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Angeline Richard1,2,3,4,5,6 (F)
(August 31, 1885 - December 9, 1971), #10620
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Angeline Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.5,2,4,1,6 Angeline was born at Rosebud Indian Reservation, Rosebud, Todd Co., South Dakota, USA, on August 31, 1885.1,2,3,5 She was the daughter of Louis Francis Richard and Jennie Renault.5,6,4 Another source states that her was also listed with a birthdate in 1886.4,6 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.5 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.4 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.6 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken in 1896 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.1 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of an unknown person on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1904 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2 She married George Washington Bettelyoun circa 1905.3 She was listed as a resident in the George W. Bettelyoun (head), Angeline (Wife-age 34), Samuel G. (Son age 8), Dora L.(Daughter age 7), Floratine(Daughter age 5), and Edison E. (son age 4). Census report at Bennett Co., South Dakota, USA, in 1920.3 Angeline died on December 9, 1971 at Gordon, Sheridan Co., Nebraska, USA, at age 86. Her body was interred on December 13, 1971 at Martin, Bennett Co., South Dakota, USA, at Grace Episcopal Cemetery.

Children of Angeline Richard and George Washington Bettelyoun
Eva Bettelyoun+ b. Oct 18, 1909
Richard Leeroy Bettelyoun b. May 17, 1914, d. Oct 5, 1977
Dora Loriane Bettelyoun+ b. Jul 19, 1914, d. Oct 17, 1977
Percy Bettelyoun Sr.+ b. Aug 29, 1917, d. Aug 3, 1995
Bertha B. Bettelyoun+ b. Sep 21, 1919, d. Nov 22, 2003
Frank Jayrold Bettelyoun+ b. May 12, 1922, d. Sep 28, 2002
Ned B. Bettelyoun b. Jul 6, 1922, d. Aug 14, 1992
Ross Alvin Bettelyoun Sr.+ b. Jun 22, 1924, d. Nov 3, 1983
Prudy H. Bettelyoun+ b. Feb 16, 1926, d. Feb 13, 2002

Citations

  1. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  2. [S159] 1904.
  3. [S372] Debra Hicks, Mike Stevens.
  4. [S269] 1894.
  5. [S556] 1892.
  6. [S561] June 30th 1895.

Angeline Richard (F)
(after 1850 - ), #10662
Pop-up Pedigree

     Angeline Richard was born after 1850. She was the daughter of Joseph Richard and (?) Cane Woman.

Anne Richard1,2,3,4,5,6 (F)
(1887 - ), #18906
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Anne Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.3,5,6,4 Anne Richard was born in 1887.1,4,3 She was the daughter of James Richard and Sophia (?).1,3,5,6,4 Another source states that her was also listed with a birthdate in 1888.5,6 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of James Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.3 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of James Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.5 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of James Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.6 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of James Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1896 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.4 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of James Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1904 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.1 Her was allotted land on July 24, 1916 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA,
; NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE
RICHARD ANNIE 06 041N 043W 036 320 253400 PA 539609 07/24/1916.2

Citations

  1. [S159] 1904.
  2. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.
  3. [S556] 1892.
  4. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  5. [S269] 1894.
  6. [S561] June 30th 1895.

Antoine Richard (M)
(1900 - ), #8448
Pop-up Pedigree

     Antoine was born in 1900. He was the son of Alexander Richard and Nettie Eldridge.

Archie Joseph Richard1 (M)
(January 15, 1924 - July 26, 1999), #8383
Pop-up Pedigree

     Archie was born at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pine Ridge, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on January 15, 1924.1 He was the son of Peter Richard and Elizabeth Hornbeck. Archie was adopted in 1937. When he was 13 years old, he was adopted by his step-father, Charles Randall, Jr.. Archie reported for active duty at South Pacific in December, 1941. In December 1941, he enlisted in the Army and served in the South Pacific in World War II. After the war when he returned to the Pine Ridge Reservation, his Grandpa Joe was so disgusted with all the boys returning from the war that did not know how to speak Lakota any more that he refused to speak English ever again and Archie was forced to relearn the language..1 Archie served in the military after 1947. Archie joined the Air Force in 1947 and received his second honorable discharge in December 1949.
.1 He married Margaret Moholland at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pine Ridge, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, circa 1950. Archie's occupation: after 1950. For the next thirty years he drove a truck and at one time owned a trucking firm in New Hampshire.

He attended Eastern Washington State University and appeared as a guest lecturer at that university. He testified in the Washington Courts as an expert in the criminal justice system. He was instrumental in abolishing Washington's parole program, expanding the work release program and helped 197 Indians get out of jail and stay out of jail the rest of their lives.

He returned to Pine Ridge in 1980 where he was a caseworker for the SD Social Services and was elected president of Pass Creek District. He retired after suffering a massive heart attack in 1984.
.1 Archie died on July 26, 1999 at Tucson, Pima Co., Arizona, USA, at age 75. Suffered severe heart attack in 1984. Died after being treated with leukeran for lymphoma.


He died of heart failure in Tucson, AZ on July 26, 1999. His last words were "I love you". This was one of his favorite phrases. He was preceded in death by his parents, brothers David and Alexander Richard; sisters Grace Brown and Pearl Whirlwind Horse and son, Richard Randall. He is survived by his wife, Bette, Tucson, AZ; children Diane Ott, Receda, CA; Anthony Richards, Canogo Park, CA; Ronald Randall; Terese Stickney, Lake Wales, FL; Ed Haumschild, Bandon, Or; Amy Dykeman, Ellenton, FL; LiAnn Pennington, Aurora, CO; and Archie Richards, Jr., Seattle, WA; and brothers, John and William Richard, Porcupine, SD; sisters Julia Sharp, Allen, SD; Florence White Calf, Pine Ridge, SD; Alice Broughton, Long Beach, CA; and Avis, FL. He is also survived by 15 grandchildren, 3 great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

Services were held in Pine Ridge and Archie's remains were cremated later to be scattered on Eagle's Nest as he wished.

Now he is free
Free to fly with Eagle
Free to be Muzaka Kekeepaysni
Loved by Eagle.
.

Citations

  1. [S90] Bette Richards , Lakota Richards Family.

Baptise Richard1,2,3 (M)
(1876 - ), #39917
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Baptise Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.1,2,3 Baptise Richard was born in 1876.2,3 He was the son of Peter Richard and Louise Red Cloud.1,3 Another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in 1878.1 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, White Clay District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.1 He was listed as "grandson" and residing in the home of Chief (?) Red Cloud on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, White Clay District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.3

Citations

  1. [S556] 1892.
  2. [S269] 1894.
  3. [S561] June 30th 1895.

Baptiste Richard1 (M)
(1875 - ), #18590

     Baptiste Richard was born in 1875.1 He married Rosa (?) circa 1897.1 Baptiste was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1904.1 He was allotted land on April 23, 1917 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA; NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE

RICHARD BAPTISTE 06 035 N 045 W 011 0 253400 PA 579766 04/23/1917.2

Citations

  1. [S159] 1904.
  2. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.

Benjamin Richard1,2,3,4,5,6,7 (M)
(1880 - ), #8470
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Benjamin Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.5,6,3,7,4,8 Benjamin was born in 1880.2,3,4,5,6,7 He was the son of Joseph Richard and Julia Le Deaux.5,6,7,3 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Joseph Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken in 1886 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Dakota Territory, USA.2 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Joseph Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1890 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.8 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Joseph Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA.5 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Joseph Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA.6 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Joseph Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA.7 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Joseph Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 14, 1896 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.3 He married Nettie Eldridge after 1901.1 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Julia Le Deaux on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1904 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.4

Citations

  1. [S90] Bette Richards , Lakota Richards Family.
  2. [S157] 1886.
  3. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  4. [S159] 1904.
  5. [S556] 1892.
  6. [S269] 1894.
  7. [S561] June 30th 1895.
  8. [S47] 1890.

Caroline Richard1 (F)
(1900 - 1920), #8488
Pop-up Pedigree

     Caroline was born in 1900.1 She was the daughter of Joseph Richard and Julia Le Deaux. She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Julia Le Deaux on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1904 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2 Caroline died in 1920.1

Citations

  1. [S90] Bette Richards , Lakota Richards Family.
  2. [S159] 1904.

Charles Richard (M)
(1853 - 1868), #1574
Pop-up Pedigree

     Charles was born at Fort Laramie Region, USA, in 1853. He was the son of John Baptiste Richard Jr. and Marie Gardinear. Charles died in 1868 at Fort Laramie Region, USA. Shot in a dispute by Cy Williams at the Ecoffey and Cuny ranch five miles south east of Fort Laramie, WY.

From the Hunton Diaries:

SIX MILE RANCH-FAVORITE SPOT FOR KILLINGS

"The sequel to the killing of Baptiste Ladeau at Chug Springs was about as follows:
      "In the spring and early summer of 1868 the government, having induced the Indians to consent to be removed to White Clay River, near Fort Randall on the Missouri, had them concentrate into one large camp east of Fort Laramie about 8 miles, preparatory to starting about the latter part of May or the first of June. This mobilization included all white men with Indian families who cared to make the move. Cy Williams, having an Indian wife, Abandoned Bordeaux late in March or early in April and moved to the Indian camp east of Fort Laramie so as to be ready to start with the Indians. After his wife had been interviewed by the relations of the murdered Ladeau boy, Williams was openly accused of the killing, which he denied, and was secretly and closely watched to see that he did not attemp to leave camp. This condition of affairs lasted about a week, when some half-breeds precipitated a gun fight. Williams was killed, but not before he had killed one halfbreed, Charley Richards, and wouned two other halfbreeds, Joseph Bissmetto and one whose name I have forgotten. Oliver P. Goodwin, an innocent spectator, was wounded but not seriously. [John Hunton's Diary. (1956) v.1, pg.40-41]. He married Louise A. DuBray in 1896.

Charles Richard1,2,3,4,5 (M)
(1850 - ), #8447

     The nationality of Charles Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.4,5,1,2,3 Also known as Chas Reshaw.3,5 Charles was born in 1850.1,2,3 Another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in 1851.6,4,5,1 He married Anne Day circa 1875.6,1,2,3,4,5 Charles was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA, in 1886.6 Charles was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on July 1, 1890.3 Charles was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA, on July 1, 1892.4 Charles was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1894.5 Charles was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 14, 1896.1 Charles was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1904.2 His was allotted land on December 18, 1906 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA,
; NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE
RICHARD CHARLES 06 040N 043W 017 320 253400 PA IA 813 12/18/1906
RICHARD CHARLES 06 040N 043W 018 320 253400 PA IA 813 07/07/1919
RICHARD CHARLES 06 040N 043W 018 320 253400 PA IA 813 07/28/1915
RICHARD CHARLES 06 040N 043W 018 320 253500 PA 484689 07/28/1915
RICHARD CHARLES 06 040N 043W 017 320 253500 PA 696253 07/07/1919.7

Children of Charles Richard and Anne Day
Susan Richard b. 18783
Ella Richard b. 18803
Edward Richard b. 18851,4,5

Citations

  1. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  2. [S159] 1904.
  3. [S47] 1890.
  4. [S556] 1892.
  5. [S269] 1894.
  6. [S157] 1886.
  7. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.

