mansion house during her natural life, and the full privilege of the stable and barn for her horse and cow and for the entertainment of friends visiting her and that each of my sons who shall be the owners of the first and second share shall pay her annually during her natural life the sum of ten dollars for her support. That Jane Wilson who is to occupy the third share pay her mother annually ten dollars if she shall survive her mother and if my wife Margaret survive her daughter Jane Wilson then the son of mine to whom the share now occupied by Jane Wilson shall descend shall pay his mother annually the sum of ten dollars. I also direct the hay pasturage and feed for her horse and cow and the necessary fuel to be delivered at her door as often as required, and her funeral expenses and all necessary medical attendance and nursing in sickness to be chargeable to my three sons William, Nathaniel and James. I hereby direct that should litigation occur respecting the title to my real estate, or any part thereof that all expenses and loss incurred by reason of such litigation be borne equally by my three sons their heirs executors administrators or assigns. I nominate constitute and appoint my son James Irwin and John M. Laird my sole executors of this my last will and testament giving them every necessary power and authority to execute this my last will and testament. In witness whereof I the said testator Samuel Irwin have to this my last will and testament set my hand and seal this seventh day of May A.D. 1846. Seal. Witnesses: T.H. Allison, Daniel Metzker, Joseph Stevenson.

 

Children:

1-     Nathaniel, went to Butler Co., Pa.; returned to Westmoreland Co. and then went "west".

2-     James, married Susan (_______)storekeeper of Murraysville, Pa. and of Allegheny, Pa. Also owned a farm.

3-     William.

4-     John, (born 1805, Co. Antrim, Ireland; died before May in 1846)

5-     Mary "Jane", married Robert Wilson (died before May of 1846); had a son Samuel Irwin Wilson.

 

 

 

II. JOHN IRWIN (born 1805, County Antrim, Ireland; died before May of 11846, Cherry Twp., Butler Co., Pa.) married Elizabeth Thompson (born Jan 28, 1812; died Apr 1, 1897) (daughter of James Thompson and Sarah ( ), see Thompson records).

 

John came to America from Ireland when he was about 15 years of age. He later located on a farm of 106 acres, which was part of the original James Thompson farm, about 3‑4 miles east of Slippery Rock (earlier called Centerville).

 

John died a few months before his youngest child, Elizabeth, was born. His widow, Elizabeth, was left with five young children to raise. She kept them all together and whenever she was approached about putting any of them out for adoption, gave an emphatic "NO".

 

Her grandson, John T. Hogg, wrote in later years: "And here is one of the marvels of power tied up in a frail human being to overcome seemingly impossible tasks. She must have had vision and set her face toward it, for in her widowhood, she carried into the years, raising her family to maturity and to a tapering off of vigilance in keeping the purse string tight and the larder full."

 

"After her responsibilities at home lessened, Grandmother would spend about two weeks every year with us. And what a treat to us! We had to walk the chalk line for her, but it was a pleasure. 'Don't be so lavish with the butter', she would say (Butter was one of her sources of income in the earlier days). 'Boys, what did you do with the poker?' 'What's that in your hand, Grandmother?' we replied. 'Now what did I do with my glasses?' she wondered. "What's that on top of your head, Grandmother?"

 

Children:

1-     Samuel, (born ca. 1837) married Mary Jane McCandless; served in Civil War; lived on a farm in Centre Twp., Butler Co., Pa. Children: Mary, John, Eva, James, Carrie, Clark and Belle.

2-     James, (born ca. 1840; died 1875) served in Civil War; unmarried.

3-     John Thompson, (born Jan 30, 1842; died May 7 1924), m(1) 1874, Louisa Catherine Thompson and had a son William Wallace Irwin; married (2) ________, and had children: Helen, Louise, Hazel and Barbara. John T. served in the Civil War.

4-     Mary Jane, (born ca. 1844) married Robert (Bob) Turk (d ca 1895‑1900) farmer of Eagles Mill, near Connoquenessing, Pa. Children: Elizabeth, Margaret, William, Martha, Samuel, Charles and Mamie.

5-     Elizabeth (Lizzie), (born June 4, 1846; died Oct 21, 1896) married John Alexander Hogg (see Hogg records).

 

 

 

JAMES THOMPSON (born ca. 1777, Ireland; died Jan/Feb 1861, Cherry Twp., Butler Co., Pa.) married Sarah (______) (born ca 1784, Ireland; living 1861).

 

James was a farmer of Cherry Twp. Butler Co., Pa. The farm was located about 3‑4 miles east of Slippery Rock.

 

The following material needs documentation before proper sorting can be accomplished. We cannot tell which James ours is.

 

In 1796, brothers James, Moses and Anthony Thompson came to Butler Co., Pa. ‑ Centre Twp. The same year another group of Thompson brothers came to Butler Co.: James, Matthew and John. The latter came among 60 young men to form a settlement. John, of the 2nd set of brothers, married Martha Humes and had a son Wm. who married Jane McCandless and another son John H. who also married a McCandless.

 

I also have records of two James Thompsons of Butler Co. who married Sarah Allison and the other married Sarah Gilliland. I do not know which James in each group of brothers married which Sarah. There was an Allison Thompson in Butler Co. about the same age as Elizabeth Thompson Irwin ‑ this Allison, l have proved, was not a son of our James.

 

Census of 1850, Cherry Twp., Butler Co., Pa.:

James Thompson, 73, born Ireland; Sarah, 66, born Ireland; Emiline, 15, born Pa.

 

On Feb 19, 1857, James Thompson, Sr. and wife, Sarah, conveyed by deeds, land originally purchased Sept 17, 1840 from the heirs of Thomas Dunlap of Philadelphia, to James Thompson, Jr. and to Mrs. Elizabeth Irwin. The land to Elizabeth Irwin was bounded by that of John Thompson and Robert Hogg.

 

On June 30, 1860, James Thompson, Jr. and wife Ann conveyed by deed to Elizabeth Irwin, about 20 acres which had been a part of the land purchased from James Thompson Sr. and his wife Sarah on Feb 19 1857.

 

Will of James Thompson dated Jan 7, 1861; proved Feb 21, 1861. "I James Thompson of Cherry Twp., Butler Co., Pa., being in poor health but being in sound, etc.. The will is difficult to read, so I will not copy it. He mentions his wife Sarah and children: Mary Ann Davidson, Jane Newkirk, Catherine Baker, Sarah Sherdock, Elizabeth Irwin, Moses Irwin, John Irwin, Arabella Tinker, James Irwin Minerva Hall and Emiline Mortland; also bequeathed to granddaughter Elizabeth Irwin, fifty dollars, one large bureau, one bed and bedding. To his daughter Elizabeth he gave "one cupboard that stands in my room".

 

Children:

1-     Mary Ann, married _______ Davidson.

2-     Jane, married ________ Newkirk.

3-     Catherine, married _________ Baker.

4-     Sarah, married _________ Sherdock.

5-     Elizabeth, (born Jan 28, 1812; died Apr 1, 1897) married John Irwin (see Irwin records).

6-     Moses, perhaps the one aged 36 in 1850; with wife Jane and children Anthony, Josiah, and James M. (1850 census of Centre Twp., Butler Co.)

7-     John.

8-     Arabella, married _______ Tinker/Tucker

9-     James, (born ca 1823) married Ann _________; children: Sarah Ann, John A., Samuel S., James T. (1850 census, Cherry Twp., Butler Co., Pa.).

10-  Minerva, married _______ Hall.

11-  Emiline, (born ca 1835) married Bill Mortland.

 

It might be supposed that our James was the brother of Moses and Anthony. Our James named a son Moses and he in turn named a son Anthony.

 

It is also highly probable that the two groups of brothers were actually cousins. The marked (italicized) paragraph and the two short ones on the page are purely speculation. I hope to find additional documents to help sort them out.

 

 

 


 

P A R T IV

 

A Bit of True Americana Autobiography

The Autobiography of John Thompson Hogg

 

Compiled by Ester Louise (Hogg) Houtz and presented December 1968

 

Ex‑presidents, by public pressure and insistence, have written autobiographies; statues of great men have sprung up like mushrooms all over our fair land; "'Who's Whos'' in education, science, pill‑making, dissertations on the nervous reaction of the lowly worm, et cetera, fill library shelves in our schools, Cities and towns, but do you know that you are one of the very few of our 200,000,000 people who possess that rare quality of being able to recognize real genius when they see it, and also to put on pressure for its expression? I am therefore yielding humbly to "public pressure" to record the "simple annuls of the poor"‑ who wrote that? I furthermore make no claim to a seat among the literate, nor to any hope that this will ever find a place among the classics. Oops, the balloon just "bursted", the "hot air" has escaped and we are back to earth again.

 

I was born June 26, 1880 on the farm on which my nephew, Ted Hogg, lives with his family and mother, in Slippery Rock Twp., two and a half miles east of Slippery Rock, then called Centerville, the sixth of nine children.

 

The earliest event in my existence that I can remember was the receipt of a new pair of leather boots with brass tips on the tops and red leather tops. For a long time I wasn't allowed to forget that the next morning I was up early, ate breakfast, then went over to the near neighbors to show them my new boots and that I ate a second breakfast with them.

 

The house in which I was born stood in the garden next to the present home, later moved across the road and used as a shed and stable. It was soon after my birth that the present home was built, with several additions in later years. The original house had three bedrooms, a living room and kitchen. Now there are five bedrooms, living room, dining room, two kitchens, and two bathrooms; a two family house. It would seem that with nine children we would have to sleep in shifts, but I have no recollection that this situation presented any difficult problem. And with eleven people to feed and clothe, I pause in admiration in memory of Dad and Mother in their accomplishment. Vie didn't have fancy clothes to wear or a table loaded with nick‑nacks to eat, but we were warmly clothed and never went hungry, except that growing youngsters are always hungry even when full to the neck. Vie were seldom sick, other than measles and mumps.

 

All in all, we had a wonderful time together. In long winter evenings, hide and seek, upstairs and down, an open fire‑place, a pail of apples in front of it, chestnuts and hickory nuts, and popcorn to be popped in the iron skillet with a bread pan over it. The popcorn bouncing against the lid was sweet music to our ears.

 

As the old prospector kneels beside the stream, discarding sand and gravel, seeing only the shining specks of gold, so are we, after more than four score years are in the past, unconscious of any sand or gravel on the path of joyous living. There were family spats no doubt, short lived, but they do not show up on the film as I unroll it. Some invisible magnetism must have been strewn on the childhood path of growing up that kept, unbroken, the homing instinct.

 

My first schooling was in the Bovard School, up over the hill and through the woods about one mile, with Miss Black as teacher, and with whom I fell in love. She said she would wait for me, but she didn't. Thus went by the board my first love affair. From that time until I was about fifteen or sixteen I attended school in the winter months and helped on the farm in the summer. When we were old enough to dig potatoes, cut and husk corn, we did not get to school until these chores were out of the way, toward the end of October and, if I recall correctly, school closed about the first of May, resulting in six months School for the year.

