Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

BROWN

 

Compiled by: Andrew L. Moore

Email: PAmoores@juno.com

Dated: 22 Sep 2015

 


 

 

BROWN

 

John Brown

Abraham Brown / unknown

 

 

Thomas Brown

 

 

 

 

Catherine MacIennan

 

 

James Brown

 

 

 

 

James Brown

Abraham Brown / unknown

 

Beatrice Brown

 

 

 

 

Mary Corsar

Walter Corsar / Beatrix Brown

James C. Brown

 

 

 

 

 

William Wood

 

William Wood

 

 

Janet Crookston

 

Christina Wood

 

 

 

 

William Grant

 

 

Elizabeth Grant

 

 

 

 

Christina Wallace

 

Henry C. Brown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph Potter

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Potter

 

 

 

 

 

 

John A. Potter

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas Brothers

 

 

 

Bridget Brothers

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarah Potter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stephen Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

Josiah Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catherine Hobson

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Potter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Susan Potter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Evans

 


BROWN

 

Note: Much of this early information was provided by William Scott and Jeanette Dall.

James Brown

 

The children of James Brown and Jean Thomson where:

 

1.     John, born 25 Nov 1753

2.     James, born circa 1755 (maybe died as there is another James born in 1764)

3.     George, born 13 Mar 1758

4.     Isabell born 1 Jan 1760

5.     Abraham, born 24 Apr 1762

6.     James, born 29 Jul 1764

 

 

Abraham Brown

 

The children of Abraham Brown and ________ were:

 

1.     John, who married Catherine Maclennan. Their son Thomas married Beatrice Brown, the daughter of Johns brother James.

2.     James, who married Mary Cosar. Their daughter Beatrice, married Thomas Brown, the son of James brother John.

 

 

John Brown

 

John Brown married Catherine Maclennan.

 

The children of John Brown and Catherine Maclennan were:

 

1.     Thomas.

 

 

Thomas Brown

 

Thomas Brown was born circa 1815 in Skiltiemuir/Skiltieuir, Cockpen, Edinburghshire, married Beatrice Brown circa 1838, and died of asthma (for 3 years) and dropsy on 2 Apr 1863 in Tranent, East Lothian, Scotland. Thomas is shown in the 1861 Pencaitland, East Lothian, Scotland census as living with his wife and family.

 

Beatrice Brown was born 6 Feb 1820 in Newbattle, Midlothian, Scotland, christened 5 Mar 1820 Newbattle, Midlothian, Scotland and died of senile decay (for 5 years) and paralysis on 28 May 1906 in Tranent, East Lothian, Scotland. According to Beatrice's death certificate, Beatrice was the daughter of James Brown and Mary Corsar (although researchers have not found any record of this marriage).

 

Information on Beatrice's parents James and Mary (Cosar) Brown

 

James Brown was married Mary Cosar 23 Apr 1819 in Carrington, Midlothian, Scotland.

Mary Cossar was born circa 1801 in Skiltiemuir, Cockpen, Midlothian, Scotland. She was the daughter of Walter Corsar and Beatrix Brown.

 

Walter Corsar was born 7 Apr 1773 in Skiltiemuir, Cockpen, Midlothian, Scotland, christened 15 April 1773, Newbattle, Midlothian, Scotland, married Beatrix Brown circa 1795 in Skiltiemuir, Cockpen, Midlothian, Scotland, died 3 Feb 1853 in Newton Cottage, Newbattle, Midlothian, Scotland, and was buried 6 Feb 1853, Newton, Midlothian, Scotland. He was the son of John Corsar and Catherine Cowan. According to 1841 census records, Walter was recorded as living at Whitehill age 66, coal Miner, wife Beatrix age 65, son John age 40.

 

Beatrix Brown was born 12 Jul 1773 in Newbattle, Midlothian, Scotland, christened 16 Aug 1773, Newbattle, Midlothian, Scotland and died after 1841. She was the daughter of John Brown and Marion Penman.

 

James and Mary had 6 children, including a daughter named Mary. Mary was born 9 Mar 1827 in Gilmerton, Midlothian, Scotland, christened 31 Mar 1827, Liberton, Midlothian, Scotland. 13 year old Mary Brown of Whitburn was interviewed in circa 1840 by the East Scotland Royal Commission Report (published in 1842) and referred to her 12 year old sister Margaret and her 19 year old sister Beatrice, who later married Thomas Brown:

 

 

East Scotland Royal Commission Report

Interview with No. 197, Mary Brown, age 13, putter(*), of Whitburn, West Lothian, Scotland

 

Wrought (worked) in Crofthead iron-stone Mines six months; goes down at seven in the morning, returns at five and six in the evening, if our work be up. We have no meals below; sometimes we take pieces of oat-cake. The work is very heavy and sore fatiguing, as I have to shove 15 to 20 hutchies (carts) every day and the distance is far away from the shaft. The weight of iron-stone varies in hutches sometimes 5.5 cwt., at others 8cwt.; the roads are all well railed; would prefer day-light work better. Has worked near five years in mines; was last at Sir George Suttie's, at Preston Grange, as a bearer of coals in that part where machinery was not employed, it being too steep for putting. Have two sisters working below, one 12 years of age, the other 19; the eldest married two years since upon her full cousin, Thomas Brown. After the first child was born he deserted her. I live with father and step-mother. There are many children work below; none of them like it, nor would they go down but their fathers or elder brothers force them; whenever they come up to daylight they run home and often get their licks for so doing. (Interviewer's notes: Does not read, nor recollects going to school; sisters do not read; has no knowledge whatever of the Testament or the questions in the Catechism.)