Charles Richard1,2,3 (M)
(1873 - ), #10616
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Charles Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.1,2,3 Charles Richard also went by the name of Charley Richard.1 Charles was born in 1873.1,2,3 He was the son of Louis Francis Richard and Jennie Renault.1,2,3 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.1 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.3

Citations

  1. [S556] 1892.
  2. [S269] 1894.
  3. [S561] June 30th 1895.

Charles Richard (M)
(after 1850 - ), #10660
Pop-up Pedigree

     Charles was born after 1850. He was the son of Joseph Richard and (?) Cane Woman. Charles Richard was allotted land on March 11, 1918 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA; NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE

RICHARD CHARLES 06 035 N 043 W 009 40 253400 PA 621591 03/11/1918
RICHARD CHARLES 06 035 N 043 W 009 40 253400 PA 621591 06/22/1920
RICHARD CHARLES 06 035 N 043 W 009 40 253500 PA 758117 06/22/1920.1

Citations

  1. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.

Charles Richard1 (M)
(1872 - ), #18862

     Charles Richard was born in 1872.1 He married Louisa (?) circa 1894.1 Charles was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA, in June, 1896.2 Charles was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1904.1

Child of Charles Richard and Louisa (?)
Louis Richard b. 18951

Citations

  1. [S159] 1904.
  2. [S158] June 30th, 1896.

Charles Richard1 (M)
(1882 - ), #19950
Pop-up Pedigree

     Charles Richard was born in 1882.1 He was the son of Unknown Richard.1 He was listed as "grandson" and residing in the home of Mrs. (?) Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken in 1886 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Dakota Territory, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S157] 1886.

Daniel Richard1,2,3,4,5,6 (M)
(1886 - ), #18904
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Daniel Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.4,5,6,1 Daniel Richard was born in 1886.1,3,2,4 He was the son of James Richard and Sophia (?).1,4,5,6 Another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in 1887.5,6,1 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of James Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1890 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.3 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of James Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.4 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of James Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.5 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of James Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.6 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of James Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1896 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.1 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of James Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1904 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2

Citations

  1. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  2. [S159] 1904.
  3. [S47] 1890.
  4. [S556] 1892.
  5. [S269] 1894.
  6. [S561] June 30th 1895.

Dora Richard1,2 (F)
(May, 1895 - ), #21398
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Dora Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.2,1 Dora Richard was born in May, 1895.1,2 She was the daughter of Louis Richard Jr. and Eva (?).1,2 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Louis Richard Jr. on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Louis Richard Jr. on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken in 1896 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  2. [S561] June 30th 1895.

Edward Richard1,2,3,4,5 (M)
(1885 - ), #17433
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Edward Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.5 Edward Richard was born in 1885.1,2 He was the son of Charles Richard and Anne Day.1,6,5 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Charles Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken in 1886 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.7 Another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in March, 1889 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2,4,5 And yet another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in 1890.6 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Charles Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA.5 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Charles Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.6 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Charles Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 14, 1896 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.1 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Charles Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1904 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2 His was allotted land on December 18, 1906 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA,
; NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE
RICHARD EDWARD 06 040N 043W 008 160 253400 PA IA 814 12/18/1906
RICHARD EDWARD 06 040N 043W 008 160 253400 PA IA 814 02/15/1972.3

Citations

  1. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  2. [S159] 1904.
  3. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.
  4. [S47] 1890.
  5. [S556] 1892.
  6. [S269] 1894.
  7. [S157] 1886.

Elizabeth Richard (F)
(circa 1874 - before 1886), #1581
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Elizabeth Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.1 Elizabeth was born circa 1874. She was the daughter of Peter Richard and Louise Red Cloud. Elizabeth, an unknown person 's child, resided with an unknown person , at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA, circa 1877. Elizabeth died before 1886.2 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1890 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Flat Bottle, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S47] 1890.
  2. [S157] 1886.

Elizabeth Richard1,2 (F)
(1848 - July 8, 1922), #2691
Pop-up Pedigree

     Elizabeth was born at Lakota Territory in 1848.1,2 She was the daughter of Pierre Peter Richard and Lucy Makes Slumber on Her Way Back. She was a student at St. Louis, St. Louis Co., Missouri, USA, before 1863. School:.1,2 She married Hiram B. Kelly in 1863.1,2 Elizabeth, as Hiram B. Kelly and Mary Eagle Man's spouse, resided with them "From the late 1860's until 1884, Mr. and Mrs. Kelly made their home on the Kelly Ranch, near Chugwater where three daughters and five sons were born. They lived in a log and sod house until 1877, when Hi built a spacious brick house containing 14 rooms which included bedrooms, a beautiful front hallway and staircase, kitchen, butler's pantry, and a back staircase leading to two small bedrooms above the kitchen. On the east side of the house was a large porch, and on the south (front) side there was a portico leading to the double front doors, and over this was a balcony.
      It was her the Kellys raised their family. Always living with the family were tutors from the East as well as household help. Hi planted cottonwood trees araound the house, many of which are still standing. Mrs. Kelly had one of the first vegeble gardens in this part of Wyoming. Close to the house was a thick-walled building made of grout with wooden bars covering the windows. It served at one time as a jail for retention of road agents on the Cheyenne-Deadwood Trail. On a little hill east of the ranch buildings was a small graveyard where several of Mrs. Kelly's reletives were buried. The brick house stood until 1874.
In 1876 Kelly built a large frame house a mile south of his home, and he and his brother-in-law, Tom Maxwell, operated this as a hotel and station on the Cheyenne-Deadwood stage road. This house still stands, and was for many years the residence of managers of the Swan Company."
Journalist of a Trip Beyond the Mississipp "

"Wed, Apr 16 [1873] - (Enroute to Bordeaux) Started home on Coach. Staid at (Hi) Kelly's all night. Denison & Dines promised to go to Medicine Bow to freight. McKinstry comcd driving. [John Hunton Diary. (1956) v.1, pg. 22]

"Sat, May 10 [1873] - Enroute to Cheyenne). Started to Cheyenne with Phillips (cash 18$) on way to Omaha to bid on contracts. Jules Ecoffey passed. Borrowed 200$ of (Hi) Kelly. [John Hunton Diary. (1956) v.1, pg. 23]

"Sun, May 11 [1873] - (Cheyenne). Staid at Kelly's all night. Nooned at Horse Creek. Arrived in Cheyenne at 5 P.M. Deep snow all the way from Bear Springs to Cheyenne. [John Hunton Diary. (1956) v.1, pg. 23], at Chugwater River Region after 1865.1,2,3,4 Elizabeth, as Hiram B. Kelly's wife, resided with him "Hi Kelly built one of the finest homes in Cheyenne for his Indian wife and family. It is still one of the show places of Cheyenne. " Big Bat Pourier, pg. 34
"After selling his property to the Swan Land and Cattle Company, Kelly moved his family to Cheyenne, where he built a large frame residence on Ferguson Street, later to be named Carey Avenue. It stood directly across the street on the west from the State Capital Building, and was torn down in the late 1960's.
"The family lived in this palatial home for 18 years until Kelly sold it to Edgar Boice."Journalist of a trip beyond the Mississipp., at Cheyenne, Laramie Co., Wyoming, USA, circa 1885.5,1 Elizabeth died on July 8, 1922 at Denver, Arapahoe Co., Colorado, USA.2,1

Citations

  1. [S63] Robert R. Larson, Journalist of a trip beyond the Mississippi.
  2. [S65] Jessie Y. Sandstrom, Montana town of colorful past was named for reletive of Chief Red Cloud and Hiram Kelly..
  3. [S295] Geoff B. Dobson, Chugwater, Swan Land and Cattle Company, The Two-Bar, Alexander Swan, Dishonest Herd Books., http://www.wyomingtalesandtrails.com/swan.html.
  4. [S64] John Hunton, Diaries of John Hunton.
  5. [S6] Hila Gilbert, Big Bat Pourier: guide & interpreter, Fort Laramie, 1870-1880..

Ella Richard1 (F)
(1880 - ), #34919
Pop-up Pedigree

     Ella Richard was born in 1880.1 She was the daughter of Charles Richard and Anne Day.1 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Charles Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1890 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S47] 1890.

Emma Richard1 (F)
(1888 - ), #35030
Pop-up Pedigree

     Emma Richard was born in 1888.1 She was the daughter of James Richard and Sophia (?).1

Citations

  1. [S47] 1890.

Esaul J. Richard (M)
(September 8, 1918 - 1983), #1721
Pop-up Pedigree

     Esaul was born at Tuthill, Bennett Co., South Dakota, USA, on September 8, 1918. He was the son of James Richard and Eva (?). Esaul reported for active duty at Central Europe after 1941. Esaul's occupation: Bureau of Indian Affairs at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA, after 1950. Esaul died in 1983.

Ester M. Richard1 (F)
(October 19, 1926 - April 29, 2005), #1699
Pop-up Pedigree

     Ester was born at Tuthill, Bennett Co., South Dakota, USA, on October 19, 1926.1 She was the daughter of Joseph Richard and Mary Ellen Brewer.1 She resided at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pine Ridge, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, in 1987. Ester M. Richard died on April 29, 2005 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pine Ridge, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, at age 78; PINE RIDGE - Esther M. Ecoffey, given the Lakota name, Mahpiya Waste Win- Pretty Cloud Woman, age 78, died April 29 at Pine Ridge. She was born October 17, 1926 at Tuthill to Joseph & Ellen (Brewer) Richards. She worked for the California Indian Legal Services in Berkley, California for seven years and also worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs as an Education Aide, where she retired after fourteen years with the Pine Ridge School. She graduated from the Black Hills State University. Her hobbies included shawl making and reading. She is survived by her three daughters: Mary Ellen Red Shirt, Marjorie Murdock and husband, Frank, and Roberta Ecoffey, all of Pine Ridge. Two sons, Robert Ecoffey and wife, Ka-Mook of Aberdeen; George Ecoffey and wife, Pauletta of Wounded Knee, SD. Also surviving are three hunka (adopted) daughters: Stephanie Autumn, Mona Miyasato and Anita Richards; 14 grandchildren and 26 great-grandchildren, along with numerous nieces & nephews. A one-night wake service begins 2:00 p.m. Tuesday, May 3, at Billy Mills Hall, Pine Ridge. Funeral Services will be at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, May 4, at Holy Rosary Mission Catholic Church, Red Cloud Indian School, Pine Ridge, with Rev. John Paul, SJ officiating. Burial will be at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Cemetery, Porcupine, SD. Arrangements have placed in the care of Sioux Funeral Home of Pine Ridge.
Published in the Rapid City Journal on 5/3/2005.1 She was buried on May 4, 2005 at Our Lady of Lourdes Cemetery, Porcupine, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S150] Obituaries.

