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CARSON

 

Compiled by: Andrew L. Moore

Email: PAmoores@juno.com

Dated: 22 Sep 2015


 

 

CARSON

 

 

 

William Carson

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Alexander Carson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sarah

 

 

 

 

 

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William C. Carson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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John Gilchrist Jr.

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John Gilchrist Sr / ??

 

 

 

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Elizabeth Gilchrist

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Margaret Cowden

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Matthew Cowden/Martha Johnston

 

 

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Ephraim Carson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ý

 

 

Samuel Chidester

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Samuel Chidester/Mahitable Tuller

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William Chidester

 

 

 

 

 

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Mary? Titman

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George Titman

 

 

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Mary Chidester

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Margaret Wilhelm

 

 

 

 

 

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Glenroy Carson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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William Ewing

 

 

 

 

 

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Elizabeth Ewing

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mary McLaren

 

 

 

 

 

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Mary Carson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

 

 

 

Daniel Easley I

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William Easley/_____Pyrant

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Ý

 

 

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Daniel Easley II

 

 

 

 

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Elizabeth Echols

 

 

 

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Stephen Easley

 

 

 

 

 

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Edith Anderson

 

 

 

 

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Ý

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Daniel Easley

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

ß

Ý

 

 

John Cadwalader

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Joseph Cadwalader/Mary Williams

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Ý

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Ý

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John Cadawalader

 

 

 

 

Ý

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Sarah Jamison

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Robert Jamison

 

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Sabina Cadwalader

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

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Ý

 

Mark Bogue

 

 

 

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Ruth Bogue

 

 

 

 

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Sarah

 

 

 

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Olive Easley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

 

 

James Harris

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Thomas Harris / Phebe Harrison

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Ý

 

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Abraham Harris

 

 

 

 

 

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Abagail

 

 

 

 

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Thomas Harris Jr

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ý

 

Philip McDivitt

 

 

 

 

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Mary Ann McDivitt

 

 

 

 

 

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Elizabeth Booker

 

 

 

 

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Sarah A. Harris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

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Thomas Hart

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ý

ß

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mary Ann Hart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mary

 

 

 

 


CARSON

 

 

William Carson

 

William Carson was born before 1725, probably in Northern Ireland, and came to central Pennsylvania's Northumberland Co PA before 1746.  He married Sarah ______.  He later migrated further west to Franklin Township, Fayette Co PA.  William was a Private in Captain Joseph Shippen’s Foot Regiment on 16 Apr 1756.  In 1785, William is recorded as having 200 acres of land, 3 horses and 2 head of cattle.  He died in Franklin Township, Fayette Co PA between 9 Feb 1791, when his will was written, and 30 Jan 1792, when his will was probated.  His burial location has not been found to date.

 

In the book The TenMile Country and Its Pioneer Families by Howard L. Leckey, the Upper Monongahela River Valley (southwestern Pennsylvania) was inhabited by individuals in the 1770s and 1780s who disputed the western edge of the state of Pennsylvania.  These inhabitants, who considered themselves Virginians, petitioned the government for the creation of a new state called Westsylvania.  Among the petitioners were William, John and Alexander Carson, Samuel and Joseph Rankin and Thomas and James Carson.

 

 

Carson References as located in

History of Fayette Co PA

Edited by Franklin Ellis, 1882

 

·         Original Landholders in Franklin Township, Fayette Co PA: John Carson-133 acres (possibly William's son, born 1746 Northumberland Co PA).

·         1785 Taxpayers in Franklin Township, Fayette Co PA:  a) John Carson (probably William's son)-100 acres, 4 horses, 3 cattle; b) William Carson (probably our ancestor the immigrant)-200 acres, 3 horses, 2 cattle.

·         1785 Single Freemen in Franklin Township, Fayette Co PA: a) Alexander Carson (probably William’s son and our ancestor)-0 acres, 1 horse, 2 cattle; b) William Carson (unknown relation due to his lack of assets)-0 acres, 0 horses, 0 cattle.

·         1799 Taxpayers in Dunbar Township, Fayette Co PA: Alexander Carson-0 horses, 4 cattle and 0 acres. Note: As a result of this information, I am guessing that this particular Alexander Carson is not ours – for ours had already moved to Washington, now Beaver Co, PA in approximately 1791. 

 

 

A note on Pennsylvania County Formations

 

Westmoreland to Fayette: Land west of the Laurel Mountains was Bedford Co PA until Feb 1773 when it was named Westmoreland Co PA.  In 1783, Fayette Co PA was formed out of the southern portion of Westmoreland Co PA (those lands west of the Youghiogheny River).

 

Washington to Beaver: On 12 Mar 1800, the Pennsylvania State legislature created the following counties: Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Crawford, Erie, Mercer, Venango and Warren Counties.  Beaver County was formed from Washington Co.  On 20 Mar 1849, a 203 square mile section of northern Beaver County (including North Beaver Township) was sectioned off to create Lawrence County. 

 

 

 

William Carson's Will

Franklin Township, Fayette Co PA

Written 9 Feb 1791, Probated 13 Jan 1792

Will Book 1, page 21

Corrections/amplifications in [ ]

 

In the name of God Amen, I William Carson of Franklin Township Fiatt [Fayette] County & State of Pennsylvania yeoman

 

Being weak in body but in a perfect state of mind & memory. Calling to mind that all men are mortal and bouren [born] to die I do make ordain and constitute this my last wll and testament in manner and form as folieth [followeth]

 

In the first place I do recommend my soll [soul] to Allmighty God that give it & my body to the earth to be desently [decently] buried as my Executor may direct not doubting but at the Jenarell [general] resuraction [ressurection] I will resave [receive] the same again.

 

Secondly I do appoint that out of my parsonal [personal] property my funeral costs together with all my lawful debts be punctually paid.

 

Thirdly I do appoint that my Executors do pay to my eldest son John Carson five shillings lawful currency as the remaining part of his full share of my whole esteat [estate] likewise the foresaid sumes [sums] in like manner be paid to my daughters Elizabeth, Jane and Sarah.

 

Fourthly I do appoint that if my beloved wife Sarah Carson should find it nesesery [necessary] in order to hir [her] comfortable living to seperate from now dwelling house & samely that she in order to hir [her] being out of the danger of want do yearly and every year draw and reserve the full third part of my estate reael [real] and personal out of which third part I do will that Mary Cassady do by my said wife be decently seported [supported] during the core?/cares? of hir [her] life and at hir [her] death decently buried providing said Cassady should out live my wife at my wifs [wife's] death to be menteaned [maintained?] and bured [buried] at the coast [cost] of my real estate.

 

Fifthly I do will that my son Alexander Carson do have & enjoy fifty acres of my wood land joyning [joining] lands of Joseph Roab & John McClara as his part and posseon [possession] of my estate.

 

Sixthly that except as is before specified in feavor [favor] of my wife and Mary Cassady I do will that my son William Carson do have hold injoy [enjoy] every less part and parcel of what may remain of my estate both reail [real] and personal and I do hereby constitute and appoint my sons John and Alexander Carson Executors of this my last will and testament in testimony whereof I have have [yep, written twice!] hereunto seat [set] my hand and seal this 19 day of February in the yer [year] of our Lord 1791.

 

                                                                                                William X Carson

 

In the presence of John McClelland, Henry Robinson

 

 

 

 


William and Sarah had the following children:

 

1.     John, born circa 1746 (probably Northumberland Co) PA.

2.     William, born 5 Sep 1748 (probably Northumberland Co) PA, married Rachel Wilson after the Revolutionary War, died 7 Nov 1823 in N. Beaver Township, Beaver (which is now Lawrence Co--formed in 1829) Co PA and is buried in the Westfield Presbyterian Church, N. Beaver Township, Beaver (now Lawrence Co) PA (death date “1823”, Age 75y/2m/2d).  Revolutionary War:  Enlisted in Northumberland Co PA in Jan 1776, serving as a Private in Captain Weitzel’s Company, 1st Battalion, PA Regiment of Riflemen, Continental Line, serving under Col. Samuel Miles.  William fought in the battles of Marcus Hook (1 Jul 1776), Long Island and Germantown and was discharged on Jan 1778 at Valley Forge PA by Col. Walter Stewart.  He began receiving a Revolutionary War Pension (#S40803) on 3 May 1820.


According to the North Beaver Township section of the  1908 book 20th Century History of New Castle and Lawrence County Pennsylvania and Representative Citizens (Chicago: Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co., 1908): “William Carson came from Virginia in the fall of 1799, and stayed that winter in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. In the spring of 1800 he brought his family, consisting of his wife and ten children, to the farm in North Beaver Township, now owned by John Alexander. He had hired a hand in Pittsburg to help him, and they built a cabin and made other improvements. The youngest child, James, was born after they came out, in 1802.

 

According to the Marion Township section of the 1883 book History of Butler County, Pennsylvania (Waterman, Watkins, & Co., Chicago, 1883) "William CARSON was a native of Ireland, but, coming to America prior to the beginning of the war of the Revolution, he espoused the cause of the Colonists, and served with them as a soldier in the struggle for nationality and independence. After peace was declared, he married Miss Rachel WILSON, of the State of Delaware, and located in Virginia, where he remained until 1800, when he settled within the limits of the present county of Lawrence, Penn. His children, of whom the youngest was born in Lawrence (then Beaver) County, in 1801, were Joseph, Polly, Rachel, Jenny, William, Jr., Ann, Rebecca, John, Nancy, Rebecca and James. These children all reached maturity except the first Rebecca who died at sixteen years of age, and of those who survived, all married and became heads of families, except James, who died in the State of Delaware. William, the second son of William CARSON, Sr., married Esther ELDER, of Lawrence County, and their children were, John E., now a Presbyterian minister in Peoria County, Ill.; William, who married Prudence CALVIN, and lived on the homestead in Lawrence County, Penn., until 1865, when he removed to his present place of residence in Marion Township; Joseph, who died at twelve years of age; James, who died in 1878; Carlon, who died in 1881; Belinda A., and David C., who died in Logan County, Ohio, in 1874."

 

William mentions the following individuals in his Beaver Co PA will (recorded in Beaver Co PA Will Book “A”, page 177), written 1 Dec 1817, probated 31 Oct 1823: his wife Rachel, sons William, John, James, daughters Nancy, Rebecca, Mary Jane, Rachael Ann, Nancy.  Rachel was born circa 1858 in Delaware and died 4 Aug 1830 in Lawrence Co PA, age 72, and is buried next to her husband.

3.     Alexander, born 1750/1763 (probably Northumberland Co) PA, married Elizabeth Gilchrist, and died circa 1823 in Hanover Township, Washington (now Beaver) Co PA. 

4.     Elizabeth.

5.     Jeane.

6.     Sarah.

 

Alexander Carson

 

Alexander Carson was born between 1750 and 1763 in Pennsylvania.  He married Elizabeth Gilchrist, daughter of Margaret Cowden and John Gilchrist, Jr (see Gilchrist Section below for additional detail on this surname).  In May and June of 1782, Alexander volunteered for Westmoreland Co Militia duty on what is now commonly referred to as the Sandusky Expedition - an ill-fated attempt to push further north and west those Indians living in north-central Ohio.  I have summarized this disastrous expedition below.  After his father died in 1791, Alexander moved to Hanover Township, Washington (now Beaver) Co and was patented 352.25 acres of land on 12 Sep 1791.  In 1804, Alexander and Elizabeth sold 78 acres of the original 352 acres.  In February 1823, Alexander (but not Elizabeth - so she must have died by then) sold another 100 acres of land.  According to Alexander’s will, he died in August 1823 in Hanover Township, Beaver Co PA.  Alexander's son, William C. Carson, died that same year.  Hanover Township, which is now the southern-most township in Beaver County, was founded in 1786 from Smith Township, one of the original Washington County townships.