 

Dad was always willing to let us work for neighbors who needed help at corn planting and harvest time, at 25, 30 or perhaps 50 cents per day! What we earned in this way was our own. All Dad and Mother required of us was to do a good job wherever we worked. Their pleasure in hearing a word of praise from the employer was all the reward they wanted, and their allowance to us was not money, but encouragement.

 

In our earlier days, two neighbor boys, Calvin, Arthur and myself found great sport in hunting Coons (raccoons), spending many nights, sometimes almost all night, listening to the dogs on the trail, with the chirping of the crickets and katydids, and with the occasional hoot of an owl. The one real "coon" dog we had belonged to Simon Duffy who was glad to have us keep his dog in training. Two or three of the hunts seem to stand out in my memory. The dogs "struck" a track along the run below home, a mile or so on. Raccoons usually travel some distance before they take to a tree, the distance usually depending on how hard or close the dogs are trailing, but on this instance the dogs seemed to be fooling around near one place, as we could tell by an occasional yap. Finally old "cap" "barked" up", a term used when a coon takes to a tree. The dog's bark is different from that used on the trail. Whether it was because I was the eldest or that I always liked to climb trees I don't know, but that was usually my job. We took with us a small revolver and a coal bank lamp, a small open wick lamp that miners fastened to their cap. When about half way up, my light disclosed a coon crouched on top of a limb. I got this one with the revolver about the same time that a second one jumped from another limb. This one the dogs got as it landed. A coon can jump from a high tree and not get hurt as we found out at other times. Everything seemed to happen at once: the shooting of the first, the jump of the second, then a scratching on the tree trunk above my head, and the third coming down not more than 3 or 4 feet above me. Not knowing what it would do I ducked my head quickly, and off went my lamp. I did not linger long enough to find out. No doubt it lived happily ever afterward.

 

On another hunt the dogs treed one in a leaning oak, possibly 25 or 30 feet high. On reaching the top I found that the top had broken off and a hole had rotted in it. I dropped a lighted match down the hole and "wham", Mr. Coon didn't even hesitate on the edge, but leaped clear and was off down through the brush, across a field and up a huge oak tree in the next piece of timber, with the dogs in hot pursuit, but it was too fast for them. As the tree was too big to climb, one of the neighbor boys and Arthur, I think it was, decided to stay at the tree until morning. Sleep overtook them and the next morning Mr. Coon was nowhere in sight. Glad he got away.

 

When I was somewhere between ten and fifteen years old, my mother and I started to visit her only sister, Aunt Mary Turk, during the winter by sleigh. She was the wife of Uncle Bob Turk, whose funeral I will mention in the "walk to Jamisonville" episode many years later. They were then living in the same area a short distance from Connoquenessing at Eagles Will, and I would say at least twenty five miles from home. The time of starting has escaped my memory, but I suppose it was early in the morning. Since there were no snow plows in those days, the snow would get packed unevenly by the movement of traffic. At one of these uneven spots where the left side of the drift sloped down to the left, the sleigh tipped over and dumped us out. Although the horse was gentle under ordinary circumstances, the upset threw a scare into him to the extent that he leaped forward suddenly, broke loose from the sleigh and up over a hill out of sight. I followed and found him not too far on where a farmer had stopped him without any trouble. I mounted him, rode back to where Mother was, put all the blankets on the horse, and rode him back home, a distance of about 3 or 4 miles. As good fortune would have it, this upset occurred a short distance from the railroad station, and Mother took the train there back to Wick Station, one mile from home. As to my ride back and Mother's getting home from Wick, there is a complete blank, but get home we did. As to why we attempted such a long trip in the winter season, I guess it was just another of those things that are done in ordinary living in keeping with the times.

 

In 1896, there was a severe epidemic of typhoid fever in Butler, where my sister Martha lived at the time. She contracted the fever and Mother insisted on caring for her. When Martha was past the crisis and able to take care of her work, Mother came home, and within one week, the fever which she herself had contracted, took her away. She was about one year younger than Aunt Edith is now (age 50). At that time, sister Mary, Uncles Calvin and Arthur, Aunt Edna and myself were at home. Mary took care of the home for some time until her marriage. With her marriage the rest of us took up the reins, and with Dad leading the way, the train kept to the track. How Dad kept his equilibrium through it all, refraining from any "why did it happen to me" expressions, we will never know. Unless it was the determination to carry to a successful finish, to the best of his ability, the completion of the responsibilities that fatherhood and motherhood portends or prescribes. Thus Dad became both father and mother to us. And I wonder if we ever told him how well he had fused Mother's and his own virtues to leave such a treasure of memories that cause us all to want to turn our faces toward "Home".

 

I had very little part in helping to keep the home fires burning, for not long after Mother's death I went to live with a Bovard family at Branchton not far from home, on a farm. Mr. Bovard had died, leaving his wife and daughter alone. In the meantime, Dad got me an opportunity to learn telegraphy at Wick Station, one mile from home, and since Branchton is about three miles south of Wick, it fitted in well with my telegraph work. So I went to Bovard's and walked the railroad track back up to Wick Station. My work at Bovards was to take care of the stock in the mornings and evenings, leaving me free during the day. The Bovards were very nice to me.

 

When I was about seventeen, I worked for Bill Fielding, a farm neighbor. He was a bachelor and had as his housekeeper, a Molly Roberts, and In addition a cousin, John German. And since neither Bill nor John could not do much more than the lighter jobs on the farm, the plowing, harrowing, planting and fence building were left to me. It seems to me now that I must have plowed up the whole farm. My hours were from sun‑rise to sun‑set, and sleeping time was from sun‑set to sun‑rise.

 

Molly was a good cook, but her housekeeping wasn't anything to brag about. Even the cat had a problem of finding room under the stove. For a week or two the scenery wasn't too conducive to a good appetite, but a 12 to 14 hour work day obliterated the whole landscape and I plunged headlong into ham, gravy, potatoes and three eggs, morning, noon and night. Too many eggs a day? Well, I am still here. In spite of her somewhat minor expertness in the cuisine department, Molly was a good old soul and very solicitous about the welfare of her charges. I was with Bill from March 1st to the last of August ‑ five months and no pay until the five months were up. Ten dollars per month ‑ fifty dollars. What did I do for expenses during the five months? I had enough work clothes when I went to work and I didn't have time to go anywhere, so, why be concerned about economic situations!

 

As I gained in experience in telegraphy and railroading, the company sent me to different stations and towers to fill in for those on vacation or in cases of illness. I substituted at most stations between Butler and Erie, a distance of over 100 miles.

 

At one place about 30 or 40 miles north, there were branch roads coming in, making it necessary for switches to the various tracks. These switches were turned by levers inside the telegraph tower, and that was the job of the telegrapher. As I had had no experience of that sort I was really on the spot. And to make the situation worse, the day man got on the same train for home that I got off from, hence, no time for instruction on lever manipulation; also, night shift, winter and snowing. At intervals I had to go out and sweep the snow from the space between the switch points that had to be shifted by the levers inside the office, to the proper connecting track. Somehow the seven P.M. to seven A.M. shift came to a close without any mishaps! I think this was the longest 12 hours I ever put in and traffic kept moving, still is, I guess.

 

On one other occasion I was "filling in" at Jamisonville, eight miles north of Butler, on night shift when Uncle Bob Turk died. Dad, Uncle John Irwin, a cousin and I came to Butler and rented a two‑seat surry to go to the funeral. Our course was up the New Castle St. hill, left on Rt. 68 (our Rt. now) to the Spang home, to the right two or three miles. There were no paved roads then, but plenty of mud. We started back immediately after the funeral, about 4 o'clock , but due to the mud we were seldom able to travel beyond a fast walk, and as a result we missed the 6 P.M. train north out of Butler. It was on this train that I had to get back to Jamisonville for the night shift at 7 o'clock. If I didn't get back it meant 36 hours for the day man without relief. There was only one thing to do. Dad and Uncle John stayed at a hotel in Butler and I headed up the track, north to Jamisonville, walking the ties, and of course no flashlight. There were none in those days. It seems strange that I can't recall anything about the actual trip, but I know I reached Jamisonville at 9 o'clock.

 

About 1900, I was given a regular job at Branchton, within sight of Bovards, as an assistant to the station agent. A branch road that extended back into a coal mining district connected with the B & LE at Branchton. There was also a limestone quarry and a sand bank a short distance to the north, and from these three sources there were many carloads of coal, limestone and sand to be weighed on the Branchton railroad scales. One of my duties was to weigh these carloads. The train crew would back their train to the scales, uncouple each car and give it a slight push. The car would pass slowly over the scales, equipped with rails but not connected to the main track rails. One had to catch the weight in seconds before the car hit the solid rail at the other end of the scale. If you missed it and had to have the car coupled up again and pulled onto the scale!! The air would be blue with the kind of language in which railroad men are well versed.

 

There were two or three long side tracks at Branchton where "empties" were stored to be picked up for loading wherever needed, such as the coal mines, lime quarry, sand bank, etc. It was another one of my jobs to keep tab on these empties and make out a report each day of the individual car numbers and the road to which they belonged, such as B & 0, Pa. R.R., Northwestern, etc,

 

At that time practically all merchandise was handled by the railroads (by truck now). The merchandise for the mining district was transferred from the main line cars to the Branch cars. Every piece transferred (by the train crew) had to be checked with the "waybill" that accompanied the various shipments containing the consignee's name. One crew man call out, "one box of crackers for Kolmeyer," another, "one sack of sugar for Hilliard & Sons" ad infinitum. Keeping up was a sweat producing task, and that was another of my jobs, and for $35.00 per.

 

After about a year of this I decided to take up carpentry with my brother Jim. When I reported my intention to the company office I was offered a night job at Bessemer, Pa., a few miles east of Pittsburg, Pa. This was a shipping point for steel from the Carnegie steel plant in Braddock, Pa. Later I was transferred to the day shift as "jack of all jobs" then to "billing" clerk, and on to chief clerk, My experience in getting to Bessemer still stirs considerable risibility in me. The largest city I had ever been in was Butler, and as I had to go through Pittsburgh, I felt like a boy whose last firecracker had "fizzed out", or had to wash his feet when the "sandman" was scratching his eyes: not much enthusiasm left. But "the mail had to go through". I think the trunk I bought is the same one that is up in the attic now and the same one that went through school with me. Then on my way to earth's mysterious end, leaving behind all the old haunts, fishing holes, hickory and chestnut trees, Dad, Calvin, Arthur, Edna; the others had homes of their own then. But my memories, I took them all with me, and they are still with me until the end of time if memories remain that long.