Florence Richard (F)
(March 21, 1911 - April 16, 1921), #7555
Pop-up Pedigree

     Florence was born on March 21, 1911. She was the daughter of Joseph Richard and Mary Ellen Brewer. Florence died on April 16, 1921 at age 10.

Francis W. Richard1 (M)
(November 6, 1912 - March 16, 1988), #1693
Pop-up Pedigree

     Francis was born at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA, on November 6, 1912.2 He was the son of Joseph Richard and Mary Ellen Brewer. He married an unknown person circa 1930.2 He resided at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pine Ridge, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, in 1987.2 Francis died on March 16, 1988 at age 75.2

Citations

  1. [S367] Gail Richard, Mike Stevens.
  2. [S55] Lakota Times.

James Richard (M)
(1875 - ), #1719

     The nationality of James Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.1 James was born at USA in 1875.2,3 He married Eva (?) at USA circa 1900.1 An unknown person was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Wakpamini District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, in 1901.2 James was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek, Bennett Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1904.1 He was allotted land on September 26, 1907 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA; NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE

RICHARD JAMES 06 036 N 046 W 025 640 253400 PA IA 122 09/26/1907.4

Child of James Richard and Eva (?)
Esaul J. Richard b. Sep 8, 1918, d. 1983

Citations

  1. [S159] 1904.
  2. [S161] 1901.
  3. [S269] 1894.
  4. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.

James Richard1,2,3,4,5,6,7 (M)
(1856 - ), #8867
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of James Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.4,6,7,2 James was born in 1856.1 He was the son of Joseph Richard and (?) Cane Woman. Another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in 1862.6,7,2 He married Sophia (?) circa 1880.8,3,4,6,7,2 James was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on July 1, 1890.3 James was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on July 1, 1892.4 James was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1894.6 James was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1895.7 James was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1896.2 James was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1904.1 His was allotted land on March 11, 1918 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA,
; NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE
RICHARD JAMES 06 035N 043W 009 40 253400 PA 621590 03/11/1918
RICHARD JAMES 06 035N 043W 009 40 253400 PA 621590 03/03/1921
RICHARD JAMES 06 035N 043W 009 40 253500 PA 798643 03/03/1921.5

Children of James Richard and Sophia (?)
Louisa Richard b. 18812,4,6,7
Daniel Richard b. 18862,4,6,7
Anne Richard b. 18871,4,6,2
Emma Richard b. 18883
Thomas Richard b. 18911,4,6,7,2
Nellie Richard b. 18932,6,7
Alfred Richard b. Mar, 18961,2

Citations

  1. [S159] 1904.
  2. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  3. [S47] 1890.
  4. [S556] 1892.
  5. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.
  6. [S269] 1894.
  7. [S561] June 30th 1895.
  8. [S157] 1886.

James Richard1,2,3,4 (M)
(1874 - ), #16664
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of James Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.5,3,2,4 James Richard was born in 1874.1 He was the son of (?) Comes In Sight.5 Another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in 1875.2,4 And yet another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in 1876.6 He was listed as "brother" and residing in the home of (?) Weasel on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1890 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, White Clay District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.5 He was listed as "brother" and residing in the home of Peggy (?) on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, White Clay District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.6 He was listed as "brother" and residing in the home of Peggy (?) on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2 He was listed as "brother" and residing in the home of Frank Baggage on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.3 He was listed as "brother" and residing in the home of Frank Baggage on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1896 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Wakpamini District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.4 James Richard married Julia (?) circa 1902.1 James was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Wakpamini District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1904.1

Citations

  1. [S159] 1904.
  2. [S269] 1894.
  3. [S561] June 30th 1895.
  4. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  5. [S47] 1890.
  6. [S556] 1892.

Jean Baptiste Richard (M)
(circa 1718 - after 1790), #16272

     The nationality of Jean Baptiste Richard was an unknown place ; French. Also known as La Parisian Richard. Jean was born at Paris, France, circa 1718. Jean's occupation: Merchant at Kaskaskia, New France, circa 1738. He resided at Kaskaskia, New France, in 1738. He was tried in criminal court at Kaskaskia, New France, in 1738. Jean died after 1790.

Child of Jean Baptiste Richard
John Baptiste Richard Sr.+ b. 1790, d. after 1865

Jennie Richard1,2,3,4 (F)
(1877 - ), #21450
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Jennie Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.2,3,4 Jennie Richard was born in 1877.1,2,3,4 She was the daughter of Louis Francis Richard and Jennie Renault.1,2,3,4 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.3 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.4 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken in 1896 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.1

Citations

  1. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  2. [S556] 1892.
  3. [S269] 1894.
  4. [S561] June 30th 1895.

John Richard1,2,3,4,5 (M)
(1878 - after June, 1896), #1583
Pop-up Pedigree

     Also known as John Baptiste Richard.3 The nationality of John Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.5 John, an unknown person 's child, resided with an unknown person , at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA, circa 1877. John was born in 1878.4,6,3 He was the son of Peter Richard and Louise Red Cloud.5 Another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in 1880.1 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken in June, 1886 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.3 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1890 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Flat Bottle, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.1 John Richard was born in June, 1892.5 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, White Clay District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.5 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken in June, 1896 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.4 John died after June, 1896.

Citations

  1. [S47] 1890.
  2. [S41] Crazy Horse surrender ledger.
  3. [S157] 1886.
  4. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  5. [S556] 1892.
  6. [S159] 1904.

John Baptiste Richard1 (M)
(February 19, 1921 - June 15, 1987), #1698
Pop-up Pedigree

     John was born at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on February 19, 1921.2 He was the son of Joseph Richard and Mary Ellen Brewer. John reported for active duty after 1940.2 He was employed after 1945 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.2 He resided at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pine Ridge, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, before 1987.2 John died on June 15, 1987 at age 66.2

Citations

  1. [S109] Carolyn Reyer, Cante ohitika Win : (Brave -hearted Women) , Images of Lakota Women from Pine Ridge Reservation South Dakota.
  2. [S55] Lakota Times.

John Baptiste Richard III (M)
(1844 - 1872), #1575
Pop-up Pedigree

     John was born at St. Charles, St. Charles Co., Missouri, USA, in 1844. He was the son of John Baptiste Richard Jr. and Marie Gardinear. He is a work associate of an unknown person at Fort Laramie Region, USA, after 1865.1,2,3 He married Unknown (?) at Crow Indian Reservation, Montana, USA, after September, 1868. When John killed the soldier at Fort Fetterman, he left for the Crow Indian Reservation. Here three captive Piegan girls lived and John married the oldest, a quiet, shy girl. The girl. The girl was in love with him and John told her that someday he would take her to his people . John had to leave her when he was called to take Red Cloud to Washington. When left his wife, now expecting their child, he told her that he would be back and gave her a little book which he said was very important-for her to never to to let anyone have it. John's baby was a girl, said to resemble Mary Richard. When she was grown, her mother died, and gave the book to her daughter, asking her to keep it always. Later the book was borrowed and lost.
     
John told his mother about the child and she began to bead for her grandchild in the Sioux tradition. He asked his mother to see that his wife and child in the Crow village would be cared for, if he should die. The daughter eventually married Little Light, a Crow Indian. [Big Bat Pourier, pg. 36.].1 He was granted a pardon at Fort Fetterman (1867 - 1882), Orpha (near present-day), Converse Co., Wyoming, USA, in September, 1869. He served in the military during war time circa 1870 at Black Hills Region, USA.1 He married Emily Janis circa 1870.4 He married Daughter of Yellow Bear before 1871.3 He married Louise Merrival at Fort Laramie Region, USA, after 1871. He resided at Red Cloud Agency, South Dakota, USA, in 1871, 1871 he had so integrated himself with the Indian Bureau that he owned a trading store at Red Cloud Agency.. He married Oldest Daughter of Red Shirt in 1871. He married Younger Daughter of Red Shirt in 1871. He married Youngest Daughter of Red Shirt circa 1871. John died in 1872.3,1

Child of John Baptiste Richard III and Unknown (?)
Unknown Child Richard b. 1869

Child of John Baptiste Richard III and Louise Merrival
Alfred Richard+ b. circa 1870, d. after 1923

Citations

  1. [S6] Hila Gilbert, Big Bat Pourier: guide & interpreter, Fort Laramie, 1870-1880..
  2. [S121] Catherine Price, Chiefs, headmen, and warriors : Oglala politics, 1851-1889.
  3. [S283] Richmond L. Clow, Brule Indian Agencies, 1868-1878.
  4. [S77] Nicholas Janis-Martha He Bear, family group sheet.