 

I have attempted to locate the burial locations of Alexander and Elizabeth - but to no avail.  They are almost certainly buried in present day Hanover Township, Beaver Co PA.  Alexander's children, William C. and Sarah, sold their remaining interest in their father's land in 1836, the same year that William and Sarah Carson migrated to Meigs Co OH.  All these Beaver Co PA land transactions are abstracted below.

 

 

Beaver Co PA Land Transactions

Involving

Alexander Carson and/or his land

 

12 Sep 1791 Beaver Co (formerly Washington Co) PA, Patent Book #10 (or #18…two conflicting sources), page 216: Alexander Carson was patented 352.25 acres "with allowances of 6% for roads"…..the tract, situated on the water of Big Traverse Creek in Smith Township, Washington Co (now Beaver Co) PA, is called the White Oak Flat.

 

13 Jan 1804 Beaver Co PA, Deed Book A, Page 69: Alexander Carson of Hanover Township, Beaver Co "formerly Washington Co" PA and his wife Elizabeth sells "78 acres and 144 perches" out of the 352 acres deeded to Alexander Carson in a deed bearing a date of 12 Sep 1791, to William Langfit, also of Hanover Township, Beaver Co PA, for $236.75.

 

18 Feb 1823 Beaver Co PA Deed Book F, page 430: Alexander Carson of Beaver Co PA sells "100 acres" out of the 352 acres deeded to Alexander Carson in a deed bearing a date of 12 Sep 1791, to William McCaw, also of Beaver Co PA, for $500.00.  As Elizabeth is not mentioned in this deed, I am guessing she died between 1804 and 1823.  Alexander died later this year.

 

13 Aug 1836 Beaver Co PA Deed Book 24 (or 54), Page 33: William (Alexander’s son) and Mary Carson of Beaver Co PA deed his bequeathed 1/2 interest in his deceased father's land--the improved part (as given to him in his father Alexander's will dated 17 Aug 1823), a total of 77 acres and 25 perches, to John Leeper for $1157.34. 

 

12 Sep 1836 Beaver Co PA Deed Book 24 (or 54), Page 233: Sarah Carson (Alexander’s daughter) of Beaver Co PA deeds her bequeathed 1/2 interest in her deceased father's land--the unimproved part (as given to her in her father Alexander's will dated 17 Aug 1823), a total of 77 acres and 25 perches, to Andrew R. Miller for $510.00.

 

 

Carson References as located in

History of Beaver County PA

By Rev. Joseph H. Bausman, 1904

 

·          Roster of Troops in the War of 1812: 1) John Carson, private, Captain David Clark’s Company, 138th Regiment, Pennsylvania Militia, service dates 12 Jan 1814 – 22 Feb 1814; 2) William Carson, private, Captain William Calhoun’s company, 138th Regiment, Pennsylvania Militia, service dates unknown.  Both are probably the sons of William Carson, born 5 Sep 1748 and the brother of our Alexander.

·          Receipts & Expenditures of the Treasury of Beaver Co from 1 Jul 1806 to 31 Dec 1806.  Debts: William Carson, North Beaver Township, 1806, $300.50.  This William would be the brother of our Alexander.

·          William Carson of North Beaver Township joined a Sept 1802 petition requesting the President and Associate Judges of Allegheny County to divide N. Beaver Township, which is 20 miles long and 6 miles wide, into townships: East Beaver and West Beaver. This William would be the brother of our Alexander.

 

 

 

Military References to Alexander Carson

 

Alexander Carson is listed as one of the "Rangers on the Frontier" from Westmoreland County during the Revolutionary War 1778-1783.  Source: Pennsylvania Archives, 3rd Series, Volume 23, Page 228, 230, 322.

 

Alexander Carson is listed as a Private in Captain Biggs' Company during the Sandusky Expedition (see below).  Alexander was commissioned on 20 May 1782.  Captain Biggs was later captured and killed by Indians.  Source: Pennsylvania Archives, 6th Series, Volume 2, Pages 385, 387.

 

According to information provided by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's Historical and Museum Commission, "Alexander Carson was enrolled as an Ensign of the 3rd Class in Captain Daniel Cannon’s Company, Westmoreland County Militia" and was ordered “on duty on the Expedition” on 14 May 1782.

 

Alexander Carson is listed as a Lieutenant in the 6th Company, 4th Battalion, under the leadership of Captain Daniel Cannon.  Source: Pennsylvania Archives, 6th Series, Volume 5, page 310.

 

Alexander Carson is listed as a member of the Fayette Co PA militia during the timeframe 1790-1800, according “to the returns of officers elected and wants commission; election date 7 Jun 1791”.  Source: Pennsylvania Archives, 6th Series, Volume 5, page 310.

 

Alexander Carson, Private: Westmoreland Co, Continental Line, Soldiers of the Revolution.

Alexander Carson, Private: Continental Line, Depreciation Pay.

 

 

 


The Battle of Sandusky

June 4-5, 1782

 

The Battle of Sandusky is of interest to the student of early American history.  However, to the descendants of Alexander Carson, the battle takes on personal significance.  Our direct ancestor, Alexander Carson, volunteered to join the Expedition against the Sandusky (OH) Plains Indians in May of 1782.  He was mustered into service on 20 May 1782 at Mingo Bottom OH as a Private in Captain Biggs' company.  There are several references to Captain Biggs' in the 2nd section below.

 

The June 1782 battle of Sandusky, the intention of which was to push the Indians who had been involved with raids on colonists in the Frontier (western PA), was precipitated by a gross misunderstanding and terrible mistake that occurred in March of 1782.

 

The Moravian Massacre

Indian raiding parties had been attacking outposts and settlements in the Ohio River valley all winter, killing and/or capturing frontiersmen and their families.  After a series of these attacks, the commanding general of the area, General William Irvine, dispatched 100 volunteers under the command of Col. David Williamson, to hunt down these bands of raiding Indians. 

 

In early March this expedition left Wheeling WVA and crossed the Ohio River.  After only a few miles of marching inland they found two bodies - a woman and her infant daughter - impaled on stakes.  The husband and father happened to be in the expedition and recognized his family.   As they were within a mile or two of an Indian village called Gnadenhutten, they decided to investigate to see if these Indians were the culprits.  The Indians occupying this village and two others nearby were Moravian Indians.  A Moravian missionary had, years earlier, converted these Indians to the Christian faith.  These Indians attempted to maintain strict neutrality between their fellow Indians of other tribes, the British and the American colonists.  The expedition arrived in the village and the chief, named Abraham (a native Delaware Indian) and Col. Williamson greeted each other cordially.  The man whose wife and child were found slaughtered less than a mile away noticed that one of the Indian women in the crowd was wearing his wife's dress.  Another soldier noticed that one of the men was wearing the cap and hunting shirt of another colonist who was recently found dead. A search took place and a number of other colonist items were discovered.  The Moravians, in the name of their common God, pleaded with the Americans, explaining that passing parties of Indians sold them these items, and many other items, in exchange for corn and food.  Unconvinced, these findings led the expedition to herd the group of Moravian Indians into the tribe's two buildings.  Col. Williamson then held a council with his men.  18 opted to take the Indians to Ft. Pitt (present day Pittsburgh PA).  The remaining 82 wanted to execute everyone, including the Indian women and children, immediately.   According to the author Allan Eckert, Col. Williamson said to the 82 in favor of execution: "Do as you please about the prisoners."

 

Just then, another 50 Moravians arrived from another village and they too were herded into the two buildings.  The following morning, the slaughter began.  Soldiers methodically tomahawked each victim (I will not go into detail but if you wish to read about it, see the references below).  An Indian boy named Thomas, as well as two other children who were hiding in a fruit cellar beneath one of the two buildings, managed to escape while the entire village was set ablaze by the expedition.  96 innocent Indians, half of whom were women and children, lost their lives as a result.   The children who had managed to escape fled to the two other nearby Moravian towns to warn them.  As a result, these towns were quickly evacuated before the expedition arrived.  These villages were set on fire as well. 

 

This incident, now known as the Moravian Massacre, raised the level of hatred and anger among the Ohio-based Indians even higher.   Settlers all over the frontier were justifiably concerned that the Indians would retaliate as a result.  

 

Hoping to catch the Indians off guard, most colonists thought that a quick follow-up attack, deep into Indian Territory, would be the best course of action to put the problem of continued Indian raiding parties to rest.  Word of the Moravian massacre filtered throughout all the Indian tribes - some hundreds of miles away.  Many vowed to retaliate.  The coming summer would be bloody one.

 

The Battle of Sandusky

A decision was made to launch a larger expedition deeper into Indian territory in early summer of 1782 - with the hope of pushing the Indians so far west and north that they would pose no threat to the settlers streaming across the Appalachian and Shenandoah Mountains and into the Ohio River valley.  The intended targets were the Indians living in the Sandusky Valley in north central Ohio.  A call was issued for volunteers.  Most responded from present day Fayette, Washington and Westmoreland Counties PA.  These volunteers were to provide their own house, flintlock, bedroll and 30 days provisions.  They were to rendezvous on 20 May 1782 at Mingo Bottom, about 75 miles downriver from Pittsburgh on the west (Indian side) of the Ohio River.  Mingo is a few miles below present day Steubenville, Jefferson Co OH.  By the 24 of May, 485 men had arrived and been officially mustered into the Sandusky Expedition.

 

The rank and file elected Col. William Crawford as their commander.  His second in command (losing by only a handful of votes) was none other than Col. David Williamson, the man who commanded what is now referred to as “the Moravian Massacre.”  The expedition was put into motion - heading west and then generally west-north-west through unbroken forest.  According to C.W. Butterfield in his book An Historical Account of the Expedition against Sandusky, "Captain Biggs' company, its lieutenant being young William Crawford, nephew of the commander, took the advance on the march, led by two pilots (guides), Slover and Zane.  'John Rogers stated to me,' writes Robert A. Sherrard, 'that the company he belonged to, in which were James Paull, Daniel Canon, Alexander Carson, my father (John Sherrard), and others, marched all the way as the first company.' "  The Indians, who were secretly watching the Expedition's every move, were well aware of their departure and sent word up ahead to the Sandusky towns to warn them. 

 

The Army traveled in four parallel columns.  On June 3rd  or 4th, after travelling over 150 miles in 10 days, the Army broke out of the forested hills through which they had traveled since leaving Mingo Bottom on the Ohio and entered the open plains of Sandusky (in what is now Crane Township, Wyandot Co OH).   30 miles ahead of them lay their intended targets - the Indian towns of Sandusky (namely, Half King's Town, Captive's Town, Wingenund's Town, Upper Sandusky, Pimoacan's Town and Monakaduto's Town).  The plains contained waist high grass and, on the horizon, "islands" of trees.  It must have been an incredible sight for the men after having traveled 10 days through thick, unbroken forest.  Many harbored thoughts of returning here once the area was safe to lay claim some of this beautiful land.