(*) a Putter is also known as a "drags-man" or a person who works/pushes coal carts around a mine.

 

The children of Thomas and Beatrice (Brown) Brown were:

 

1.     Mary, born Sept 1839, Whitburn, West Lothian, Scotland.

2.     John, born 1842.

3.     James, born 19 Sep 1843 Whitburn, West Lothian, Scotland, married Christina Wood 31 Aug 1866 Inveresk, a suburb of Musselburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, died 13 Nov 1879 Woolmet Colliery, Niddrie, Midlothat, Scotland.

4.     Abraham, born 5 October 1845 Whitburn, West Lothian, Scotland.

5.     Catherine, born 1848 Geenburn, Whitburn, West Lothian, Scotland; married William Wood (brother of Christina Wood who married James Brown) 15 Jan 1866 Tranent, East Lothian, Scotland, died 4 Feb 1894 in Inveresk, Midlothian, Scotland. William was born 15 May 1845 in Tranent, East Lothian, Scotland.

6.     Margaret, born 1850 in Cranston, Midlothian, Scotland.

7.     Thomas, born 1852 in Stobhill, Midlothian, Scotland.

8.     William, born 1854 in Tranent, East Lothian, Scotland.

9.     Neil Alexander Kennedy, born 29 Mar 1856 in Pencaitland, East Lothian, Scotland. Neil is listed as the brother of James and the informant in the death register listing of James Brown, who died due to "injuries sustained at the No. 11 Woolmet Colliery.

10.  Beattie, born 7 Apr 1858 Crichton, Midlothian, Scotland.

11.  Robert, born 28 Jun 1860 Pencaitland, East Lothian, Scotland.

12.  Walter Corsar, born 26 May 1862 Pencaitland, East Lothian, Scotland.

 

 

James Brown (Sr)

 

James Brown was born 1843 in Scotland. He married Christina Wood 31 Aug 1866 at Inveresk, a suburb of Musselburgh, Midlothian, Scotland and died in a coal mining accident on 13 Nov 1879 at the No. 11 Pit (a coal mine, also listed as the "No 11 Woolmet Colliery") of the Benhar Coal Company at Niddrie, Scotland.

 

Christina Wood was born on 4 Oct 1844 in Tranent, East Lothian, Scotland and christened 18 Oct 1844, Tranent, East Lothian, Scotland. Her parents were William Wood and Elizabeth Grant. After James' death, Christina married a Thomas Cleland in July of 1883 at New Craighall, Edinburgh, Scotland. Her family and Thomas' family then migrated to the US. She died on 17 Mar 1919 in Arma, Crawford Co KS and is buried in the Mt. Olive Cemetery, Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS.

 

Information on Christina Wood's ancestry

William Wood, born in Tranent, East Lothian, Scotland, married Elizabeth Grant, died Invesek, Midlothian, Scotland in 1877 at the age of 57. William was the son of William Wood and Janet Crookston who married circa 1820. William and Janet had six children: Jean-born 1809, Archibald-born 1811, James-born 1813, David-born 1816, William-born 1819 and Catherine-born 1828.

 

Elizabeth Grant, born in Bo'ness, West Lothian, Scotland and died in Inveresk, Midlothian, Scotland in 1887 at the age of 63. She was the daughter of William Grant and Christina Wallace who married circa 1824.

 

William and Elizabeth spent some time in Coatdyke Lanark, Scotland in the early years of their marriage because their two oldest children, Christina and William Jr, were born there. They then spent a number if years in his hometown of Tanent where 8 more children were born, the youngest then being born in Inveresk, Midlothian, Scotland in 1864. William and Elizabeth both died in Inveresk, William in 1877, aged 57, and Elizabeth in 1887, aged 63. (Williams death certificate incorrectly gives his age at death as 47, but censuses during his life indicate that he was 10 years older than that, a good age for a miner).

 

William and Elizabeth had 11 children: Christina-born 5 Oct 1844, William-born 15 May 1845, Robert-born 28 Mar 1848, Janet-born 20 Aug 1850, Elizabeth-born 6 Feb 1853, Jane-born 25 Dec 1854, Archibald-born 21 Dec 1856, Mary Morton-born 24 Feb 1858, James-born 18 Apr 1860, Helen-born 4 Jul 1862, and John-born 27 Sep 1864.

 

 

 

James Browns Obituary

Dalkeith (Scotland) Advertiser 21 Nov 1878

(Dalkeith is 3 miles S of New Craighall and 6 miles SE of Edinburgh, Scotland)

 

A Miner Lost in a Pit. On Wednesday forenoon, the roadsman at No. 11 pit of the Benhar Coal Company at Niddrie, while going his rounds, noticed that a man named James Brown as not at his post. He observed that there was a hole in the floor, and at once suspected he had fallen through it into an old working. Operations were at once begun but several days elapsed before the body was found.

 

According to some 1994 correspondence I received from genealogy researcher M.V. Gilfillan, 3 Whitehill Street, New Craighall, Musselburgh EH218RB England: "James Brown died from injuries received at the No. 11 Woolmet Colliery. His death was registered by his brother 'Neil' in the district of 'Newton' in November 1878..due to missing records, I (the researcher) was unable to trace his resting place. The only burial I can trace is of a child named Robert Brown, died April 30, 1878, age 13 months. Father: James Brown. At rest Newton Churchyard, layer # 158." James and Christina did have a child named Robert, but my records indicate that he was born on 28 Nov 1875.

