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HARROD

 

Compiled by: Andrew L. Moore

336 Sarver Road, Sarver  PA  16055

Email: PAmoores@juno.com

Dated: 22 April 2012


 

 

HARROD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Alexander Mitchell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hiram Mitchell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mary ????

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Alexander Mitchell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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William Bailey

 

 

 

 

 

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Lucretia Bailey

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Margaret Greene

 

 

 

 

 

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Carl Mitchell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Col William Harrod

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John Harrod/Sarah Moore

 

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William Harrod Jr

 

 

 

 

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Amelia Stephens

 

 

 

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John R Harrod

 

 

 

 

 

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John Rice

 

 

 

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Nancy Rice

 

 

 

 

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Sarah Roach

 

 

 

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Mary Harrod

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Isaac Kinney

 

 

 

 

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Susan Kinney

 

 

 

 

 

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Abraham Taylor

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William Taylor/Sarah ______

 

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Amelia Taylor

 

 

 

 

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Mary ????

 

 

 

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Barbara Mitchell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hugh Bracken

 

 

 

 

 

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Granville Bracken

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lt. James Daugherty

 

 

 

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Samuel Daugherty

 

 

 

 

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Rebecca Cunningham

 

 

 

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Sarah Daugherty

 

 

 

 

 

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Samuel Latimore

 

 

 

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Chlore Latimore

 

 

 

 

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Lucy Bracken

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Charles Brady

 

 

 

 

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Thomas A Brady

 

 

 

 

 

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Rebecca Anderson

 

 

 

 

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Milton A Brady

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thomas Bailey

 

 

 

 

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Elizabeth Bailey

 

 

 

 

 

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Mary Bailey

 

 

 

 

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Elizabeth Brady

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Barent Smock

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Barent Smock/Johanna Luyster

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Pieter Smock

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Antje Cozzine

 

 

 

 

 

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Eliza Smock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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David Clark

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Judith Clark

 

 

 

 

 


HARROD

 

HARROD.  English: (1) from the Old English personal name Hereweald, its Old Norse cognate Haraldr, or the Continental form Herold introduced to Britain by the Normans.  These all go back to a Germanic personal name composed of the elements heri, hari, army + wald rule, which is attested in Europe from an early date; the Roman historian Tacitus records a certain Cariovalda, chief of the Germanic tribe of Batavi, as early as the 1st AD.  (2) occupational name for a herald, Middle English herau(l)d (Old French herau(l)t, from a Germanic cpd of the same elements as above, used as a common noun).  (3) variation of Harwood.  (4) Variation of Herrod.  Excerpted from A Dictionary of Surnames by Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges, Oxford University Press, Oxford NY  1988.

 

 

The Harrod Name

 

            “The names Harrod, Harwood and Howard derive from the ancient name Hereward, dating back before William the Conqueror [circa 1028-1087, Duke of Normandy and, from 1066-1087, the 1st Norman King of England].  Howard became a name in the sixth generation from Hereward.  Harwood was “Horewood of the 14th Century”.  Early English records show the names spelled variously as Harwood, Horwood, Haward, Heyward and Harwode in the 1500s.  Early in 1600 Harrod appears with Harwood in the English counties of Berks and Bucks, and later in Bedford, England.  During about 1700, Harrod appears to be an accepted name.

 

            All these families descend from Robertus Hereward who was given land in East Hagbourne.  One branch settled in Bedfordshire, centering around Leighton Buzzard, Ampthill and Woburn.  Their connections were with the nobility, one member being Master of the Robes at Manor House. 

           

            The Arms of the family vary slightly, principally in color, the Berks branch having the bearings gules, instead of sable.  Before Charles I and II, they used both eagles and stag heads.  The ancient arms of Sir Robert Hereward were “chi ker d’or et d’azure a une bende de gules iij eagles d’argent”.

 

            The early Harrods in America were Baptists and members of the families presently living in England belonged to that church.  Their history has been around Leighton Buzzard, County of Bedford, England, which is said to have been the haven for persons of that faith.  The names of Baptists early in Maryland read like a roster of the names found at Leighton Buzzard and vicinity.

 

            The same confusion in the spelling of the name is found in the records in this country until about 1800, when the families themselves seem to have settled the problem, and Harrod went on to become prominent in the military and pioneer history of America, and later in the fields of education and science.”

 

The preceding was taken from The Harrod Family Genealogy by Bernice Lewis Swainson, The Filson Club History Quarterly, Vol 32, No 2, Page 111, April 1958 and Vol 32, No 2, Page 256, July 1958, Louisville KY.  Comments in [ ] added by ALM.

 

 

The Draper Collection

 

            A very early first hand account of our Harrod ancestry was recorded in an interview between Dr. Lyman C. Draper and William Harrod, Jr, grandson of John and Sarah (Moore) Harrod in November of 1845 presumably at William Harrod’s home near Germantown, Bracken Co KY.  Dr. Draper was something of a roving historian.  His manuscripts are now in the archives of the Wisconsin Historical Society in Madison, Wisconsin.  Amplifications in ( ) are part of the original handwritten notes of Dr. Draper.  Amplifications in [  ] added by ALM.

           

 

Copy of Draper Mss 37J168

 

            The father of the Harrods (Thomas or Samuel, probably) [later research concluded it was “John”] came from England when a young man--married Sarah Moore, on the Shenandoah [in Virginia]; oldest son, Samuel, born there, and then removed to the Big Cove in then Cumberland County, Penna., and there William was born on the 9th day of December 1737--then Nellie (married to Voluntine House)--then James, born in 1742--then Rachel (married to George Newland) then Mary (married to Adam Newland)--Levi, Sallie (never married)--then Elizabeth (married to Benjamin Davis, cousin of Anthony Wayne)--and Jemima (never married).

            William Harrod served as a sergeant on Fobers (Forbes) campaign in 1758, greatly pressed for provisions and had to kill some of the pack horses, and Harrod went out one day and killed three deer, Forbes having given permission-this was on the return to Fort Cumberland.

            Before the close of the French War, Captain Harrod was sta­tioned at Juniata [Juniata River PA Fort] and Captain James Piper commanded at a neighboring fort.  A party of Indians came and killed some men near Juniata Fort.  Others with them fled and reported about fifty Indians.  Harrod raised at his own and Piper's Fort, 35 men; took the trail, and overtook them in the evening, camped at the head of a hollow.  Harrod's men surrounded the Indian camp, and as the day was dawning and the Indians just getting up, fired on them and killed several; the others fled without firing a gun, leaving several guns and other plunder in camp.  Harrod's party returned victorious, and no depredations [Indian raids] were committed in that region for some time.

            On the first of October 1765, Captain [later Col.] [William] Harrod [Sr] married Amelia Stephens, moved from the Big Cove to the Little Cove, and in 1772, removed to the Monongahela country [southwestern PA], and settled on the south fork of Tenmile Creek [and what is now Greene Co PA].

            It was Samuel Harrod who in 1767 was with Michael Stoner hunting in Illinois.  Samuel was a great hunter, remained in the French country, killed buffalo meat and took it to New Orleans to supply the garrison, and thus remained until the spring of 1780, when he was killed at the mouth of the Tennessee by an Indian hired to do so from some pique by a French trader at Kaskaskia, whom William Harrod had apprehended and put in irons, took his store of goods and divided them among his soldiers.

            War of 1774.  In the summer of 1774 Captain Harrod com­manded at Ross's fort on Rough Fork of Tenmile.  (Ruff's Creek) Captain Harrod aided in getting supplies for Dunmore's Army and went out with a company in the Fall of 1774.  Dunmore's Treaty was made on Kinnekenic Creek, a branch of the Sciota.

            Early in 1776 and perhaps late 1775 Captain William Harrod visited Kentucky.

            Late in 1776 he was placed in command at Grave Creek and there remained the most of 1777. He was of Foreman's party, took to the hillside with Samuel Thomas and others.  Foreman's men were fired on. Harrod and others hollowed and ran down the hill firing on the Indians. The latter fled and several swam the Ohio.  One Thomas shot swimming and both the Indian and his gun sank.

            Thinks he commanded at Wheeling in 1776 and 1777.

            Aided in taking Kaskaskia~went down the Monongahela [River, which joins the Allegheny River at Pittsburgh to form the Ohio] with his company in a keel boat. John Swan (Jr.) was his lieutenant.

            At the taking of Vincennes [IL], Harrod was ordered by Clark to march and remarch around the Sugar Loaf Hill in sight of the British garrison. (Here Draper says that Harrod was not there.)

            Bowman's Campaign. William Harrod commanded a company.  John Moredock was killed either here or at Pickaway in 1780, and his brother Edward killed two Indians.

            Clark's Campaign l780--William Harrod was out--James Harrod commanded the right wing, and Col. William Harrod the left-and at the battle, Col. William killed two Indians.  His cousin, Samuel Moore was killed in this battle.  He had dreamed before leaving Harrodsburg that he would either be killed or wounded, but rather than remain and be considered a coward, he went along, taking bandages with him.

            Captain Harrod commanded at the Falls of the Ohio [near present day Louisville KY] - had a town laid off there [Louisville KY].

During the hard winter of 1780 (3 feet of snow on the Monongahela country and the river froze over in November and continued till the last of March--snow 4 1/2 feet deep on the mountains between Redstone and Cumberland).  G. R. Clark spent a part of his time at Jacob Vanmeter's Fort on Swan's Run. (note-this was Henry Vanmeter's Fort.)