 

By the time the Army had reached the Sandsky Plains, there were a total of 583 men on the Expedition.  Of the 18 companies formed, approximately 2/3s men were from Washington County, PA (extreme SW corner of present day Pennsylvania) and the remaining 1/3 were from Westmoreland Co PA (one county east of Washington County).  20 men were from Ohio Co VA (present day Ohio Co WVA, in West Virginia's panhandle.

 

The Expedition headed for a slightly mounded island of trees in the distant.  Just before reaching it, the advance guard, travelling several hundred yards ahead of the main body of soldiers and who had already past through this particular island of trees, engaged the Indians who were waiting to ambush the Americans.  It was 4PM.  The advance guard turned their horses and returned to warn the rest - who, upon hearing of the attack, sped ahead to secure and fortify the slightly mounded island of trees - now known as "Battle Island."  This island is located 3 miles due north and 1/2 mile due east of the Courthouse in Upper Sandusky OH.

 

As Allan Eckert states in his book, That Dark and Bloody River, "The Battle of Sandusky was on."

 

The raised wooded hill, with its trees and downed timber, provided some protection to the Army.  Unfortunately, they were surrounded by 600 Wyandots and Delaware warriors who later increased their ranks by an additional 200 Shawnee warriors.  The Army soon discovered that the forested hill had no water…..the little bit they did find was tainted and a number of men got sick.   By 7:30pm (3.5 hours later), 5 men had been killed and 19 wounded (some severely). 

 

Over the next two days, a number of men were shot and killed…and Dr. John Knight did all he could to care for those injured by the lead balls.  Through a captured soldier, the Indians learned that Col. David Williamson was part of the Expedition - which certainly heightened their desires to obliterate the Americans.  Most captured soldiers were either immediately tomahawked or taken to nearby Indian towns to run a gauntlet (a 300 yard long run between members of the entire tribe…who are allowed to hit you on your side and back with anything, including the point blank range firing of an empty flintlock) and then either granted life or death.

 

At night, the Indians prepared fires that encircled the wooded hill.   Indian women came from nearby villages to scream and yell.  Warriors chanted war chants.  The visual and audible scene was certainly physiologically terrifying. 

 

On the morning of 5 June, 3 men had died and another 19 were near death.  During the night, 15 volunteers from Washington Co PA had deserted and, miraculously, escaped through enemy lines.  The fighting resumed at 6am and intensified throughout the day….and the weary men, who had not been able to sleep during the previous night because of the commotion and sheer fright, were attempting to hold their ground.  During the day, the men looked out and saw a strong formation of white, smartly dressed officers approaching on the horizon.  The unit of British Rangers had arrived from Detroit to aid the Indians.

 

By the end of that day, it was apparent that due to their position, and their lack of water, ammunition and food, that it was only a matter of time before they all met their fate.  It was decided the Army would attempt to withdraw at 9pm - first dark.  The men built fires for two purposes:  1) To give the appearance that they were planning to settle in for another night, and 2) to prevent the Indians from mutilating the bodies of their fallen comrades – for these fires were built over the shallow graves of the deceased.  After night fell, Col. Crawford learned that one of his Captains, John Hardin, and some if his men were attempting to slip away.  Furious, Col. Crawford told the men to stand their ground and he rode off to intercept the deserters.  While he was gone, the rest of the Army noticed that their main guide, John Glover and the good Doctor, John Knight, were no where to be found.  This further raised the anxiety level of the Army. 

 

As Col. Crawford was approaching the mutinous company of men, shooting commenced by the Indians who had detected the incursion into their lines.  This gunfire, heard all over the plains of Sandusky, was about all the Army could handle and their immediate retreat commenced in a state of uncontrolled panic.  The Indians in the nearby grasses added to the Army's panic-stricken state by yelling and shooting.  The main body of the Expedition now started a disorderly full-scale retreat to the south - on the trail they had come.   The wounded were carried on litters dragged behind horses.  Col. Crawford, who upon hearing the initial shots directed towards Captain Hardin's men, turned his horse around and galloped back to the island of trees….where he found Dr. John Knight who had stayed with the two most seriously injured men as long as possible before having to leave them and all his surgical tools behind.  Col. Crawford and Dr. Knight realized that they were too far behind the main body to catch up with them - so they struck off to the north a few miles before heading east and south in an attempt to avoid as many Indians as possible (most Indians had congregated to the south, east and west of "Battle Island" in anticipation of the Expedition's eventual retreat south).

 

Col. Williamson assumed command of the main retreating body - and he placed the company of Captain Biggs (Alexander Carson's unit) at the back to act as a strong rear guard (Captain Biggs was not part of the general retreat - he had become separated from the main body during the retreat).  The retreat continued all evening and into the next day - all the while Indians and members of the British Rangers continued their sniping - shooting at any stragglers who lagged behind.   A new skirmish broke out when the Army had stopped for a short rest while in the open at some springs in order to water their horses and give them some rest.  Now, attacks resumed not only from the rear but from the front…..leaving another 8 wounded and 3 dead.   A drenching rain ensued and soaked the men and their flintlocks.  They continued their march and made camp in a small clearing in the midst of thicker stand of trees.

 

In the meantime, Col. Crawford and Dr. Knight had managed to travel a dozen or more miles east of the Battle and managed to link up with Captain Biggs and several other soldiers who had been separated from the main body the previous night.  They teamed up and resumed their march east - but were ambushed by a group of Delaware Indians who had, moments before, seen them approaching.  Col. Crawford and Dr. Knight were captured.  Captain Biggs and several others, who had attempted to escape at the first sign of trouble, were caught, tomahawked and scalped.

 

Back at the main body, Col. Williamson resumed their retreat back to the Ohio and the Army was able to march with little interference from the Indians and British Rangers lurking in the woods.  During their retreat, the tattered remains of Captain Biggs' company (and including, it is assumed, Alexander Carson), had been acting as the Army’s strong rear guard.  The senior member of the group requested permission of Col. Williamson that the group be relieved.  This company, including presumably Alexander Carson, had been reduced from 32 men to only 9….and no officers remained. Col. Williamson relieved this Company, placed them next to the front and instituted a rotation whereby no one Company would have to act as the rear guard for an extended period.  On June 13, Col. Williamson led the remaining members of the Sandusky Expedition into Mingo Bottom.  The wounded were treated and then everyone was transported back across the Ohio.  They camped for one more night and on June 14, all the volunteers were discharged from their disastrous 22-day campaign. 

 

The fate of Col. William Crawford was a horrible one.  Col. Crawford and Dr. Knight were first taken to the village of Wingenund's Town and later to Pimoacan's Town.  Because Col. Crawford had led the assault on the Sandusky Plains, the Indian's level of anger and hatred towards him was very high.  Additionally, because they had not also captured Col. Williamson, the leader of the Moravian massacre, they vented their full wrath on Col. Crawford in Williamson’s stead.  He was sentenced to death.  Dr. Knight witnessed the entire episode.  Col. Crawford’s hands were bound with a short rawhide tether and this was tied to a young tree that had been topped about 15 feet above the ground.   Col. Crawford could move a short distance from the base of the tree or to circle it a few times.  A fire was started a few feet away and laid into it were numerous poles and branches.  The resulting torture is extremely grotesque and I will spare the reader most of the details (if you care to read about it, I highly recommend Allan Eckert's book That Dark and Bloody River…..Mr. Eckert has done a considerable amount of research on the entire episode…as well as the entire 1750-1800 timeframe – excellent reading).  Col. Crawford's ears were first cut off, then he was shot approximately 70 times with empty flintlocks—the exploding powder inflicting deep and painful burns; then every single inch of his body was poked and stabbed with the white hot points of the burning poles that had been laying in the fire; he was then scalped and had burning coals dumped on top of his skinless head.  The entire torture lasted between 2 and 4 hours.  After he died, a huge quantity of wood was added to the fire and his body was burned.  The Indians apparently reveled for hours.

 

The fate of the Expedition's surgeon, Dr. John Knight, ended differently.  He had witnessed the entire torture and death of Col. Crawford, and assumed he would meet the same.  He was guarded by several warriors who began leading him west to a distant village.  Enroute, some of the warriors wanted to return and continue the sniping of the retreating army.  Due to the weak and innocent disposition displayed by Dr. Knight, a single warrior was assigned to escort him to the distant village where he too was to be put to death.  During their walk, the Indian and Dr. Knight stopped for the evening when the Indian spotted a treed tom turkey and shot it down.  The Indian commenced building a fire.  Not having any success, the Doctor laughed at the Indian's inability to start a fire and claiming he could do so with no problem.  The warrior, probably filled with pride, agreed to let him try and untied Dr. Knight then returned to the fire site.  Dr. Knight instantly picked up a short club-length log and whacked the Indian in the head.  He then proceeded to pick up the Indian's flintlock and pointed it at the Indian.  The warrior fled - which was probably the best thing for Dr. Knight - for in his haste to cock the flintlock, he broke the spring.  This occurred on the 14th of June.   Dr. Knight took off in the opposite direction – heading north and east for the Ohio River and safety - over 150 miles away.  On July 5 Dr. Knight was found by some American hunters just west of the Ohio above present day Wheeling WVA.  His condition was horrible.  Almost naked, he was barely recognizable from the 3 weeks of starvation and exposure to the elements.  His story of the torture and death of Col. Crawford and his eventual escape and return were passed throughout the territories. 

 

 

 

 


Alexander Carson's Will

New Hanover Township, Beaver (formerly Washington Co) PA

Written 17 Aug 1823, Probated 29 Aug 1823

Will Book A, page 175

Amplifications or uncertainties in [ ]

 

In the name of God Amen:

 

I Alexander Carson of Hanover Township Beaver County & state of Pennsylvania being sick and weak in body but of sound mind, memory and understanding and considering the certainty of death and the uncertainty of the time there of and to the end I may be the better prepared to leave this world whenever it shall please God to call me hence to therefore make and declare this my last will and testament manner following (ie:)

 

First and principally I commend my soul into the hands of Almighty God and my body I commit to the earth at the discretion of my Executors herein after named.

 

It is my will that all my just debts as shall be by me owning at my death together with my funeral expenses and all charges touching the ? [pieces?] of this my will, shall in the first place, out of my personal estate & effects and due be fully paid & satisfied, & from and after payment thereof my will is that the residue of my goods & estate be divided in the following manner, to wit--

 

I give and bequeath unto my beloved son William the one half of my real estate, the improved part together with the horses (except the two year old colt which shall be hereafter disposed of), geers [gears?] & farming utensils & one half of the bedding.

 

I give and bequeath unto my beloved daughter Sally the remaining unimproved part of my real estate together with a Beurse [or Beuroe?] to be purchased for her out of the sale of my personal property and also the remaining one half of my bedding - and viz the bedding tis my desire that they be divided by choice about & likewise -- and likewise I give & bequeath unto her my two year old colt together with her side saddle.

 

I do hereby appoint my son William Carson & John Glasgow the sole executors of this my last will and testament hereby revoking and disannulling all former wills & in testimony whereof I the said Alexander Carson to this my last will and testament have set my hand and seal declaring it to be my last will and testament.

 

Dated this 17th day of August in the year of our Lord 1823.