John Baptiste Richard Jr. (M)
(1810 - circa December, 1875), #86
Pop-up Pedigree

     John was born at St. Charles, St. Charles Co., Missouri, USA, in 1810. There is some question concerning the correct date of Richard's birth. His age is given as fifty in the 1860 Denver census; and sixty in the 1870 Fort Laramie census..1 He was the son of John Baptiste Richard Sr. and Rosalie Cote. He resided at Rocky Mountain Region in 1840. John's occupation: Fur Trader at Rocky Mountain Region after 1840. Mid 1830's-1842
     Richard came to the fur trade naturally. While he was growing to manhood, his relatives roamed the wild regions from Mexico to Canada in search of beaver.
In Febuary 1819, Cabanne and Company designated one of the Richards to share the responsibility of the command of its Upper Missouri River operations, and in March 1819 of the same year, Thomas Nuttall met another Richard in central Arkansas, loaded with furs obtained by trade with the Osages.
     Richard went west in the late 1830's. In 1840, he formed a partnership with A.M. Metcalf and bartered for furs in the Rocky Mountains. Metcalf proved undesirable to Indian agents on the Upper Missouri, and in 1843 they refused him permission to trade with the Sioux near Fort Larimie.. He married Marie Gardinear at St. Charles, St. Charles Co., Missouri, USA, in 1841.      About this time [1843], Richard married Mary Gardiner, a half-blood living with the Northern Oglalas or Smoke people, and cemented an alliance with that tribe that was to last until his death. They were to have six children John, Jr., Louis, Peter, Charles, Josephine (who married Bat Pourier), and Rosalie..2 John's occupation: Trader at Fort Platte (1841 - 1847), Fort Laramie (present-day), Goshen Co., Wyoming, USA, after 1842. 1842-1843:
      In early 1842 he became an employee of Sybille and Adams, owners of Fort Platte, an adobe-walled trading post built in 1841 on the south bank of the North Platte River about a mile from the mouth of the Larimie. Richard soon became the firm's most trusted employee, and in the spring of 1842 he accompanied Sybille and Adams to St. Louis to sell their buffalo robes. [Two heavily loaded boats left Fort Platte pointed for St. Louis on May 7, 1842. The traders hoped to float their cargo down the Platte on the spring rise to the Missouri, and then on to the fur trading capital. The Platte, however, proved impossible, and after 200 agonizing miles of dragging the boats over the shallow stream, the boat crews cached the robes on the river bank and sent word back to the post of their failure. Obtaining wagons, Adams, Sybille, and Richard collected the robes and personally escorted them to St. Louis.]
          The next year [1843], he commanded the expeditions taking robes east. Leaving Fort Platte on May 7, 1843 with 5 or 6 wagons, he reached Missouri in 2 months. Not far from Fort Platte stood Fort John, commonly referred to as Fort Larimie. Owned by the powerful American Fur Company, Fort John engaged in a deadly struggle with its neighbor post for trade in robes, skins, and furs. [During the first few years of its existence, Fort Platte competed very successfully with Fort John. In Aug. of 1843 and 1849-1852.] Intense competition led to the excessive use of alcohol in the Indian trade. Richard seems to have been assigned to the purchase of liquor for Fort Platte, and he rapidly gained a reputation for smuggling alcohol in from the New Mexican settlements.
     In 1842 the American Fur Company succeeded in having one of its men, Andrew Drips, appointed Indian Agent for the Upper Missouri. Drips in turn selected another American Fur Company employee, Joseph Hamilton, as sub-agent for the Larimie region. During the winter of 1842-43, Richard used liberal quantities of alcohol in his trade with the Sioux on the north forks of the Cheyenne River, and the loss of life in consequence stirred Drips to action. He ordered his sub-agent to make an autumnal raid on Fort Platte, hoping to catch the bootleggers with a fresh supply of liquor brought in for the winter trade.
. John's occupation: Trader at Fort Platte (1841 - 1847), Fort Laramie (present-day), Goshen Co., Wyoming, USA, after 1843. 1843-1844
     During the summer of 1843, Bernard Pratte and John Cabanne became the owners of Fort Platte, and Richard, Hamilton's main target, became unemployed. The raid, however, occurred as scheduled. In early September 1843, Hamilton made his move, but the Fort Platte traders, learning of his mission, moved the liquor cached in the post and his it elsewhere, escaping detection. When Richard returned to the Larimie region shortly thereafter, he reached an agreement with Pratte and Cabanne. On Nov. 5, 1843 they requested permission from Drips to include Richard under their trading license and apparently received it.
     The Fort Platte traders did well during the winter of 1843-1844, utilizing the liquor brought in by Richard from Taos and which escaped Hamilton, but the next winter Fort John began to emerge triumphant in the contest. The pleasure applied by the sub-agent and the greater financial resources of the American Fur Company were probably factors in the victory. Whatever the reasons, Pratte and Cabanne abandoned their post during the summer of 1845. Acting for the company, Joseph Bissonette took the goods left over from the spring trade and moved down the North Platte to a point about eight miles east of Fort John where he established another post, named Fort Bernard after Pratte. In December, Honore Picotte of the American Fur Company post, Fort Pierre, reported that he had succeeded in buying out the Pratte and Cabanne interest at Fort Benard and that the two traders were glad to be out of the business.. He is a work associate of an unknown person at Fort Bernard (1845 - 1846), Lingle (present-day), Goshen Co., Wyoming, USA, after 1845. 1845     The American Fur Company found Richard less cooperative. Occupying the half-finished log fort, he carried on a brisk winter trade much to the annoyance of Picotte. The Fort Pierre manager declared that Richard and the other Taos peddlers obtained many of the good robes by trading corn for them and recommended that five hundred bushels be sent to Fort John. Richard's partners in the enterprise were his brother Peter, Joseph Bissonette, a Mr. Branham of Kentucky, and one of the Bordeaux. On June 11, 1846, Edwin Bryant met some of Richard's partners near Grand Island, Nebraska, navigating two mackinaw boats loaded with buffalo robes, bound for the nearest port on the Missouri.
     In the spring of 1846, the Indian trade having been completed, Richard and his partners concentrated on the emigrant trade. Here, too, they competed successfully with Fort John using another technique. They simply undersold the powerful rival, at times 30-40%.[Richard charged ten cents less a pound for flour and three and one half cents less a pound of bacon.]

     In late June, 1846 the main party of emigrants swept by Fort Bernard and Fort John, and on July 10, 1846 Richard left his post to make his annual pilgrimage to New Mexico for liquor. Several days before, he met the Crosby-Brown party of Mississippi Mormons who planned to winter on the east side of the mountains. They had come west on the Oregon Trail as far as Ft. Benard without knowing they were ahead of Brigham Young and the main body of saints. Richard recommended Pueblo and became their guide, proving a faithful and able pilot according to Brown.
     On Aug. 20, 1846 Parkman found Richard in Pueblo quartered in the trapper's stockade. Prevented from reaching Taos because of the Mexican War, Richard stayed in Pueblo to await the cessation of hostilities. During his absence, Fort Bernard burned to the ground. The reasons for its destruction are not known, but Richard must have suspected the American Fur Company.
     During the next six years, [1846-1852] Richard continued to trade on a small scale at various sites along the North Platte and the Larimie. By June 1847, opposition to Richard's Fort Benard had been effectively disposed of.
     In 1848, Joseph Robidoux supplied the backing for his trade in buffalo robes, and as in the past, Richard obtained corn from Kansas to supplement regular trade items. In the Spring of 1848, the new Indian Agent for the Upper Platte and Arkansas, confiscated his some kegs of liqueur and dumped it into the Platte. In 1850 he apparently had a trading post at Ash Point about 20 miles below Fort Larimie, but sold his interest to Seth Ward and William Guerrier early in 1851..3 He employed Joseph Knight at Fort Laramie Region, Wyoming, USA, after 1849. He worked for John Richard on occasion in the Fort Laramie area after 1840 and as an fur trader and overland freighter working from Saint Joseph to Montana..4 He resided at Fort Laramie Region, USA, circa 1850. He is a work associate of an unknown person at Fort Laramie Region, USA, after 1851.      In the early 1850's, Richard branched out into other business activities. Forming a partnership with a French-Canadian names Monterevier, Richard began farming above Fort Larimie. Prince Paul Wilhelm of Wurttenberg visited the farm in Oct. 1851, and viewed the entrepreneur's corn field, vegetable garden, and orchard. At the same time, Richard entered the ferrying and bridge building business with Langdon, Steele, Miller, and Randall.
     Early in 1851, the partners raised $8000 and built two bridges, one over the Larimie near Fort Larimie, now a military post, and one over the North Platte near the mouth of Deer Creek, 100 mile west.
     Because the Larimie bridge was inside the military reservation, the Post Council of Administration probably regulated the toll. The price for wagons fluctuated between two and three dollars. In 1853 the spring flood swept the structure away, and since Richard and his partners had done little to keep it in good repair, Fort Larimie's commanding officer recommended that another company be given the contract for a new bridge.
     Early in 1853 Richard and his companions built another bridge over the North Platte near the present town of Evansville, Wyoming. This time the men built a more substantial bridge at least those who crossed it in 1853 applauded its strength. Count Leonetto Cipriani crossed the bridge in june and stated that it consisted of 12 arches made from cedar and had piers formed of huge tree trunks filled with gravel. During the next few years, Richard evidently bought out his partners, for travelers make no mention of them.
     After 1853 Richard lived near the bridge with his half-breed family. He constructed a log cabin, a blacksmith shop, and a few other buildings on the south side of the river. He named his own price for crossing the bridge, and during high water travelers had little choice but to pay it. The standard fee for wagons was five dollars, and he usually charge four dollars for every hundred head of stock. If the water level was low that emigrants might take a chance in fording the stream, he would reduce the price for wagons to $3 and sometimes to $2.
     Richard normally received payment in cash, but he was willing to accept goods for the toll, and he had no difficulty in securing all the furniture and household implements that he needed from emigrants. He traded fresh stock for lame animals and sometimes made a profit of 100% in a single transaction. During the off season he continued to trade for robes and skins with Red Cloud's band.
     Richard prospered at his new business. Traveler William Sloan calmed that Richard had pocketed over $40,000 in tolls by June 11, 1853. He made enough money, at least, to provide Ward and Guerrier with enough trade goods for the year. The following year was also a profitable one. On June 11, 1853 for example, Richard made $500 exacting high water fee from Sarah Sutton's party.
     Richard was less fortunate in 1855. In April 1855 he lost 75 head of horses to pillaging Sioux. After the battle of Ash Hollow in September 1855, white traders were not safe in Indian Country, and Richard fled to Fort Larimie for protection. Major William Hoffman recommended that 25 soldiers guard the bridge from harm during the winter, and General Harney agreed. Soldiers dubbed the site Camp Payne. Hoffman told Richard that he could return to his bridge if he promised not to trade with the indians until peace had been made. Richard refused and spent the winter at the post in a quiet rage,contemplating the profits lost from inactivity. The spring of 1856, however found him back at the bridge doing a booming business.
     During the winter of 1857, Richard again quarreled with the military. In December, General Johnston, commander of the Utah Expedition, ordered 30 rifles seized from his stock of goods. Apparently Richard was keeping the rifles for a Mormon party who planned to return for them in the spring. When Richard appeared at Camp Scott, he declared the weapons were his private property, and demanded $3000 for them. He was informed that the necessity for their retention had passed and that he might have them again. Richard, however, did make some money because of the Utah Expedition; on May 8, 1858, he sold 100 head of cattle to the commissary at Camp Scott.
     In late June or early July of 1858, Richard learned of the presence of gold near Pike's Peak, apparently through his Indian connections. With some other traders from Fort Larimie region, he made a trip to the gold fields and took some samples near Cheery Creek. Reaching the Kansas-Nebraska border settlement in late August, he was one of the first men to spread the word of the discovery.

          From an aticle entitled "Fort Pierre-Fort Laramie Trail", (1965), pg. 7, we find that John      Richard is mentioned as still using the old trail to bring in his trade goods up intil the Civil War      utilizing this Fort Pierre-Fort Laramie trail that traversed Oglala lands along the White River.      "It continued to have fragmentary use as a highway. At least until the Civil War, John Richard and other independent traders were bringing in goods from New Mexico to the White River."