Swan's Fort and at Captain Harrods--Adam Rowe's family, wife and several children killed, two sons not killed; hid some pot metal plowing irons; going down the Ohio with Captain Harrod, and Rowe would go and get his hidden articles against Harrod's advice, who saw fresh Indian signs; Rowe and Isaac Perry, & young man, went to Rowe's cabin under the floor of which the articles were hidden, and as they recovered it, they discovered several Indians sitting down in front of the cabin eating.  Several fired and shot Perry, who ran a few steps and fell.  Rowe escaped and joined Harrod, abandoned their canoe where it was tied and had to go around back water, and thus were so long in getting to Wheeling [WVA].

            Harrod, Rowe, and Perry had left a large keel boat, in & large keel boat to Rowe's plunder, and then rejoin the keel boat.   Accompanying the keelboat were other boats-a day or so after Perry was killed, this keelboat was fired upon and Mrs. Richard Swan was wounded in the shoulder.

William Swan was Colonel of the militia of Washington County, Pennsylvania (this should be Charles Swan).  This was before Greene County (PA) was laid off.  In some way William Harrod gave his vote against slavery.

            In April 1793, William lost wife about that time he commanded a block house high up on Wheeling Creek, some 22 miles. Commanded at Fish Creek a while.

            While Harrod was at the Block House up Wheeling Creek in the Spring of 1793, perhaps in May, Captain William Enochs, with a party of men, pursued Indians that had killed two of widow Crow's daughters.  About seven miles up Captina, they fell in with the enemy and a battle ensued.  Captain Enoch killed an Indian, Abraham McCoun killed another.  The whites were defeated with the loss of Abraham and Isaac McCoun, Abraham  Enochs and John .......ines, and perhaps more. Duncan MacArthur was in this defeat. When the party returned subsequently, the body of Abraham Enochs, (the first who was killed in the fight, he being in advance) was found, cut up and mangled. The body of one of the McCouns was not found. Harrod had advised Captain Enochs not to follow much over the river.

            Jackson's Fort on south fork of Tenmile, was principal station in that region. Ross's, and John Antrim's (Ankrom's) on the south fork. Jacob Vanmeter's on Muddy Creek, Legg's (Clegg's) on Dun­kard Creek, William Minors on Big Whitley Creek, Guthrie's on Big Whitley, John Swan's on Swan's Run, Henry Vanmeter's also on Swan's Run, Henry Enoch's at the forks of the Tenmile, (he was the father of Captain Enochs) Bell's Fort on Rough Creek and others.

            The Harrods forted at Ross's Fort in 1774, subsequently they forted at Swan's Fort, while Captain William Harrod was in Kentucky in 1780 or before.

            In the Spring of 1782 Simon Rinehart, William Brown, and one English (William) some two miles down from Jackson's Fort, while moving some merchandise on sleds were fired upon and all three killed.  Vincent Brown and Michael Archer escaped to the fort, chased there.

            In July 1787 Colonel William Harrod and several others went out hunting on Fish Creek. Michael Archer, while on the way to join the hunting party, nearly a dozen miles above Jacksons Fort on Tenmile, was killed by the Indians.  His body was found with his fists clenched, and full of hair, evidently had fought till the last.  His dog was found lying, three days after, beside his master and very active.

            About 1782 or 1783 Caleb Linsecum and Michael Archer, when on Laurel Run, a mile from Jackson's Fort, were surprised by the Indians.  Archer beckoned Linsecum to mount their only horse, but Unsecum was so overcome with fear that he was easily killed, Archer escaping.

            About 1783 Indians fell upon the families of Robert McClennan (Meclelland) and James Archer, whose families lived in the same cabin, about three fourths of a mile from Fort Jackson.  They came on a foggy morning. Eight or nine of the two families were killed, a few escaped.  Jane Archer, a small girl was tomahawked and scalped, and left for dead but recovered.

            Col. William Harrod was a little short of six feet, (not more than an eighth of an inch wanting) raw-boned, about 180 pounds, dark hair and complexion. He was fond of hunting, in one day he killed eleven deer, a wolf, and a wild cat on Fishing Creek. One Fall in Kentucky, he killed 110 deer and sent the skins up the river.  This was somewhere in the 1780s. He killed 28 bear and 75 deer on a six weeks fall hunt up on Fish Creek.

            Col. Harrod came to Kentucky in the Spring of 1795 and lived with his son William [Jr] in Bracken County at the head of Locust Creek, and died October 9th 1801 after a few days illness with fever.  He was buried near the present Sharon Meeting House.

            Col. James Harrod may have been out on the Forbes Cam­paign, don’t recollect. In 1773 he explored Kentucky with several in a party.  Went to Greenbriar.  Next Spring, went again and settled Harrodsburg, etc.

            The elder Harrod (John Sr) had two sons, John and Thomas, by a first wife, then married Sarah Moore.  Thomas Harrod (Col. James Harrod's half brother) settled in North Carolina, and James used to go and visit him, and there very likely met [Daniel] Boone and others and learned of Kentucky.  He was six feet, could read and write, spare, dark black hair and eyes.  He (James) probably met foul play out trapping.  Made his will at Washington, Kentucky, and then went out on his last trapping on the Sandy. 

            Col. David Williamson boarded at William Harrod’s at big Cove.  Levi Harrod was one of the pilots on the White Woman’s Campaign, this about 1790 or 1791.  Williamson and someone else commanded, quite a body of men.  Captain William Crawford was a captain, no fighting, all horsemen.  Found the Indians too strong.  Thomas Stokely was along.

            Captain Ezekiel Rose was wounded thru the body, a very bad one, had a silk handkerchief pulled through the wound several times, got well and lived on Shirtee or Pigeon Creek. 

            General James Ray, when a man was out plowing at Harrodsburg, and an Indian was stealing up behind him, got in the rear and shot the Indian.  The man escaped to the fort and reported.

            Ben Eulen, perhaps a man killed with him, ran and jumped down from the eastern bank of the Kanawa, some 60 or 70 feet.  Would have been killed but for the grape vines, as it was he had his thigh broken and perhaps an arm.  Was taken to the fort at Pt. Pleasant.  Had a halt in his walk when my informant saw him at Pt. Pleasant.  A heavy set small man.

            James Harrod, once out hunting on horseback, fired, horse jumped and threw him and broke his thigh.  At a subsequent period he had the other [hip] broken the same way.

            Capt. Jesse Pigman commanded a company at Wappatomika in 1774, an old Indian fighter, who lived in the Muddy Creek Section.

            Col. William Harrod--early in the French War, prior to Forbes Expedition.  Harrod was stationed at, and this was probably his first service, and very likely in 1755, at Fort Littleton (so his son thinks) and rather receive the contumelious insults, he engaged in a fisticuff fight, and came out best amid the shouts of “hurrah for the widow’s son”.  Hence his father had deceased prior to that date.                                                      November 1845

 

 

Early Harrod Genealogy

 

            John Harrod, Sr was born c. 1700+/- in England, probably in the County of Bedford or Bucks.  He married in either England or Pennsylvania (wife unknown) and had two sons, John and Thomas, the latter of which settled in North Carolina.  An early Harrod family history states that while John Harrod, Sr. was away from home, Indians came and burned his house and killed his wife.  John then married a Sarah Moore “on Shenandoah” in Virginia about 1734.  After their first son was born there, the family moved north to the “Big Cove”, Cumberland Co PA where William Sr, our direct ancestor, and others were born.

 

 

James Harrod

 

Generation #1 [James Harrod] taken directly from “Genealogy Family Name: Harrod”

 by John Harrod (b 17 Sep 1900), 5713 Daphne Lane, Dayton, OH 45415;

Material located in the Kentucky Historical Society, Frankford, KY.

 

James Harrod, born circa 1668 in Bedfordshire, England.  Married Maria Kent in 1690 in Luton England.   Maria was born in 1670 at Oxford England.  They had at least five children, all sons:

 

1.       Ambrose, born 1692 England.

2.       Thomas, born 1694 England.

3.       Samuel, born 1696 England.

4.       William, born 1698 England.

5.       John, born 1700 Bedfordshire, England.

 

In 1714 James emigrated from England to America with John’s four older brothers.  John was left behind with his mother in England.

 

In 1722, James communicated to John and his mother “all possible is now in readiness for your occupancy, come and we shall keep hourly watch for you.  Sail up what is becoming known as Delaware Bay, as far as navigable up Delaware River, and land on East Shore, known to mariners as New Jersey.  We shall meet the landing with oxen and sled to haul all belongings to our new home.”  This location was later named Piscataway, NJ.

 

By then John was 21 years old and was engaged to marry a young English lady Caroline Downey.  The above message from America hastened their marriage.  The ceremony was performed at a local chapel in Luton by a wedding ring in the presence of his and her mother who stood with them.  Caroline was a black-haired, black-eyed Scotch-Irish girl.  Soon after the wedding, a group of young friends accompanied the departing Harrod’s, John and his mother Maria and bride Caroline, to London whence they boarded a sail vessel for America.

 

The exultant Harrod family greatly enjoyed their bridal voyage across the Atlantic much more happily by the three being together than such a trip could have been under ordinary circumstances.  The tradewinds were favorable, the ocean was calm, and the ocean-blue by day, and its white caps by night afforded a lovely scene for such a happy occasion. 

 

While awaiting the family, the men cleared and planted a garden, erected more log cabins, and a log barn for storage and for housing and protecting their live stock as such accumulated.

 

 

John Harrod

 

Generation #2 (James Harrod) taken partially from “Genealogy Family Name: Harrod”

 by John Harrod, 5713 Daphing Lane, Dayton, OH;

Material located in the Kentucky Historical Society, Frankford, KY.