 

                                                                                                Alex X Carson

 

In the presence of James Clarkson---James Biggen---

 

 


Gilchrist Information

Alexander's wife was Elizabeth Gilchrist.  Her birthplace or birthdate are unknown.  As she is not mentioned in Alexander's 17 Aug 1823 will, it is assumed she died prior to that date.  Elizabeth was the daughter of John and Margaret (Cowden) Gilchrist.  Although the burial locations of Alexander and Elizabeth have yet to be located, I am guessing they are buried somewhere in present day Hanover Township, Beaver Co PA.

John Gilchrist, Elizabeth's father, was born 17 Jul 1731 in Paxtaung Township, Dauphin Co PA, married Margaret Cowden circa 1752, and died 3 Sep 1795 in Laurel Hill, Fayette Co PA.   He was apparently a Major in the Revolutionary War and was the son of John and Eleanor Gilchrist.  John (Sr) was born circa 1691 in Londonderry, Ireland and died in Feb 1745 or 1746 (conflicting sources) in Paxtang Township, Dauphin Co PA.  John and Margaret are buried at the Laurel Hill Cemetery in Dunbar, Fayette Co PA.

Margaret Cowden, Elizabeth's mother, was born 1 Jan 1731 (another source says 15 Jan 1733) in Paxtang Township, Dauphin Co PA and died 15 Nov 1826 Laurel Hill, Fayette Co PA.  She is the daughter of Matthew and Martha (Johnston) Cowden.  Matthew was born circa 1707 and died July 1773 in Dauphin Co PA.

A number of other Gilchrist's are buried in the Laurel Hill Cemetery near Dunbar, Fayette Co PA.

 

 

Gilchrist Deeds located in Fayette Co PA

that refer to

Alexander and Elizabeth (Gilchrist) Carson

 

4 Jun 1814 Fayette Co PA Deed Book "K", Page 390:  This deed refers to a land patent granted to John Gilchrist dated 13 Dec 1785 and called Gilchrist's Attempt" located on Harpers Run and that empties into the Youghiogheny River in Dunbar Township, Franklin Township, Fayette County, PA containing 371 acres with allowances for 6 percent for roads.  This deed states that in John's will, dated 19 Jun 1792, he gave this land to his wife Margaret Gilchrist and 8 of his children, to wit: Matthew; Elizabeth, now married to Alexander Carson, Mary; Jane; Rebecca, now married to David Byers; Sarah, now married to Benjamin Byers; Nancy.  In this deed, the above individuals sell 215 acres of this land to Christian Stoffer for $4302.

15 Sep 1815, Fayette Co PA Deed Book "K", Page 406:  This deed refers to a land patent granted to John Gilchrist dated 13 Dec 1785 and called "Gilchrist's Attempt" located at the head of Harper's Run which empties into the Youghiogheny River at Stewarts Crossing in Franklin Township in Fayette County, PA.  This deed states that in John's will, dated 19 Jun 1792, he gave his son Matthew 160 acres one quarter and 28 perches, excepting 11 acres and 28 perches.   In this deed, Matthew Gilchrist purchases this 11 acres and 28 perches for $330 from the following heirs of John Gilchrist, deceased: Margaret Gilchrist, relic (widow) of John Gilchrist deceased, Alexander Carson and Elizabeth his wife "who is a daughter of the deceased", Benjamin Byers and Sarah his wife "also a daughter of the deceased" and Nancy Gilchrist.

 

 

 

 


The children of Alexander and Elizabeth (Gilchrist) Carson were:

 

1.     William C, born circa 1794 in PA, married Mary Elizabeth Chidester, and died 14 Dec 1864 probably in Meigs Co OH.  He is probably buried in Meigs Co OH (possibly Harpold Cemetery?).

2.     Sarah (Sally).

 

 

William C. Carson

 

William C was born circa 1794 in PA.  He married Mary Chidester, the daughter of William Jennings Chidester and Margaret Wilhelm in 1822, probably in Washington or Beaver Co PA.  William C Carson died 14 Dec 1864 probably in Meigs Co OH and is probably buried there also (possibly Harpold Cemetery?).  Sometime after 13 Aug 1836, when William sold his interest in his deceased father’s Beaver Co PA land (see above), William and Mary moved to Meigs Co OH.  Meigs Co OH deed records indicate that William purchased his first tract of land in OH on 20 May 1836.  He is listed in that deed as  “of Pennsylvania”.

 

Mary Chidester was born circa 1800 in PA and died 19 May 1870 in Pomeroy, Meigs Co OH.  She is probably buried next to her husband in Meigs Co OH.  According to death record 642 on page 30 of the Meigs County OH "Records of Death, Probate Court, Volume I", Mary was a resident of and died in Pomeroy OH of "palpitation heart".  Mary’s mother, Margaret, was born circa 1752 in Rotterdam, Holland.  For more information on the surname Chidester, please see the chapter by that name.

 

In Matthew Rankin Sr's will, written in Mt. Pleasant Township, Washington Co PA and dated 20 Dec 1821, Matthew will's "to Mary Chidester in consideration of her kindness and affection to me, I give and bequeath one feather bed, benstead (bedstand?) and bed clothes, one cow, six sheep and twenty dollars which I wish her to appropriate to the buying of a new saddle".  As Mary is referred to by her maiden name in Dec 1821, it is assumed that she and William C Carson married during 1822 as they had their first child, Matthew Rankin Carson, in 9/1823.

 

 

Meigs Co OH Land Transactions

Involving

William Carson

 

20 May 1836 Meigs Co OH Deed Book 5, Page 79: Benjamin & Hannah Noyes, of Meigs Co OH, deeds a tract of land (SE1/4 Section 17, Range 12, Township 2, excepting 50 acres that belongs to the estate of David Young) to William Carson "of Pennsylvania" for $600.  No acreage given.

 

28 July 1839 Meigs Co OH Deed Book 8, Page 218: Lucius Cross, Guardian of Carlton Young and Sally Young, sells the following 103 acres, at a public auction, to William Carson: "50 acres off east corner of Section 17 Town 6 Range 12, also 53 acres in Section 16 Town 2 Range 12" for $380.

 

 

 

William Carson’s Will

Meigs Co, OH

Written 12 Nov 1864, Probated 2 Feb 1865

 Spelling not corrected

Amplifications are in [ ]

 

Seing the grate uncertanty of life & wish to leave my wish as to the management of my affairs.

 

the land to be sold to the best advantage one half of the procedes to be given to Mary my wife and my son David B Carson if they can settle together not in one family the mother to be carefully and kindly treated and cared for, if not to live together the money s to be put to intrest all but three hundred dollars to be given to D.B. Carson or his children as soon as it can be had.

 

The rest of the price of the land to intrest during the life of my wife after this if D.B. Carson be alive one third of what the place brought be given to him counting out the three hundred given to him at the first.

 

E.C. Carson is to have the rest but four hundred dollars to be put [in] safe keeping for the children of Wm. C. Carson, deceast.  The two young horses is for David with the farming utentials if he lives to get home [he must be away serving in the Civil War right now] if not the[y] must be sold & the money given to Mary my wife to help her to be cumfortable.

 

The property insid[e] of the house ?inturly? at her disposal. 

 

The mare Lucy is for my wife.

                                                                                                                                Wm Carson

Witness: Charles Pugh, S. Sullivan

 

 

William Carson's Abstracted Estate Settlement Papers

Meigs Co, OH

 

Probate Record, dated 3 Feb 1865: Probate of the last will of William Carson, deceased, was presented on 2 Feb 1865.  Charles Pugh and Samuel Sillivan, witnesses of the will of William Carson, deceased, depose and say that on 12 Nov 1864 they were present when William Carson wrote signed and sealed his will.

 

Probate Record, dated 3 Feb 1865: E.C. Carson states that he is well acquainted with property mentioned in his father William Carson's will and further states that all the property that his father owned is not worth over $4000.

 

Request for Administration, dated 24 May 1865: Samuel McElroy, Lucius Cross and Wm Chittenden affirm that William Carson is dead and that he left a will and personal property worth approximately $500. Mary Carson, the widow of said decedent, asks the Judge of the Probate Court of Meigs Co OH to be appointed Administrator with the will annexed and she offers an $8000 bond with Wm C. Williamson and John B Hampton.

 

Executor's Bond, dated 24 May 1865: Mary Carson, William C. Williamson and John B. Hampton are bound for sum of $8000.  Mary Carson has been appointed by the Probate Court of Meigs Co as Administrator with the will annexed of the estate of William Carson, late of Meigs Co OH.  If Mary Carson: 1) provides a true inventory of the estate within three months, 2) administers the will of her husband, and 3) render a just and true account of her administration of said will within 18 months, the Executor's Bond will be void.

 

 

 


The children of William C and Mary (Chidester) Carson were:

 

1.     Matthew Rankin, born 6 Sep 1823 Beaver Co PA, married Lucetta Allen 12 Feb 1845, died 19 Dec 1861 Meigs Co OH fighting a forest fire.  Lucetta, the daughter of Elizabeth Walton and Barnabas Allen, was born 11/16/1819 Canterbury CT and died 8/20/1887 Mt. Erie IL.

2.     Alexander, born 30 Jan 1825 Beaver Co PA, married Caroline Fisher 27 Oct 1849, died 10 Nov 1850 Meigs Co OH, buried in either Harpold Cemetery (on SR124 out of Racine) or Oak Grove Cemetery, Racine, Meigs Co OH.  Caroline Fisher was born possibly 1824 in KY and remarried a Washington Stivers following Alexander’s death.

3.     William C Jr, born 28 Dec 1826 Beaver Co PA, married Eliza Cross 20 Sep 1848 Meigs Co OH, died 14 Oct 1861 Meigs Co OH, buried Oak Grove Cemetery, Racine, Meigs Co OH.  William was a carpenter.  Eliza, a school teacher, was born 1828 in OH to Thirza Stanley and Lucius Cross.  Lucius, who is listed in various land transactions involving William C. Carson (Sr) and is listed in William C. Carson (Sr) estate settlement, was born 12/30/1798 Mansfield CT and died 3/24/1912 (112 years old!) and is buried in the Oak Grove Cemetery.

4.     Ephraim Chidester, born 25 Apr 1833 Beaver Co PA, married Elizabeth Leanna Ewing 26 Mar 1857 Meigs Co OH, died 29 Oct 1880 Syracuse, Meigs Co OH, buried Oak Grove Cemetery, Meigs Co OH.

5.     David Byers, born 1838, married Susan M. Marion 12 Jan 1860 Pomeroy, Meigs Co OH, died 15 Sep 1867 Racine, Meigs Co OH, buried Harpold Cemetery, Racine, Meigs Co OH.  Susan was born circa 1839 OH and died 10 Nov 1914.  She is buried in “Rvr Cemtery OH”.

6.     John G, born circa 1841, died circa 1858.

7.     Theodore F (B), born Oct 1842 Meigs Co OH, died 22 May 1862 Military Hospital, Cincinnati OH, buried Harpold Cemetery, Racine, Meigs Co OH.  He was a Lieutenant in the Civil War.

 

    

Ephraim Chidester Carson

 

Ephraim Chidester Carson was born 25 Apr 1833 in Beaver Co PA.  After his parents moved the family downriver to Meigs Co OH, Ephraim met Elizabeth Leanna Ewing, the daughter of William H. Ewing and Mary McLaren, at the Albany Academy in Athens Co OH.  Ephraim and Elizabeth married on 26 Mar 1857 in Meigs Co OH. 