          In High Hawk's Winter-Count, he is listed in the 1859 with the following description: "A Trader brought blankets", The blankets were of Navaho manufacture, as shown by the B.G. count. Cloud Shield explained that they were brought by John Richard, who purchased many wagon-loads of them from the Mexicans".

          Joseph ran the store while Richard supervised business operations on the North Platte and made occasional trips to Denver. The brothers suffered heavy loses in the Denver fire of April, 1863, and when Joseph died the following year as a result of a drinking bout, Richard sold what property and stock he may have had left.
          At the same time, the bridge business declined because of competition. During the late 1850s Louis Guinard built a new bridge across the North Platte about 7 miles above Richard's and in a few years drew most of the emigrant travel. In addition to tending his bridge during the high water season, Richard moved place to place during the off-season, trading with the Sioux at their camps. When the army established a sub-post near Guinard's bridge in May, 1862, Richard supplemented his income by selling hay to the small garrison and to other nearby.
          Richard's last brush with the military occurred in August, 1864. Soldiers arrested Richard, his family, and a number of Oglalas, and sent him to Fort Larimie under guard. The reasons for the arrest are lost to history, but apparently troops at Platte Bridge Station had engaged some Oglalas in a skirmish, and the army hoped to force the Indians to surrender by holding some of their people hostage.
          In a short time, Richard was free, but the incident evidently drained the last bit of enthusiasm he held for the Platte Bridge site. In the spring of 1865, he sold his trading post near the bridge and established a camp on Rock Creek, about 20 miles west of present-day Laramie. In 1869 he settled near Bordeaux, Wyoming, on the creek that now bears his mane and busied himself raising horses and cattle.
          After 1865 Richard took a less active part in the Indian trade, but financed the operations of his half-breed son, John jr. who traded with the Crows and the Sioux. Like his father, young Richard sought success in diversity. He carted trade goods to Virginia City, Montana, during the gold rush, held the haying contract for Fort Phil Kearney shortly after the Wagon Box Fight, and supplied Fort Fetterman with both wood and hay..2 He is a work associate of an unknown person at Denver, Arapahoe Co., Colorado, USA, in 1858.      Richard and his brother Joseph returned to Cheery Creek later in the year [Fall of 1858] and built a trading house near the stream, becoming the proprietors of one of the first business establishments in what is now the city of Denver. General William Larimer reported that Richards had a fine stock of Indian goods and a large herd of beautifully marked ponies. By 1860 the brothers had a store and a saloon on Blake Street..2 He resided at Denver, Arapahoe Co., Colorado, USA, in 1859. John Richard and his brother, Joseph, and their families settled in Denver..2 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1860 Census at Denver, Arapahoe Co., Colorado, USA. He is a work associate of Joseph Richard at Denver, Arapahoe Co., Colorado, USA, in 1863. "Had a ranch on Cherry Creek. The brothers also ran what might have been the first industry in the region making Indian crafts, they employed over 20 indian women. Along with this they also had a store and saloon on Blake street . This was handed over to Joseph who carried on the business. The brothers suffered heavy loses in the Denver fire of April, 1863, and when Joseph died the following year as a result of a drinking bout, His brother John sold what property and stock he may have had left."[Big Bat].2 He resided at Bordeaux Ranch, Wyoming Territory, USA, in 1869. Chief (?) Rocky Bear was travel on May 16, 1870 at Washington, D.C., USA; "On May 16, [1870] Red Cloud arrived at Fort Fetterman with about 500 of his followers to send him on his historic journey to the Great Father. The other Oglalas were: Brave Bear, and his son Sword (a shirt wearer) of the Bad Faces, Red Dog, Yellow Bear, and High Wolf of the Oyukpas, Sitting Bear of the True Oglalas, Little Bear, Long Wolf, Bear Skin, Brave, Afraid, Red Fly, Rocky Bear, Swing Bear, Black Hawk, and The One That Runs Him Through, who probably represented the warriors. 11....Two days later, the delegates arrived at Fort Laramie to meet former commanding officer Col. John E. Smith who had returned from Washington to escort them. Accompanying the party were the Indians' hand-picked interpreters, John Richard, Jr. (Red Cloud's personal favorite), W.G. Bullock, James McCloskey, and Jules Ecoffey. On May 26, the party left Fort Laramie and arrived safely in the capital on the first of June. The New York Times published many detailed reports of the historic visit of the Oglala and Brule spokesmen 15. .....Commissioner Ely S. Parker and Secretary of the Interior Jacob D. Cox kept the Indians waiting for two days before meeting them on June 7 for the first of several discussions. For over a week the Lakota guests were treated to lavish displays of diplomatic hospitality, and although the Oglalas must have felt overwhelmed at times, Red Cloud, their primary spokesman, remained solemn and business like. They were determined to obtain information for their people and would not shirk their responsibilities. 17 Red Cloud voiced the opinions of all the delegates. He asked the president to abandon Fort Fetterman and prevent settlers from entering the Big Horn and Black Hills country. In addition, the Oglalas expected guns, ammunition, and provisions. Finally, he declared once more that his people would not relocate to the Missouri. 18
     The Indians returned to the Office of the Commissioner on the tenth. Secretary Cox, Govener J A. Campbell of Wyoming Territory, former peace commissioners Vincent Colyer and Felix R. Brunot, and their wives were also present. The proceedings had been relatively calm up to this point but Red Cloud created a furor when he angrily informed Cox, who was carefully discussing the terms of the 1868 treaty, that "this is the first time I have heard " of it and "do not mean to follow it" He contended, instead, that the paper he and others "signed" merely provided for the removal of the forts from the Powder River country and formal peace with the whites. Other representatives supported Red Cloud's assertions, and all blamed their interpreters for lying at Fort Laramie council. 19
     .... The Oglalas could live on the headwaters of the Big Cheyenne River northwest of Fort Fetterman outside the boundaries of the Great Sioux Reservation but within the limits reserved for hunting. Although they would be expected to trade at the Missouri River they would not have to travel there to receive their annuity goods. The commissioners also asked them to summit the names of those they wanted as their agent and traders. Red Cloud responded that he disapproved of military men for agents, as they frightened his people, nor poor men for agents who would be tempted to steel their annuities. 20 He felt that Benjamin B. Mills would make a fine agent and could trust W. G. Bullock as trader. 21
     On June 14, Red Cloud and the other delegates arrived in New York City where he and Red Dog were scheduled to speak at Cooper Institute on the sixteenth.
     .... The Indians left New York City immediately after Red Cloud's speech at Cooper Institute and arrived back at Fort Laramie on 26 June" [Price, Catherine, 1956-, Chiefs, headmen, and warriors : Oglala politics, 1851-1889 / by Catherine Price. 1987. Thesis (Ph. D.)--Purdue University, 1987. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 300-313). Photocopy. Ann Arbor, Mich.: University Microfilms International, 1993, pg. 68-73].5 John was listed as the head of a family on the 1870 Census at Fort Laramie (1834 - 1890), Platte Co., Missouri Territory, USA.2,1
He is a work associate of an unknown person at Three Mile Ranch, Fort Laramie Co., Nebraska Territory, USA, after 1873.      Adolph Cuney was a well known Plains Frontiersman. He was a partner in the Three-Mile Ranch saloon and roadhouse with John Richard or Reshaw and Ecoffey in the Platte River region 3 miles north of Fort Laramie.

From the John Hunton Diary:

A short distance west of Fort Laramie, at the edge of the old military reservation, are remains of the Three Mile Ranch where soldiers and others who wished to join the fun once cavorted in questionable forms of gaiety. The original site of Three Mile, on the Clark Rice place south of the Laramie, has been reduced to several mounds of rubble, with a few handrivited old barrel bands scattered around and a remarkably preserved rock-walled wekk which could probably still be used with a little cleaning out. Albert Nietfeld, born on an adjoining place and the son of Pioneer Henry Nietfeld, piloted us to this old well and also on the search for Eagles Nest-else we might still be looking for it.
On the north side of the Laramie, almost directly opposite the old well, is the later site of Three Mile, now part of the John Yoder ranch. A long, narrow building with several closely spaced alternating doors and windows along its front, still stands in fairly good condition at this location. According to John Hunton the structure was built in 1874 by E. Coffey and Cuny. Mr. Hunton recalls that these gentlemen found business slowing down at their trading post, saloon and road ranch that summer and "decided to add new attractions." They built several such cottages and recruited ten or more broadminded young women from Omaha and Kansas City to make headquarters there. Among them was the fabled Calamity Jane. So it must have been from these same windows and doors that mistress Calamity and her professional sisters made their welcoming bows to the men of the wes, and no introduction neccessary. [John Hunton Diary. (1956), v.2, pgs. 30-32]

Also From John Hunton's Diary we find:

"About the time of the first appearence of Calamity Jane in this part of the country (meaning the Fort Laramie area). in the fall of 1873 E. Coffey and Cuny started a large trading outfit five miles west of Fort Laramie on the north side of the Laramie River, where they carried on quite an extensive business selling goods, running a saloon and general road ranch.
"In 1874 business got very slack with them and they decided to add attractions and for that purpose they constructed eight two-room cottages to be occupied by women. They sent to Omaha, Kansas City and other places and in a short time had their houses occupied by ten or more young women all of whom were known as sporting characters.
"Among this bunch was"Calamity Jane" who who was of the type generally given her by magazine writers and newspaper correspondents. ... [John Hunton Diary. (1956), v.2, pgs. 109-111]

     The combination of brothel, roadhouse, and legitimate ranch may have been unique to the partnership of Cuny and Ecoffey. But these there enterprises each appeared independently elsewhere around Fort Laramie, such as Wright's brothel, mentioned above, which was also three miles west on the south side of the Laramie River. The Six Mile Ranch southwest of the fort doubled as a genuine roadhouse in 1876 as well as a house of prostitution, a tradition that dated from years earlier. Other ranches, such as those owned and operated by John Phillips and John Huton were true cattle spreads, with incidental, often elaborate services for travelers. William G. Bullock, another Fort Laramie old-timer, operated a ranch up the Laramie beyond Cuny and Ecoffey's, and he also partnered with Hutton on the Chugwater. All together there were at least three cattle ranches on the Laramie River, ten on Chugwater Creek, and dozens more on the road to Cheyenne. Small and large, these establishments interacted in countless ways with Fort Laramie, especially during the event-filled year of 1876.33
[Hedren, Paul L., Fort Laramie in Eighteen Seventy-six: ,1988, pp.45-46]