 

John Harrod, born circa 1700 Bedfordshire England (other sources simply mention County Bedford or County Bucks, England), married Caroline Dewey in Luton England in 1722 and migrated to the America with his mother and his new bride that same year.  While in Piscataway NJ, John and Caroline had three children:

 

1.       Thomas, born 1724, Piscataway NJ.

2.       Eleanor, born 1725, Piscataway NJ.

3.       John Jr, born 1727, Piscataway NJ.

 

 

Caroline died at the hands of Indians in 1733 in or near Piscataway NJ.  Two versions of her death have been recorded:

 

a)       John returned from a hunting trip to find that Indians had burned the house and killed his wife.  Not far down-stream, he discovered her left hand, minus her wedding ring, lying in a canoe with part of the household goods.  Neighbors had rescued the bodies, Thomas and John, Jr.

b)       Caroline was killed and her body mutilated by savage Indians in a brief absence of her husband, John, while taking his two boys to spend the day with relatives a short distance away.  On John's return home, he saw his house afire, and rushing home found the savages still there, and his wife murdered, but in such excitement John was unable to shoot and kill the cowardly savages who dis­appeared into the dense forest.  Nearby John saw a canoe loaded with his household furnishings in which also was the hand of his wife, cut off by her attackers to get her ring, the wedding ring given her by John in England.

 

Two stories are recorded about John Harrod’s 1734 marriage to Sarah Moore, born 1712-15 in Baltimore, Maryland:

 

a)       Soon after the tragedy, John took his sons to Baltimore to stay with his Mother's family (Kents?).  He met Sarah Moore.  Her father, James Moore (*), was a wealthy planter liv­ing near the mouth of Gunpowder River, by the thriving lit­tle town of Joppa.  It was evident that Sarah's dignified Mother Frances Ruxton (Gay) Moore, would have preferred a young merchant or professional man for a son-in-law but John had won the love of this high spirited girl and marry her he did.

 

(*) James was born circa 1681/1682 New Kent, James City, VA and died before 21 Dec 1769 in Baltimore, MD.  He may have married twice: 1st to an unknown wife (having children Sarah and Simeon), and 2nd to Frances Ruxton Gay (having three children: James, Levi and Rachel).

 

b)       From it all John was so grief stricken that when he went back to where he had taken the two little boys (about 6 and 9 years old), friends and relatives who were there to greet the children, became sorrying sympathizers and words were incapable of consoling each other.  Then, when they went to Baltimore, among friends and relatives was Miss Sarah Moore, whose deep sympathies and kind consolation afforded John his first apparent comfort, for she was truly a substantial character,  Her pity for the motherless little boys was most impressive; and while John's relatives insisted on keeping the two boys, Thomas and John, Jr., so that the Father would be free to attempt his renewal of life and prospects, Miss Sarah Moore became his most prized prospect.

 

There was a land being opened for settlement west of the Blue Ridge in the valley of Virginia, so Sarah and John started out on horseback along the east bank of the Susque­hanna to Harris' Ferry (Harrisburg, Penna.) where they joined other families crossing the river and passing through the Conocheaque Valley into Maryland again, down to Harpers Ferry and into the upper Shenandoah Valley - a place known to the Indians as "daughter of the stars".

 

Here the Harrods found the Vanmetres, the Shelbys, the Walkers and the Hites, and many other families who had known John and his brothers when they were living in New Jersey a few years after their arrival in America. Like most settlers along the South Branch, John had not bothered to make the long trip to Williamsburg or Orange, the County seat, to secure land titles before moving in; he had settled on the first vacant spot that looked good to him, and since there were only a few hundred people in the valley with no official to challenge him there had been no argument,

 

On one point John had miscalculated.  He had gone along in this manner, building his stone house, wall­ing in his pastures. raising his small crops of tobacco and corn, only vaguely aware that an English Lord named Fairfax held title to this district.

 

The children of John and Sarah (Moore) Harrod are:

 

1.       Samuel, their first son, born 1735.

2.       William, born December 9, 1737.

3.       Rachel, their first daughter, born 1739.

4.       John, born 1742/45

5.       Levi, born January 22, 1750

           

They had a total of six girls, including Eleanor (Nelly) and Mary (birth dates not known).

 

1742/45:  Their third son James was born.  (In January 1760 James gave his age as 16, his height 5 feet 2 inches).  His nephew [our] Col. William Harrod, said he was born in 1742, while his wife Ann Coburn told her son-in-law that he was about 10 years older than she.  There is reason to believe that James was born as late as l745.

 

1746:  John learned of a disturbing announcement.  It seemed that Lord Fairfax had determined by survey that the valley was a part of his holdings and was about to open a land office here - not to issue titles in small parcels of a hundred acres or so for a few shillings each, but to establish a large manor on which settlers could remain, pro­vided they were willing to talk leases.

 

Unwilling to meet these terms and eager to own land out--right, large numbers of John's neighbors became panic-stricken and moved out, some of them taking stock and baggage all the way to the back country of North Carolina. But the Harrods, with a few others, crossed the Potomac to the west side and made their way along an old Indian trail down the Opekon Creek Valley through western Mary­land, northward into a beautiful valley called "the little Cove" so named because of the steep mountain wall surround­ing it,  They settled a few miles below the present Shepards­town, West Virginia.

 

The only trouble with the Cove was that it too was in disputed territory.  Originally a part of Virginia, it had been cut off when Pennsylvania and Maryland became colonies, but there had been no clear definition of boundaries between the two.  Neither colony was ready to make an outright claim, preferring to wait until British authorities established the line without question.  Nor was this uncertainty the only one facing the Harrods in the Cove.  The Indians still claimed the land west of the Kittatinny range on the ground that Great Britain had not concluded a treaty purchase - a customary procedure used to quiet the Indians prior to attempts of settlement.  At first this omission did not bother the Harrods but after more settlers had joined them, they dis­covered that the Delaware tribesman were becoming increas­ingly angry and threatening to attack centers farther east, places such as Lancaster, if the new-comers did not move quickly.  News of the threat spread through the country, like leaves in an autumn wind, until the council of Pennsylvania felt obligated to send its Secretary, the Reverend Richard Peters, and several Commissioners to straighten out matters.

 

Peters was a fortunate choice for the task.  Basically a kindly man, but capable of using strong and abusive lan­guage when he chose....he was also a good diplomat. Working his way south from the Juniata River, Peters and the other Commissioners gingerly ousted a few settlers, warning others off the "Indian land" and here and there burning cabins, usually only the "meanest ones".  In each case, Peters was careful to have the furnishings removed first, and to direct the owners toward land farther east, even advancing them money to start out anew.

To the settlers it all looked like a joke, but for the present the Indians were satisfied,

 

When the Commissioners reached the border of the Little Cove, they stopped fearful lest they stir up the old boundary dispute with Maryland.  Instead of being pleased by this turn of fortune, John Harrod, and his neighbors were actually dis­appointed.  At Peter's suggestion they drew up a petition to the Governor of Pennsylvania declaring their belief that the Cove was north of the temporary boundaries and expressing their desire to be recognized as citizens of Pennsylvania, not that Harrod, or any of the other signers had much love for Pennsylvania.  All they wanted was protection from the Indians and secure land titles.  Since Maryland would offer none, they were turning to their northern neighbor.  Peters at first refused to accept the petition because he felt that there were too few signers, so Harrod and the other advo­cates hastened to remedy the situation.  The efforts were useless, for they never heard from their petition; it dis­appeared among the council's ever increasing stack of papers on the boundary question.

 

Meanwhile, John became uneasy over Indian attacks which were more frequent and savage.  To play it safe, he moved his family through the narrow pass to the area east of the range in the Conococheaque Valley, where they would be closer to Pennsylvania frontier territory.  However, when the excite­ment over legalities again subsided and the Indian terror reached a lull, the Harrods moved west once more.  They set­tled north of their old home, in the Great Cove that nestled between two high ranges, crosscut by many low ridges and abounding in well-stocked streams and fertile pasture-land. (For record of purchase of farm, see court records of Warren Township, Franklin County, Pa., March 18, 1755.) But despite their sheltered location, the Harrods were even nearer the unfriendly Indians - an ominous considera­tion, since they could expect little sympathy from Pennsyl­vania authorities.

 

NOTE:  Wm. R. Anthony states that John moved from his first home in the Shenandoah Valley up into the Big Cove of Pennsylvania in autumn of 1737 and John named this terri­tory BEDFORD after his homeland Bedfordshire, England. This Bedford territory was erroneously miscalled Bedford County before Pennsylvania ever had a Bedford County, in quite a different locality, first set up March 9, 1771, altogether west of Bedford Territory, which name came into disuse after the Harrods ceased to live there.

 

1754:  John Harrod died on this farm leaving his wife and dozen children with his dream of a rich inheritance in land unrealized.  Sarah, the widow, had no easy life, but she was luckier than many she could have named.  Including her stepsons Thomas and John, who were coming from Baltimore to live with her, she had six healthy boys - tall, straight-made, olive skinned and dark eyed - all of them excepting four year old Levi able to read and write, thanks mostly to Sarah to whom this skill was a matter of pride and not to be neglected in any case.

 

Her oldest boy, Samuel, had recently joined the Mary­land militia; William, who was sixteen, could handle a gun and a plow as well as anyone; ten year old James was already a skilled woodsman.  She also had six girls, two of them almost grown.  Nellie was engaged to marry a friend of her half brother, John, and Sarah was happy about this. (Note: Previous accounts of the death of John's first wife do not mention Eleanor (Nelly) as a survivor.)  They would live in the Connallways, a section along North Mountain in the western part of Maryland, and provide a home for John, Jr. and Samuel when they were not on military duty,

 

For all she knew, Sarah might have to bundle up her children and move to Maryland,  herself.  One by one the widow's neighbors were sifting across the mountains looking for haven from hostile tribesmen.  But Sarah was re­luctant to leave the plantation she and John had estab­lished.  Even the killing of her hogs and sheep could not frighten her.