 

The children of James and Christina (Wood) Brown were:

 

1.     Thomas, born 17 Sep 1867.

2.     William, born 6 Feb 1869 Climpy-Parish of Cornwath/Carnwath, Lanark Co, Scotland. Was a veteran of the Boer War. Believed to be buried in Edinburgh (at Niddrie or Newton), Scotland.

3.     John, born 26 Aug 1870.

4.     Elizabeth Grant, born 4 Aug 1872.

5.     Beatrice, born 5 Feb 1874 Climpy-Parish of Cornwath/Carnwath, Lanark Co, Scotland, married her stepbrother William Ross Cleland (see below) 22 Sep 1890 Foster IA, died 1 Sep 1959 Cheyenne WY. She was a nurse.

6.     Robert, born 28 Nov 1875 Durham, Lintsgreen Co, England. See paragraph above. Possibly died Apr 30, 1878.

7.     Abraham, born 12 Aug 1877 New Craighall, Edinburgh, Scotland.

8.     James Clifford, born 5 Jun 1879 New Craighall, Edinburgh, Scotland, married Sarah (Sadie) Potter 9 Apr 1900 Mineral, Cherokee Co KS, died 23 Feb 1953 Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, buried 25 Feb 1953 Highland Park Cemetery, Pittsburg KS.

 

 

The Cleland Connection

 

After James died in November 1878, Christina continued to raise her children by herself until she remarried. In July 1883 Christina married Thomas Cleland at New Craighall, Edinburgh, Scotland. Thomas was born ____________ and died 10 Dec 1916 at Raton, Colfax Co NM. Thomas was the son of James and Ann (Riddell) Cleland.

 

Thomas Cleland, his new wife Christina (Wood) (Brown) Cleland and their combined families sailed from Glasgow Scotland (with an intermediate stop in Dublin Ireland) and migrated to the United States on the SS (Steam Ship) Hibernian on 7 May 1887, landing at Philadelphia PA. Thomas Cleland applied for citizenship 23 July 1892 and was granted final citizenship paper on 3 Sep 1906.

 

History of the SS Hibernian

 

According to the North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor (Vol.1, page 309), the "Hibernian" was built by Wm.Denny & Bros, Dumbarton, Scotland in 1860 for the Montreal Ocean SS Co, which in 1897 became the Allan Line. She was a 1,888 gross ton ship, length 280ft x beam 37.7ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw (propeller) and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 101-1st, 30-2nd and 324-3rd class passengers. Launched on 11/1/1861, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal on 23/5/1861. In 1871 she was lengthened to 351.2ft; 2,752 tons and on 17/8/1871 resumed the Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal service. On 19/12/1871 she commenced her first Liverpool - Halifax - Norfolk - Baltimore sailing and on 23/10/1883 started her last voyage from Liverpool to Halifax and Baltimore. On 28/3/1884 she was transferred to the Glasgow - Philadelphia route for two round voyages and then on 25/6/1884 to the Glasgow - Boston route for two further round voyages. In 1885 she was rebuilt to a tonnage of 3,440 tons, two masts and re-engined. On 5/8/1885 she resumed the Glasgow - Philadelphia service and on 19/12/1900 commenced her final voyage from Glasgow to Boston. In 1901 was scrapped in Germany.

 

According to the 4 May 1887 Passenger List of the SS Hibernian:

 

         Number of Passengers: 814 souls

         Diseases on Board: 3 cases of measles

         Stowaways aboard? 1

         Convicts, cripples, destitute, very old or feeble individuals aboard? No.

         Females pregnant, destitute and alone? None.

 

The following passengers were listed in the Passenger manifest. As Thomas is not listed, I am guessing he came over to the United States first and then sent for his family. Mary Lou Allison, a fellow Cleland researcher, noted that Christina must have been a thrifty Scotswoman - for the ages of everyone except herself and the two oldest boys are incorrect (showing individuals as being two years younger than they really were). Mary Lou surmised that the steamship company probably charged according to age.

 

Name

Age

Christina Cleland

40

William Brown

18

William Cleland

18

Thomas Cleland (age 9)

11

Beatrice Brown (age 9)

11

Rob Brown (age 9)

11

? Mclaughlin (a relative or a friend?)

31

Hugh Cleland (age 9)

9

Abe Brown (age 9)

7

Ann Cleland (age 9)

7

James (C) Brown (age 7)

5

Mary Cleland (age 7)

5

Christina Cleland

2

John Cleland

infant

 

 

For record keeping purposes, the children born to Thomas Cleland and his previous wife, Margaret McGinnis/McGinnies/McGuinnes (born 6 Jul 1828 Glasgow Scotland, d 20 Oct 1881 Scotland), were:

 

1.     James, born 23 Oct 1867, died 15 Jul 1858 Scotland.

2.     William Ross, born 4 Jan 1869 Waterloo England, married Beatrice Brown (his step-sistersee above) 22 Sep 1890 Foster IA (by the Mayor of that fair city), and died 12 Mar 1925 Gallup NM. Applied for US citizenship on 29 Oct 1896 in Cherokee Co KS. Stated he was a native of Scotland (understandable as he moved from Scotland shortly after his birth) and about 27 years old. They had 10 children, including Alexander, the father of researcher Mary Lou Cleland Alison:

1.     Thomas R, born 1 Nov 1891, Forbush IA, married Amelia _____ 19 Sep 1913, settled in Chicago where they lived and had one son Thomas Jr, and died 9 Oct 1959 Chicago IL.