 

During the Civil War, Ephraim was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant on 22 Jul 1861 and then commissioned a Captain on 16 Sep 1862 in the 4th Regiment of the Virginia Volunteer Infantry.  He was later re-enlisted as a Captain in the 174th Regiment of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  His horse was named Beauty.  According to his Civil War June 1865 discharge papers, Ephraim was described as follows:  “born at Beaver Co PA, 30 years of age, 5 feet 10 inches, fair complexion, black eyes, and a mechanic”. 

 

After the Civil War (circa 1865), Ephraim and Elizabeth lived for a time in Mason City WVA, directly across the river from Pomeroy OH.  By 1872, the family was living in Syracuse OH, a few miles upstream from Pomeroy. 

 

According to Elizabeth’s obituary, she and Ephraim met while attending the “Albany Academy in Athens county”.  During some research, I discovered that there was an Albany Manual Labor University (formerly known as the Lewis Academy) operating in Athens County during this time period.  The school was divided into three departments: primary, preparatory and collegiate.  The primary department operated much like a private elementary school.  The preparatory department taught subjects such as orthography, reading, penmanship, arithmetic, geography, English grammar, bookkeeping, history, Latin and Greek.  The collegiate department offered two courses of study: classical and scientific.  A fourth department was also in existence: the Manual Labor Department – where farming the land was the primary activity. 

 

According to Elizabeth’s obituary, Ephraim “organized a company of soldiers at the first call to arms (for the Civil War) in 1861 and he served his country continually throughout the war, serving on General Milroy’s staff. As a result of exposure and hardship, he contracted bronchial trouble, which weakened his strong constitution and resulted in his death.”  Ephraim died 29 Oct 1880 in Syracuse, Meigs Co OH, and is buried next to his wife in Oak Grove Cemetery, Meigs Co OH.  During his lifetime, Ephraim was not only a Civil War Captain but also a carpenter, agent, machinist, mechanic and a Postal Clerk in Pomeroy OH.

 

According to the book “Ohio in the War”, Ephraim was listed as serving in the following regiments and in the following capacities:

 

·         1st Lieutenant, 4th Regiment Virginia Volunteer Infantry, 3 year’s service, commissioned July 1861 at Point Pleasant WVA, from Pomeroy OH.  The regiment was mustered into service as a Virginia regiment although it was mainly comprised of Ohio men.  This Regiment saw action at Fayette Courthouse, Gauley and Charleston (all in eastern Kentucky) and at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  On the morning of May 19th, 1863 (only one day after reaching Vicksburg), under the command of General William Tecumseh Sherman, this regiment and numerous others attacked Confederate forces defending Vicksburg – and out of 400 men in this regiment, 192 men and officers were either killed or wounded.  During the second Union attack on May 22, an additional 31 men and officers were killed or wounded.  This regiment stayed at the front lines until the Confederate surrender of Vicksburg on 4 Jul 1863.  The fall of Vicksburg, with its prominent bluffs overlooking the Mississippi, allowed the Union forces to take control of the Mississippi River.  The Regiment saw additional action at Tennessee.  On the 16  Dec 1863 they arrived in Larkinsville, Alabama – having marched 996 miles since being mustered into service seven months earlier.

·         Captain, 174th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 1 year’s service, commissioned 14 Sep 1864, detached on General Milroy’s staff at the muster out of the Regiment.  The regiment was organized at Camp Chase OH and left Columbus OH on 23 Sep 1864 with orders to proceed to Nashville TN and report to General William Tecumseh Sherman, then commanding the Military Division of the Mississippi.  The regiment saw action in Murfreesboro TN and Decatur AL and in the battles of Overall’s Creek and “The Cedars”.  During a charge in the latter engagement, this regiment captured two cannon and a stand of Rebel colors belonging to the 1st and 4th Florida, C.S.A. and captured about 200 prisoners – losing only one officer and 4 men.   Following these engagements, they were dispatched via rail to Washington City (Washington DC I’m assuming) and then onto Fort Fisher NC.  They then marched to Moorehead City and New Bern NC in Feb 1865.  It was here they participated in the Battle of Five Forks at Kingston NC – sustaining 25 men wounded and four killed – and capturing some 142 confederate prisoners and a larger number afterwards.  This was one of the last battles of the war and the last for the 174th.  They were mustered out of service on 28 Jun 1865 in Charlotte NC – and reached Columbus OH on 5 Jul 1865.  They were paid and discharged 7 Jul 1865.

 

I have located, ordered and received Captain’s Ephraim Carson’s pension file from the National Archives.  Below is a summary of events in his military career and the events that followed relative to his request for a pension:

 

a)     ?? Jul 1861: Commissioned a 1st Lieutenant, 4th Regiment, Virginia Volunteer Infantry.

b)    22 Jul 1861: Commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant, 4th Regiment, Virginia Volunteer Infantry.

c)     16 Sep 1862: Commissioned a Captain, 4th Regiment, Virginia Volunteer Infantry.

d)    04 Aug 1864: Enlisted in the 174th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry at Columbus OH.

e)     14 Sep 1864: Commissioned a Captain, Company “F”, 174th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

f)     21 Sep 1864: Ephraim wrote a letter to his superior, Captain Henry Norten, requesting a furlough of 20 days for David B. Carson – after having received intelligence that David’s father (and Ephraim’s too!) “was at the point of death and there being no one there to attend to the business which will cause a great sacrifice of not attended to. He is the last one out of eight that is in the army….request that a furlough be granted.”

g)    13 Oct 1864: Detached to General Milroy’s staff.

h)     23 Dec 1864: Ephraim wrote a letter to his superior, Brigadier General William D. Whipple in Murfreesboro TN, requesting a leave of absence of 20 days for the following reasons: “I have been in the U.S. Service since the beginning of this war and have never been absent with or without leave during this time; My property is in a very unsettled state, oweing to the ill health of my father in whose charge it was left and I will suffer great ?frecumary? loss if not allowed to attend to it myself.  I am on General Milroy’s staff and will leave a competent officer in my place during my absence. Hoping this will meet your approval and you will grant this leave.  I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your Obedient Servant”  E. C. Carson, Captain, 174th O.V.I. and Acting Assistant to the Inspector General.”  Whipple forwards this request directly to General Milroy who responds: “Approved and recommended.  Capt. Carson is an A.D.C to A.I.G. on my staff and has been efficient and faithful Officer and deserves the favor he asks.”

i)      28 Jun 1865: Discharged as a Captain from Company “F”, 174th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry at Charlotte NC.

j)      23 Nov 1878: Invalid Claim for Pension filed (#263461).  In his application he states “While in his line of duty in Murfreesboro TN on 1 Nov 1864, by reason of exposure and hardship, contracted piles which was greatly aggravated by an injury received at the battle of Wilkison’s Pike TN on 7 Dec 1864 by his horse stumbling and throwing him onto the horn of his saddle bursting his piles, his kidneys and are seriously affect in consequence of said disease….was not treated in any hospital nor by any surgeon while in the service”. 

k)     29 Oct 1880:  Ephraim dies.

l)      17 Dec 1880: Elizabeth L. Carson files a “Widow’s Claim for Pension”.   In it she declares her marriage to Ephraim, his physical condition (hemorrhoids, enlarged prostate gland, and injuries and diseases received in his service mentioned) and date of his death and lists the following children as being under the age of 16 at the time of his death:  Lulu, Frank H, Dora and Dwight.  W.H. Ewing, her father, witnessed the Claim.

m)   3 Mar 1909: Pension Dropped.  Due to Elizabeth’s death on 26 Feb 1909, the Widow’s Pension (#200721) was cancelled by the U.S. Pension Agency in Topeka KS.  The last payment was made on 4 Feb 1909 for $20.

 

 

Letter from Mary Helen Chidester to Cousin Lucetta Carson

containing information about Ephraim and Elizabeth Carson

 

Mary Alice Willcockson, my main source for some of this Carson information, provided me with a copy of a letter, dated 2 Jan 1872, that Mary Helen Chidester of Ravenswood WVA wrote to Lucetta Carson, the wife of Matthew Carson, Ephraim’s brother.  Ravenswood is across the Ohio River and a few miles upriver from Pomeroy OH.  Mary Helen Chidester was a daughter of Ephraim Chidester.  Ephraim Chidester and Mary (Chidester) Carson, the wife of William C. Carson, were siblings.  In this letter, Mary Helen talks about her recent visit to Pomeroy OH and her recollections of Ephraim and Elizabeth Carson.  I initially hesitated to include these comments because a few of them are not very flattering….and not knowing the context in which they were written does not help.  Nevertheless, I have abstracted her letter and list below those comments about Ephraim Carson:

 

·         “I had thought that before we left Eliza (unknown?) I’d go up to the old homestead but oh it looked so delapitated so sad and dreary-my heart failed me much as I wanted to drink again from the dear old spring on the way home-for we had gone up in a buggy (a horse buggy) we stopped in Syracuse to see Eph (Ephraim Carson) all though he acted so badly brought so much trouble on his friends, himself and to almost poverty a disgrace all by his own actions still he was our dear aunt’s son, our cousin’s brother and we can not but pity him. You would not know him so care worn and so sad he looks.  Lib (Elizabeth, Ephraim’s wife) looks about the same and could not perceive any change in her ways.  Ida (Ephraim and Elizabeth’s oldest daughter, about 14 years old) is quite a large girl and said to be real smart in school but I think in appearances much like mother.  The little boys (Winfield-11, Cassius-8, Glen Roy-6 and Frank-1) look bright but poor children they have a hard life from acquaintence(s).”

·         “About one year ago Eph and Lib joined the Methodist Church and it is said Eph has been very faithful.  He works very hard and he’s in such bad health (due to his civil war injuries?) for maybe he is surely suffering the folly of his youthful days (not sure what she is referring to here!).”

·         “I had a long letter from Sue (Marion) Carson (she married Ephraim’s brother, David Byers Carson) about two weeks ago – the first lines from her since last spring.  Her father (Mr. Marion is down now with his goods is (?) about Racine (OH) at this time.  This is the first time he has stopped with us since Aunt’s death.  She was down once.  I suppose she felt hard at us when Aunt came here.  She brought her basin, her arm chair, and two feather beds and a few bed clothing…leaving Sue two feather beds.  You know she took nothing with her to Aunt’s.  When Eph Carson came home (from the war?) and was living in Mason City, Aunt went there in the fall and took one of her beds—for Lib (Elizabeth, Ephraim’s wife) had destroyed hers—and most of her clothing so at the time of Aunt’s death or rather afterwards Eph claims the bed and she claimed it.  We didn’t know what to do finally Eph came and got the basin and arm chair and Sue feels hard about it ever since she got all the money Aunt had left except to pay for the funeral expenses.  We thought she might have been satisfied.”

 

 

 

Meigs Co OH Land Transactions

Involving

Ephraim C. Carson and/or Elizabeth L. (Ewing) Carson

 

29 Jul 1867 Meigs Co OH Deed Book 32, Page 401-403: Ephraim C. Carson, Elizabeth L. Carson, E.C. Carson, David B. Carson, Susannah Carson (wife of David B Carson) sells 108 acres to George W. Cooper for $2626.

 

24 Nov 1888 Meigs Co OH Deed Book 67, Page 119: Elizabeth L. Carson sells Town Lots Numbers 7, to William C. Edwards for $700.