 

1755: On one November morning in 1755, Patrick Burns, who had been captured by the Indians, escaped and came running into the Great Cove, shouting the King Shingas, the great Delaware War­rior whose hands had long been stained by white man's blood, was on his way to make ashes of the cabins and scalp every man, woman and child he could find.  Some of Sarah's neighbors refused to believe this rumor, but she knew the time had come.  Without waiting to gather her pots and blankets together, she lifted young Levi, Eliz­abeth and Jemima onto her remaining horse; then, fol­lowed by the other children, she hurried toward the eastern sun.  A dozen other families straggled along up the steep wooded slope toward the river pass that led to the new Fort Littleton on the other side of the moun­tain.  At the summit of the first foothill, Sarah and her neighbors turned to have one last look at the Valley. Before their eyes was an awesome spectacle of destruction. Their houses were in flames; Delawares were riding like wild men through the Great Cove; and even at this distance the refugees could hear "the last shrieks of their dying neighbors."

Refugees crowded into the rectangular Fort Littleton, and by the following April, the surrounding area was de­serted.

 

1772:  James Harrod was listed in tax assessments of Bedford County as head of a family.  It is likely that he housed his Mother's household.  Two of her grand children were living with her.

In spite of the general hysteria, the widow Harrod would not budge probably because of news which arrived unexpectedly from Philadelphia that the peace-loving Assembly had finally aroused itself, contributing 60,000 pounds to the defense of the Colony, and passing a Mil­itia Act.

 

Thomas Gist offered to get the Harrods title to Ten Mile Tract, a few miles below Redstone, Monongahela country.  Will, living on his father's old claim in the Little Cove, was enthusiastic; but John, Jr. preferred to remain on the Conocoheague plantation.  Sarah began packing at once, and the Hughes, Swanns, the Van Meters and others did too.  When all were ready they started from Fort Combedand (Cumberland?) on Wills Creek for Ten Mile Creek, along old Braddock trail.  The immigrants left Braddock’s road six miles east of the present city of Uniontown and pushed on to Redstone Fort (Brownsville), setting up camp on the west side of the river near the mouth of Ten Mile Creek.  Jim and Will Harrod followed the course of Ten Mile Creek, from its steep banks at the mouth, along its greatly winding course to the South Fork and marked off their clearings.  The widow, Sarah, surrounded by children and friends, was snug and comfortable in her new home.  This was the good life her sons had been fighting for and she was content.

 

Although the Harrods had lived most of their lives in central Pennsylvania, they preferred at this time to consider themselves Virginians, since they had taken up their Ten Mile tracts in expectation of title under Virginia's favorable settlement law.  Pennsylvania wanted to include Ten Mile tract in Westmoreland County.

 

Actually it made little difference to the Ten Mile set­tler to which colony they belonged as long as they could keep their land.

 

1774: The recruiting center in the Ten Mile area was Richard Jacksons Fort, Waynesburg, and it was here that Captain William Harrod (son of Sarah) and other captains organ­ized their companies.  Since William had to make numerous extended journeys through the country, leaving his wife and his Mother without protection, he moved them to Ross' Fort, ten miles distant where he was in command.

 

The widow, Sarah, had been as enthusiastic about pioneering as her sons.  When her husband died in l754, leaving her with a house full of children, she had not returned to Baltimore to live comfortably with her family. She had gone on with her children, moving to the newly opened country east of the Tuscarawas, and later to the Monongahela with William and James.  No pioneer Mother could have asked more for her children.  Her girls were married well, into good families long associated with the Harrods and Moores, her boys, excepting James and Samuel, were married too; their wives had been raised on the fron­tier, and their parents the widow knew.  The Harrods, were good soldiers, good farmers, and leaders among their people. Although Sarah could not pioneer with James, she had lived to know that Ten Mile was not the end of the trail for her sons.

 

There is a persistent legend, supported by meager evidence, that a few years after the family moved to Ten Mile, the widow Sarah married a man named Brown and at the age of fifty (1762) bore a child, a girl, who later moved to Harrodsburg, Kentucky and married in the fort there.  Accord­ing to the gossip Sarah's two eldest daughters acted as mid­wives at the baby's birth.  If this story is true, this was Sarah's thirteenth child.

 

1775: But Sarah did not live to rear her because some time during this fall and winter, when the girl would have been ten years old, the Mother died at her home on Ten Mile.  It is not known whether Indians killed her or she died from a malady.  With but scanty knowledge of medicine, many pioneers fell victim to a "fever" or "flux" or to severe stomach pains.  Sarah was (sixty?) sixty-three, then a good age for a woman whose life had been strenuous with work and child bearing so perhaps it was natural that her sons should accept her death quietly and without later comment.

 

Note:  Even William Harrod, Jr., her grandson, omits any reference to her death in his sketch of the family.

 

1.    John, Jr, born c. 1734 Chester Co PA, married Rachel Sheperd 5 Aug 1758, died 26 Dec 1781 Bedford Co PA.

2.    Thomas, settled in North Carolina, died circa 1798 Rutherford Co NC.

 

After John’s wife was killed by Indians, he married a Sarah Moore in 1734 “on (the) Shenandoah” River in Virginia.  After having one child, the couple removed north up the Shenandoah Valley to the “Big Cove” in what was then Cumberland Co PA.  John and Sarah had the following children:

 

3.    Samuel, born circa 1735/6 “on the Shenadoah”.  Samuel never married and was killed by an Indian about 1780.

4.    Eleanor (aka Nellie), married John Valentine House, son of John House.  They lived in what was Fredrick Co VA and now Berkley Co WVA.

5.    William, born 9 Dec 1737 on the “Big Cove” River in Cumberland Co PA.  William married Amelia Stephens on 1 Oct 1765 in Bedford Co PA.  Attained the rank of Colonel in the Revolutionary War.  Died in Bracken Co PA on 1 Apr 1801.  I will expand on this direct descendant of ours later.

6.    James, one of Kentucky’s greatest pioneers and the founder of Harrodsburg KY, was born circa 1742/1746 “on the Eastern of the Susquohanna and Potomac”.  He married Ann Coburn McDaniel, a widow, in 1778/9 and they apparently had one daughter.  He died under mysterious circumstances in approximately 1792.  His will was probated in Washington Co KY in January 1794.  Several biographies have been written about this famous frontiersman.

     James is said to have aided his brother William in settling the Ten Mile Creek region of Greene Co PA.  He was taxed there in 1772.  In 1773, he explored Kentucky with a party and went to the Greenbriar River vicinity.  In the spring of 1774, he led a group into Kentucky which had organized for the purpose of establishing a permanent settlement on this virgin frontier.  On 16 June 1774, they selected a location upon a stream which is in Mercer Co KY and named it Harrod’s Town.  It later became known as Harrodsburg and was the first town in the entire state of Kentucky.  The founding of Harrod’s Town preceded the founding of another famous town called Boonesboro, Madison Co KY.  Boonesboro was established in 1775 by Captain Richard Henderson.  Daniel Boone built the first fort there that same year.

     Some interesting first hand statements made about James Harrod, the founder of Harrodsburg, include: “best woodsmen ever known”, “a very kind, friendly man and though no professor of religion yet held his house open to visits and public worship of the Methodists”, “His house protected all who called on him free of any charge”, “kind, but when roused to anger was like a thunderstorm, which seldom happened”, “He could talk French as fast as any of them (having spent some time at Kaskaskia in 1766)”, “Was beloved, honorable, no seeker after fame, he served his country....a good soldier and the men were always willing to turn out under him....served his country faithfully” and finally “his word was good....could read and write...a hero God made”.

     He was described as “of good parentage, good size...6 ft 1 in tall...trim made, and straight Roman nose, very black hair and beard”.  James served as a Justice for Kentucky in 1777 as well as in the Virginia Legislature. 

7.    Rachel, born 1739, married George Newland, died c. 1811 Bracken Co KY.  George was born circa 1741 in Berkley VA.

8.    Mary, married Adam Newland, remarried Evan Shelby. 

9.    Sarah, never married.

10. Levi, born 22 Jan 1750 Bedford Co PA, died 2 Oct 1825 Knox Co OH.  Married Rachel Mills who was born 22 Oct 1752, died 28 Sep 1834.

 

 

Colonel William Harrod, Sr.

 

            William Harrod, Sr, the second son of John and Sarah (Moore) Harrod, was born on 9 Dec 1737 on the “Big Cove” River in Cumberland Co PA.  William married Amelia Stephens on 1 Oct 1765 in either Bedford Co PA or Peters Township, Cumberland Co PA (sources conflict).  After his marriage, William moved from the “Big Cove” to the “Little Cove”.  In 1772, he moved his family to the Monongahela Country and settled on the South Fork of Ten Mile Creek, Ayr Township, Cumberland Co (now Futlon Co) PA.  In addition to this land, William patented a tract called “Drawl” in Morgan Township, Greene Co PA.  He also owned property in Kentucky and a large tract in the “Illinois Grant”.

            In April 1793, his wife Amelia died.  William sold his property in Greene Co PA in 1796 and joined his son, William Jr, who was already living in Bracken Co KY.  William Sr died in Bracken Co KY on 1 Apr 1801--reportedly at the home of his son William, Jr.  He is buried in the Sharon Cemetery next to his son William Jr.

            Dr. Lyman C. Draper’s interview with William Jr (see above) sheds a great deal of information on William Sr and his activities in and around the Pennsylvania and Kentucky frontiers before, during and after the American Revolution.  William Sr. and Amelia has six (or seven, depending on sources) children:

 

1.    John (uncertain).

2.    Sarah, born 6 Aug 1766 Peters Township Cumberland Co PA; married William Swan, son of John and Elizabeth (Lucas) Swan; died 16 Nov 1822 in Greene Co PA and is buried in the Swan Cemetery near Rices Landing/Carmichaels, Greene Co PA.