2.     James R, born 13 May 1894 Rathbun IA, married Alice Craddock 13 Dec 1914, moved to CA, had one daughter Hanna. James killed himself in Pomona CA on 17 Feb 1936 by pouring gasoline over himself and lighting a match.

3.     Alexander Byron, born 19 Jul 1897 W Mineral KS, married Georgia Ruth Craig 18 Apr 1921 Raton NM, lived in Raton NM until 1931 when they moved to Albuquerque NM, died 7 Aug 1974 Albuquerque NM.

4.     Christina, born 11 Jan 1900 W Mineral KS, married William Evans 27 Dec 1915 Koehler NM, had 2 sons, lived in the small coal mining town of Koehler NM.

5.     William R, born 14 Sep 1902 W Mineral KS, married Esther circa 1926 Raton NM, lived in Las Vegas, NV, died 14 Sep 1958 Las Vegas NV.

6.     Margaret, born Mar 1906 Sherrard, Mercer Co IL, married ______ Smith 15 Oct 1923 Santa Fe NM, they lived in Port Orchard, WA and had 3 sons, died Bremmerton WA.

7.     Beatrice, born 4 Nov 1909 Curranville KS, married John Wilson 28 Jul 1927 Koehler NM, lived in Rock Springs WY and had 2 sons, died 1999 Amarillo TX.

8.     Agnes, b 13 Jun 1914 in Koehler NM, married Roxie Carpinella 19 Jul 1937 Denver CO, lived in Denver CO then moved to Bremerton WA, died 3 Jul 1972 Bremmerton WA. They had no children.

 

3.     Agnes, born 31 Aug 1870, died 6 Jun 1882 Scotland.

4.     James, born 9 Feb 1872, died 17 Feb1872 (lived 8 days) Scotland.

5.     Thomas, born 15 Mar 1873, died 7 Nov 1873 (8 months) Scotland.

6.     Thomas, born 19 Aug 1874 Scotland, died 10 Dec 1916 Raton NM.

7.     Hugh, born 15 Aug 1876 Waterloo Scotland, married Margaret Wilson 17 Nov 1898 at Stippville KS, died 8 Sep 1941. It is on Hugh's Declaration of Intention papers that we learn that the family emigrated from Glasgow Scotland to the US on the SS Hibernian, landing in Philadelphia PA on May 1888.

8.     Margaret Ann, born 23 Jul 1878 Scotland.

9.     Mary Ann, twin, born 4 Oct 1880 Scotland, married _______ Hardie, died 9 Jan 1950 Pomona/Ontario CA.

10.  John, born 4 Oct 1880 Scotland, died 9 Oct 1881 Scotland.

 

 

The children born to Thomas and Christina (Wood) (Brown) Cleland were:

 

1.     Christina Cleland, born 12 May 1885 Loanhead Scotland.

2.     John Cleland, born 5 Nov 1887 Barnsmuir Scotland.

3.     Archibald "Archie" Cleland, born 18 Jan 1889 What Cheer, Keokuk Co Iowa, died June 1966 Oklahoma.

 

James Clifford Brown (Jr)

 

James Clifford Brown was born 5 Jun 1879 in New Craighall, Edinburgh, Scotland. He married Sarah (Sadie) Potter on 9 Apr 1900 in Mineral, Cherokee Co KS, and died 23 Feb 1953 in Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS. James was buried on 25 Feb 1953 in the Highland Park Cemetery, Pittsburg KS.

 

Sarah Potter was born 21 Jan 1881 McAlester, Oklahoma Territory (current day Pittsburg Co OK), died 8 Oct 1970 in Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS and is buried in the Highland Park Cemetery, Pittsburg KS. Her parents were John A. Potter and Elizabeth Smith. For more information on the Potter or Smith surnames, please see the chapters by those names.

 

I have James Alien Registration Card (numbered 5177080 and issued to James Clifford Brown, 206 E. 16th Street, Pittsburg, KS). His fingerprint is also located on the card. These cards were issued to all non-citizens as a result of the Alien Registration Act of 1940.

 

 

Brown-Potter Golden Wedding Anniversary

Pittsburg (KS) Sun, April 1950:

 

Easter Golden Wedding Anniversary. Mr. and Mrs. James C. Brown, 1012 South Broadway, will observe their golden wedding anniversary Easter Sunday.

One of four children, Mr. Brown was born June 6, 1879 at New Craighall, Scotland, and came to the United States with the family in 1886. He moved to Scammon (Cherokee Co KS) from Iowa in 1894, going from there to Mineral (Cherokee Co KS) two years later and coming to Pittsburg (Crawford Co KS) from Mineral in 1915.

In 1902 Mr. Brown began mining engineering for the Missouri, Kansas and Texas railroad, work which he had done for all the major coal companies in the district through the years. He retired from the Mackie-Clemens Coal Company in 1948 but still does some engineering.

Mrs. Brown, formerly Miss. Sarah Potter of Mineral, was born Jan. 21, 1881 at McAlester, Okla., and was one of eight children. She and Mr. Brown were married at Columbus (Cherokee Co KS) April 9, 1900.

The Brown's have one son, H.C. Brown of 1702 South College, and two granddaughters. The two families will go out for dinner on Sunday night but otherwise no celebration is planned.

 

 

James C. Browns Obituary

Pittsburg (KS) Headlight, 23 Feb 1953, front page:

 

James C. Brown, 73, is dead. Retired Mining Engineer Succumbs This Afternoon.

James C. Brown, 73, retired mining engineer, died at 1:45 o'clock this afternoon at Mt. Carmel hospital. Seriously ill the last few days, Mr. Brown had been in ailing health since 1951.