 

 

Ephraim’s obituary was located in the Wednesday 3 Nov 1880 Meigs Co (OH) Telegraph:

 

Mr. E. Carson, of Syracuse, who has been very low with consumption for some months, died last Saturday morning and his remains were interred in Oak Grove Cemetery, near this place, last Sunday.  He formerly lived in this place and has a number of relatives here to mourn his loss.

 

 

Elizabeth Leanna Ewing was born Oct 1839 in Columbiana Co OH and died as a result of complications due to diabetes on 26 Feb 1909 at 1315 Temple Place in St. Louis MO (probably at the home of one of her children).  Locating her death certificate (#1293) from the St. Louis Department of Health was very difficult but after approximately 6 months of letter writing, the finally located it.  I am certainly glad they did - for it provided conclusive proof on who her parents were and where they were born.  Her father is listed as William H. Ewing of PA and her mother is listed as Mary McLaren of PA.  Elizabeth is buried next to her husband at the Oak Grove Cemetery, Racine, Meigs Co OH.  After Ephraim died in 1880, Elizabeth raised the young children herself.  She later followed her eldest son, Winifield Scott Carson, to Kansas City, Missouri where he and some of his brothers became railroad employees.  Her lengthy and interesting obituary is listed in its entirety below.  For more information on the Ewing surname, please see the chapter with that name.

 

The St. Louis (MO) Dispatch carried Elizabeth’s initial obituary announcement in their 26 Feb 1909 edition, page 14, column 1:

 

CARSON—Entered into rest on Feb 26, 1909, after a lingering illness, Elizabeth L. Carson (nee Ewing), mother of Winfield S, Cassius E, Glen roy, Frank H., Dwight A. Carson, and Mrs. T.W. Karr of Pomeroy, O.; Mrs. Ferd Plate, Chicago, and Mrs. Orville P. Blake, St. Louis.  Burial at Pomeroy, O.  Chicago and Kansas City papers please copy.

 

Elizabeth’s formal obituary was located in The (Pomeroy, OH) Leader, Thursday March 4, 1909, front page, column 3:

 

ELIZABETH EWING CARSON

-------------------

Passes from Earthly Scenes to the Great Unknown.

-------------------

Elizabeth Ewing Carson was born in Columbiana county Oct, 17, 1839, and quietly breathed her last at the home of her daughter, Mrs. O.P. Blake, at St. Louis, last Friday morning, the immediate cause of her death being diabetes.

Mrs. Carson's mother died she was 14 years of age, and at that time her father moved to Meigs county.  She attended school in this city and at the Albany Academy in Athens county, at the latter place meeting Ephraim Carson to whom she was married March 24, 1857.  To them were born nine children all of whom survive except William, who died when six months old.

Capt. Carson organized a company of soldiers at the first call to arms in 1861, and he served his country continually throughout the war, serving on General Milroy's staff.  As a result of exposure and hardship, he contracted bronchial trouble, which weakened his strong constitution and resulted in his death Oct. 29, 1880.  Thus thrown on her own resources with a large family of children, the ensuing years were fraught with unusual care which would have overwhelmed one of less dauntless courage and devotion than Mrs. Carson.

Although reared a Presbyterian, Mrs. Carson was too broad-minded to be controlled by denominational lines, and while residing in Syracuse associated herself with the Methodist church.  Her activities are well known there and in Kansas City where she lived during the last 25 years of her life.

The remains were brought here Sunday and Monday at 9am funeral services were held at the residence of Prof. T. W. Karr in Syracuse, conducted by Rev. Jewett, the body being laid to rest in Oak Grove cemetery by the side of her husband.

The children left to mourn by the death of this good woman are Mrs. T.W. Karr, Syracuse, W.S., Mexico City; C.E., Tampico, Mexico; G.R., Cherokee, Kansas; Mrs. O.P. Blake, St. Louis; Mrs. Ferdinand Plate, Chicago; Dwight, Bay City Michigan; Frank, Kansas City, MO.

 

 

 

The children of Ephraim Chidester and Elizabeth (Ewing) Carson were:

 

1.     Ida Margaret, born 30 Dec 1857 Meigs Co OH, married Thomas Wilson Karr 17 Oct 1878 Syracuse OH, died 15 Oct 1930, buried Beech Grove Cemetery, Pomeroy, Meigs Co OH.  Thomas was born 28 Aug 1853 to Angeline Smith and John D. Karr.  He was a teacher, school superintendent and died 10 Jun 1922 in an automobile accident.  He is buried in Beech Grove Cemetery, Pomeroy OH.  They had 8 children.

2.     Winifield Scott, born 1861, married Ida Bell, died Dec 1933, buried Zanesville OH. They had 3 children.

3.     Cassius Ewing, born 9 Jan 1864 Portsmouth OH, married Jessie Pearl Rose 20 May 1888 Sedalia MO, died 7 May 1924 Des Moines IA or Vets Hospital Leavenworth KS (conflicting information), buried Bellfontaine Cemetery, St. Louis MO.  Cassius worked for many railroads including the Frisco (now Burlington Northern).  Jessie Pearl Rose was born 14 Dec 1871 Ft Scott KS to Alice Kelso and William Henry Rose and died circa 1893 of pneumonia when their third child was only 3 months old.  Cassius remarried an Elsa Christina Plate 3 Jun 1896 in Hutchinson KS.  Elsa was born 7 Jun 1875 in Hamburg Germany to Mary Storm and Ferdinand Plate and died 31 Dec 1960.  Elsa’s brother Jacob married Cassius’ sister Dora.  Cassuis had 5 children.

4.     Glen Roy, born 1 Dec 1866 Racine, Meigs Co OH, married Olive Gertrude Easley 29 Dec 1897/1898 Cherokee, Crawford Co KS, died 3 Sep 1937 Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, buried Highland Park Cemetery, Pittsburg KS.  They had 5 children.

5.     Lulu, born 30 May 1869 Meigs Co OH, married Orville Prescott Blake 30 Sep 1898 Kansas City MO, died 1955 Philadelphia PA.  Orville was born circa 1870 Kirkwood MO to Emma Pearson and Elzy Blake.  They had 2 children.

6.     Frank Howard, born 12 Feb 1871 Syracuse, Meigs Co OH, married Mary Emily Blakeslee 24 Mar 1909 Jackson Co MO, died 25 Apr 1961 Ft Scott KS, buried probably Evergreen Cemetery, Ft Scott KS.  Mary was born Jan 1889 DeQuion IL and died at Ft. Scott KS.  They had 3 children.

7.     Dora, born 5 May 1875 Syracuse OH, married Jacob Heinrich Ferdinand Plate, died Jun 1948, buried Memorial Park Cemetery, Evanston IL.  Jacob was born 3 Mar 1870 in Hamburg Germany to Mary Storm/Sturm and Ferdinand Plate and is buried in Memorial Park Cemetery also.  Jacob’s sister Elsa married Dora’s brother Cassius.  Dora and Jacob had 2 children.

8.     Dwight Alexander, born 27 Aug 1877 Syracuse, Meigs Co OH, married Anna May Rogers, died 1932 Chicago IL, buried Mt. Washington Cemetery (location unknown).  Anna was born circa 1879 in Cleveland OH and died 19 May 1971 in Baltimore MD.  They had 2 children.

 

 

 

Glen Roy Carson

 

Glen Roy was born 1 Dec 1866 Racine, Meigs Co OH.  He married Olive Gertrude Easley, the daughter Daniel M. Easley and Sara Angeline Harris, on 29 Dec 1897/1898 in Cherokee, Crawford Co KS.  He died 3 Sep 1937 in Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, and is buried next to his wife in the Highland Park Cemetery, Pittsburg KS.  He began his railroading career as a Conductor.  Later he was promoted to Railroad YardMaster in Pittsburg Kansas before being promoted and transferred to Birmingham AL as Superintendent of Railroad Terminals.

 

Olive Gertrude Easley was born 17 Sep 1875 in Weir, Cherokee Co KS and died 30 May 1969 in San Gabriel, Los Angeles, CA.  She is buried next to her husband in the Highland Park Cemetery, Pittsburg, KS.  Mary Brown, my grandmother, remembers her mother Olive as a good disciplinarian, wonderful cook, baked great pies and loved babies.  One time before she took a trip to California to see her mom, she baked Glen Roy 4 pies.  She also remembers her mother telling her that she (Olive) had blood poisoning when she was born.  Mary has given us a red and black wool afghan that was made for her by her mother Olive – she apparently made one for each of her children.  For more information on the Easley surname, please see the chapter with that name.

 

Glen Roy Carson’s obituary was located in the Pittsburg (Kansas) Headlight, Friday September 3, 1937, front page, column 4:

 

G.R. CARSON, 70, DIES HERE

----------------

Retired Railroader is victim of Long Heart Ailment

----------------

Glen Roy Carson, 70, died at 8:45 o'clock this morning at the home, 404 West First.  Mr. Carson, a railroad man for many years, had been ill for several months.

Mr. Carson retired from active service as a conductor on the Frisco railway last Feb 1.  Following his retirement, he went to California for a rest and suffered a heart attack on May 29.  A second attack came on June 17 and Mr. Carson was brought to his home here on Aug. 10.  Born on Dec 1, 1866 in Racine, Ohio, Mr. Carson came to Kansas City in 1880, beginning work for the Kansas City, Fort Scott and Gulf railway when still a boy.  He remained in rail service after that time, continuing work with the Frisco when the other road became known by that name.

For ten years he had served as a conductor.  He had also held positions as yardmaster and assistant superintendent.  For two years he served as superintendent of terminals in Birmingham, Alabama.

Mr. Carson was a member of the Christian church and had served for several years as a member of the church official board at the time of his death.  He served for two terms as a member of the board of education.  A membership was held in the Order of Railway Conductors and Mirza Temple of the Shrine.  Mr. Carson was a 32nd degree Mason.

Funeral services will be held at 5 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the home with Rev. Dyre Campbell officiating.  Burial will be at the Highland Park cemetery.  The body will be taken to the home at 10 o'clock Sunday morning and will remain there until time for the services.  The casket will be closed at 3 p.m. Sunday and will not be opened during the services.  The body is at the Bowman chapel.

Survivors include the widow, Mrs. Ollie E. Carson, three daughters, Mrs. Christine C Faist of Birmingham, Alabama, Mrs. Henry Brown of 1702 South College and Miss Claribel Carson of the home; two sons, Glenroy E. Carson of 124 West Monroe and Charles Carson of the home; two grandchildren; two sisters Mrs. O.P. Blake of Camden, MO, and Mrs. Ferd Plate of Camden, and a brother F.H. Carson of Fort Scott.

 

 

The children of Glen Roy and Olive Gertrude (Easley) Carson are:

 

1.     Christine, born 23 Jul 1900 Cherokee, Crawford Co KS, married (1) Lou/Lew Faist, (2) Leonard A. Sanders in Birmingham AL, died 31 Dec 1966 New Orleans LA, buried Birmingham AL.  Christine did not have any children.  Mary, her sister and my grandmother, remembers Christine as smart, went to school in Chicago as an x-ray Technician, became a dental hygienist, was a registered nurse, lived in Birmingham AL and New Orleans LA.  Leonard was an engineer on the Southern Railroad.