3.    Samuel, born 19 Jan 1769; baptized 24 Sep 1769 Upper West Connoheague, Warren Twp, Franklin Co PA; married Sarah O’Neil/O’Neal, daughter of Barent O’Neal Sr; and died after 19 Sep 1798 in Bracken Co KY.  Other sources have Samuel alive as late as 8 Jan 1808 in Clark Co IN and being buried in Silver Creek Cemetery, Charlestown Twp, Clark Co IN.

4.    Elizabeth, born 16 Apr 1770.

5.    William, born 10 Jan 1773 or 10 Oct 1773 (sources conflict) on the South Fork of Ten Mile Creek, Greene Co PA; married Nancy Ann Rice, the daughter of John and Sarah (Roach) Rice; died 23 Oct 1847 in Bracken Co KY.  I will expand on this direct descendant below. 

6.    Rachel, born circa 1777-1781; married Isaac Miranda in Bracken (or Mason) Co KY 13 Feb 1796; died after 15 Oct 1841. 

7.    James (uncertain).

 

 

William Harrod, Jr.

 

            William, the third son born to William and Amelia (Stephens) Harrod, was born on 10 Jan 1773 or 10 Oct 1773 (sources conflict) on the South Fork of Ten Mile Creek, Greene Co PA.  William married Nancy Ann Rice, the daughter of John and Sarah (Roach) Rice, probably in Greene Co PA.  In 1796/7, William, his wife Nancy and his father William Sr, left the Ten Mile region of western PA and migrated to Bracken Co KY where they purchased approximately 160 acres of land in 1798/1799 on the waters of Locust Creek near Germantown KY.

            William Jr died in Bracken Co KY on 23 Oct 1847.  His estate affairs, administered by his son, William S. Harrod, is found in Bracken Co KY Court Book F: Page 161 Inventory, Page 163 Estate Sales and page 235 Estate Settlement.  William Jr is buried next to his wife Nancy Ann Rice and his father William Sr in the Sharon Cemetery next the Sharon Presbyterian Church.

            There is conflicting information on Nancy Ann Rice.  Buried next to William in the Sharon Presbyterian Cemetery in Bracken Co KY is an "Ann Harrod, died 3 May 1846, aged 74y 2m 2 d" (calculated to be born 1 Mar 1772).  Yet in the book "Ten Mile Country" by Howard Leckey (page 260), Nancy is listed as dying in Clarke Co IN in 1847.

 

 

William and Nancy had six or seven children:

 

1.    Nancy Ann, born circa 1794 Washington Co PA; married John H. Poe on 22 Aug 1833 in Bracken Co KY; died after 1866.  John was the son of Samuel and Mary (Hook) Poe.

2.    Elizabeth, born circa 1796 Washington Co PA.  Elizabeth married Fielding Hazelrigg on 8 Feb 1816 in Bracken Co KY.  Fielding died after they had two sons (names unknown).  Elizabeth then married a Daniel Kiger (born 1798 in KY) and moved to the Connersville IN area.  In 1832 they homesteaded two 80 acre tracts of land in Center Township, Hendricks Co IN - about two miles northeast of Danville IN.  Elizabeth and Daniel were the parents of four daughters - all born in Hendricks Co IN: Elizabeth (b 10 Nov 1833), Hannah, Cynthia (b 24 Mar 1841) and Sarah (b 1846).  It was the discovery of Elizabeth Harrod Hazelrigg Kiger in Hendricks Co IN that led to the sibling connection between Elizabeth and John Harrod.  Daniel Kiger died in 1885 and Elizabeth on Friday March 13, 1885.  Both are buried in a family cemetery on the original farm.  Her obituary can be found in the 19 March 1885 Hendricks County Republican: “Died Friday March 13, Mrs. Daniel Kiger.  The deceased was one of the early pioneers of Hendricks County.”

3.    Unidentified Daughter - as listed in 1810 Bracken Co KY census. 

4.    Hannah, born circa 1800 Bracken Co KY; married Benjamin Bravard on 8/9 Jan 1817 Bracken Co KY; died before 16 Apr 1883 Bracken Co KY.

5.    John R, born 12 Oct 1805 Bracken Co KY; married Susie Kenney; died 13 Apr 1883 Hendricks Co IN.  I will expand on this direct descendant below.

6.    William S., born 15 Sept 1808 Bracken Co KY; married Catherine Neal 19 Sept 1832 Bracken Co KY; died 26 Sept 1866 Bracken Co KY; buried Maple Grove Cemetery, Germantown KY

7.    James N, born circa 1814; married Mary Rich on 11 Dec 1838 Campbell Co KY; died 13 Oct 1854 Pendleton Co KY.

 

 

John R. Harrod

 

John R. Harrod was born on Oct 21, 1805 in Bracken Co KY.  John was almost certainly the son of William Harrod and Ann Rice.  He married Susan (Kinney) Hamilton in Bracken Co KY on 11 Oct 1841. Susan, the daughter of Isaac and Amelia (Taylor) Kinney, was born in Bracken Co KY around 1805.  She had first married a Joel W. Hamilton on 16 Nov 1825 in Bracken Co KY.  Susan and Joel had two children, Sarah Ann and Lucinda.  Joel must have died shortly after Lucinda was born in 1829 as Susan used her married name of Susan Hamilton when she married John R. Harrod in 1841.

 

Isaac Kinney, father of Susan Kinney (Hamilton) Harrod, was a farmer who had migrated to Bracken Co KY from Somerset Co MD between 1800 (where he appeared in that census) and 1810.  He apparently migrated from Somerset Co MD with a large contingent of Taylor families (including Abraham and Bartholomew, sons of Abraham--d 1792 Somerset Co MD--and Mary Taylor).  Additional information on the Kinney’s and Taylor’s appear in the Kinney chapter.

 

After extensive research, two references have been found confirming John Harrod’s wife: 1) The death certificate of Mary Harrod Mitchell, John’s fourth daughter, lists Mary’s parents as John R. Herod and Susie Kenney, and 2) in late 1997, the Bracken Co KY Historical Society published a “Marriages and Bonds 1797-1859” Book that contained Susan’s first marriage to Joel Hamilton and her second to John R. Harrod.

 

In the first census where all family members within the household are recorded (1850 Federal Census), the family of John R. Harrod (listed in the 1850 Harrison Co KY census) lists only John and his four youngest children.  It is entirely possible that Susie Kinney (Hamilton) Kinney died giving birth to their final child in 1849.

 

            In 1855, John migrated with his 4 young daughters from Harrison Co KY to Hendricks Co IN where his oldest two daughters, Sarah Ann Proctor and Lucinda M. Fronk, had already established families.  John lived in Hendricks Co IN until his death in on 13 April 1883 near Danville IN.  He is buried in the Danville South Cemetery, Danville IN.

 

            John purchased and sold land in Bracken Co KY, Harrison Co KY and Hendricks Co IN.  His wife is not mentioned on any of the deed transactions - which leads to the assumption that his wife (or wives) died before the transactions took place. 

 

            The following listing is from the 1872 Directory of Hendricks County IN, page 343:  “Harrod, John;  farmer; 3 miles sw Pittsboro.  Born KY 1802, settled in Hendricks Co in 1852.  Republican.  Protestant.”

 

            John’s obituary is found in the 19 Apr 1883 Danville Republican (pg. 8 col 1):  “Died - - Near this place, at the residence of Alfred Finn, on the 13 inst., John R. Herrod, in the 78 year of his age.  He was a widely known and well respected citizen and his death was very sudden and unexpected.  On the morning of his illness, he appeared in perfect health.  His death was caused by a paralytic stroke.  He was born in Bracken County, Kentucky in 1805, and moved to Hendricks County Indiana in 1854 where he has resided ever since.  He was kind and benevolent and always ready to help those in need.  A very large number of friends gathered at the residence to take the last sad look at the calm and peaceful countenance of the deceased.  There were few that did not weep.  The remains were interred at the Danville cemetery by the side of his daughter (Susan Harrod Pattison) who had gone before.  The sympathy of the entire community is with the heart broken family.  He leaves five grown daughters to morn his loss.”

 

            In the 16 Oct 1884 Hendricks County Republican, the Hendricks County Circuit Court issued a notice to heirs and creditors of John Harrod, deceased, that John’s administrator has submitted the final settlement of John’s estate to the court - and asks if anyone can show cause why the account cannot be settled.  During late 1884 and early 1885, several court records have been recorded documenting the settlement of John’s estate.  By 25 Jan 1885, the Judge issued the final settlement of $64 to each of the surviving children.  Although his land must have also been distributed to his children, no record can be found substantiating this.   Mary Harrod Mitchell, the grandmother of William B. Moore, sold her portion of her father’s land in early 1884 while she was living in Centerville IA. 

 

John R. Harrod Deed Records

From Bracken, Pendleton and Harrison COs KY and Hendricks CO IN

Date/Location

Deed

Transaction

22 Apr 1833/Bracken Co KY

J/391

John buys 100 acres in Bracken Co KY from Martin & Matilda Marshall for $275.

13 Jan 1838/Bracken Co KY

L/362

John sells the 100 acres to Rueben Smarr for $400.

21 Sep 1854/Pendleton Co KY

 

John, “of Pendleton Co KY”, buys 30 acres of Harrison Co land from John Doyle of Brown Co IL for $185.

23 Mar 1855/Harrison Co KY

 

John nominates William B. Glave to be his lawful attorney to sell several slaves in Harrison Co KY. 