Born June 6, 1879, at New Craighall, Scotland. Mr. Brown came to the United States with his parents at the age of seven. The family settled in Watcher (What Cheer, Keokuk Co), Iowa, later moving to Mineral in 1895.

Mr. Brown was mining engineer for the M.K.& T. Railroad Company in the coal division from 1904 to 1910. In 1910 he became the county engineer for Cherokee County, a position he held until 1912.

Moving to Pittsburg in 1915, Mr. Brown did free lance engineering for all major coal companies here until his retirement in 1948.

Mr. Brown was interested in music and played in the city band for many years. He also was a member of the Shrine Band for a number of years. A membership was held in the First Methodist Church.

Mr. Brown was married to Sarah Potter, April 9, 1900 at Mineral. She survives. The present address is 1012 South Broadway.

Other survivors include one son, Henry C. Brown, 1702 S. College; two granddaughters, Mrs. Carol Moore, 1734 South Olive, and Mrs. Jacqueline Bertoncino, El Dorado (KS); one great grandson, Jeffery Bertoncino, El Dorado; one sister, Mrs. Beatrice Cleland, New Mexico; one brother, Abraham Brown, Roseland (KS); three half-brothers, John Cleland, Arma, Thomas Cleland, Madrid Iowa and Archie Cleland, Oklahoma, and one half sister, Mrs. Christine Atha, Girard (KS).

Funeral arrangements are incomplete. The body is at the Brenner chapel.

 

 

Sarah (Potter) Brown newspaper reference

Columbus (KS) Modern Light, 7 Jan 1926, page 3:

 

Mrs. James Brown of Pittsburg, was called here last week by the serious illness of her grandmother, Susan Wilcox.

 

 

Sarah (Potter) Browns Obituary

Pittsburg (KS) Headlight Sun, 9 Oct 1970:

 

Mrs. Sarah Brown. Mrs. Sarah Potter Brown, 89, died at 10:45pm Thursday at the Golden Age Lodge No. 1 in Pittsburg. She had been a resident of the lodge since 1959 and seriously ill the past 6 weeks.

She was born Jan. 21, 1881 in McAlester, Okla and came to Mineral with her parents as a small child. She was married to James C. Brown, a mining engineer in the area, in 1900. The couple moved to Pittsburg in 1915. Her husband died in 1953.

She was a member of the First United Methodist Church.

She is survived by one son, Henry C. Brown, 1702 S. College; two granddaughters, six great grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Margaret Russell, Englewood, Colo, and Mrs. Minta Rowe, in Utah.

The Brenner Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements, which are as yet incomplete.

 

 

The children of James Clifford and Sarah (Potter) Brown were:

1.     Henry Clifford, born 18 Feb 1902 West Mineral, Cherokee Co KS, married Mary Ann Carson 4 Jun 1924 Birmingham, Jefferson Co AL (at Mary's parents home), died 13 Oct 1987 Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, buried in the Highland Park Cemetery, Pittsburg KS.

 

 

Henry Clifford Brown

 

Henry Clifford Brown was born on 18 Feb 1902 in West Mineral, Cherokee Co KS. He married Mary Ann Carson on 4 Jun 1924 in Birmingham, Jefferson Co AL at the home of Mary's parents. Henry died 13 Oct 1987 at the Mt. Carmel Hospital, Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS and is buried in the Highland Park Cemetery, Pittsburg KS.

 

Henry Brown was a surveyor by trade. He learned civil engineering without the benefit of formal education or schooling. He worked for a number of years for many coal companies as a Mine Surveyor. He also worked as the County Engineer for Cherokee Co KS.

 

Mary Ann Carson was born 22 Oct 1905 in Cherokee, Crawford Co KS. She is the daughter of Glen Roy Carson and Olive Gertrude Easley. For more information on the Carson and Easley surnames, please see the chapters by those names.

 

Brown/Carson Wedding Announcement

Newspaper and date unknownprobably the Pittsburg (KS) Headlight

 

Brown-Carson. Mrs. and Mrs. Glen R. Carson announce the marriage of their daughter Mary Ann to Henry Clifford Brown. The wedding took place at 10 o'clock on the morning of Wednesday June 4 (1924), at the home of the bride's parents in Birmingham, Ala., and the wedding was followed by a breakfast. Mr. and Mrs. Brown are at home in Pittsburg (KS) at the Rex apartments.

 

 

 


Mine Surveyors Vanishing Tribe

Pittsburgh (KS) Headlight-Sun 31 May 1970

By Harold O. Taylor, Headlight-Sun Staff Writer

 

They were a hardy breed. But those chaps who squinted into tripod-supported telescopes, waved with sweeping gestures to working associates stationed at various distances and who penciled down long strings of numbers are almost a vanished clan in the Pittsburg area. They were mining engineers with owl-like abilities who could do surveying deep in the interior the earth with the same efficiency they operated topside in the bright sunlight. One of the remaining veterans of the art says that at times it was even easier.

"We could shoot up to 300 feet," says Henry C. Brown, civil and mining engineer for the Mackie Clemens Fuel Co. He is one of four men known to be left in the field who in an earlier day went into coal mine shafts to "match the underground lines" with those they marked on the surface earlier. The others are George Krushich, long identified with the old Western Coal Mining Co., who got in a bit of the look and write operation underground in fading years of deep mines and who continues active as an engineer; long-retired Jack Vincent; and Arthur Mallams still with P. & M. He formerly lived in Weir but is now in Independence.