     "Fort Laramie's closest ranch neighbors were probably Adolph Cuny and Jules Ecoffey, who owned the Three Mile Ranch west of the fort on the Laramie River. Both Cuny and Ecoffy were old-timers in the area. Ecoffey, for instance had a long history of friendship and association with the Sioux, serving in the 1860's and 1870's variously as trader, interpreter, and conficonfidant to Red Cloud and his Oglalas30.
      In 1876 these partners operated a ranch in the traditional sense, at least according. to J.H. Triggs, who in the extensive discussion of grazing and stock growing in southeastern Wyoming that appeared in one of his guidebooks, listed 2,000 head of cattle and 150 horses and mules on their place.31 Cuny and Ecoffey offered other services too. Morton, the post quartermaster, would contract with them for wagons and teams later during the summer. And in the true spirit of frontier entrepreneurs, they operated a roadhouse for Black Hills travelers, offering meals, an outfitting store, a billiard hall, a blacksmith shop, and a corral with hay and grain. Appealing to baser instincts, they also ran a saloon and brothel, principally for Fort Laramie's soldiers. The unvarnished nature of that concern was described with some detail by General Crook's aide-decamp Lieutenant Bourke:

     Several times, on mild afternoon, Lieut. Schuyeler and myself went riding, talking the best road out from the post. Three miles and there was a nest of ranches, Cooneys and Ecoffey's and Wright's, tenanted by as hardened and depraved a set of wretches as could be found on the face of the globe. Each of these establishments was equipped with a rum-mill of the worst kind and each contained from three to half a dozen Cyprians, virgins whose lamps were always burning brightly in expectancy of the upcoming bridegroom, and who lured to destruction the soldiers of the garrison. In all my experience, I have never seen a lower, more beastly set of people of both sexes.32

     "In common with many other army officers from the colonial period on, Bourke disliked "borderers" of any stripe. Especially those he found at three "ranches" within three miles of the fort-Cooney's, Ecoffy's and Wright's-which were combination gin-mills and whorehouses. "In all my experience, I have never seen a lower, more beastly set of people of both sexes." [Knight, O. "War or peace". Nebraska History. (1973): pp. 528]

     From Crawford's Rekindling Camp Fires, we find the following reference to the Adolph Cuny in the winter of 1875-76:

     "When we reached the Old Woman's Fork on Rawhide Creek the third day of our journey, we found Scotty Philips in camp with an outfit belonging to Adolph Cuny , and his partner". [Crawford, Rekindling camp fire. 1926., pg. 218]

On November 1 1876 an employee of Cuny's was killed.

     "And on November 1 Joe Walters was killed in a fight at Cuny's Three Mile Ranch Cooney's Walters was a discharged twenty-third Infantryman, who until recently had been an employee at the Hat Creek Ranch adjacent to the Sage Creek cantonment and now was tending bar at Cuny's. Apparently he scuffled with a freighter named Charlie or Garsy Brown, had his own gun turned on him, and was shot through the bowls.29 " [Hedren, Paul L., Fort Laramie in Eighteen Seventy-six:, 1988, pp.206-7]

From Stella Dora Twiss:
Ecoffey and Cuny established "Three Mile", a general road ranch, in 1873. When business slowed down they decided to expand the operation. They constructed eight two-room cottages to be occupied by women. According to the book The Cheyenne and Black Hills Stage and Express Routes, published in 1967, the pair sent to Omaha, Kansas City, and other places. And in a short time their houses were occupied by ten or more young women, all of whom were known as sporting characters. Among this bunch was Calamity Jane, whose character had been whitewashed considerably by the newspaper correspondents of the day. Prospectors often passed through Three Mile and gold dust began to be plentiful at the place. In November of 1875, Ecoffey and Cuny sent three pouches of gold dust, about $125 worth to the editor of the Cheyenne Leader. By 1876 the Three Mile was a regular meal station on the stage route. Good meals were served at fifty cents each.
Ecoffey died in November of 1876 of injuries inflicted by a man named Stonewall, who had attacked him three months before. Two years later while trying to prevent a robbery of his freight line, Dora's grandfather was killed by Clark Pelton, alias Billy Webster. Cuny had been deputized at the time and was pursuing the robbers when he was ambushed and fatally wounded by Pelton. Josephine, not realizing her husband's interests were still hers, loaded up her eight children and left everything behind to return to her people, who were camped near Fort Robinson. In time she moved back to Cuny Table where her oldest son, Charles, had established a ranching operation. Elizabeth and her son formed a partnership on the land that is still inhabited by Josephine's descendants..6,7,8,9,10 John died circa December, 1875 at Niobrara River, USA. During the winter of 1875, Richard and Alfred Palladay started north with a wagon of trade goods, but death ended the trip on the upper crossing of the Niobrara River. Marauding Cheyennes were evidently the perpetrators of the crime, but several white men were accused, including the famous scout, California Joe. He was buried at Ft Robinson, and later moved to Ft. McPherson and buried in a common grave. [Big Bat Pourier, pg. 44].2 His body was interred in 1876 at Nebraska, USA, at Fort McPherson.2

Children of John Baptiste Richard Jr. and Marie Gardinear
Louis Francis Richard+ b. 1842, d. after 1904
John Baptiste Richard III+ b. 1844, d. 1872
Peter Richard+ b. 1848, d. after 1909
Josephine Richard+ b. 9, 1853, d. Feb, 1936
Charles Richard b. 1853, d. 1868
Rosalie Richard+ b. 1857

Citations

  1. [S167] 1870, Federal.
  2. [S6] Hila Gilbert, Big Bat Pourier: guide & interpreter, Fort Laramie, 1870-1880..
  3. [S210] John Dishon McDermott, Joseph Bissonette.
  4. [S117] Susan Bordeaux Bettelyoun & Josephine Waggoner, With my own eyes: a lakota woman tells her people's history.
  5. [S121] Catherine Price, Chiefs, headmen, and warriors : Oglala politics, 1851-1889.
  6. [S64] John Hunton, Diaries of John Hunton.
  7. [S83] Paul L. Hedren, Fort Laramie in Eighteen Seventy-six: Chronicle of a Frontier Post of War.
  8. [S78] Lewis F. Crawford, Rekindling campfire: the exploits of Ben Arnold (Connor) Wosicu Tomaheca..
  9. [S84] Oliver. Knight, War or peace: the anxious wait for Crazy Horse.
  10. [S490] Jacqi Bell Dagenais, Michael W. Stevens.

John Baptiste Richard Sr.1,2 (M)
(1790 - after 1865), #88
Pop-up Pedigree

     John Baptiste Richard Sr. was Catholic. He speaks (an unknown value). The nationality of John Baptiste Richard Sr. was an unknown place ; French. Also known as Jean Baptiste Richard. John was born in 1790. He was the son of Jean Baptiste Richard. He married Rosalie Cote at St. Charles, St. Charles Co., Missouri, USA, on January 7, 1812. Married Rosalie Cote (b. 1790) in the Catholic Church on Jan. 7, 1812, according to O.W. Collet's Index to St. Charles Marriages.
Richard's direct descendants-Mrs. William McGaa, Mrs. William Tibbits, and Mrs. William Swallow-contend that John Jr., Peter, and Joseph were full brothers. The birth dates of Peter and Joseph are recorded in Collet's Index to St. Charles Baptisms, but no mention is made of John B. Richard Jr. may have been born out of wedlock, or more probably, his parents, following the custom of the time, lived as man and wife under common law until they could have the marriage sanctioned by the church. Their children listed where: Richard, John Baptiste Jr. (b. 1810), Peter (b. 1820), Joseph (b. 1823), Susan (b.?) Sources state that Susan never married..1,2 John's occupation: at Rocky Mountain Region in 1832. In 1832, John Richard seriously considered a trip west for William Sublette. Sublette ordered Ashley to give Madam Richard $10.00, three months from the date of the letter, if John Richard kept an agreement, apparently to go to the mountains.] All (3) boys traded in the west as early as 1836.

The following reference was found in Price, Oglala People, (1996) p. 20

     "It is also difficult to discern how much influence the whites who intermarried with the Lakotas and their mixed-blood offspring had on the political affairs of the Oglalas before the 1880's, and whether they held any specific political roles among the various tiyospaye. According to historian Brian Strayer, few traders "associated with the Sioux intimately learned to understand and appreciate their government and organization." Those who did, he adds, "left sparse records revealing their attitudes."55 [55. Strayer, "Fur Trappers' attitudes," p.39]
     Fur trader Joseph Bissonette married into the Lakotas twice. His first wife, with whom he had seven children, was Oglala; his second wife, a Brule, bore him fourteen more. While serving as an interpreter for the Brules and Oglalas, he won the confidence of several Lakota leaders, including Red Cloud. In 1875 Bissonette accompanied the Oglala and Brule delegation to Washington DC, where he is said by some to have played a key role in persuading both Red Cloud and Spotted Tail to consider selling the Black Hills to the United States. James Bordeaux called Mato (the Bear) by his Lakota family and associates married a sister of Swift Bear, a prominent Brule itancan. Also engaged in the fur trade, Bordeaux's family ties brought him enough Brule customers during the 1840's to give his employer, the American Fur Company, the competitive edge in the Upper Platte country. Two other fur traders forged ties to the Red Cloud family: John Richard Sr., whom often transported illegal supplies of trade liquor; and Swiss-born Jules Ecoffey, who operated in the Fort Laramie area after 1854.56" [56.McDermott, "Joseph Bissonette," pp.50, 52, 60; McDermott, "James Bordeaux," p. 69; Robinson, "Journals and letter books," p. 177; Unrau, Tending the talking wire, p 56.].3 John's occupation: at Fort Laramie Region, USA, in 1843. From Anderson, Fur Traders, we find the following excerpt:

     ...In the summer of 1843 James Bordeaux was acting as bourgeois at Fort Laramie and had only fifteen men in his employ. 3 That fall the competitive organization trading in opposition to Fort Laramie and Fort Pierre recruited an unusually large number of employees for the winter season-twenty traders and forty voyagers, or engages, along with seventy head of horses, mules, and oxen. Under the active direction of Joseph Bissonette and John Richard, Sr. the "intend scattering in every direction" in search of trade. 4
     The technique of trading throughout the countryside, which Bissonette and Richard carried out in 1843, had been an integral part of the operation in Sioux country for at least two decades. In late fall or early winter a number of trading parties were sent out to locate at or near the Sioux winter camps. These crews either constructed wintering houses (or occupied those remaining from the previous years) or took up residence in the lodge of a prominent warrior in the Sioux village where trade was being sought.
     4.      Robinson, "Fort Pierre Journal," p. 197..4 John's occupation: Gold Digger at Fort Laramie Region, USA, in 1858. From Hafen, Colorado Gold Rush we find the following:

FROM THE PLAINS CORRESPONDENCE OF THE REPUBLICAN 11

     Rulo, Nebraska ter., August 22 [1858]
Mr. Editor: Our fellow-citizens, Charles Martin and Wm. Renceleur (Kenceleur], 12 have just arrived from the Platte bridge. They made the trip to this place in seventeen days. Their partner in the bridge, John Richards, 13 Esq., came with them. The news they bring is cheering. The plains are alive with men, teams and business. Gold has been discovered along the South Platte, on Cherry creek, and they bring with them a specimen of the dust, which is very beautiful. I have in my possession a small portion of the specimen brought by them. A Company is about organizing to start from here immediately to the mines, and several other companies will leave early in the spring. They state that a man can work out from ten to fifteen dollars per day in a common pan.
     The place where the miners are at work is not over about five hundred miles from this place, and the above named gentlemen state the country is very fertile, being just at the foot of the mountains, and the timber is abundant of every kind. They also state fair crops of corn have been raised on the Platte this season in many places; among others, near Fort Laramie and at the Platte Bridge. You will hear of this matter, however from other sources in a few days as Mr. Richards leaves here to-day, on the packett, for your city to purchase goods for the Platte. Yours truley, M.H.W.
     11.This appeared in the Daily Missouri Republican of September 1, 1858
     12.     These men are identified as early settlers of Rulo (in the extreme southern corner of Nebraska) in Nebraska State Historical Society Publications.
     13.     John Richard [sometimes rendered Reshaw or Richaud] was a promenant trader of the Fort Laramie region during the 1840's and 50's. He set up a trading post in pioneer Denver.