13 Oct 1855/Hendricks Co IN

19/84

John buys a full quarter (160 acres) for $3100 from Joshua and Nancy Hutchings.

7 Oct 1856/Hendricks Co IN

20/178

John buys 40 acres from William & Sarah Proctor (his daughter and her husband) for $600.

2 Jan 1866/Hendricks Co IN

30/118

John sells 10 acres to Eliza Ann Long for $180

2 Jan 1866/Hendricks Co IN

30/119

John sells 10 acres to John A. Long for $180

1 Feb 1884/Hendricks Co IN

61/383

Deed by Alexander and Mary Herrod Mitchell selling “the (Hendricks Co IN) land....that was assigned and set off to the said Mary J.L. Mitchell or the partition of the Lands belonging to John Herrod, late of Hendricks County, IN deceased.”  33.33 acres were sold for $1500.  Alex and Mary had the deed notarized in Appanoose Co IA.

 

The two daughters of Susan Kinney and Joel Hamilton (Sarah Ann and Lucinda) and the four daughters of Susan Kinney and John R. Harrod are:

 

1.       Sarah Ann, born 23 Aug 1828 in Bracken Co KY, married William M. Proctor between 17 Feb 1845 (when Marriage Bond was issued) and 1 Dec 1846 (when marriage was recorded in Bracken Co KY records), died 29 Feb 1892 in Maplewood IN.  Both are buried in the Danville South Cemetery.  Sarah’s obituary appears in the 3 Mar 1892 Hendricks County Republican (pg. 7 col 4):  Sarah Ann Proctor, of Maplewood, died Monday and was buried Tuesday.  She was born Aug 23, 1828.  In her death, a heavy loss is sustained by the community in which she lived but especially by her family.  Her sunny, earnest Christian life was a blessed benediction to all who knew her.  Her husband, with whom she had shared life’s joys and sorrows for over forty seven years said of her: ‘She was a good woman’.  No higher praise could be given, than such words after such companionship.  When she was fourteen years of age, she became a member of the Christian church and lived a consistent Christian life.  Her husband and children have the deepest sympathy of a large circle of friends and neighbors.  Her husband William’s obituary appears in the 1 Oct 1894 Hendricks County Republican (pg. 2 col 4): “William Proctor, living the Quebec neighborhood south of Pittsboro, died Sunday.  The funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon by Elder Orcutt at the late home of the deceased and the remains were interred in the south cemetery at this place”.

2.       Lucinda M, born 14 Oct 1829 in Bracken Co KY, married James M. Fronk/Frank on 20 Jul 1846 Bracken Co KY, died 12 Jun 1908 Danville IN,.  Both Lucinda and her husband are buried in the Danville South Cemetery.  Lucinda’s obituary appeared in the Hendricks County Republican on 12 June 1908 (pg. 3): “Mrs. Lucinda Herrod Fronk died Friday afternoon of the infirmities of age, she being in her 79th year.  The funeral was Sunday from the home of her daughter, Mrs. James McCoun.  Mrs. Fronk was the widow of James Fronk and long a member of the Christian church.  Three children survive--Mrs. McCoun, Mrs. McLean and L.H. Fronk”.  A more detailed obituary of Lucinda appeared in the Hendricks County Friday Caller on 12 June 1908 (pg. 5 & 6): “Death of Mrs. Lucinda Fronk - Good Woman Claimed by Death Angel Friday Afternoon.  Mrs. Lucinda Fronk, widow of the late James M. Fronk, died Friday afternoon at the home of her daughter Mrs. James McCoun, on West Marion Street, at 4:30 o’clock, after an illness of just sixteen weeks.  the end came quietly as one could have anticipated and she dropped into a quiet sleep.  She was born on Bracken County Kentucky., Oct 14, 1829, and had she lived until her next birthday anniversary would have been seventy-nine years of age.  She was married to James M. Fronk on July 19, 1846.  The minister who married them had previously baptized both into the Christian church.  After their marriage they lived in Kentucky for four years, coming to Indiana on 1850, and locating on October 18 of that year on a farm north of Danville.  They built a cabin of logs, covering it with clapboards, even the lath being hewn.  For eleven years they made this one place their home, moving to Danville on August 18, 1861.  They lived in several different homes for the next five years, and on March 16, 1866, moved into the house on the corner of Clinton and Cross streets which they occupied over forty one years, until the death of Mr. Fronk on January 20, 1907.  Since that time, Mrs. Fronk made her home with her daughter Mrs. James McCoun on West Marion street.  To Mr. and Mrs. Fronk were born four children, one of which died in infancy, the other three, Mrs. James. McCoun, Mrs. J.A. McLain ad Alonzo Fronk surviving her.  The funeral services were held Sunday morning at 10:00 o’clock at the home of Mr. and Mrs. McCoun, conducted by Rev. E. E. Moorman, pastor of the Christian church.”

3.       Permelia J (aka Amelia), born in 31 Aug 1842 KY, married John W. Druin/Druen on 6 Apr 1864 in Hendricks Co IN and died 28 May 1899 Hendricks Co IN.  Both Permelia and her husband are buried in the Danville South Cemetery next to her father.  Her short obituary can be found in the Hendricks County Republican, cover page: “Mrs. Druan, who has been an invalid for some time, died Saturday night at her daughter’s Mrs. Ora Holtsclaw’s.”

4.       Mary J.L. (aka Mollie), born 14 May 1846 in Bath Co KY, married Alexander Mitchell on 18 Nov 1866 in Danville IN and died 12 Jun 1916 Arlington KS.  Both Mary and Alexander are buried in the Arlington Cemetery in Reno Co KS.

5.       Elizabeth, born 1847 in KY, married John Jones on 5 Oct 1870 in Hendricks Co IN and died 18 Aug 1923 in Danville IN.  She and her husband are buried in the Danville South Cemetery.  Her obituary can be found in the Hendricks County Republican: “Mrs. Elizabeth Jones, age 79, died at the home of her son, John Jones, east of town, Saturday.  Heart disease was the cause of death.  Mrs. Jones was the daughter of John Herod and was the last member of that family.  She was born in Kentucky, but moved here with her parents [incorrect-just her father] to this county early in her life.  Funeral services were held Monday, with burial in the South Cemetery.”

6.       Susan, born 29 Feb 1848 in KY, married Fredrick L. Pattison on 24 Feb 1867 in Hendricks Co IN and died 1 Jun 1880 in Prairie Center (now Prairie Village), Johnson Co, KS.  Buried in the Danville South Cemetery.  Fredrick returned to Prairie Center.  He is buried in the Olathe Memorial Cemetery in Olathe KS.  Her obituary was found in the 10 June 1880 Hendricks County Union (pg. 8, col 3): “DIED--Pattison, on the 1st ist., near Prairie Center, Kansas, aged 32 years, 3 months and 3 days.  Her remains were brought to Danville for burial, and services were held at the residence of James M. Fronk last Friday , the 4th, by Rev. S.P. Colvin.  The deceased was a sister to Mrs. Fronk, and formerly well known in this community.  She and Mr. Pattison were students of the writer of this in the old Danville Academy in 1865 and 66.  She united with the M.E. Church in her 18th year and lived a consistent member of the same all of her life and died in the triumphs of Christian faith.  She was a great sufferer in her last illness but bore it patiently and meekly, but longed to depart and rest with her blessed Savior.”

 

 

Mary Harrod

 

Mary J.L. (aka Mollie) was born 14 May 1846 in Bath Co KY.  She married Alexander Mitchell on 18 Nov 1866 in Danville IN and died 12 Jun 1916 Arlington KS.  Both Mary and Alexander are buried in the Arlington Cemetery in Reno Co KS.  For more information on this ancestor and her descendants, please see the “Mitchell” chapter.

 

Mary’s obituary was located in the Friday 16 Jun 1916 Arlington (KS) Enterprise (pg. 3, col 2):

 

“Mrs. Alexander Mitchell Dead.  Old Resident of Arlington Passed Away at Her Home Here Monday -- This week we are again called upon to publish the obituary of an esteemed citizen, Aunt Mary Mitchell, as she has been known by her many admiring friends.  A short time since she was taken quite sick, but she thought that it was only ordinary sickness and that she would be perfectly well in a short time, but it was soon very evident that she could not recover, and on Monday afternoon at one o’clock, she departed this life. 

 

Mary Herod was born May 14, 1846 in Bath County, Kentucky [no record has been found of this family residing in Bath Co KY in 1846, only Bracken and Harrison Co KY].  Departed this life after an illness of about two weeks, Monday June 12, 1916 aged at the time of her death, 70 years and 29 days.  She was united in marriage to Mr. Alexander Mitchell at Danville, Indiana, November 18th, 1866.  During the same year they moved to Centerville, Iowa at which place they resided until the spring of 1885 when they moved to this county and located on a farm five miles west of this city in Langdon, they remained on the home farm until about six years ago when they moved to this city where they resided at the time of her departure. 

 

To this union were born five children, two sons and three daughters, namely, Carl (father of Barbara Mitchell Moore), who departed this life June 19, 1900, Lora who died December 9th, 1909.  Dorr and Eva who died in infancy [in Centerville IA].  Leffa the only surviving one of the children.  In her early life she accepted Jesus Christ as her Savior and united with the Christian church of which she remained a faithful member until the time of her death.  She is survived by her husband, Alexander Mitchell, and one daughter, Mrs. Leffa Hays, six grandchildren, and one sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Jones of Danville, Indiana, who were all here in attendance at the funeral with the exception of the sister who is in Indiana. 

 

The funeral service was conducted from the home in this city on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock by the Rev. CH. Croft, pastor of the Methodist church, and the body was laid at rest in the Arlington cemetery.  The family in their bereavement have the deepest sympathy of their many friends at the time of seeming darkness.”