Despite his close association with the industry, the engineer has never tailed to be amazed by the actual scope involved and the almost unbelievable contribution to the district's economy made by coal mining.

He recalls a generally accepted statement that in the earlier 1920s with many deep mines operating as power shovels began to move into the field that there were some 12,000 miners working in the overall Pittsburg area.

"When you figure the wages paid these workers, the money spent for land, materials and equipment among the multi other costs, the total is staggering," he said, adding that: "Without all this, think how insignificant Pittsburg very likely would have been."

Admittedly Henry Brown's snappy stride and erect figure despite more years than might be imagined stooping to sight almost belies the "veteran" tag. But then, Henry was a "kid surveyor," initially accompanying his father, the late James C. Brown, in the role of a civil and mining engineer before, but later again like his father, branching out on his own as a free-lance surveyor.

To keep the record straight, there are several engineers in the Pittsburg area with considerable surveying experience. But theirs did not include going into mine shafts for the underground work that had to be as accurate as the open-air listing.

And for further good measure, the Browns---Henry and James---were about as good an exemplification of "like father, like son" as to be found locally at least. In addition to the engineering and other activities, they went in a big way for music.

James C. Brown was a baritone player in different area bands, and well recalled as both good and loud. If he was playing with a 30 piece concert or marching band, the mellow-toned baritone in the hands of Jim Brown could be heard above all the other brasses. Then should he be lipping the instrument in a 40 piece band, the tonal reception was the same.

Henry C. Brown tooted too, but he preferred the mouthpiece of a trumpet, performing with dance bands, the Pittsburg Municipal Band and others, currently blowing with the Mirza Temple band. It was this son of James C. Brown who organized the one and only DeMolay band in Pittsburg in the 1920s.

Henry Brown got his start in measuring and marking back in 1918. Working with his dad, Henry would accompany his "boss" in climbing aboard an interurban car to ride as near the site to be surveyed as the tracks would take the swaying electric rig, from which point they would walk and carry their equipment. Sometimes the distance defied the tramping and lugging so they would ride to the nearest town or mining camp where they would rent a horse and buggy for the trip. They would release the horse in a mine mule lot for the duration of the surveying.

Now the senior Brown "traveled first class', so even before it was actually 100 per cent practical due to mud, he bought a Model T Ford and the father-son combination rode in style, except where the son had to alight and push.

Much of the earlier day surveying was made up of markers and other identification set up when the area was sectionalized. The original surveying saw corner stones, usually of sandstone, set up at each corner of a section, at half-section corners and at the augmenting these markers there were "witness points" marked. Usually these were identifiable trees, the distance from the markers being marked.

Two kinds of surveying were in order, one a regular type but the other being a legal survey which was to be done by a county engineer or a deputized operator. Henry, like his dad, has done both.

In the deep mine surveying, the surface area was marked, then duplicated in the mine, obviously being done a bit at a time as mining progressed. It was the duty of the engineer to keep in touch with the underground boss and keep him duly informed of just how much further in a certain direction the operations could extend.

Almost ironically, Brown recalls, underground the sighting engineer could see the "bob' held by his assistant although this was largely by silhouette. The sighting was as clear as on the outside, which is something because where it has been said for years the power shovel operators "can almost pick their own teeth with the shovel teeth" through their efficiency. Brown says with the telescope, the surveyor could almost tell whether or not his rodman had brushed his teeth that morning" in the outside measuring.

While the mining scene in the Pittsburg area has changed almost 100 per cent," oddly enough, the surveying is done just as it was done before the turn of the century. And with the same sort of equipment, other than there is no more deep mine work and the surveying engineers dress differently.

Surveying itself is just as necessary and the continued checking is as prevalent these days as ever. In the open cut mining there is regular checking with a pit survey made every 30 days. The surveying engineer keeps the pit boss well informed of the distance allowable just as he did in the deep mines.

This in no way means less work for the engineering in the "new phase" of coal mining. With open cut mining operations, the engineer must consider drainage problems that might arise and lick them before they create themselves, among many added responsibilities. The coal company gives a lot more consideration to adjoining land than the uninitiated have any idea, the engineer says.

As a free lance engineer working "on contract" for different coal mining concerns in the area and then working as a staff employee, the Henry Brown list of employers reads like a directory of the coal mining industry. He was first a free lancer, then worked for the onetime Klaner Goal Co. for a quarter of a century. He recalls the Western, the Crowe Coal Co., the Clemens Coal Co., the Jackson-Walker holdings and many others probably forgotten down the years by even longtime residents of the area. He has been with the lone major coal company operating in the immediate Pittsburg vicinity, the Mackie Clemens Fuel Co., since 1957.

Engineering these days has given him added duties to his surveying. He has management of farms owned by the company and engineering with Buildex, a Mackie Clemens holding with two away-from-Pittsburg locations.

While topside operations of the engineer and the equipment he uses are little changed from half a century ago, there is one noticeable departure. Engineer-surveyors over the years were immediately identifiable by their "costumes," the "World War I style" of military trousers with the pegged sides and their knee and calf-hugging extremes which were fit into knee-high leather, laced boots. They do not wear this garb any more. "You can't buy those kind of pants these days," quotes the engineer, now qualified to retire but who is enjoying his work and his relations with the Mackie Clemens organization so much he hasn't given it any real thought.

 

 

 


Henry C. Brown Obituary

Pittsburg (KS) Headlight-Thursday 15 Oct 1987

 

Henry C. Brown, 85, of 2207 Tucker Terrace, died at 7:03 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 13, 1987, at the Mt. Carmel Medical Center. He had been ill for three years.