2.     Gertrude, born 11 Feb 1903 Cherokee, Crawford Co KS, died 16 Aug 1903 Cherokee, Crawford Co KS, buried Cherokee Cemetery, Cherokee, Crawford Co KS.  Only lived 6 months.  Mary, her sister, remembers Gertrude as sick ever since birth, died on a Sunday.  Their mom, Olive, was sick at the time also.

3.     Mary Ann, born 22 Oct 1905 Cherokee, Crawford Co KS, christened Mar 1913 Christian Church, Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, married Henry Clifford Brown 4 Jun 1924, Birmingham, Jefferson Co AL, died 29 Nov 2002 Scottsdale AZ.

4.     Glen Roy Easley Jr, born 31 Mar 1908 Cherokee, Crawford Co KS, christened Oct 1917 Christian Church, Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, married Louise McElhaney, Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, married again to a Dottie _______ and died 26 Jan 1980 Oceanside CA, with his ashes being scattered over the Pacific Ocean.  They had one son, Stephen (possibly adopted?).  According to Mary her brother, Glen Roy was a Civil Engineer, worked on Catelina Island (off the coast of California) and worked for the Pacific Railroad.

5.     Claribel, born 29 Jan 1912 Cherokee, Crawford Co KS, christened Mar 1920 Christian Church, Crawford Co KS, married Wendell Coffelt in MO, died 25 May 1983 Los Angeles CA, cremated.  They adopted two children, Phillip and Wendy.  According to Mary her sister, Claribel taught school (primary to 2nd grade?) in Pittsburg KS, worked for the Red Cross in CA during the war, her husband was also in the service – as a Pediatrician.  Claribel was nicknamed “Bitty” by her brother Glen Roy, for he said “She was a little bitty thing” when she was young.

6.     Charles Bertholf, born 6 Jul 1915 Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, christened 11 Feb 1923 Christian Church, Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, married Ruth Ball, died 12 Mar 1984 Los Angeles CA, with his ashes being scattered over the Pacific Ocean.  They had one daughter, Jane.  According to Mary, his sister, Charles was tall, had a stroke in his 2nd year of college at Pittsburg State Teachers College, was going to collaborate on a book, and limped due to a stroke.  His wife, Ruth was real cute.

 

 

 

Mary Ann Carson

 

Mary Ann was born 22 Oct 1905 in Cherokee, Crawford Co KS.  She was christened on Mar 1913 in the Christian Church, Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS. .  When a young teenager, her family moved to Birmingham, AL where her father worked as the Superintendent of Railway Terminals.  Mary married Henry Clifford Brown, the son of James Clifford and Sarah (Potter) Brown, on 4 Jun 1924 in Birmingham, Jefferson Co AL at her parents home at 1208 N. 30th St by Robert N. Simpson, Pastor of the 1st Christian Church.  They moved up to Pittsburg KS shortly after getting married.  According to Mary, they were sweethearts in school.

 

Henry Clifford Brown was born 18 Feb 1902 in West Mineral, Cherokee Co KS and died 13 Oct 1987 in Grace Hospital, Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS and is buried in the Highland Park Cemetery, Pittsburg KS.  For more information on the Brown surname, please see the chapter with that name.

 

After returning to Pittsburg, they purchased some land in Pittsburg KS at 1702 S. College.  There, working long hours and even evenings, they built their own home.  I remember my grandmother telling me that grandpa (Henry) did all the plumbing work at night by candlelight – for fear of offending the local plumbing unions that was not that keen on having individuals do their own work.

 

 

 

Federal Census Records

 

CARSON

 

1783 Tax Lists, Franklin Township, Westmoreland Co PA (ours?)

Alexander Carson, 1 horse, 1 cow, 1 inhabitant (did Franklin Township get switched to Fayette Co?)

 

1785 Tax List, Franklin Township, Fayette Co PA (payment probably in British pounds)

William Carson, 200 acres, 3 horses, 2 cattle, paid 10.0

Alexander Carson, paid 11.3

William Carson, paid 10.0

John Carson, 100 acres, 4 horses, 3 cattle, paid 8.5

 

1786 Tax List, ???, Fayette Co PA (payment probably in British pounds)

William Carson, Sr, paid 11.4

Alexander, paid 10.9

William, paid 10.0

John, paid 7.5

 

1790 Federal Census, Franklin Township, Fayette Co PA

William Carson (d 1791)          

3 free white males 16 and older

1 free white males under 16

3 free white females

John Carson (possibly a brother of William)

1 free white males 16 and older

3 free white males under 16

3 free white females

John Gilchrist (Alexander's wife's father)

3 free white males 16 and older

2 free white males under 16

9 free white females

Matthew Gilchrist (John Gilchrist's son)

1 free white males 16 and older

4 free white males under 16

1 free white females

2 slaves                       

 

1799 Tax Lists, Dunbar Township, Fayette Co PA

Alexander Carson, 4 cattle, no land  (STRANGE - sound be in Beaver/Wash Co by now (patented land there 1791: see pg 507 of Hist of Fayette Co PA)

 

1800 Tax Lists, Beaver Co PA

Alexander Carson (pg. 24)

Males                           1 under 5

                                    1 between 5 and 10 (probably William C, born 1794)

                                    1 between 16 and 26 (probably Alexander)

Females                        1 between 16 and 26 (probably Mary, his wife)

 

1810 Federal Census, Hanover Township, Beaver Co PA

Alexander Carson (pg. 006)

Males                           1 between 6 and 16 (probably William C, b 1794)

                                    1 45 and older (probably Alexander)

Females                        1 under 5 (probably Sarah/Sally)

                                    1 between 6 and 16

                                    1 45 and older (probably Elizabeth, his wife)      

 

1820 Federal Census, Hanover Township, Beaver Co PA

Alex Carson (pg. 118)

Males               1 between 16 and 26 (probably William C, born 1794)

                        1 male over 45 (would be Alexander, age  57-70, died 1823)

Females            1 between 16 and 26 (probably Sally)

                        1 over 45 (would be Elizabeth Gilchrist)                                                 

 

1830 Federal Census, Hanover Township, Beaver Co PA

William Carson (pg. 275)

Males               1 under 5 (probably Wm Jr, born 1826)

                        2 between 5 and 10 (probably Alexander, b 1825 & Matthew b 1823)

                        1 over 50 (probably William)

Females            2 over 50 (probably Mary, his wife)

 

1840 Federal Census, Sutton Township, Meigs Co, OH (pg 42)

William Capon/Carson

Males               1 under 5

                        1 between 5 and 10

                        1 between 10 and 15

                        2 between 15 and 20

                        1 between 40 and 50 (probably William)

Females            1 between 15 and 20

                        2 between 30 and 40 (probably Mary)

NOTE: Immediately before the household entry of William Capon (sic, s/b Carson), was the household of Ephraim Chittenden (sic, s/b Chidester, Mary's brother).

 

1850 Federal Census, Sutton Township, Meigs Co, OH  (Household 1128)

 

 

 

 

Value of Real

Place of

Name

Age

Sex

Occupation

Estate Owned

Birth

William Carson

50

M

Farmer

CHECK ORIG

PA

Mary

50

F

 

 

PA

Alexander

25

M

Farmer

 

PA

Ephraim

16

M

Farming

 

PA

David

13

M

 

 

OH

John

10

M

 

 

OH

Theodore

8

M

 

 

OH

Caroline

26

F

 

 

KY

 

1860 Federal Census, Sutton Township, Meigs Co, OH  (Household 742)

 

 

 

 

Value of Estate Owned

Place of

Name

Age

Sex

Occupation

Real Est.

Personal

Birth

William Carson

65

M

Farmer

CHECK

ORIGINAL

PA

Mary

60

F

 

 

 

PA

David

23

M

Farmer

 

 

OH

Theodore

17

M

Farmer

 

 

OH

Susan

20

F

 

 

 

PA

 

1860 Federal Census, Salisbury Township, Meigs Co, OH  (Household 1355)

E(phraim) Carson

28

M

Clerk

 

$50

PA

Elizabeth (Ewing)

20

F

 

 

 

PA

Ida

  2

F

 

 

 

OH

Andrew Forbes

20

M

 

 

 

PA

 

1870 Federal Census, 2nd Ward-City of Pomeroy, Meigs Co, OH  (Household 21)

 

 

 

 

Value of Estate Owned

Place of

Name

Age

Sex

Occupation

Real Est.

Personal

Birth

Ephraim Carson

37

M

M. Carpenter

 

$200

PA

Elizabeth

30

F

 

 

 

PA

Ida

12

F

attends school

 

 

OH

Winifield

  9

M

attends school

 

 

OH

Cassius

  6

M

attends school

 

 

OH

Glenroy

  3

M

at home

 

 

OH

Lulu

  1

F

at home

 

 

OH

 

1880 Federal Census, Syracuse Precinct, Sutton Township, Meigs Co, OH  (Household 83)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

E.C. Carson (d 1/’80)

46

M

Father

Carpenter

PA

PA

PA 

L.E.

40

F

Wife

 

PA

PA

PA

E.C(assuis)

16

M

Son

Miner

OH

PA

PA

Glenn

13

M

Son

Laborer

OH

PA

PA

Lulu

11

F

Daughter

at school

OH

PA

PA

Frank

  8

M

Son

at school

OH

PA

PA

Dora

  6

M

Daughter

at school

OH

PA

PA

Dwight

  3

M

Son

at school

OH

PA

PA

 

1900 Federal Census, Jackson Co, Kansas City, MO  (Household 110--2510 Perry Avenue)

 

 

 

Yrs

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Md

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

Elizabeth L Carson1

60

F

 

Head

Widow

PA

MD

PA

Frank H. 2

28

M

 

Son

RR Acct’t

OH

PA

PA

Dwight A. 3

22

M

1

Son

Hotel Clerk

OH

PA

PA

Mary4

21

F

1

D-i-Law

 

OH

NY

NY

Plate, Dora5

26

M

4

Dau

 

OH

PA

PA

Plate, Fred6

30

M

4

S-i-Law

Cashier

Ger

Ger

Ger

Plate, Helen

  3

F

 

G-Dau

 

MO

Ger

OH

 

1.         Born Oct 1839, widow, had 9 children, 8 still living, can read, can write, can speak English, renting home.

2.         Born Dec 1871, single, can read, can write, can speak English.

3.         Born Aug 1877, married 1 year.

4.         Born May 1879, married 1 year, no children.

5.         Born May 1874, married 4 years, had 1 child.

6.         Born Mar 1870, married 4 years, came to US in 1882, here 18 years, naturalized, can read, can write, can speak English.

 

1900 Federal Census, Cherokee City, Sheridan Township, Crawford Co, KS

Household 170 (Cedar Street)

Glenn Carson

33

M

2

Head

RR Conductor

OH

PA

OH

Ollie E(Easley)

24

F

2

Wife

 

KS

IL

OH

           

1910 Federal Census, Cherokee City, Sheridan Township, Crawford Co, KS

Household 80 (West Pine Street)  

 

 

 

Yrs

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Md

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

Glen R. Carson

43

M

12

Head

RR Yard Master

OH

OH

OH

Olive E

34

F

12

Wife

 

KS

IL

OH

Christine

  9

F

 

Daughter

 

KS

OH

KS

Mary

  4

F

 

Daughter

 

KS

OH

KS

Glen R

  2

M

 

Son

 

KS

OH

KS

 

Household 79 (W. Pine St, next door to Glen R Carson, containing mother of Olive E. Carson)

Horance E. Bertholf

66

M

23

Head

Own Income

IL

NY

OH

Sarah A (Harris)(Easley)

57

M

23

Wife

 

OH

OH

OH

Charles M

35

M

 

Son

Physican/

Gen'l ??