 

 

 

 

Federal and State Census Records

 

HARROD

 

1770 Tax (“AIR Rates”) Records, Cumberland Co, PA

John Harred                 1 h, 2 c, 2 sh, 50 W, 7 C

William Harred               1 h, 2 c, 80 L, 7 C

 

1780 Tax Records, Bedford Co (later Fulton Co), PA

John Herod                  Ayr Township

 

1790 (“1st Census) Federal Census, Bedford Co, PA

Rachel Herred                2 white females including heads of families

 

1800 (“2nd Census”) Federal Census, Harrison Co, KY - dated ??/??/1800

John Harod

 

1800 (“2nd Census”) Federal Census, Bracken Co, KY - dated 11/22/1799

William Harrod, Jr.

William Harrod, Sr.

 

1810 Federal Census, Bracken Co, KY (page 145a, line 4)

William Harrod (Jr)      Under 10:    2 males             1 female (John R. and Wm S. Harrod)

                                    10 to 16:                             3 females (Elizabeth Harrod Hazelrigg)          

                                    26 to 45      1 male              1 female (William and Nancy)

                                                     

1820 Federal Census, Bracken Co, KY (page 14, line 24)

William Herod (Jr)       Under 10:    2 males             2 females

                                    10 to 16:     2 males (John R. and Wm S. Harrod)

                                    16 to 26:                             2 females

                                    26 to 45      1 male (Wm Jr)

                                    Over 45:      2 males             1 female (Nancy)     

                                                                             

1830 Federal Census, Bracken Co, KY (page 6)

William Harrod (Jr)      Under 5:      1 male

                                    15 to 20:     1 male              1 female

                                    20 to 30:     1 male (John R. Harrod)                   

                                    30 to 40:                             1 female

                                    50 to 60:     1 male              1 female (Wm and Nancy)   

 

1840 Federal Census, Bracken Co, KY (page 354)

William S                      Under 5:                              2 females

                                    5 to 10:       1 male

                                    15 to 20:     1 male

                                    20 to 39:     1 male (prop Wm S. Harrod, Wm Jr’s son)

                                    40 to 59:                             1 female (most likely his mother Nancy)

                                    60 to 70:     1 male (most likely his father Wm. Jr who died 1847)

 

1850 Federal Census, Harrison Co, KY  (Household 769)

 

 

 

 

Value of Real

Place of

Name

Age

Sex

Occupation

Estate Owned

Birth

John Harrod

44

M

Farmer

 

KY

Amelia (Permelia)

  7

F

 

 

KY

Mary

  5

F

 

 

KY

Elizabeth

  3

F

 

 

KY

Susan

  1

F

 

 

KY

 

1860 Federal Census, Pittsbrough PO, Middle Township, Hendricks Co, IN

Household 657 (Wm Proctor and James Warnock living next to John)

 

 

 

 

Value of Estate Owned

Place of

Name

Age

Sex

Occupation

Real Est.

Personal

Birth

John Herrod

54

M

 

3200

475

KY

Amelia

16

F

 

 

 

KY

Mary

15

F

 

 

 

KY

Elizabeth

13

F

 

 

 

KY

Susan

11

F

 

 

 

KY

 

1870 Federal Census, Pittsboro PO, Middle Twp, Hendricks Co, IN  (Household 12)

 

 

 

 

Value of Owned

Place of

Birth

Name

Age

Sex

Occupation

Real Est.

Personal

John Harod

66

M

Farming

6,300

900

KY (can’t read/write)

Elizabeth

20

F

Keep’g House

 

 

KY

 

1880 Federal Census, Middle Township, Hendricks Co, IN  (Household 125)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

John R. Harrod (widower)

74

M

 

Farmer

KY

PA

PA

Samuel Patterson

21

M

Servant

Farm Laborer

KY

KY

??

Elizabeth Patterson

20

F

Servant

Housekeeper

KY

KY

KY

 

1880 Federal Census, Middle Township, Hendricks Co, IN  (Household 152)

Contains John W. Druen (40) and Permelia (Harrod) (36), with Emma (14), Mary (12) & Lena (4).

 

 

HARROD Information from Hendricks County, IN

 

Hendricks Co IN Marriage Records, 1823-1920

Compiled by the Indiana Works Progress Administration, 1939.

Every Name Reference to Harrod, Harod, Herrod and Herod.

Harrod Reference

Spouse

Married

Book/Page

Herod, Charles

Donnie Brown

21 Dec 1893

11/225

Herod, Elizabeth

John Jones

5 Oct 1870

7/295

Herod, John J

Lilly C. Lee

8 Mar 1880

9/118

Herod, Mary L

Alexander Mitchell

18 Nov 1866

6/520

Herod, Nancy A

John H Rudd

3 Nov 1892

11/120

Herod, Paul

Geneva Bryant

18 Mar 1920

15/66

Herod, Permelia

John W. Druin

6 Apr 1964

6/273

Herrod, Mary E.

Bowen Vaught

12 Mar 1878

8/479

Herrod, Susan

Fred L Pattison

24 Feb 1867

6/561

 

 

Hendricks Co IN Courthouse Records

Selected Harrod, Harod, Herrod and Herod references

Probate Order

Book/Page

 

Harrod Reference

 

Description

??? / ?08.

March Term 1889

Mary D. Herod, a minor

A few ledger entries that seem to indicate that Mary was either an orphan or lost her parents.  Some legal proceedings cost her Guardian, Henry H. Underwood, $7.25.  I do not know who this Mary is. 

??? / ???

John Harrod Estate, George W. Brady, Administrator

Several ledger entries listing fees due the Clerk of the Court for matters related to the settlement of John’s estate.  Dates range from 5 May 1883 to 3 Feb 1885.

11 / 292

5 May 1883

Estate of John Harrod

First entry listing John’s death, intestate, leaving an estate of approximately $3,000.  George W. Brady is appointed Administrator; Henry Gibbs and Fletcher M. Mitchell (Alexander Mitchell’s brother) are appointed as Brady’s securities.

11 / 338

28 Jun 1883

Estate of John R. Harrod

Administrator files the Sale Bill (copy of which has never been found).

11 /  460

11 Jan 1884

Estate of John R. Harrod

As John’s grave was without a stone, “nor has any of his children contracted for one”, John’s Estate Administrator petitions the court to purchase one not to exceed $250.

11 / 475

24 Jan 1884

Estate of John R. Herrod

Mareen Pierson, husband of Emma Druen (daughter of Permelia Harrod Druen, John’s daughter) filed a lawsuit against the Estate of John Harrod.  In this entry, both parties agree to pay the John’s estate $20 and to “dismiss the whole claim and all matters in relation to said claim”.  Details not provided.

12 / 132

26 Jan 1885

Estate of John Harrod

Final Report of the Estate Settlement: Mary L. Mitchell and Parmelia Druin, two heirs, file objections to the approval of the final report (claimed that the Administrator failed to collect a $100 loan that John Harrod made to a George Wells).  The Judge acknowledges this and then splits the remaining balance of the estate into five equal parts of $86.52 each for Sarah Proctor, Lucinda Fronk, Elizabeth Jones, Mary Mitchell and Parmelia Druin. 

 

 

Hendricks County Indiana - Deed Record Search

Every Name Reference to Harrod, Harod, Herrod and Herod - in chronological order.

Grantee

Grantor

Date

Price

Sec/Twp/Rg

Acres

Deed Book

John Herrod

Josh Hutchings

10/30/1855

$3100

23/16/1W

160

19/84

John Herrod

Wm M. Proctor

10/07/1856

600

14/16/1W

40

20/178(1)

Sarah Ann Herod

John Case

04/23/1867

 

18/16/1W

40

32/80(2)

Sarah Ann Herod

Ed. Weekley

03/22/1869

1500

20/16/1W

40

32/450(3)

Eliza A Long

John Herrod

01/02/1866

180

14/16/1W

10

30/118

John A Long

John Herrod

01/02/1866

180

14/16/1W

10

30/119

Randy Morgason

Sarah A. Herod

03/17/1869

800

18/16/1W

20

34/523(4)

R.J. Fausset

Sarah A. Herod

03/17/1869

800

18/16/1W

20

34/524(4)

John Craver

Sarah A. Herod

08/26/1872

1600

20/16/1W

40

40/87(4)

JJ Davis

Sarah S Harrod

05/14/1895

2500

24/15/1E

50

78/473(5)

(1) John purchases 40 acres from his daughter and her husband who migrated to HC earlier.

(2) Sarah A. Herod of Putman Co IN.

(3) Sarah A. Herod of Hendricks Co IN.

(4) Sarah A. Herod and George W. Herod her husband.

(5) Sarah S. Harrod and Shelby Harrod her husband.

 

 

Hendricks County Indiana - Deaths with Burial in County

Compiled by the County Seat Genealogical Society, 1992.

Every Name Reference to Harrod, Harod, Herrod and Herod

Name

Born

Died

Age

Father

Mother

Bk/Pg.