 

When I got to Pittsburgh I found there were three railroads running from there to my destination. It may seem strange that so many railroads ran through the same city, and still do, but all three followed the Monongahela River through several steel towns and cities. I figuratively "tossed a coin" and took the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie, which, it turned out, was the farthest from where I eventually found a rooming and boarding house, several blocks away. I didn't know then there were such things as dray wagons. How to get my trunk to my room!! A $64 question now. I asked no questions but borrowed a wheelbarrow at the station and was off on the last leg of my peregrinations. What a sight I must have presented! I guess all that was lacking was the high leather boots with trouser legs draped over the tops. And I started to my work each morning with the ingrained habit of speaking to whomever I met, as in the good old days, whether a neighbor or stranger. After several vacant stares I came to the conclusion that I was in a new world, and went my solitary way, deciding it was best. "When in Rome, do as the Romans do."

 

Night shift, unable to sleep in daytime, between two railroads 100 yards apart, another railroad crossing the river, overhead, nearly at right angles, a large steel mill just across the river, smoke and soot. Sleep!! To one who was used to dropping off to the music of crickets and katydids or the rain beating on the roof!! Nostalgia drove me a wandering up the river, over the hills and through the woods, longing to get out of the smoke and dirt of a steel community. On one trip I found a little stream cascading over a rock, an ideal shower. I reverted to the old swimming hole days, and with trees and underbrush as my only protection, no palm trees there I plunged. I suppose my shirt was my towel, and what a shower bath! However, I finally became fairly well adjusted to my environment and associations. The bright spots were the occasional weekend trips back to "Old Frog Hollow" (a nickname for home).

 

I might mention something here that I missed earlier. After graduating from the country school, I entered Slippery Rock Normal School. My first term went fairly well but during the second term without any guidance as to what I should take, I got into classes for more advanced students and was completely lost, consequently, I became a "dropout" (present day vernacular) A good alibi to blame it on lack of guidance. At this point, I took up telegraphy.

 

In 1905, while still working at Bessemer, I was rooming with Mr. and Mrs. Bailey who had both attended Otterbein College in Ohio. Dr. Sanders of Otterbein, who was touring the Pittsburgh area for prospective students, gave a talk in their church and stayed over night with the Baileys. At breakfast the next morning, Dr. Sanders said to me, "Why don't you come to Otterbein?" My answer was that I was too old to return to school, (25). He said, "You are not fifty yet are you?" "Some older than you and married are just starting". I actually didn't know the difference between a noun and a verb, let alone subjects and predicates. Well, on our way to work, Mr. Bailey and I talked the situation over and I decided to "burn the bridges behind me". On arrival at the office, the first thing I did was to notify my boss that I was quitting to go to school. (The "boss" was Mr. Cannon). Eight years later in Butler High School, I met Mr. Cannon, a school board member of Duquesne, near Bessemer. He said, "When you left, the other boys said you would soon be back." Little, did he know how close they came to the mark, but there were no bridges for a retreat.

 

In 1905, I entered Otterbein. Fortunately, Otterbein had a preparatory dept. of three years, covering the courses similar to our present day high school courses; and that is where I started, at the very beginning. The administration gave me their best help in choosing my subjects although sometimes, due to conflicts, I had to take courses in which there were more advanced students. Then I had to hit "the midnight oil" to keep up. It was either sink or swim, and remember, no bridges. When called on for recitation my legs and vocal organs refused to respond, complete oblivion. When Dr. Scott, in Bible History and reputed as having an uncontrollable temper would call on me, it was like turning on the faucet on a disconnected water pipe. But never a cross word from good "Old Dr. Scott". He threw out a life saver every week in the form of a written test. In that way I could compete on even terms with other class members and regain my "land Lubbers" legs. As the weeks and months passed I found there were others just as dumb as myself. The midnight oil helped to balance a low I.Q.

 

In the middle of my third year I scraped the bottom of the barrel, financially speaking, and came home. During the spring and summer months, I built the cement foundation for a new barn at home and got considerable work telegraphing again on night shifts. And Aunt Edna and Dad gave me free room and board.

 

I did not return to Otterbein that fall; instead I enrolled in Slippery Rock Normal, and in the classes of some of the teachers I had had at least seven years before. They must have forgotten me in the period from "fuzz to whiskers". I managed to make the football team and was given my room and board for part of the year, the fall term. For the rest of the year I stayed at home and walked to Slippery Rock; no hitch‑hiking on paved roads then. The year was one of the most pleasant of my life. Dad and Edna were alone then and Dad was still hauling merchandise from Nick Station to Slippery Rock. Many times, on coming down the street after school I used to find Dad unloading merchandise in front of the stores, and what a treat to ride home with him! Not that the ride was any faster than walking, but the companionship, oral or silent! After supper (not dinner then.) Dad, Edna and I in the winter evenings would play a game or two of cut‑throat'' euchres, then Edna to her work, Dad to a book, and myself to study ‑ seven subject and up the next morning for the two mile walk for a 7:45 class.

 

I took summer school the following summer at Grove City College and with the credits received at Slippery Rock was advanced to the Junior class at Otterbein when I returned in 1909.

 

The best I could do in my Junior year in athletics was to substitute and travel with both the football and basketball teams, but no letters.

 

A special event occurred in this year (Junior). Each year the students held a valentine party, at which each student on entrance was given a half of a small valentine. As a means of becoming acquainted with each other it was necessary to mingle with the students to find the person who had the other half that matched. Before the circulation began a fellow by the name of Crogan said, "Let's trade." "OK", I said and the trade was made and the search was on. Finally my half matched with that of one "Helen Osgood". I believe you later became acquainted with her. I told "Gammy" on several occasions later that my one ambition in life was to get my hands on that man Crogan.

 

My Senior year was too full for proper study, my own fault. Finally made the football team and played full‑time, except one game with a sprained ankle; was also made student manager of the basketball team, and editor of the "Aegis", a college publication.

 

Graduation came June 1911, not with any summa, magna nor cum laudis, but as an ordinary run‑of‑the‑mill student. In the spring of 1911, I had a small part in Shakespeare's play, "Midsummers Nights Dream". Uncle Calvin came all the way out to see it and attend commencement exercises. That touch of interest and courtesy has remained with me ever since.

 

After graduation I was recommended for a position teaching German and Latin in an Ohio city near Otterbein at $75.00 per month, the same monthly salary I was getting when I quit the railroad road; a twelve month job as against a nine month job, or $675.00 per year against $900.00, after six years of schooling!! I turned it down. At that time with a college diploma to wave before the world, or before the, "bull", in bull fighting parlance, I thought I had the bull by the horns, but it turned out that I didn't know the difference between the horns and the tail.

 

As my search widened, my EGO became ego and the world hadn't yet recognized greatness. About the time I was going down for the third time, I was told that the principalship of West Sunbury Academy was open, and upon application I was elected at $75.00 per month. It was a full‑time teaching position plus two or three plays each year, in which the other teacher and myself had to take part to supplement the tuition fees for enough money to pay our own salaries. Each of us taught seven subjects covering the entire three year course. The year was a busy one but very pleasant.

 

The next year, 1912, I was elected to teach Latin, in Butler High School. At that time I think there were three Latin teachers with a full Latin schedule as against only one now with a small enrollment. In addition to a full teaching schedule, I was asked to coach the football team. I did not feel competent to do coaching but rather reluctantly accepted. After two or three years I was glad that the coaching was turned over to a better man. However, I remained in athletics as faculty manager of the various teams, football, basketball, and baseball; and acted in this capacity until 1929 when I was relieved of athletics and teaching, and taken into the office.

 

In 1931, Mr. Irwin, the High School Principal, was taken ill and was given a year's leave-of‑absence, and the role of acting principal fell to my lot for the year. On his return, I was appointed Assistant Principal, which position I held until my retirement in 1950.

 

Incidentally, you may already know that on August 14, 1912, the day before our final settlement in Butler for a siege of 38 years, my "Valentine" and I were married In Bradford, Pa., in northern Pennsylvania, in a saucer‑like depression, surrounded by mountains. "How did any living creature ever get in there except wildcats?" "There are no wildcats there." "Well, there was at least one, for I brought it back."

 

We boarded the train immediately after the wedding, for Butler. The next day we went house and furniture hunting. A bank roll of $200.00 might have spelled disaster to the experienced, but to us the silver lining was bright in the sky. We finally located a six room house on Brown Ave. for $15.00 per month, bought furniture, on credit mostly, enough to get started. And there we were, ready to kick the world in the eye.

 

Serenades were the custom, in those days, requiring a treat of some kind for the serenaders, all youngsters. As we were strangers we had given no thought about a serenade, but to our consternation, as darkness came the house was surrounded by a howling, bell ringing mob of youngsters. What to do for a treat? How Helen (not Gammy then) kept them in leash until I got back I can't remember. I slipped out the back door and down to the store at the lower end of the street and purchased a fifteen or twenty lb. pail of the old fashioned hard candy and small paper bags. The process of filling the bags and passing them out is somewhat of a blank to me now, but the "mission was completed". Not, however, until a little strategy on the part of the "enemy" had been discovered. Familiar faces were reappearing for a treat. Why? Strategy unearthed. They were circling the house and taking their place in line again. They knew their ruse was laid bare and accepted in good humor the order to "walk straight down the street".

 

During the summer months, in the earlier years, I worked in a nearby oil well drilling tool shop, at the Standard‑Pullman car shop (carpenter), a shell shop, boring six inch shells during World War I, and taking school census for a few summers before I was taken into the office.

 

Gammy's nephew, Harlow Osgood, lived with us from the time we were married until the time he himself was married. He entered the fourth grade, graduated from Butler High, Westminster College and Cornell University with a PhD in chemistry. He later taught chemistry at Westminster near New Castle, Pa., and from there to the State of Washington as a hospital chemist; then back to Pittsburgh, Pa. hospital until 1959, where he died from a brain tumor in 1960. One of his sons, Jim, is doing library work in Chicago University. The other son, Charles, is teaching math in the University of Illinois. I believe he received his PhD at Berkeley, Calif. Their mother, Dorothy, is living alone in Pittsburgh. Harlow seemed more like a son to us than a nephew.

 

In 1918, a cousin of ours, Belle Irwin, who owned a farm five miles north of Butler, asked us if we wouldn't like to live on the farm for awhile. The house had been unoccupied for some time and was badly in need of repairs. She agreed to have some plastering and papering done if we would go, so we decided to give it a try. To hasten the repair work, on weekends during the spring months I would go by train to the station nearest the farm, about two miles, on Friday evening and work on cleaning up on Saturday. One upstairs room had been kept furnished with a few articles including a bed which I used on Friday nights then back home Saturday evening. There were no inside conveniences except a sink. We got our water from a pump outside the kitchen door.