     Also From Hafen, Colorado Gold Rush, pg.31 we find the following excerpt:
     ..."Mons. Richard, an Old French trapper, has several ounces of the precious dust, which he dug with an axe. Mons Boesinette17 has several rich specimens"
     17.      Bissonet is frequently encountered in the Fort Laramie region in the 1840's and 50's. For biological data on Louis and Joseph Bissonet, see J.C. Luttig, Journal of a Fur-trading Expedition, edited by Stella M. Drumm, 148-149.

Also From Hafen, Colorado Gold Rush, pg.37 we find the following excerpt:
By Telegraph23
Leavenworth, August 29, per U.S. Express
     Company to Boonville, August 30, Considerable excitement exists in Lawrence and Kansas City in consequence of recent arrivals from the gold region of Pike's Peak, confirming the existance of the ore in abundance at that locality. A Company which went from Lawrence in June had met with good success. The gold found at these diggins is similar to that of Fraser River and California.
     A Mr. Richards arrived at Kansas City on the 28th, reported that with very limited prospecting satisfactory result were obtained. Two men with inferior implements, washed out $600 in one week, on a small stream fifty miles from Pike's Peak.
     A second Fraser River is apprehended.

23.     Published in the Daily Missouri Republican, August 31, 1858. The same story appeared in the Boston Evening Transcript, September 1, 1858.

      Also From Hafen, Colorado Gold Rush, pg.64 we find the following excerpt:

More About the Gold Mines 81
     So Great is the demand for provisions at St. Joseph for the mines, the Mr. Isidore Poulin, a merchant of that place, who has been shipping to this port large quanitites of bacon, has come here to purchase some of that article. He says that he assisted a few days ago, in carrying from the steamer Wattossa, to the White Cloud, thirty-five thousand dollars worth of gold dust, which Mr. John Richard had procured from the Indians who had collected it with implements of the rudest description, which they made themselves. 82
     Yulo, Yancton, Winnebago, and St. Stephen villages, are points from which many Indians, half-breeds, etc., have gone to the diggings. Mr. Poulin has sold goods for the mines, the amount of $13,000 and carroborates the reports in regard to the richness of the auriferous region. He is stopping at King's hotel.

23.     Published in the Daily Missouri Republican, August 31, 1858. The same story appeeared in the Boston Evening Transcript, September 1, 1858.. John's occupation: Scout at Platte River Region on August 1, 1865. The following was taken from Capt. H. E. Palmer's account of the Connor expedition:

     We arrived at the south bank of the Platte August 1, 1865 expecting to cross at the LaBonta crossing. 19 The general and his guides and advance guards had arrived the night before, expecting from information furnished by his guides that he would find a good crossing here. Our guides that he would find a good crossing here. Our guides, chief among whom were Maj. James Bridger, Nick Janisse, Jim Daugherty, Mich Bouyer, John Resha , Antoine LaDue, and Bordeaux, 20 were supposed to be thoroughly posted on this country, especially the region so near Fort Laramie, where they had been hundreds of times; but the treacherous Platte was too much for them. The spring flood that had just passed had washed away the crossing, and after ten hours' diligent searching not one of the cavalry escort could find a place to cross the river without swimming his horse and endangering his life.
     19.     La Bonte stage station was near the mouth of La Bonte Creek and about seven miles south of present Douglas, Wyoming.
     20.     They had an outstanding array of scouts. For the first named guides see J.C. Alter, James Bridger, (Salt Lake City, Shepard Book Co., 1925). Nicholas Janise (spelled variously) and his brother Antoine, were traders who inter married with the Indians and whose descendants still live among the northern Sioux. A descendant of Nicholas, Mrs. Elizabeth Janis Mayfield, of Denver, told us on July 24, 1952, that Nicholas Janise had nine children and died about 1906, and is buried at Pine Ridge, South Dak. She says Antoine had 10 or 11 children, and is also buried at Pine Ridge. G.B. Grinnell, Fighting Cheyennes, (New York, Charles Scribner's Sons, 1915), p 126, says that Nicholas and Antoine Janise were Frenchmen, born in St. Charles County, and were brought out west by James Bordeaux...John Resha, or Richard, had been an Indian trader in the region for more than twenty years. He is frequently mentioned in the literature. [Hafen, Leroy R. Powder River Campaigns and Sawyer Expedition of 1865.].5,6,7 John died after 1865.

Children of John Baptiste Richard Sr. and Rosalie Cote
John Baptiste Richard Jr.+ b. 1810, d. circa Dec, 1875
Pierre Peter Richard+ b. 1820, d. 1864
Susan Richard b. circa 1820
Joseph Richard+ b. 1823, d. 1864

Citations

  1. [S6] Hila Gilbert, Big Bat Pourier: guide & interpreter, Fort Laramie, 1870-1880..
  2. [S40] Virginia I Kain Lautenschlager, History of Cuny Table - 1890-1983.
  3. [S208] Catherine Price, Oglala People, 1841-1879: a Political History.
  4. [S213] J.W. Anderson, Fur Trader's Story.
  5. [S173] Leroy R. Hafen and Ann W. Hafen, Powder River Campaign and Sawyers Expedition of 1865.
  6. [S178] G.B. Grinnell, Fighting Cheyennes.
  7. [S179] J.C. Alter, James Bridger.

Joseph Richard1,2 (M)
(1823 - 1864), #180
Pop-up Pedigree

     Joseph was born at Fort Laramie Region, USA, in 1823.1 He was the son of John Baptiste Richard Sr. and Rosalie Cote. Joseph's occupation: Fur Trader at Rocky Mountain Region after 1836.1 He married (?) Cane Woman circa 1845.1 He is a work associate of an unknown person at Denver, Arapahoe Co., Colorado, USA, in 1858.      Richard and his brother Joseph returned to Cheery Creek later in the year [Fall of 1858] and built a trading house near the stream, becoming the proprietors of one of the first business establishments in what is now the city of Denver. General William Larimer reported that Richards had a fine stock of Indian goods and a large herd of beautifully marked ponies. By 1860 the brothers had a store and a saloon on Blake Street..1 Joseph's occupation: at Denver, Arapahoe Co., Colorado, USA, in 1859. Joseph was a member of the staff of the first school in the area, the Union Day School, which opened October 31, 1859..1 He resided at Denver, Arapahoe Co., Colorado, USA, in 1859. John Richard and his brother, Joseph, and their families settled in Denver..1 Joseph's occupation: Indian Trader at Denver, Arapahoe Co., Colorado, USA, in 1863. "Had a ranch on Cherry Creek. The brothers also ran what might have been the first industry in the region making Indian crafts, they employed over 20 indian women. Along with this they also had a store and saloon on Blake street . This was handed over to Joseph who carried on the business. The brothers suffered heavy loses in the Denver fire of April, 1863, and when Joseph died the following year as a result of a drinking bout, His brother John sold what property and stock he may have had left."[Big Bat].1 Joseph died in 1864 at near Fort Collins, Larimer Co., Colorado, USA. "About this time the Ute Indians stole one hundred head of Joe's horses. The family sold their remaining interests and started back to the bridge. Joe was a heavy drinker, but suffered more from the effects than most mountain men. John Baker, one of his companions, was the heavyiest drinker of all, but lived to be ninety. Joe is believed to have died after a drinking party with John Baker near the present Fort Collins."[Big Bat].1

Children of Joseph Richard and (?) Cane Woman
Joseph Richard+ b. 1847
Charles Richard b. after 1850
Louise Richard+ b. after 1850
Angeline Richard b. after 1850
James Richard+ b. 1856

Citations

  1. [S6] Hila Gilbert, Big Bat Pourier: guide & interpreter, Fort Laramie, 1870-1880..
  2. [S90] Bette Richards , Lakota Richards Family.

Joseph Richard1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 (M)
(1881 - August 9, 1936), #1584
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Joseph Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.6,7,3,5,8 Joseph, an unknown person 's child, resided with an unknown person , at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA, circa 1877. Joseph Richard was born in 1881.8 He was the son of Peter Richard and Louise Red Cloud.6,7,2,5,3,8 Conflicting evidence states that Joseph was born at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA, in 1882.3,2,6 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken in June, 1886 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.2 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1890 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Flat Bottle, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.5 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, White Clay District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.6 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, White Clay District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.7 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, White Clay District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.8 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken in June, 1896 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.3 He married Mary Ellen Brewer at USA circa 1905. His was allotted land on April 23, 1917 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA,
; NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE
RICHARD JOSEPH 06 035N 045W 011 20 253400 PA 579766 04/23/1917.1 Joseph died on August 9, 1936 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA. His body was interred on August 13, 1936 at Porcupine, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, at Our Lady of Lourdes Cemetery. Grave 4, Lot 31, Sec E.

Children of Joseph Richard and Mary Ellen Brewer
Alice Richard b. Mar 6, 1906
Loretta Richard b. Mar 2, 1909, d. Mar 2, 1911
Florence Richard b. Mar 21, 1911, d. Apr 16, 1921
Francis W. Richard+ b. Nov 6, 1912, d. Mar 16, 1988
Alfreda M. Richard+ b. Sep 23, 1919, d. Jan 18, 1987
John Baptiste Richard+ b. Feb 19, 1921, d. Jun 15, 1987
Alma Richard+ b. Nov 8, 1922, d. Dec 16, 1983
Ester M. Richard+ b. Oct 19, 1926, d. Apr 29, 20059

Citations

  1. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.
  2. [S157] 1886.
  3. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  4. [S41] Crazy Horse surrender ledger.
  5. [S47] 1890.
  6. [S556] 1892.
  7. [S269] 1894.
  8. [S561] June 30th 1895.
  9. [S150] Obituaries.