Born Feb. 18, 1902, in West Mineral to James C. and Sarah Potter Brown, he attended schools in Pittsburg and the Kansas State Teacher College, now Pittsburg State University. He lived in the community all of his life.

He married Mary Carson, June 4, 1924, in Birmingham, Ala., and she survives.

Mr. Brown was vice-president and superintendent of the Klaner Coal Company and later an engineer for the Clemens Coal Company and Buildex, Inc., until he retired.

He was a member and elder of the First Christian Church, former president of the 20th Century Class, and a member of the Building Committee of the church. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge No. 187, the Consistory at Fort Scott, the Mirza Shrine, a charter member of the DeMolays, a member of the National Society of Professional Engineers and the Kansas Engineering Society.

Additional survivors include one daughter, Jacqueline Bertoncino of Scottsdale, Ariz.; six grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. Two brothers, two sisters and one daughter, Carol Moore, preceded him in death.

Services will be 10:30 a.m. Friday at the First Christian Church, with Dr. Wayne Black officiating. Burial will be in Highland Park Cemetery. Friends may call at the Brenner Chapel or at the family home at their convenience.

 

 

 


Mary Carson Brown Obituary #1

The Arizona Republic -Tuesday 3 Dec 2002

 

Mary Carson Brown, 97, of Scottsdale (Eldercare @ Vista Drive, 8407 E. Vista Dr, Scottsdale AZ 85290) died November 29, 2002 of natural causes. She was born in Cherokee, Kansas on October 22, 1905. Mary, married Henry C. Brown on June 4, 1924. He preceded her in death. Together they raised two daughters, Carol Moore and Jacqueline Bertoncino-Venckus. Carol preceded her in death, November 1976. Mary moved to Scottsdale from Pittsburg, Kansas in 1990. She has six grandsons, Jeff, John and Jim Bertoncino and David, Byron and Andrew Moore There are 5 great grand children. A private service will be held. Interment will be in Pittsburg, Kansas.

 

Mary Carson Brown Obituary #2

The Arizona Republic -Wednesday 4 Dec 2002

 

Mary C. Brown, 97, Scottsdale, Arizona, passed away November 29, 2002. Visitation: December 5, 2002, 1:30 p.m., Valley Presbyterian Church. Services: December 5, 2002, 2:00 p.m., Valley Presbyterian Church, 6947 E. McDonald, Scottsdale, AZ. Botimer Funeral Home Inc.

 

The children of Henry Clifford and Mary Ann (Carson) Brown are:

1.     Carol Carson, born 18 Dec 1926 Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, married William Byron Moore 2 Feb 1947 Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, died 19 Jan 1978 Fairfax Hospital, Fairfax Co VA, buried Memorial Gardens, Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS.

2.     Jacqueline, born XX/XX/XXXX Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, married (1) Giovanni (John) Bertoncino Jr 19 Jun 1949 Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS, (2) Ronald Bernard Venkus.

 

 

Carol Carson Brown

 

Carol Carson was born on 18 Dec 1926 in Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS. She married William Byron Moore on 2 Feb 1947 in Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS. Carol died on 19 Jan 1978 at the Fairfax Hospital, Fairfax Co VA. She is buried in the Memorial Gardens Cemetery, Pittsburg, Crawford Co KS. According to her mother, Carol was named after a cousin of hers - Carol Hammons of Ft. Scott KS.

 

William Byron Moore was born 18 Apr 1925 Hutchinson, Reno Co KS. He is the son of Claude Sorency and Barbara Morma (Mitchell) Moore. For more information on the Moore surname, please see the chapter by that name.

 

 

 

Scotland, Federal and State Census Records

 

 

BROWN

 

 

1861 Pencaitland, East Lothian, Scotland Census

Name

Age

Born

Occupation

Thomas Brown

46

Skiltiemuir, Edinburghshire

Coal Miner

Beatrice

41

Newbattle

 

James

17

Cranston

 

Abraham

15

Whitburn

 

Catherine

13

Whitburn

 

Margaret

11

Cranston

 

Thomas

9

Stobhill

 

William

7

Tranent

 

Neil Kennedy

5

Cranston

 

Beatrice

3

Cranston

 

Robert

9 mo

Pencaitland

 

 

 

 

1881 Census, 41 Luggy Road Lasswade, Edinburgh, Scotland

Source: FHL Film 0224014 GRO Ref Volume 691 EnumDist 6 Page 5

Name

Marr?

Age

Sex

Born

Relation

Occupt'n

Beatrice Brown

W

60

F

New Battle, Edinburgh, Scotland

Head

House wife

William

U

24

M

Port Seaton, Haddington, Scotland

Son

Coal Miner

Beatrice Brown Raeburn

W

22

F

Porthead, Edinburgh, Scotland

Dau

 

Walter

U

18

M

Newton, Haddington, Scotland

Son

Coal Miner

Beatrice Raeburn

U

5

F

Tranent, Haddington, Scotland

Grand Dau

 

Robert Raeburn

U

2

M

Lasswade, Edinburgh, Scotland

Grand Son

 

 

 

 

1900 Federal Census, Ross Twp, Cherokee Co, KS Household 234

 

 

Yrs

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Md

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

James Brown(*)

21

M

2

Head

Coal Miner

<<<<<<Scotland>>>>>

Sarah (Potter)

19

F

2

Wife

 

Indian Territory

 

 

(*) mentions immigration to US in 1880 at 2 years of age

 

Household 314 (containing Christina (Wood) Brown Cleland, the mother of James C Brown)

 

 

Yrs

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Md

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

Thomas Cleland(*)

53

M

19

Head

Coal Miner

< < < < Scotland > > >

Christina

53

F

19

Wife

 

< < < < Scotland > > >

Thomas Jr

25

M

 

Son

Coal Miner

< < < < Scotland > > >

Mary

19

F

 

Daughter

 

< < < < Scotland > > >

Christina

15

F

 

Daughter

Housekeepr

< < < < Scotland > > >

John

12

M

 

Son

Coal Miner!