 

As I remember, Gammy, your Dad (Calvin H.), Edith and John went to Granddad Osgoods in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada that summer, and on their return, we moved out to the farm. None of them were old enough for school then except Harlow, who was then in School. We bought a cow and horse and buggy, and planted a garden. Even though the children were small then, John being about three, we tramped around quite a bit over the farm, picking berries and gathering hickory nuts, chestnuts and walnuts. When winter came on, we bought a sleigh. In the early autumn months, Harlow and I drove the horse and buggy to school and when winter came, we used the sleigh.

 

A heavy snow in early December stayed on into Feb. or March, enough for good sleighing. The snow started on a Saturday morning and continued until the next Monday morning. We attempted to drive to Butler on Monday but got only about a mile since the drifts were too deep for the horse to get through. We pulled into a farm yard, and after unhitching the horse, Harlow rode him back home and I headed for Butler on foot, four miles away. On several occasions I had to take to the fields as the snow was too deep in the cuts, but I made it to the High School on time. But, of course, it was necessary to walk home that evening. Until the snow got packed, many times we had to get out of the sleigh and ease it up over a drift.

 

There were no other houses in sight of the farm house, but Gammy never made one word of complaint about staying alone during the cold winter days, and it really was cold. And every noon during the winter she brought the cow to the watering trough, kept the old slack burner going, pumped water for washing, both clothes and baths, in the wash tub.

 

As I was still the basketball manager, I had to be away long into the night on trips many times; and since Harlow had to get home, he would drive the horse, and on my return to Butler from the trips, "Shanks horse" was my only mode of travel ‑ five miles.

 

Once our school janitor invited us to dinner (evening) and as soon as Harlow and I got home Gammy was ready and we started immediately back to Butler in the sleigh. As I recall, the weather was near zero or below. "Fools", you say? We really enjoyed it. When we were ready to return home, Mr. Turner, the janitor, had two large "fire bricks" heated to put at our feet. The so‑called "fire bricks" were similar to stepping stone cement blocks, about one foot square and two inches thick. Our return went well so far as the weather war concerned, until we came within a half mile from home. At that point the road faced down hill and to the north with a strong wind blowing in our faces. Although I was wearing heavy mittens, my hands were so numb I could scarcely get the horse unhitched and into the barn. When I think of it now I wonder why we took such a trip, but at the time it was just a part of living and not an ordeal.

 

The next summer, my cousin rented the farm and we moved back to Butler for one year into the house in which we had lived when we went to the farm. When, in the spring of 1920, this house was sold, we decided then that we had done enough moving. After a long search, we found "Pine Grove". And here I am, still "drifting down the stream of life" with many fond memories of our life together, until 1960, keeping me afloat, such as Granddad Osgood being with us for four years and Grandma Osgood for nine years. And that "Stinker" from Oak Ridge and Alexandria, Va. cluttering up the premises for several summers.

 

And this good old world is still not burned up, but is as green and beautiful as ever. It is only people that cause all the trouble, greed, selfishness, hate, racism; yet there are so many good people who are arraying their virtues against vices; and virtue has a certain quality that tends to perpetuate itself, and vice has a certain characteristic that tends to destroy itself.

 

 

 

Here, at a future date, will be inserted a collection of the philosophies of this most rare and wonderful person, John Thompson Hogg.

 

 

 

Post script, In 1941, "J.T." received a Masters Degree from the University of Pittsburgh.

 

Post script:

 

"You may be interested in a few other reminiscences without much thought given to chronological order.

 

Our Grandfather and Grandmother Irwin lived on a farm about three or four miles east of Slippery Rock. They had five children: Uncles Sam, Jim and John, Aunt Mary and my mother, Elizabeth ("Lizzie"). Grandfather Irwin died a short time before Mother's birth. To the suggestion that she give the children out for adoption, or whatever term was used then, Grandmother gave an emphatic "NO". And here is one of the marvels of power tied up in a frail human being to overcome seemingly impossible tasks. She must have had vision and set her face toward it, for in her widow‑hood she carried on into the years, raising her family to maturity, and to a tapering off of mandatory vigilance in keeping the purse string tight and the larder full. The three sons served in the Civil War, one of them dying soon after; another one, Uncle Sam, lived on the farm where we lived for one year, just north of Butler, and Uncle John took over Grandmother's farm, when she died at the age of 84.

 

After her responsibilities at home were lessened, Grandmother would spend about two weeks every year with us. And what a treat to us! We had to "walk the chalk line" for her, but It was a pleasure. "Don't be so lavish with the butter." (That was one of her sources of income in the earlier days.) "Boys, what did you do with the poker?" "What's that in your hand, Grandmother?" "Now what did I do with my glasses?" '"What's that on top of your head, Grandmother?""

 


 

P A R T V

 

A TRIP TO IRELAND

from the personal diary of

Beulah (Boulden) Hogg, 1908

 

Willis Edwin Hogg, son of John Alexander and Elizabeth Irwin Hogg, of Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania, received the Nettie McCormick Hebrew Fellowship from McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago, Illinois which untitled him to study in Europe. Having been married recently to Beulah Boulden, daughter of John Calvin and Mary Esther Perry Boulden, of Butler, Pennsylvania, she accompanied him. While there, they took side trips, among them being to Ireland to seek the Hogg family roots. An account of that trip was recorded by Beulah in a diary called ALPHA and related here:

 

On March 18 (1908) we left Glasgow (Scotland) for a short trip to Ireland. We went by train to Greenock, and from there to Londonderry (Ireland) by boat. The trip being made at night, we saw nothing of the country. We arrived at Londonderry about 5:30 but we did not leave the boat until 7 o'clock. From the pier we walked along the Way to the railroad station. The station was a low brick building with no accommodations whatever. While waiting here we saw a street car drawn by horses. At 9:30 we left Londonderry for Fahan. The train was a poor one, and very slow, so slow that we took several pictures with our Kodak while the train was in motion. The cars were so small that two men pushed two freight cars from the switch to it* main track by hand. We left the train at Fahan and crossed Look Swilly by ferry. The tide being low, the ferry could not reach the pier and we went ashore in a row boat. We had to climb up the side of the high pier on a pair of narrow stone steps. When we reached the top we were seized upon by jaunting car drivers who wanted us to ride in their cars. This little lakeside town was Rathmullen. Our destination was Ramelton. The car drivers were each anxious for. us to go in their car and so great was their zeal that we had to go to the Hotel to get rid of them. After lunch we took a walk about the town. There was an old fort and a ruined castle, the only things of interest in the place. We went into the old castle, and a man took us up to the top of the high tower. We climbed up to the top by means of a pair of very narrow and much worn steps that were built around the inside of the tower like a corkscrew. From the tower we could see all over the town.

 

After this we went back to the Hotel, and on our way we saw a couple of farmers hauling loads of sea weed from the lake shore for fertilizer. Some boys were digging in the sand for worms to use as bait. At the Hotel we took a jaunting car For Ramelton. This was our first ride in a side car. They are much used in Ireland. They are like a two‑wheeled cart, with a keg seat on each side over the wheels for the passengers and a small seat in front for the driver. The roads were fine, the sun was bright and warm, and we enjoyed the ride very much.

 

The driver took us to a hotel which did not look very inviting. We objected but he said it was the best in town so we had to be content. We went in and left our luggage, and then went in search of Rev. Wallace. The object of our trip was the find the ancestral home of the Hoggs and were were told that Rev. Wallace could very likely be able to assist us. We called at the manse but he was not at home. We called on Rev. Torns and waited till evening. We had tea with Rev. Torns and had a very pleasant afternoon. We then returned to the manse and found Rev. Wallace at home. He is the pastor of The First Presbyterian Church of Ramelton where Samuel Hogg, Willis' great‑grandfather was a member in 1791, Rev. Burke then being the pastor. Rev. Wallace was very well versed in the history of the church and its people, and told us that a family of Hoggs lived in Ellistrin. As it was to late to go out then, we remained with Rev. Wallace until about 9 o'c. In the course of the evening we discovered that many people from Ramelton and vicinity had gone to America and settled about Slippery Rock and Harrisville (Pennsylvania). Among them were McFates, Blacks, Billingsleys and Hoggs. Moses Black of Ramelton is a cousin of some Blacks near Harrisville. We met a Mr. Tynan who has a brother in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)

 

Next day we drove to Ellistrin and found Mr. Charles Hogg. He lives near the old homestead from all the Hoggs emigrated to America. He is the last one of the family in Ireland. He and his family were very kind to us. We intended going on to Letterkenny that day, but they persuaded us to remain over Sabbath. Mr. Hogg had at home at this time two sons, David and Charles, and a daughter Maggie. One daughter Mary (Mrs. Fleming) lives near Letterkenny. He has a son Francis in Philadelphia and a son James in Washington state; a daughter Sarah (Mrs. Calhoun) in Ossian, Indiana. He also has two brothers in Indiana.

 

We went on Saturday to call on Mrs. Fleming and look a little ride through Letterkenny in a side‑oar drawn by a donkey. On Sabbath Willis preached in Ramelton First Church for Rev. Wallace As the ministers read their sermons in Ireland, they were very much astonished and pleased when he delivered his sermon without a manuscript. They were anxious to have him stay awhile and preach again. While we were in Ramelton on Friday, we saw the old church which is not used now. Got a picture of it. Saw the graveyard where the Hoggs are buried.

 

On Monday we drove to Letterkenny and went by train to Londonderry. As we had some time there we went about the town. Londonderry was at one time a walled town, but has outgrown its limits and is spread out on all sides of the old city. The old wall still stands and is used as a thoroughfare. We walked around the old city on top of this wall. They use many donkeys here, and we saw some funny sights.

 

From Londonderry we went by train to Belfast. The scenery here as well as in other parts of Ireland was fine. In many places we saw men working in the turf or peat bogs. They cut the turf out in pieces about the size of a brick and pile them in large piles to dry. Sometimes they find well‑preserved fir trees buried in the bogs, and these make fine firewood. Between Londonderry mid Belfast we saw large chalk cliffs where men were digging out the chalk. We had only a few hours in Belfast, and as it was dark we couldn't see much. We went to a lunch room for coffee.

 

 


 

P A R T VI

 

Reconstruction of the Hogg Genealogy

By

Andrew L. Moore

 

Note to readers: Because so much Hogg genealogy information has already been researched, compiled and published by the individuals above, I will simply be presenting descendancy information from the earliest known Hogg ancestor as well as any additional information I uncovered during my research.

 

 

 

?John? Hogg

 

?John? Hogg, born Ramelton, Donegal Co, Ireland, married Elizabeth _______, died ?Northern Ireland?.

 

Elizabeth _________ was born circa 1764 in Ramelton, Donegal Co, Ireland and died in Milford Twp, Mifflin Co PA.