Canada Carrie Dee

 

 

 

 

Mary D Herod

INDEX

Collins Ann

 

 

 

 

Eliz Herrod

INDEX

Druin Mrs. John

IN

1899/05/28

66

John Herod

--------

48/40

English Nellie F

 

 

 

 

Doria Herod

INDEX

Frank Alonzo H

 

 

 

 

Lucy Herod

INDEX

Frank, Lucinda M

1829/10/14 KY

1908/06/12

 

John Howard

--------

S25/57

Greenlee Hattie

 

 

 

 

Alice Herod

INDEX

Hand Hertha

 

 

 

 

Alice Herod

INDEX

Herod Paul

1894/05/02 IN

1984/05/19

 

O.T. Herod

Mable Pool

67/27

Herod Rose

IN

1894//09/01

28

 

 

48/6

Herod Harriet

IN

1913/06/25

77

Jesse Miner

Nancy Hunter

A15/45

Herrod Bertha

IN

1899/09/08

22

Bailey Herrod

Winter Harriett

48/12

Herrod Sarah

 

 

 

John Proctor

 

INDEX

Hill Anna May

 

 

 

 

Mary Alice Herod

INDEX

Huff Cynthia

 

 

 

 

Eliz Herod

INDEX

Jones Elizabeth

KY

1923/08/18

79

John Herrod

--------

51/94

Jones John Jr

1871/08/23 IN

1939/05/04

 

John Jones

Betty Herod

56/23

Kiger Elizabeth

IN (wrong)

 

87Y

Wm Herrod

Ann Rice

1/263

Kiger Elizabeth

1833/11/13 IN

1918/04/25

 

Daniel Kiger

Eliz Harrod

51/34

Kiger Elizabeth

1835/12/12 IN

1932/03/05

 

Daniel Kiger

Eliz Harrod

55/20

Lydick Wm Everett

 

 

 

 

Alice Herod

INDEX

McCoun Lavona

 

 

 

 

---- Herrod

INDEX

Nelson Edna

 

 

 

 

Alice Herod

INDEX

Parker Lance

 

 

 

 

Milly Herrod

INDEX

Pearson Emma

 

 

 

 

----- Herod

INDEX

Proctor John W

1847/01/04 KY

1921/02/25

 

Wm Proctor

Sarah Herrod

51/70

Proctor Minnie

1867/01/12 IN

1903/06//27

 

Wm Proctor

Sarah Herod

49/49

Rudd Wannie

 

 

 

Bailey Herod

 

INDEX

 

 

HARROD Information from Pendleton County, KY

 

Marriages

                        Baily Herod and Sally Hart                                              9 Jun 1808

                        Pendleton Harod and Fanny Hopper (father Thomas)         5 Feb 1838

 

 

HARROD Information from Bracken County, KY

 

Marriages

Located in Bracken County KY Marriages and Bonds 1797-1859, by Rosemarie Pell.

                        Elizabeth Harrod and Fielding Hazelrigg               8 Feb 1816

                        Hannah Harrod and Benjamin Bravard                  9 Jan 1817

                        John Harrod and Marah Spencer              1 Oct 1827

                        Sally Harrod and William Man/Main/Mann            12 Apr 1832

                        William S. Harrod and Catherine Neal                  25 Sep 1832                 

                        Nancy Harrod and John H. Poe                           22 Aug 1833

                        John R. Harrod and Susan Hamilton                11 Oct 1841

                        Sally Ann Harrod and William M. Proctor 17 Feb 1845~1 Dec 1846

                        Lucinda M. Harrod and James Fronk                    20 Jul 1846

                        Ann E. Harrod and John H. Holton                       11 Dec 1855

                       

 

Bracken Co KY Deed Index

Provided by Harrodsburg Historical Society and by Kathryn E. Miller, Winchester OH.

Deed Book

Parties

Document Type

A/19   1797

Wm Harrod to Philip Buckner

Deed

A/53

Wm S. Harrod to Isaac Meranda

Deed

A/54

Wm Harrod to Philip Buckner

Deed

B/99

Wm Harrod to Rachel Newland

Deed

C/103

Wm Harrod to John Mannon

Deed

C/167

Wm Harrod to John Mannon

Deed

C/186

Wm Harrod to Rachel Newland

Bill of Sale

C/320

Wm Harrod to Isaac Meranda

Power of Attorney

C/321

Wm Harrod to Philip Bucker

Deed

D/368   1810

Wm Harrod et ux to John Fee Sr

Deed

D/372

Wm Harrod from John Fee Sr et ux

Deed

J/391

John Harrod from Martin Marshall

Deed (copy on file)

K/193

Wm Harrod from Levi Perkins

Mortgage

L/115

William S. Harrod from Sidney S. Manning

Mortgage

L/123

Wm Harrod from Abner Bennett et ux

Deed

L/210

Wm Harrod from Abner Bennett et ux

Deed

L/355

Wm S. Harrod et ux to Henry Fronk

Deed

L/362

John Harrod to Rueben Swan

Deed (copy on file)

M/157

Harrod, Fronk et al from Bowers and Cassell

Bill of Sale (copy on file)

M/192

Wm Harrod from Whitfield Craig

Mortgage

O/002

Wm S. Harrod from Sheriff of Bracken Co KY

Deed

O/103

Wm S. Harrod from County Court

Judgement

O/119

Harrod, Power et al from S.C. Pinckard

Mortgage (copy on file)

O/161

Wm S. Harrod from Isaac Day’s Executor

Deed

 

 

1791-1841 Bracken Co KY Tax Lists

Compiled by Kathryn E. Miller, Winchester OH.

Year

Name

Acres

Location/Notes

1797

no Harrods listed

 

 

1799

William Harrod Sr

100

 

   

William Harrod Jr

200

 

1801

William Harrod Sr

 

1 male over 21

   

William Harrod Jr

 

1 male over 21

1803

William Harrod

150

1 male over 21

   

William Harrod Jr

 

 

1805

William Harrod

157

Waters of Locust Creek

1806

William Harrod

 

 

1807

William Harrod

157

Locust Water Course

1808

William Harad

157

 

1809

William Harrod

157

 

1810

William Harrod

157

 

1811

William Harrod

157

 

1812

William Harrod

157

 

1813

William Harrod

157

 

1815

William Harrod

165

 

1816

William Harrod

163

 

1817

William Harrod

163

Locust

1819

William Harrod

163

Locust

1820

William Harrod

163

Locust

1821

William Harrod

163

Locust

1822

William Harrod

163

Locust

1823

William Harrod

163

Locust Creek

1824

William Harrod

162

Locust Creek

1825

William Harrod

163

Locust Creek

1826

William Harrod

163

 

1827

William Harrod

160

 

1828

John Harrod

-----

no acreage given - 1st mention of JOHN HARROD

   

William Harrod

160

 

1829

John R. Harrod

100

Locust

   

William Harrod

160

Locust

1831

John R. Harrod

100

 

   

William Harrod

-----

no acreage given

1833

William Harrod Sr.

160

Locust

   

William S. Harrod

-----

no acreage given

 

John R. Harrod

100

Locust

1834

John Harrod

100

Locust

   

William Harrod Sr.

160

 

   

William S. Harrod

-----

no acreage given

1835

William S. Harrod

-----

no acreage given

   

William Harrod, Sr.

160

Locust

1837

William Harrod

160

Locust

1838

James N. Harrod

-----

no acreage given

 

John R. Harrod

-----

no acreage given

 

William Harrod

160

Locust

 

William S. Harrod

300

 

1839

William S. Harrod

132

 

   

William Harrod, Sr.

160

 

1840

John Harrod

-----

no acreage given

   

William Harrod

160

Locust

   

William S. Harrod

26+11

 

1841

William Harrod, Sr

160

Locust

   

William S. Harrod

13

 

   

John Harrod

-----

no acreage given

 

 

HARROD Sources

 

·         Genealogical and historical information I conducted.

·         The TenMile Country and Its Pioneer Families - A Genealogical History of the Upper Monongahela Valley by Howard L. Leckey, Greene County Historical Society, Waynesburg PA, 1977, The Bookmark, Knightstown, IN.

·         Harrod Family Genealogy by Bernice Lewis Swainson, The Filson Club History Quarterly, Louisville KY, April 1958, Vol. 32, No. 2, pages 107-131 and July 1958, Vol. 32, No. 3, pages 258-283.

·         James Harrod of Kentucky by Kathryn Harrod Mason, 1951, Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge, LA.

·         Harrod’s Old Fort 1791 by Willard Rouse Jillson, Sc. D., 1929, The State Journal Company, Frankfort, KY.

·         The Horn Papers - Early Westward Movement on the Monongahela and Upper Ohio 1765-1795 by W.F. Horn, Volume II, Greene County Historical Society, Waynesburg PA, 1945, Herald Press, Scottsdale, PA.

·         Plainfield Public Library, 1120 Stafford Road, Plainfield, IN  46168.  Attn: Phyllis Walters, Asst.

·         Harrodsburg Historical Society, 220 South Chiles Street, P.O. Box 316, Harrodsburg, KY  40330.

·         Bracken County Historical Society, P.O. Box 66, Brooksville, KY  41004. 

·         The Draper Collection, Volume 37, Reel 34, Pages 168-174.  Kemp Library, East Stroudsburg University, 200 Prospect Street, Stroudsburg, PA  18301-2999.  The actual notes of Dr. Draper when he interviewed William Harrod, Jr in Germantown, Bracken Co, KY in November 1845.

·         My Conclusions from The Search for “My” William Harrod : A Study Paper by Helynn M. Carrier, 601 South Baywood Avenue, San Jose, CA  95128-3302.  An incredible compilation of Harrod information. 

·         Bracken County Kentucky Marriages and Bonds 1797-1859 by Rosemarie Bonwell Pell, July 1996, published by the Bracken County Historical Society, PO Box 66, Brooksville, KY  41004.

·         The History of Hendricks County: 1914-1976, edited by John R. McDowell, published by the Hendricks County Historical Society, Danville, IN, October 1976.

·         History of Hendricks County, Indiana by the Honorable John W. Hadley, published by B.F. Bowen & Co., Indianapolis, IN, 1914.

·         History of the Moore Family by Gladys Harper.  A copy of it is at the Harrodsburg (KY) Historical Society.

·         Phyllis D. Miller, Harrod Researcher.  Email: pdmiller@mis.net.