< < < < Scotland > > >

Archabald

11

M

 

Son

 

Iowa

< Scotland >

(*) mentions year of immigration to US in 1881. All other family members born in Scotland have an immigration year of 1884. Thomas must have come over to the U.S. first then returned to Scotland and married Christina - and then brought them back over.

 

1910 Federal Census, Ross Twp, Cherokee Co, KS Household 262--Filmore Street

 

 

Yrs

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Md

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

James C. Brown

30

M

10

Head

Coal Miner-Surveyor

< < < Scotland > > >

Sarah

29

F

10

Wife

 

OK

England

IL

Henry

8

M

 

Son

 

KS

Scotland

OK

 

Household 32 (containing James mother, Christina (Wood) Brown Cleland)

 

 

Yrs

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Md

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

Tom Cleland(*)

63

M

26

Head

Coal Miner

< < < Scotland > > >

Christina

63

F

26

Wife

 

< < < Scotland > > >

???

21

M

 

Son

Coal Miner

< < < Scotland > > >

(*) mentions year of immigration as 1881 or 1883 (hard to read).

 

1920 Federal Census, Baker Twp, Crawford Co, KS Household 206

 

 

 

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

James Brown

41

M

Head

Surveyor-Coal Mines

< < < Scotland > > >

Sarah

39

F

Wife

 

OK

ENG

US

Henry

18

M

Son

Laborer-Coal Mines

 

 

 

 

124 Galieto Ave, Raton City, Colfax Co, NM Household 131 (containing the household of William and Beatrice (Brown) Cleland. Beatrice is the sister of James Brown (above).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Father

Mother

Name

Age

Sex

Relation

Occupation

Born

Born

Born

William Cleland(*)

50

M

Head

Engineer-Coal Mines

< < < Scotland > > >

Beatrice(*)

45

F

Wife

 

< < < Scotland > > >

Alexander

22

M

Son

Electrician-Railroad

KS

< < Scotland > >

William Jr

17

M

Son

Laborer-Garage

KS

< < Scotland > >

Margaret

13

F

Daughter

 

IL

< < Scotland > >

Beatrice

10

F

Daughter

 

KS

< < Scotland > >

Agnes

5

F

Daughter

 

NM

< < Scotland > >

(*) They list 1896 as the year of their immigration, and 1892 as the year of their citizenship.

 

1930 Federal Census, Pittsburg, Crawford Co, KS (ED 19-27, Sheet 22)

 

 

 

First

 

Father

Mother

 

 

Name

Relatn

Age

Status

Marr

Born

Born

Born

Occupation

Industry

Brown, James C (*)

Head

50

M

20

IA

Scotland

Scotland

Civil Engineer

Mining

, Sarah

Wife

49

M

19

OK

Ireland

IL

 

 

(*) Value of owned home: $3500

(**) 206 E. 16th St.

 

1930 Federal Census, Pittsburg, Crawford Co, KS (ED 19-22, Sheet 25)

 

 

 

 

First

 

Father

Mother

 

 

Name

Relatn

Age

Status

Marr

Born

Born

Born

Occupation

Industry

Brown, Henry C (*)

Head

28

M

22

KS

Scotland

KS

Civil Engineer

Mining&Civil

, Mary

Wife

24

M

18

KS

OH

KS

Homemakr

 

, Carol

Dau

3

S

 

KS

KS

KS

 

 

, Jacqueline

Dau

1

S

 

KS

KS

KS

 

 

(*) Rented 416 W. Forest for $25/month

 

 

1940 Federal Census, Pittsburg, Crawford Co, KS (ED 19-23, Page 1)

Own/ Rent

Home
Value


Name


Relation


Age


Status


Born


Occupation


Industry

O

$3000

Brown, James C

Head

60

M

IA

Mining & Civil Engineer

Free Lancing Coal Company

 

 

, Sadie

Wife

58

M

OK

 

 

(**) 206 E. 16th St.

 

 

1940 Federal Census, Pittsburg, Crawford Co, KS. By this time, the Henry C. Brown family should have been in their 1702 S. College Ave (which Henry had moved to that location after preparing the foundation). Reviewed ED 19-16A-16B, 19-17, 19-18, 19-19A, 19-19B, 19-22A and 19-22B for Henry C. Brown and family in Pittsburg KSno success. Henry told the author that he used to work in the basement by candlelight at night to hook up the new home to the electricity and plumbing in the basement for fear of the local unions who preferred that homeowners hire them to do the job.

 

 

BROWN SOURCES

 

         Genealogical and historical research I conducted.

         Mary Lou Allison, genealogy researcher (email address as of 2002: mlalison@yahoo.com ).

         William Scott, genealogy researcher (email address as of 9/03: wmglovscott@ntlworld.com; website http://www.geocities.com/wglovscott). Lives in Giffnock near Glasgow in Scotland.

         Jeanette Dall, Wood and Brown genealogy researcher in Australia (email address as of 9/03: jeanettedall@yahoo.com.au).