 

?John? and Elizabeth had the following children:

 

1.     Margaret, born circa 1776 in Ramelton, Donegal Co Ireland, married ??P.?? Atwell.

2.     Samuel, born circa 1779 in Ramelton, Donegal Co Ireland, married Jean ______ circa 1804 Mifflin Co PA, died 18 Jun 1846 Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA, buried Harmony Cemetery, Harrisville, Butler Co PA.

3.     Robert "Robin", born circa 1785/1788 Ramelton, Donegal Co Ireland, married Anna McCoy, died 7 Feb 1857 Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA, buried Harmony Cemetery, Harrisville, Butler Co PA. Anna died circa 1831. See http://www.nims-leistiko.info/RobertAnnaHogg.htm for more information on Robert and Anna.

4.     William, born circa 1789, Ramelton, Donegal Co, Ireland, married Sarah Richey circa 1817 Mifflin Co PA, died circa 1876 Jackson Co, Iowa. Sarah, born circa 1800 in Ireland, and died circa 1836 in Butler Co, PA, was the daughter of William and Margaret (Stinson) Richey. See http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/o/g/Clayton-L-Hogg/BOOK-0001/0006-0001.html, for more information on William.

5.     James, born Ramelton, Donegal Co Ireland.

6.     George, born circa 1799, married Martha ??Forsythe??, died 1 Feb 1890 Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA.

7.     Mollie, born Ramelton, Donegal Co Ireland.

8.     Jane, born Ramelton, Donegal Co Ireland, married a ??McElwane??.

9.     Mary Sarah, born circa 1794 Ramelton, Donegal Co Ireland.

10.  Unknown, born Ramelton, Donegal Co Ireland, married a ??McAlwe??.

 

 

Samuel Hogg

 

Samuel Hogg was born circa 1779 in Ramelton, Donegal Co Ireland, married Jean ______ circa 1804 Mifflin Co PA, and died 18 Jun 1846 in Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA. Samuel is buried in the Harmony Cemetery, Harrisville, Butler Co PA. His gravestone, re-discovered by the family in 1992 in the 9th row from the west end of the cemetery, states the following: Samuel Hogg, Sr., died 6/18/1846 Age 67years.

 

Jean ________ died circa 1814 in Slippery Rock Twp, Butler Co PA. Her gravestone has yet to be located. No record of it exists in the Harmony Church cemetery files.

 

 

History of Butler County, Pennsylvania

R.C. Brown & Co., Publishers, 1895

Page 622 Churches

 

Bethel United Presbyterian Church is the successor of the Covenanter society. In 1833, the Reformed Presbyterians organized and held meetings in the log school house near the north line of the township. Rev. Andrew W. Black served as pastor from 1833 to 1838, the elders being Samuel Hogg and Samuel Braham. For a decade subsequent to the 1838, the pulpit was vacant. In 1848 Josiah Hutchman became pastor. He was succeeded in 1852 by Rev. David Kennedy, who organized the Sunday school. The pulpit was again vacant from 1855 to 1858, when Rev. J.F. Hill became pastor and remained until1866. About this time the original organization passed out of existence. In 1868 a reorganization took place, under the present name, with Rev. William Hutchinson as pastor, sixty two members being enrolled. Rev. W.D. Ewing, Rev. J.O. McConnell and Rev. A.B. Dickey have been successive pastors of this congregation, which now numbers thirty four members.

 

 

The children of Samuel and Jean _______ Hogg were:

 

1.     John, married Elizabeth Slemmens. Elizabeth, born 13 Jan 1775, was the daughter of Isabella and John Slemmons of Butler Co PA. The children of John and Elizabeth were: Mary Jane, born 21 Jul 1838; Caroline Harriet, born 20 Dec 1840; Orbison S., born 25 May 1843; Alice Rachel, born 31 Mar 1846 and died Dec 1853; Norman Doak, born 24 Feb 1849 and died 14 Jun 1852; and Isabel Elizabeth, born 29 Jun 1852. Note: Orbison was named after his mother Elizabeths mother Isabella Orbison, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Bailey) Orbison. From the History of Juniata Valley, PA.

2.     Samuel, born Milford Twp, Mifflin Co PA.

3.     Mary, born circa 1805 Milford Twp, Mifflin Co PA.

4.     James, born 3 Feb 1808 Milford Twp, Mifflin Co PA, married Elizabeth Watt circa 1840 PA, died 2 May 1885 Slippery Rock Twp, Butler Co PA, buried Harmony Cemetery, Harrisville PA.

 

 

James Hogg

 

James Hogg was born 3 Feb 1808 in Milford Twp, Mifflin Co PA. He married Elizabeth Watt circa 1840 PA and died 2 May 1885 in Slippery Rock Twp, Butler Co PA. James is buried in the Harmony Cemetery, Harrisville PA.

 

Elizabeth Watt was born circa 1820 in PA, died 4 Jun 1851 in Slippery Rock Twp, Butler Co PA and is buried in the Harmony Cemetery, Harrisville PA. Elizabeth was the daughter of Hugh and Elizabeth (White) Watt. For more information on the ancestors of Elizabeth Watt, please see the chapter so entitled.

 

The children of James and Elizabeth (Watt) Hogg were:

 

1.     Calvin, born circa 1841 Slippery Rock Twp, Butler Co PA, died circa 1845 Slippery Rock Twp, Butler Co PA.

2.     James Harvey, born circa 1843 Slippery Rock Twp, Butler Co PA, married Jane Billingsley.

3.     John Alexander, born 11 Jan 1845 Slippery Rock Twp, Butler Co PA, married Elizabeth Thompson Irwin circa 1870, died 6 Jan 1924 Slippery Rock Twp, Butler Co PA, buried Slippery Rock Cemetery, Butler Co PA.

 

 

John Alexander Hogg

 

John Alexander was born 11 Jan 1845 in Slippery Rock Twp, Butler Co PA. He married Elizabeth Thompson Irwin circa 1870 and died 6 Jan 1924 in Slippery Rock Twp, Butler Co PA. John Alexander is buried in Slippery Rock Cemetery, Butler Co PA.

 

Elizabeth Thompson Irwin was born 4 Jun 1846 in Butler Co PA and died 21 Oct 1896 in Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA. She is buried in Slippery Rock Cemetery, Butler Co PA. Elizabeth was the daughter of John and Elizabeth (Thompson) Irwin. For more information on the ancestry of Elizabeth Thompson Irwin, please see the chapter entitled IRWIN.

 

Obituary of James A. Hogg

Butler (PA) Eagle - 7 Jan 1924

 

James A. Hogg, aged 79, a life-long resident of the northern section of the county, died yesterday morning at his residence in Slippery Rock township on the farm on which he was born. His wife, Elizabeth Irwin Hogg, preceded him in death 20 years ago, from which time he has kept his home unbroken by ties of devotion.

Mr. Hogg is survived by all of his nine children and also 27 grandchildren. The children are: James I. Hogg, Edna Hogg and Mrs. Jams Kerr, all of Slippery Rock; Calvin Hogg, principal of the Harrisville schools; Mrs. W.B. Smith of Douglass, Kan; Mrs. Charles Ifft, Forestville; Arthur J. Hogg, Dayton, Pa.; Rev. Willis Hogg, Centerville, Mich., and John T. Hogg, a teacher in the Butler high school. He was a member of Bethel United Presbyterian church.

Funeral services will be held at 2:30 Tuesday afternoon in charge of Rev. J. A. McCormick. Burial will be in Slippery Rock cemetery.

 

 

The children of John Alexander and Elizabeth Thompson (Irwin) Hogg were:

 

1.     James Irwin, born 9 Jul 1872 near Slippery Rock, Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA, married Linda V. Schramm, died 13 or 24 Feb 1966 Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA.

2.     Martha E, born 26 Jul 1873 near Slippery Rock, Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA, married William B. Smith, died 25 Nov 1953 Conway, MO.

3.     Mary S., born 11 Jan 1875 near Slippery Rock, Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA, married James Kerr, died 1 Nov 1959 Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA.

4.     Evalyn, born 13 Nov 1876 near Slippery Rock, Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA, married Charles Adams Ifft 8 Jun 1897, died 24 Aug 1968 Forestville, Butler Co PA.

5.     Rev. Willis Edwin, born 15 Mar 1878 near Slippery Rock, Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA, married Beulah Bessie Boulden 10 Jun 1907 Renfrew Home, Penn Twp, Butler Co PA, died 3 Nov 1965 Michelson Home, Schoolcraft Twp, Kalamazoo Co MI. Reverend Willis wife Bessie kept a diary during a trip that she and Willis took in 1908 trip to Ramelton and Letterkenny, Ireland. This interesting narrative is found under Part V above.

 

Below is a circa 1920s letter from Rev. Willis Hogg to genealogist Murrel VanDyke Bernhardt. Though not dated, the letter was probably written sometime during the 1920's, the years during which Murrel did most of her genealogical research. Thanks to Muriel "Sam" Tamura, granddaughter of Murrel, for providing the letter. Letter originally located here: http://www.nims-leistiko.info/RobertAnnaHogg.htm

 

 

 

 

6.     John Thompson, born 26 Jun 1880 near Slippery Rock, Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA, married Helen Charlotte Osbood 14 Aug 1912 Angelica NY, died 13 Jul 1975 Vassar Brothers Hospital, Poughkeepsie NY.

7.     Calvin, born 10 Mar 1883 near Slippery Rock, Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA, married Dorothy Pearle Voorus 29 Aug 1921 Hogg Homestead, Slippery Rock PA, died 15 May 1962 Hogg Homestead, Slippery Rock, Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA, buried Slippery Rock Cemetery, Butler Co PA.

8.     Arthur Jesse, born 2 Mar 1887 near Slippery Rock, Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA, married Bessie Longwell 5 Sep 1921 Hogg Homestead, Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA, died 27 Jan 1969, Nursing Home, Harrisville, Mercer Twp, Butler Co PA. Arthur and his brother Calvin wed their spouses at the same wedding (see newspaper article below).

9.     Edna Louise, born 25 Jul 1889 near Slippery Rock, Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA, died 19 Aug 1987 Orchard Manor, Grove City, Lawrence Co PA, buried Slippery Rock Cemetery, Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA.

 

 

Calvin Hogg

 

Calvin Hogg was born 10 Mar 1883 near Slippery Rock, Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA. He married Dorothy Pearle Voorus on 29 Aug 1921 at the Hogg Homestead, Slippery Rock PA. Calvin died 15 May 1962 at the Hogg Homestead, Slippery Rock, Cherry Twp, Butler Co PA and is buried at Slippery Rock Cemetery, Butler Co PA.

 

Dorothy Pearle Voorus was born 8 Jun 1899 in Venango Co PA and died 10 Sep 1975 Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA. She is buried next to her husband at the Slippery Rock Cemetery, Butler Co PA. Dorothy was the daughter of Hiram Andrew and Melvina Lucinda (Watson) Voorus.