IL

IL

IL

Lorita J?

30

M

 

Step Dau

Music Teacher

KS

IL

OH

           

1920 Federal Census, Pittsburg City, Crawford Co, KS  (Household 31--West 1st Street)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

Glenn R. Carson

53

M

Head

Asst Supt, RR

OH

PA

PA

Olive E

44

F

Wife

 

KS

IL

OH

Christine

19

F

Daughter

 

KS

OH

KS

Mary

14

F

Daughter

 

KS

OH

KS

Glenroy E

11

M

Son

 

KS

OH

KS

Claribel

  7

F

Daughter

 

KS

OH

KS

Charles B

  4

M

Son

 

KS

OH

KS

 

1930 Federal Census, Pittsburg, Crawford Co, KS (ED 19-22, Page 11B)

 

 

 

 

First

 

Father

Mother

 

 

Name

Relat’n

Age

Status

Marr

Born

Born

Born

Occupation

Industry

Carson, G. R. (*)(**)

Head

63

M

31

OH

PA

OH

Conductor

RR

           , Ollie E.

Wife

54

M

22

KS

IL

OH

Homemakr

 

           , Glenroy

Son

22

S

 

KS

OH

KS

None

 

           , Claribel

Dau

18

S

 

KS

OH

KS

None

 

            , Charles

Son

14

S

 

KS

OH

KS

None

 

(*) Value of owned home: $3500.

(**) Lived at 402 W. First St.

 

1940 Federal Census, Pittsburg, Crawford Co, KS (ED 19-17, page 11)

Own/ Rent

Home
Value


Name


Relation


Age


Status


Born


Occupation


Industry

O

$1950

Carson, Ollie E

Head

64

Wd

KS

 

 

 

 

         , Charles

Son

24

S

KS

 

 

(*) Lived at 402 W. First St.

 

 

 

Meigs County Ohio

Records Relative to the Surname Carson

 

Carson Wills & Probate Records  1826-1925 (first index)

Name

Case #

Comments

Ellen E

2525

Guardian, Wade Cross

Arthur M

2525

Albert E

2525

Anna M.

2525

David B.

935

Adm’r: Susan Carson

Clara P et al

3337

Guardian Wm A Carson

Cora et al

3337

John C

2525

Guardian, Wade Cross

Letitia

1785

Adm’r: BT Trussel

S.A.

899

Adm’r: David O. Hopkins

Robert

993

Adm’r: Wm N Nease

Wm(*)

534(**)

Admx; WW: Mary Carson

Wm L

2525

Guardian, Wade Cross

 

(*) The “Wm” above (File 534) is Wm C Carson, father of Ephraim Chidester Carson.

(**) Copied obtained.

 

 

 

Carson Land Records--William or Wm C. Carson

 

Date/F(rom)--T(o)/Name

 

Vol

 

Pg

# of

acre

 

Lot

# of Lot

 

Remarks

05/20/1836 F Ben Nayes

5

79

160

640

17

1st land purchase

07/26/1839 F Lucius Cross M.C.

8

218

103

640

16-7

 

04/??/1841 T Lewis Tonei*

8

268

---

---

---

 

05/12/1845 T Thomas Pinnell*

10

217

---

---

53

Graham Station

04/13/1846 T Lewis Jones *

11

34

---

640

17

 

07/06/1848 T Peter Harpold*

13

19

---

---

57

Graham Station

01/29/1851 T Lucius Cross*

17

20

---

640

16

 

02/16/1854 T M R. Carson*

17

490

50

640

17

no relation mtn’d

12/17/1855 T Peter Harpold*

19

140

160

640

 

 

09/22/1860 T Wm Chittenden(2)

23

259

1.53

160

17

mentns wife Eliza

11/19/1860 F Peter Harpold

24

136

16.5

640

 

 

05/15/1861 T Jackson Woodruff*

24

137

16.5

160

 

 

09/23/1861 T Wm C Carson*

24

352

2.55

640

17

father to son

09/23/1861 F Wm Carson *

24

352

2.55

640

17

son from father

01/12/1862 F John Savage

24

561

.17

640

26

 

08/06/1867 T Levi Pierce* (1)

33

449

.17

640

26

wife: Mary A.

*=mentions Wm’s wife as Mary

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1)=Can’t be ours as ours died 1864/65

(2)=This is Wm C Carson and wife Eliza-Wm Sr’s son.....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carson Land Records--Mary Carson et al (1)(2)

07/27/1867 T George W Cooper

32

401

108

640

17

 

(1)=mentions: E.C. Carson (Ephraim), E.L. Carson (Elizabeth Leanna Ewing--EC’s wife), David B Carson, Susannah (his wife) and Mary Carson

(2) No other land records from 7/27/1867 thru 1879

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carson Land Records--Ephraim C Carson

none from 1848-1883 (died 1880)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carson Land Records--Elizabeth L Carson(1)

10/23/1880 F John W Shaver (for $860)

52

448

 

 

9,10

Syracuse

10/23/1880 F John Blair (for $260)

52

496

 

 

7,8

Syracuse

11/24/1888 T Wm C Edwards (for $700---lost a little on this deal.....................................)

67

119

 

 

7,8,9,10

Racine(??)

(1) no other from 11/24/1888 thru 1902

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meigs County OH Deaths

Volume I&II

 

Name

 

Death Date

Aged

Y/M/D

 

Information

Carson, Samuel

02/18/1890

79/9/18

b WVA, d Garret Bend

Carson, Robert

07/30/1871

66/5/20

b PA, d Sutton Township

Carson Ephraim C

10/29/1880

46/6/4

b PA, d Syracuse OH, cause: consumption, residence: Syracuse OH.

+several Carson infants but no time to record before leaving!

 

 

Meigs County Cemetery Index

CARSON references Only

 

Name

 

Death Date

Age

Y/M/D

 

Cemetery

 

Remarks

Anna M

01/06/1882

22/7/12

Oak Grove

 

Eliza

03/24/1912

84

w/o Wm C

Wm C

10/14/1861

35/9/16

 

Ephraim C

10/29/1880

b 4/25/1833

 

Elizabeth L

1839-1908

 

 

Elizabeth

06/20/1850

41/1/21

Gilmore

w/o James Carson

Henry

10/10/1856

 

s/o  JJ & E Carson

Mary B

??/??/1856

21

d/o JJ & E Carson

Wm A

1844-1909

 

Carmel

 

Polly Ann

1850-1878

 

w/o Wm A

James

12/20/1853

20/8/12

s/o R & S Carson

Letecia

06/20/1884

 

born in Wash Co PA

Robert

1805-1871

 

 

Corp Johnathan

 

 

Rock Springs

Co H 53rd OH INF

Chester

1911-1987

 

Lehart Falls

WWII vet

Ethel

1914-

 

 

Floyd W

1913-

 

Meigs Mem’l Gardens

 

Ester L.

1920-

 

 

Edith G

09/25/1877

 

Smith

d/o CA & EJ Carson

Herman

1907-

 

Lehart Falls

Mason h/o Inez

Inez

1911-1983

 

E Star w/o Herman

James W.

05/22/1873

1/1/22

“Ours”? Cem

s/o TC & MS Carson

Julia W.

06/07/1870

1/0/1

d/o TC & MS Carson

David B.

 

 

Harpold

From Veteran’s Records

Theodore, Lt.

 

 

From Veteran’s Records

 

 

Meigs County OH Marriages

Books I & II

Carson References

Carson Name-Bride Name

Married

Book

Alexander-Caroline Fisher

10/27/1849

1/388

David B-Susan Marion

01/12/1860

2/346

Ephraim C-Elizabeth L Ewing

03/26/1857

2/218

Henry-Phebe Crawford

08/05/1855

2/137

James-Polly Brightenstein

07/23/1851

1/431

Robert-Susan Wolf

11/14/1861

2/442

William-Eliza Cross

09/20/1848

1/383

William-Mary E Wright

11/04/1860

2/382

 

 

 

CARSON SOURCES

 

·         Genealogical and historical research I conducted.

·         Mary Alice Willcockson, 1008 W. Washington, Jonesboro AR  72401.  Carson reseacher with whom I corresponded up until 1994.  A majority for the Carson biographical information I presented above is from her exhaustive 1992 work “Descendants of the William Carson who came to Northumberland Co PA from Ireland before 1746”.

·         Dorothy Helen Starkel, 700 Sailfish Drive, Ft. Walton Beach FL 32548.  Carson researcher born 1920 and a descendant of Dora Carson, a daughter of Ephraim Chidester Carson.

·         Eugene Carson Blake, Prophet with Portfolio by R. Douglas Brackenridge, The Seabury Press, New York, NY.

·         Meigs County, Ohio History Volume II, 1987.

·         Ohio in the War by Whitelaw Reid, Cincinnati; New York: Moore, Wilstach & Baldwin, 1868.  Pages 918 – 920 and 706 – 708.  Lists Ephraim Carson’s Regiments in the Civil War.

·         The TenMile Country and Its Pioneer Families - A Genealogical History of the Upper Monongahela Valley by Howard L. Leckey, Greene County Historical Society, Waynesburg PA, 1977, The Bookmark, Knightstown, IN.

·         Pennsylvania Archives: 3rd series, Volume 23, page 230, edited by W.H. Egle. Harrisburg, PA.,  Harrisburg Publishing Company, State Printer, 1894-1899.

·         Pennsylvania Archives: 6th series, Volume 2, page 387, edited by Thomas Lynch Montgomery, under the direction of the Secretary of the Commonwealth.  Harrisburg, PA., Harrisburg Publishing Company, State Printer, 1906-1907.

·         That Dark and Bloody River: Chronicles of the Ohio River Valley by Allan W. Eckert, Bantam Books, 1995.  Provides detail on life in the Ohio River Valley from 1750 – 1800….and describes the skirmishes and wars between the colonist and the native american.

·         An historical account of the expedition against Sandusky under Col. William Crawford in 1782; with biographical sketches, personal reminiscences, and descriptions of interesting localities; including, also, details of the disastrous retreat, the barbarities of the savages, and the awful death of Crawford by torture, by Consul Willshire Butterfield (1824-1899), Cincinnati OH, R. Clarke & Co., 1873.

·         History of Fayette County, Pennsylvania: with biographical sketches of many of its pioneers and prominent men, edited by Franklin Ellis, Philadelphia, PA : L.H. Everts & Co., 1882.

·         History of Beaver County, Pennsylvania and Its Centennial Celebration by Rev. Joseph H. Bausman, the Knickerbocker Press, New York, 1904.

·         History of Washington County, Pennsylvania by Earle Robert Forrest, Chicago, S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1926.

·         History of Washington County, Pennsylvania edited by Boyd Crumrine, Philadelphia, H.L. Everts & Company, 1882.

·         Pioneer History of Meigs Co (OH) edited by Edgar Ervin, 1949.

·         Thorold Erskine (Tod) Roberts provided some of the Gilchrist information.  Email as of 7/2002: thorsdag@comcast.net.  Website as of 7/2002: http://www.todroberts.com/gilchrist_reunion.htm

·