 

Double Serenade for Newlyweds

Butler (PA) Eagle - Monday, September 5, 1921

 

Wick, Pa. Sept. 5--Quite a crowd of Wickites attended the serenade at the Hogg home on the Slippery Rock road, Monday night. The very noisy and enjoyable affair was arranged by the young folks to properly celebrate the marriage of two popular and highly esteemed young men, Calvin and Arthur Hogg; both popular educators of Butler county, having decided to sail on the sea of matrimony, will be accompanied by Dorothy Voorus of Pleasantville and Bessie Longwell of Slippery Rock. About 200 guests were present at the serenade, which was conducted in the usual unceremonious manner. After a short honeymoon trip to Slippery Rock and back in the farmwagon hitched to the grocer's truck, the bridal couples were at home to their friends with a fine lunch, after which the crowd danced to music furnished by the grooms who are violinists of talent. Prof. Calvin Hogg and wife will reside at Harrisville, and Prof. Arthur Hogg and wife will reside at Dayton, Pa., after September 6.

 

 

Obituary of Calvin Hogg

Butler (PA) Eagle Wednesday May 16, 1962

 

Calvin Hogg, 79, Former County Schoolman Dies

 

Calvin Hogg, 79, former assistant superintendent of Butler County schools for 28 years, died suddenly of a heart attack yesterday at his home, Slippery Rock R.D. 3.

Mr. Hogg served in the County School post from 1924 until his retirement in 1953.

Prior to assuming his position in the superintendent's office, he served as principal of Karns City High School and West Sunbury High School, and was a former supervising principal of the Harrisville schools and the Evans City schools.

While at Harrisville, he was one of the group of principals who organized the North Butler Basketball League which later included nearby high schools in Venango and Armstrong Counties and was then merged with the PIAA.

The former county school educator was graduated from Slippery Rock and Grove City colleges, and received his Masters Degree from the University of Pittsburgh. He completed his Master's thesis on the subject of reading habits and was a constant student, during his career, of methods of improving the learning of reading.

Mr. Hogg was a member of the Bethel United Presbyterian Church, serving as an elder for over 40 years.

He served in the armed forces during World War I, and was a member of the American Legion at Slippery Rock.

After his retirement, he lived on his farm at Slippery Rock R.D. 3, and was a member of the Pennsylvania Farmers Association.

He was also a member of the General School Authority of the Slippery Rock Area Jointure.

Born March 10, 1883, Calvin Hogg was the son of John and Elizabeth Hogg, and was one of a family of nine children. He spent his early life in the Slippery Rock vicinity.

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Dorothy Pearl Hogg; two sons, Theodore H. and Robert A. Hogg, both of Slippery Rock R.D. 3, four daughters, Mrs. Vance (Esther) Burtner of Butler R.D. 4, Mrs. Richard (Naomi) Emmons of Binghamton, N.Y., Mrs. Lauren (Lois) Monroe of Bovina Center, N.Y., and Mrs. Florence Louise Burtner of Slippery Rock; 17 grandchildren; four brothers, the Rev. Willis Hogg of Vicksburg, Mich., John Hogg of Renfrew, James Hogg of Slippery Rock, and Arthur Hogg of Slippery Rock R.D. 3; and two sisters, Mrs. Eva Ifft and Edna Hogg, both of Slippery Rock R.D. 3.

Two sisters, Mrs. Martha Smith and Mrs. Mary Kerr, preceded him in death.

 

HOGG--Friends of Calvin Hogg of Slippery Rock R.D. 3, who died Tuesday, May 15, 1962, will be received at the Uber Funeral Home, Slippery Rock, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Friday from the funeral home, with the Rev. Virgil Barnes pastor of the Highland United Presbyterian Church, Slippery Rock and Mr. Patrick Morrison, student pastor of the Bethel United Presbyterian Church, officiating. Burial will be in Slippery Rock Cemetery. Arrangements by Uber.

 

 

Obituary of Dorothy Pearle (Voorus) Hogg

Butler (PA) Eagle - Wed 10 Sep 1975

 

Mrs. Hogg, 76, Retired Slippery Rock Teacher, Dies

 

Mrs. Dorothy Hogg, 76, of Slippery Rock R.D. 3, died at 12:50 a.m. today at her home. She had been in poor health for the past five months.

Born in Venango County, June 8, 1909, she was the daughter of Hiram and Melvina Watson Voorus.

She was the wife of Calvin Hogg, who died May 15, 1962.

Mrs. Hogg graduated from Slippery Rock Normal School, and received her Bachelor of Education degree in 1955 from the University of Pittsburgh.

She taught in Slippery Rock Area schools for 25 years before retiring in 1964, and had lived in the Harrisville and Slippery Rock area for 54 years.

Mrs. Hogg was a member of Bethel United Presbyterian Church, where she had been organist and choir director for over 50 years. She was also an elder of the church.

Surviving are two sons, Theodore H. Hogg and Robert A. Hogg, both of Slippery Rock R.D. 3; four daughters, Mrs. Vance (Esther) Burtner of Butler R.D. 4, ; Mrs. Melvin (Louise) Gindler of Rockford, Ill.; Mrs. Lauren (Lois ) Monroe of Bovina Center, N.Y.; and Mrs. Richard (Naomi) Emmons of Ridgefield, Conn.; a brother, Robert Voorus and three sisters, Lena, Bessie, and Blanche Voorus, all of Pleasantville R.D. 2; and 21 grandchildren.

 

Hogg--Friends of Mrs. Dorothy Hogg of Slippery Rock R.D. 3, who died Wed., Sept.10 1975, will be received at the Harold C. Jamison Funeral Home, Harrisville, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Friday from the funeral home, with the Rev. T.D. Stewart and the Rev. Don McKim, pastors of Bethel United Presbyterian Church, officiating. Burial will be in Slippery Rock Cemetery. Arrangements by Jamison.

 

 

Last Will and Testament

of
Dorothy P. Hogg

 

I, DOROTHY P. HOGG, of Slippery Rock Township, Butler County, Pennsylvania, being of sound and disposing mind, memory and understanding, do make and publish this my Last Will and Testament hereby revoking and making void any and all other or former Wills by me at any time heretofore made.

 

FIRST: I direct that all my just debts and funeral expenses be paid as soon after my decrease as can conveniently be done.

 

SECOND: I give and devise all of my right title and interest in and to the Voorus Homestead property situate in Oil Creek Township, Venango County, Pennsylvania, containing 200 acres, more or less, to my two sons, Theodore Hogg and Robert Hogg, subject however to a life estate to my sisters, Lena V. Voorus, Bessy B. Voorus and C. Blanche Voorus, or to the survivors or survivor of them.

 

THIRD: I give, devise and bequeath unto my son, Theodore H. Hogg, my property consisting of a farm located in Slippery Rock Township, Butler County, Pennsylvania, together with all buildings thereon erected and all contents of such buildings, and each and every item of real and personal property pertaining to said farm, absolutely and in fee.

FOURTH: All the rest residue and remainder of my estate, real, personal, and mixed, I give, devise and bequeath to my children Robert A. Hogg, Esther Burtner, Louise Gindler, Lois Monroe and Naomi Emmons, share and share alike, absolutely and in fee.

 

LASTLY, I nominate, constitute and appoint my two sons, Theodore H. Hogg and Robert A. Hogg, as Executors of this my Last Will and Testament, and in the event of vacancy in said office of Executor by reason of death, renunciation, removal, discharge, sickness or otherwise, the remaining Executor shall have all the rights, powers, authorities and discretions of both.

 

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I, DOROTHY P. HOGG, the Testatrix, have hereunto set my hand and seal this 12th day of March, A. D., 1969.

 

_________Dorothy P. Hogg_______(SEAL)

 

Signed, sealed, published and declared by the above named, Dorothy P. Hogg, as and for her Last Will and Testament in our presence who at her request and in her presence and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses.

 

_______John Murrin________________________

_______Lana J. Swartzhamer (sp?) ______

 

 

 

 

The children of Calvin and Dorothy Pearl (Voorus) Hogg are:

 

1.     Theodore Harvey, born 26 Jul 1922 Harrisville, Butler Co PA, married Mary Armes 11 Jun 1948 State College PA, died 7 Nov 1986 Franklin Regional Hospital, Franklin, Venango Co PA, buried Slippery Rock Cemetery, Butler Co PA.

2.     Robert Arthur, born 13 Jul 1923 Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA, married Christine Elizabeth Schultz 24 Aug 1952 Oil City, Venango Co PA, died 20 Aug 2000 Orchard Manor Nursing Home, Grove City, Lawrence Co PA, buried Slippery Rock Cemetery, Butler Co PA.

3.     Esther Elizabeth, born xx/xx/xxxx Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA, married Vance Burtner 2 Jan 1948 Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA.

4.     Florence Louise, born xx/xx/xxxx Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA, married Melvin Gindler 29 Jul 1961 Pittsburgh, Allegheny Co PA.

5.     Lois Emma, born xx/xx/xxxx Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA, married Lauren Henly Monroe 17 Nov 1953, Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA.

6.     Naomi Ruth, born xx/xx/xxxx Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA, married Richard Alvin Emmons 2 May 1959 Binghamton NY.

 

 

Robert Arthur Hogg

 

Robert Arthur Hogg was born 13 Jul 1923 in Slippery Rock, Butler Co PA. He married Christine Elizabeth Schultz on 24 Aug 1952 in Oil City, Venango Co PA. Bob died 20 Aug 2000 at the Orchard Manor Nursing Home, Grove City, Lawrence Co PA and is buried in the Slippery Rock Cemetery, Butler Co PA.

 

Christine Elizabeth Schultz was born xx/xx/xxxx in Oil City, Venango Co PA. She is the daughter of Reuben Peter and Minnie Albertine (Sandberg) Schultz. For more information on Christine's ancestors, please see the chapters entitled Schultz and Sandberg.

 

 

WED HERE SUNDAY

Mon 25 Aug 1952 The Oil City (PA) Derrick

 

A lawn reception late Sunday afternoon followed the wedding in which Miss Christine Schultz, pictured above, became the bride of Robert Arthur Hogg of Slippery Rock.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Schultz of Maple Avenue, Hasson Heights, and Mr. and Mrs. Calvin C. Hogg of Slippery Rock are parents of the bridegroom.

Dr. Norman R. Adams officiated at the double ring rite at 3:30 p.m. yesterday in the First Presbyterian Church.

Mrs. Paul Stormer, organist, played a prelude of numbers including "Prayer" and "Garden of Faith." She also presented the traditional wedding marches by Wagner and Mendelssohn as processional and recessional for the wedding party.

Miss Anne Sherman, violinist, played, "Salute d' Amour," Mendelssohn; and overture to Thaiss by Massenet, to organ accompaniment.

The vocal numbers, "Because," d'Hardelot; and "the Lord's Prayer," were sung by Lester Stuck.

The bride's only jewelry was a pearl necklace, gift of the bridegroom. Given in marriage by her father, she appeared in a Chantilly lace gown with jacket, styled with short sleeves and high ruffled neckline. She wore matching lace mitts and an embroidered satin Juliet cap studded with seed pearls secured her brief veil. A white orchid and satin streamers crested her white Bible.

Honor attendants to the bride were Mrs. Roger Burtner (Louise) of Orangeville, sister of the bridegroom, who wore yellow Chantilly lace and net and Miss Margaret Weidle, who appeared in an aqua costume. Clusters of forget-me-nots decorated the sides of the mesh Dutch caps in colors to match their gowns. Carnations in those colors in their colonial bouquets were encircled with similar flowers in white.

Theodore Hogg of Slippery Rock was best man and Robert M. Schultz of Dover, N.J., was head usher. They are brothers of the wedding couple. Ushers were Charles and Edward Gamble of Fredonia.

White gladioli and fern framed by ivy and roses formed the setting for the wedding rite.

A three-tier cake crested with a miniature bridal couple centered the bride's table at the lawn reception at the Schultz home. The cake was encircled in ivy and gladioli blooms on white satin streamers.

The serving table was centered with a mixed bouquet in a gold glass statue-vase. Yellow and aqua, colors of the attendant's costumes were used in the flowers and streamers.

Aides were Mrs. Robert M. Schultz of Dover, N.J.; Misses Lois and Naomi Hogg, twin sisters of the bridegroom; Misses N. Jane Corle, Marion Smith and Patricia Shreffler, all of this city.

The bride was attired in a suit of lilac hue and white accessories as the couple left for Cleveland, O., where they will take a boat tour of the Great Lakes. She wore her wedding orchid.

Mr. and Mrs. Hogg will reside in Fredonia where the bridegroom has accepted the position as vocational agriculture instructor in Fredonia-Delaware High School. He graduated from Penn State College and Slippery Rock High School and belongs to Alpha Tau Alpha, national honorary fraternity.

Mrs. Hogg graduated from Oil City High School and has been employed in the Oil City Trust Company bank.

The wedding was attended by residents of Titusville, Meadville, Fredonia, Slippery Rock, Orangeville, Butler and Dover, N.J.

 

 

Obituary of Robert Arthur Hogg

Butler (PA) Eagle, Tuesday August 22, 2000

 

Robert Arthur Hogg, 77, of Franklin Road, Slippery Rock Township, died at 8 a.m. Sunday at Orchard Manor in Grove City after a two-month illness.

Born on the family farm in Hoggs Flats, Slippery Rock Township, July 13, 1923, he was the son of Calvin and Dorothy Pearle Voorus Hogg.

He graduated from Penn State University with a teaching degree in science and dairy husbandry. While at PSU, he was a member of the Glee Club and the Penn State National Cattle Judging Team. He later received a masters degree in guidance counseling from Westminster College.

Mr. Hogg began his career in education at Fredonia High School, Mercer County, where he taught dairy husbandry. He also was the head basketball coach and took the team to the state championship. He then taught science and was a guidance counselor at Moniteau High School.

He next taught science and math at Butler Junior High School and retired in 1987 as a guidance counselor at Butler Intermediate School.

During World War II, he was a helmsman on the USS Yakutat.

He was a member of the Bethel Presbyterian Church in Slippery Rock Township, Slippery Rock American Legion Post 0393, F&AM Lodge 272 of Butler, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite Valley of New Castle and the Pennsylvania Association of School Retirees. He was a former member of the Penn State Alumni Association.

Surviving are his wife, Christine Elizabeth Schultz Hogg, whom he married Aug. 24, 1952; three sons, Cmdr. Philip Hogg of Chicago, Ill., Gregory Hogg of Pleasantville and Stanley Hogg of Grand Valley; two daughters, Vicki Kusaila of Houston, Texas, and Dorothy Moore of Sarver; and nine grandchildren. Four sisters, Esther Burtner of Butler, Louise Gindler of Union City, Calif., Lois Monroe of Bovine Center, N.Y., and Naomi Emmons of Ridgefield, Conn., also survive.

He was preceded in death by a brother.

HOGG Friends of Robert Arthur Hogg, who died Sunday, Aug. 20, 2000, will be received from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday at SMITH FUNERAL HOME, 421 New Castle St., Slippery Rock. Services will be at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home with the Rev. Wayne Bell, pastor of Bethel Presbyterian Church, officiating. Burial will be at Slippery Rock, Cemetery Slippery Rock Township.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Penn State University Department of Dairy Science.

 

 

 

 

Federal and State Census Records

 

Hogg

 

 

1804 Tax List, Milford Twp, Mifflin Co PA

Widow Hogg, 2 horses

 

1810 Federal Census, Union Twp, Mifflin Co PA

Elizabeth Hoge

1 male under 10

2 males between 16 & 26

1 female under 10

1 female 10 to 16

1 female between 16 & 26

1 female between 26 & 45

1 female over 45 (Elizabeth)

40 woollen cloth, 22 flaxon, 24 cotton, no hempen, 2 spinning wheels, 4 gammon sheep, 2 horses, 2 cattle, 1 loom, no hand cards.

 

Samuel Hoge (listed next to the household of Elizabeth Hoge).

2 males under 10 (one is James - who later married Elizabeth Watt))

1 male 10 to 16

1 male over 45 (Samuel)

1 female 10 to 16

1 female 16 to 45

1 female over 45 (Jean)

 

1811 Tax List, Milford Twp, Mifflin Co PA

Samuel Hogg, Range 8, 200 acres, 2 horses 2 cows, value $1720

 

1812 Tax List, Milford Twp, Mifflin Co PA

Samuel Hogg, Range 7, 100 acres transferred to George Guiliford, value $874

 

1813 Tax List, Milford Twp, Mifflin Co PA

Samuel Hogg, Range 7, 100 acres, value $874

 

1814 Tax List, Milford Twp, Mifflin Co PA

Samuel Hogg, Range 7, 100 acres, value $800

 

1816 Tax List, Milford Twp, Mifflin Co PA

Samuel Hogg, Range 3, 150 acres, value $800

 

Note: Robert Hogg was listed as a single freeman in 1813, 1814, 1815 and 1816. He was listed as a weaver in 1816. William Hogg was listed as a single freeman in 1812, 1813 and 1814.

 

 

1820 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Township, Butler Co PA

Samuel Hoge

1 male under 10

2 males 10 to 16 (one is James - who later married Elizabeth Watt))

1 male over 45 (Samuel)

1 female 16 to 26

1 female over 45 (Jean)

 

1830 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Township, Butler Co PA

Samuel Hoge

1 male 15 to 20

2 males 20 to 30 (James - who later married Elizabeth Watt))

1 male 60 to 70 (Samuel)

1 female 30 to 40

1 female 60 to 70 (Jean)

 

1840 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Township, Butler Co PA

Samuel Hogg

1 male 15 to 20

1 male 30 to 40 (James - who later married Elizabeth Watt))

1 male 70 to 80 (Samuel)

1 female 10 to 15

1 female 20 to 30

1 female 30 to 40

 

1850 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Twp, Butler Co PA Household 109

Name

Age

Sex

Occupation

Value of Estate Owned

Born

James Hogg

42

M

Farmer

$1500

PA

Elizabeth (Watt)(*)

30

F

 

 

PA

James H.

7

M

Attd'd school

 

PA

John A.

5

M

Attd'd school

 

PA

(*) died 1851.

 

Household 110 (living next door to James and Elizabeth Hogg - unknown relation)

Mary Hogg

45

F

 

$800

PA

Mary L Love ??

22

F

 

 

PA

 

Several other potentially-related Hogg families living in Cherry Township, Butler Co PA

Household 140 (Cherry Twp)

Robert Hogg

62

M

Farmer

$1000

IRELAND

Elizabeth

26

F

 

 

PA

Isabell

18

F

 

 

PA

 

Household 141 (Cherry Twp)

Robert Hogg Jr

33

M

Farmer

 

PA

Mary J (or S)

25

F

 

 

IRELAND

John A.

6

M

Attd'd school

 

PA

Robert

4

M

Attd'd school

 

PA

Margaret A

2

F

 

 

PA

Wm

1/12

M

 

 

PA

Margaret McFate

31

F

 

 

IRELAND

 

Household 142 (Cherry Twp)

John Hogg

31

M

Farmer

 

PA

Flowrinda (sp?)

28

F

 

 

PA

Margaret

7

F

Attd'd school

 

PA

Anne

4

F

Attd'd school

 

PA

Robert M.

1

M

 

 

PA

 

Household 143 (Cherry Twp)

James ? Hogg

26

M

Farmer

 

PA

Mary E.

25

F

 

 

PA

Perry Hale

10

M

Attd'd school

 

PA

 

1860 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Township, Butler Co PA, Household 132

 

 

 

 

Value of Estate Owned

Place of

Name

Age

Sex

Occupation

Real Est.

Personal

Birth

James (*)

50

M

Farmer

$2800

$635

PA

James

17

M

Farm Laborer

 

 

PA

John (Alexander)

15

M

Farm Laborer

 

 

PA

Nancy McGinnis

37

F

Domestic

 

 

Derry?

(*) died1885

 

Household 133 (living next door to James Hogg and family)

Mary Hogg

56

F

 

$1000

$400

PA

Catherine Donaldson

35

F

Domestic

 

 

PA

 

Household 134 (living two doors down from James Hogg and family)

John Hogg

46

M

Farmer

$6000

$6754

PA

Elizabeth

42

F

 

 

 

PA

Mary

21

F

 

 

 

PA

??????????

20

M

Farm Laborer

 

 

PA

Mary Stillwagon

5

F

 

 

 

PA

 

1870 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Township, Butler Co PA

Reviewed entire township - no entry for James (died 1885) or son John Alexander Hogg.

 

1880 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Township, Butler Co PA

Reviewed entire township - no entry for James Hogg (died 1885).

 

1880 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Township, Butler Co PA Household 41

 

 

 

 

 

Father

Mother

 

Name

Age

Sex

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

 

 

John Hogg

35

M

 

Farmer

PA

PA

PA

 

Elizabeth (Irwin)(*)

33

F

Wife

Keeping house

PA

IRELAND

PA

 

James

7

M

Son

Attd'd school

PA

PA

PA

 

Martha

6

F

Dau

Attd'd school

PA

PA

PA

 

Mary

5

F

Dau

Attd'd school

PA

PA

PA

 

Eva

3

F

Dau

 

PA

PA

PA

 

Willis

2

M

Son

 

PA

PA

PA

(*) died 1896.

 

1900 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Township, Butler Co PA Household 122

 

 

Yrs

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Md

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

John Hogg

55

M

25

Head

Farmer

PA

PA

PA

James

26

M

 

Son

Carpenter

PA

PA

PA

Willis E.

21

M

 

Son

Teacher

PA

PA

PA

John F.

19

M

 

Son

Telegraff Oprtr

PA

PA

PA

Calvin

15

M

 

Son

Oprtr Telegraff

PA

PA

PA

Arthur

12

M

 

Son

At School

PA

PA

PA

Edna

11

F

 

Dau

 

PA

PA

PA

 

Household 121 (relation unknown but next door)

Mary Jane Hogg

58

F

33

Head

 

PA

Ireland

Ireland

Robert Bovard

33

M

6

Son-in-Law

Farm Laborer

PA

PA

PA

Emma C? (Hogg)

31

F

6

Dau

 

PA

PA

PA

Price? F.

5

F

 

Grand-dau

 

PA

PA

PA

Bernice M.

1

F

 

Grand-dau

 

PA

PA

PA

 

1910 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Township, Butler Co PA Household 33

Road: Slippery Rock to Adams Corners

 

 

Yrs

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Md

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

John Hogg

65

M

Wdw

Head

Farmer

PA

PA

PA

John

30

M

 

Son

Theological Student

PA

PA

PA

Calvin

26

M

 

Son

High School Teacher

PA

PA

PA

Arthur

23

M

 

Son

Grammer School Teacher

PA

PA

PA

Edna L.

20

M

 

Dau

 

PA

PA

PA

 

1920 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Township, Butler Co PA Household 179

 

 

 

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

John Hogg (*)

76

M

Head

Gen'l Farming

PA

PA

PA

Edna

27

F

Dau

Home Duties

PA

PA

PA

Calvin

35

M

Son

High School Teacher

PA

PA

PA

Arthur

32

M

Son

High School Teacher

PA

PA

PA

(*) died 1924.

 

Household 180 (*)relation unknown but next door to John Hogg and family)

Robert B. Bovard

53

M

Head

Gen'l Farming

PA

PA

PA

Emma (Hogg?)

51

F

Wife

Home Duties

PA

PA

PA

Iris F.

25

F

Dau

Public School Teacher

PA

PA

PA

Bernice

21

F

Dau

Music Teacher

PA

PA

PA

Mary Jane Hogg(*)

78

F

Mother

Home Duties

PA

Ireland

Ireland

 

Household 182 (relation unknown but three doors down from John Hogg)

James F. Hogg

65

M

Head

General Farming

PA

PA

PA

Martha

54

F

Wife

Home Duties

PA

PA

PA

Sarah

21

F

Dau

Public School Teacher

PA

PA

PA

Dora

25

M

Dau

Home Duties

PA

PA

PA

Raymond

2?

M

Son

Home Farmer

PA

PA

PA

 

Jackson and Forward Townships, Main Street, Evansburg Borough, Butler Co PA

Household 140 (showing Calvin also being enumerated in Evansburg Borough)

Mary Markk?

61

Wdw'd

Head

 

PA

Ger

Ger

Emma

36

F

Dau

 

PA

PA

PA

Zirus H

25

M

Son

Hardware Merchant

PA

PA

PA

William

24

M

Son

 

PA

PA

PA

Dorothy

22

F

Dau

Public School Teacher

PA

PA

PA

Mary

20

F

Dau

 

PA

PA

PA

Jean

18

F

Dau

 

PA

PA

PA

Fred Caderer

3

M

Grandson

 

PA

PA

PA

Calvin Hogg

36

M

Boarder

Public School Teacher

PA

PA

PA

Earl F Stubbs

25

M

Boarder

Public School Teacher

PA

PA

PA

 

 

1930 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Township, Butler Co, PA (ED 10-61)

 

 

 

First

 

Father

Mother

 

 

Name

Relatn

Age

Status

Marr

Born

Born

Born

Occupation

Industry

Hogg, Calvin

Head

47

M

38

PA

PA

PA

School Supt

Public School

, Dorothy P.

Wife

30

M

21

PA

NY

PA

 

 

, Theodore

Son

7

S

 

PA

PA

PA

 

 

, Robert

Son

6

S

 

PA

PA

PA

 

 

, Ester E.

Dau

4

S

 

PA

PA

PA

 

 

, Florence L

Dau

2

S

 

PA

PA

PA

 

 

(*) Value of owned home: Not mentioned

 

 

1940 Federal Census, Slippery Rock Township, Butler Co, PA (ED 10-77, page 1B)

Own/ Rent

Home
Value


Name


Relation


Age


Status


Born


Occupation


Industry

O

3,000

Hogg, Calvin

Head

56

M

PA

Teacher

Public School

 

 

, Dorothy

Wife

41

M

PA

Housewife

 

 

 

, Theodore

Son

17

S

PA

 

 

 

 

, Robert

Son

16

S

PA

 

 

 

 

, Esther

Dau

14

S

PA

 

 

 

 

, Louise

Dau

7

S

PA

 

 

 

 

, Lois

Dau

6

S

PA

 

 

 

 

, Naomi

Dau

6

S

PA

 

 

 

 

 

HOGG INFORMATION

 

 

 

Mifflin Co, PA Court Docket

January 1811 Session

 

According to the following 1811 Mifflin County Court documents, there appears to have been several incidents between several Hogg brothers and a James Cummings. It appears as if brothers William and Robert were initially charged with assault and battery. One of the witnesses ordered to appear was a James Cummings. The 2nd charge was against Samuel Hogg for threatening James Cummings. The 3rd charge, of theft, was lodged against brothers William and Robert. The 4th charge of robbery was lodged against Robert and William. Charges #3 and 4 were discharged.

 

Commonwealth
vs

William Hogg &
Robert Hogg

On charge of assault and battery

Robert Hogg held on $100
William Hogg held on $100

conditioned for their appearance at this session to answer ???

 

         Samuel Hogg held on $100 conditioned for the appearance of Robert and William Hogg at this session to answer ???

         John Cummings held on $50 conditioned for the appearance of James [Cummings] minor at this session to give testimony ???

         James Cummings held on $50 conditioned to appear at this session to give testimony ???

Commonwealth

vs

Samuel Hogg

On a charge of threatening James Cummings

Samuel Hogg held on $100 condition for his appearance at this session to answer ???

 

         James Cummings held on $50 conditioned to appear at this session to give testimony

Commonwealth

vs

William Hogg &

Robert Hogg

On a charge of theft

Robert Hogg held on $100
William Hogg held on $100

each conditioned for their appearance at this session to answer ???

 

         Samuel Hogg held on $100 conditioned for the appearance of Robert and William Hogg at this session to answer ???

         James Cummings held on $50 conditioned to appear at this session to give testimony

         John Cummings held on $50 conditioned for the appearance of James ______ minor at this session to give testimony ???

 

January session 1811 on the above charge of theft the defendants are discharged by proclamation.

Commonwealth

vs

Robert Hogg &

William Hogg

On the charge of robbery

Robert Hogg held on $100
William Hogg held on $100

each conditioned for their appearance at this session to answer ???

 

         Samuel Hogg held on $100 conditioned for the appearance of Robert and William Hogg at this session to answer ???

         James Cummings held on $50 conditioned for his appearance at this session to give testimony ???

         John Cummings held on $50 conditioned for the appearance of James ______ minor at this session to give testimony ???

 

January session 1811 on the above charge of robbery the defendants are discharged by proclamation.

 

 

Early Hogg/Hogue References

Butler Co, PA Estate Index 1800-1901

Butler County (PA) Courthouse

Name

Of

File#

Death Date

Will Notes

Hogg, Robert (Sr)

Cherry Twp.

H108

2/2/1857

John Hall and Robert Hogg, Administrators

Hogg John

 

H139

 

 

Hogg, James

 

H151

 

 

Hogg, John L.

 

H192

 

 

Hogg, Jane H.

 

H335

 

 

Hogg, Harvey

 

H389

8/7/1892

Died intestate, wife possibly Mary Jane.

Hogg, Robert

Cherry Twp.

H472

 

 

Hogg, Robert

Cherry Twp.

H761

10/8/1918

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spelled Hogue

 

 

 

 

Hoge, James

 

H253

 

 

Hogue, Martha

 

H296

 

 

Hoge, Archie

 

H421

 

 

Hoge, Matilda

 

H434

 

 

 

 

 

Early Hogg/Hogue References

Butler Co, PA GrantorGrantee Index

Butler County (PA) Courthouse

Date

Grantor

Grantee

Location

Bk/Pg

Sep 28 1854

Hogg, Samuel Est

John Hogg

Rel

V / 259

Sep 28 1854

Hogg, Samuel Est

John Hogg

Rel

V / 260

Jul 12 1867

Hogg, Samuel Est

James H Hogg

S Rock Twp

19/520

Oct 30 1872

Hogg, Samuel Est

John A. Hogg

S Rock Twp

32/421

Mar 31 1874

Hogg, Sarah

James Cury

P of A

38/197

May 28 1908

Hough, Susan S

Catherine Lehnerd

Summit Twp

259/34

Jun 27 1910

Hogue, Samuel (or S S)

John H McLure

RofWW Lib

279/253

May 25 1912

Hogue, S L

Mfrs Light & Heat Co.

Lease-W Lib

296/206

Jul 31 1914

Hogue, Sarah M

John W McKissick

Cherry Twp

314/277

Jul 31 1914

Hogue, Sarah M

Joseph W McKissick

W Sunbury

314/281

Dec 8 1914

Hogg, Samuel H

G E Hutchinson

S Rock Twp

313/134

May 18 1915

Hogue, Sarah (M)

D L Hindman

W Sunbury

319/338

Apr 7 1916

Hogue, Samuel L (or) S L

John C Hogue

Worth Twp

327/486

Sep 18 1916

Hogg, Samuel H

Geo E Hutchinson

S Rock & Cherry Twps

330/406

Oct 3 1918

Hogg, Samuel H

Margaret Bryan

Q C-Cherry Twp

352/361

Feb 19 1920

Hogg, Samuel H

James A Hockenberry

Cherry Twp

370/21

Oct 28 1921

Hogue, Scott G

Jonathan Durnell

Worth Twp

386/208

Apr 3 1924

Hogue, S L

Roy J Hogue

Worth Twp

411/215

Aug 17 1925

Hogue, S L

Mfrs L & H Co

Lease-Brady Twp

426 303

 

 

 

 

HOGG SOURCES

 

         Genealogical and historical research that I was provided with (for example, all the previously conducted genealogies mentioned in this chapter) and research that I conducted.

         History of the Juniata Valley and its People Vol. III, John W. Jordon, LL.D.; Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York; 1913, page 930. See: http://pa-files.biofiles.us/Juniata/JunValley.1913.V2.907-944.pdf

         2013 genealogy research by David Nims (djnims7@gmail.com) on Robert Hogg (1783-1852). See his website here: http://www.nims-leistiko.info/RobertAnnaHogg.htm

         2013 genealogy research on William Hogg, Sr (b 1789-d after 1875): http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/o/g/Clayton-L-Hogg/BOOK-0001/0006-0001.html