Joseph Richard1,2,3,4,5,6 (M)
(1847 - ), #8374
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Joseph Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.7,5,6 Joseph was born at Platte River Region in 1847.1,3 He was the son of Joseph Richard and (?) Cane Woman. Another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in June, 1848.8,7,5,6,2 And yet another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in 1849.2 He married Julia Le Deaux circa 1876.1,3,8,7,5,6,2 Joseph was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Dakota Territory, USA, in 1886.3 Joseph was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on July 1, 1890.4 Joseph was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA, on July 1, 1892.7 Joseph was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA, on June 30, 1894.5 Joseph was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA, on July 1, 1895.6 Joseph was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 14, 1896.2

Children of Joseph Richard and Julia Le Deaux
Alexander Richard+ b. 1877, d. Aug, 19017,5,6,2
Benjamin Richard+ b. 18807,5,6,2
Lucy Richard b. 18822,7,5,6
Julia Richard b. 1891, d. after 19507,5,6,2
Josephine Richard+ b. 1892, d. Aug 30, 19155,6,2
Caroline Richard b. 1900, d. 1920

Citations

  1. [S90] Bette Richards , Lakota Richards Family.
  2. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  3. [S157] 1886.
  4. [S47] 1890.
  5. [S269] 1894.
  6. [S561] June 30th 1895.
  7. [S556] 1892.
  8. [S498] Albert Ledoux, Mike Stevens.

Josephine Richard1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12 (F)
(9, 1853 - February, 1936), #1446
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Josephine Richard was Makahu Oglala Lakota Sioux.9 Josephine Richard was born in 1849.9 Another source states that her was also listed with a birthdate in 1852.11,12 She speaks (an unknown value).1 Conflicting evidence states that Josephine was born at Fort Laramie Region, USA, on 9, 1853.3,6,8,4 She was the daughter of John Baptiste Richard Jr. and Marie Gardinear. She married Big Bat Pourier at Laramie Co., Wyoming Territory, USA, on October 22, 1869.4,10
Josephine Richard was enrolled with the Oglala Sioux Tribe and assigned an enrollment number of PR-7692.(!).
An unknown person was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Dakota Territory, USA, in 1886.5 Josephine was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Wounded Knee District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on July 1, 1890.9 Josephine was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Wounded Knee District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA, on July 1, 1892.10 Josephine was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Wounded Knee District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA, on July 1, 1894.11 Josephine was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Wounded Knee District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA, on June 25, 1895.12 Josephine was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Wounded Knee District, South Dakota, USA, in 1896.6 An unknown person was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Wounded Knee District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, in 1901.8 Josephine was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Wounded Knee District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1904.7 Her was allotted land on January 17, 1910 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA,
; NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE
POURIER JOSEPHINE 06 039N 044W 002 80 253400 PA 103153 01/17/1910
POURIER JOSEPHINE 06 039N 044W 002 38.36 253400 PA 103153 01/17/1910
POURIER JOSEPHINE 06 039N 044W 002 38.35 253400 PA 103153 01/17/1910
POURIER JOSEPHINE 06 039N 044W 011 160 253400 PA 103153 01/17/1910
POURIER JOSEPHINE 06 040N 043W 029 160 253400 PA IA 718 12/18/1906
POURIER JOSEPHINE 06 040N 043W 029 160 253400 PA IA 718 04/13/1918
POURIER JOSEPHINE 06 040N 043W 029 160 253500 PA 625156 04/13/1918.2 Josephine was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA, in 1913.13 Josephine died in February, 1936.

Children of Josephine Richard and Big Bat Pourier
Alice Aldene Pourier+ b. Jul 8, 1870, d. Dec 8, 19599
Elizabeth Pourier+ b. 1872, d. Aug 16, 19299,10
John Pourier II+ b. 1872, d. circa 19309,10
Josephine Pourier b. 18769
Louis Pourier+ b. 1878, d. Nov 1, 19379,10,11,12
Joseph Pourier Sr.+ b. 1878, d. Sep 15, 19089,11,12
Amelia Pourier b. 18825
Emile Albert Pourier+ b. 1882, d. Nov 30, 19549,10,11,12
Livia Mary Pourier+ b. 1884, d. 19869,10,11,12
Ellen Pourier+ b. 1886, d. 19609,11,12
Peter Pourier+ b. 1888, d. 19569,10,11,12
Rose Pourier+ b. Jan, 1890, d. 196510,6,7,11,12
Charles Pourier+ b. 1892, d. 194511,12

Citations

  1. [S40] Virginia I Kain Lautenschlager, History of Cuny Table - 1890-1983.
  2. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.
  3. [S140] Troy Geraldsen, Mike Stevens.
  4. [S6] Hila Gilbert, Big Bat Pourier: guide & interpreter, Fort Laramie, 1870-1880..
  5. [S157] 1886.
  6. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  7. [S159] 1904.
  8. [S161] 1901.
  9. [S47] 1890.
  10. [S556] 1892.
  11. [S269] 1894.
  12. [S561] June 30th 1895.
  13. [S263] 1913.

Josephine Richard1,2,3,4 (F)
(1892 - August 30, 1915), #8483
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Josephine Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.3,1,4,2 Josephine was born in 1892.1,2 She was the daughter of Joseph Richard and Julia Le Deaux.3,4,1 Another source states that her was also listed with a birthdate in March, 1893.3,4,1 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Joseph Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA.3 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Joseph Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA.4 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Joseph Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 14, 1896 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.1 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Julia Le Deaux on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1904 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2 She married Baptiste Dubray on December 18, 1911.5 Josephine died on August 30, 1915 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.5

Citations

  1. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  2. [S159] 1904.
  3. [S269] 1894.
  4. [S561] June 30th 1895.
  5. [S90] Bette Richards , Lakota Richards Family.

Josephine Richard1,2,3,4,5,6 (F)
(1888 - ), #18588
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Josephine Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.4,5,2,1,6 Josephine Richard was born in 1888 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.1,2,4 She was the daughter of Peter Richard and Louise Red Cloud.4,5,1,2,6 Another source states that her was also listed with a birthdate in 1889.6 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, White Clay District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.4 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, White Clay District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.5 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, White Clay District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.6 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken in June, 1896 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.1 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Peter Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1904 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2 Her was allotted land on July 24, 1916 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA,
; NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE
POURIER JOSIE 06 041N 043W 035 320 253400 PA 539608 07/24/1916
POURIER JOSIE 06 041N 043W 035 320 253400 PA 539608 04/13/1918
POURIER JOSIE 06 041N 043W 035 320 253500 PA 625155 04/13/1918.3

Citations

  1. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  2. [S159] 1904.
  3. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.
  4. [S556] 1892.
  5. [S269] 1894.
  6. [S561] June 30th 1895.

Julia Richard1,2,3 (F)
(1891 - after 1950), #8479
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Julia Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.1,2,3,4,5 Julia Richard was born in 1870.1 Conflicting evidence states that Julia was born in 1891.5,2,3 She was the daughter of Joseph Richard and Julia Le Deaux.1,2,4,3 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Joseph Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA.1 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Joseph Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA.2 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Joseph Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota ., USA.4 She was listed as "daughter" and residing in the home of Julia Le Deaux on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1904 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.5 She married (?) Red Willow before 1909.6 She married John Hawkins on August 19, 1909. Her was allotted land on December 13, 1913 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA,
; NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE

RICHARD JULIA 06 035N 047W 011 240 253400 PA 371143 12/13/1913
RICHARD JULIA 06 035N 047W 012 80 253400 PA 371143 02/06/1929
RICHARD JULIA 06 035N 047W 012 80 253400 PA 371143 10/19/1931
RICHARD JULIA 06 035N 043W 009 320 253400 PA IA 215 03/31/1906
RICHARD JULIA 06 035N 043W 009 320 253400 PA IA 215 03/11/1918
RICHARD JULIA 06 035N 043W 009 320 253400 PA IA 215 03/11/1918
RICHARD JULIA 06 035N 043W 009 320 253400 PA IA 215 03/11/1918
RICHARD JULIA 06 035N 043W 009 320 253400 PA IA 215 03/11/1918
RICHARD JULIA 06 035N 043W 009 320 253400 PA IA 215 03/11/1918.7 She resided at Allen, Washabaugh Co., South Dakota, USA, in 1945.6 Julia died after 1950 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA.6

Citations

  1. [S556] 1892.
  2. [S269] 1894.
  3. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  4. [S561] June 30th 1895.
  5. [S159] 1904.
  6. [S90] Bette Richards , Lakota Richards Family.
  7. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.

Julia Richard1,2,3,4 (F)
(1826 - ), #21264

     The nationality of Julia Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.3,4,2 Julia Richard was born in 1826.1,3,4 Julia was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Porcupine District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on July 1, 1890.2 Julia was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on July 1, 1894.3 Julia was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1895.4 Julia was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Wakpamini District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1896.1

Citations

  1. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  2. [S47] 1890.
  3. [S269] 1894.
  4. [S561] June 30th 1895.

Loretta Richard (F)
(March 2, 1909 - March 2, 1911), #7554
Pop-up Pedigree

     Loretta was born on March 2, 1909. She was the daughter of Joseph Richard and Mary Ellen Brewer. Loretta died on March 2, 1911 at age 2.

Louis Richard1,2 (M)
(1895 - ), #18864
Pop-up Pedigree

     Louis Richard was born in 1895.1 He was the son of Charles Richard and Louisa (?).1 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Charles Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1904 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.1 Louis Richard was allotted land on May 7, 1918 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA; This record may pertain to Louis:

NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE

POURIER LOUIS 06 040 N 043 W 030 160 253400 PA 629150 05/07/1918.2

Citations

  1. [S159] 1904.
  2. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.

Louis Francis Richard1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 (M)
(1842 - after 1904), #1576
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Louis Francis Richard was Oglala Lakota Sioux.2,7,8 Louis was born in 1842.4,7,8 He was the son of John Baptiste Richard Jr. and Marie Gardinear. Another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in 1843.2 And yet another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in 1847. He married Jennie Renault circa 1867.9,2,7,8 He attended a meeting at Fort Laramie (1834 - 1890), Platte Co., Missouri Territory, USA, on November 4, 1868.3           On October 24, 1874, at the agency, after a summer of tense relations tensions climaxed when the Agent decided to erect a flagpole at the Agency stockcade. Within hours the Agency was surrounded by 500 angry warriors. The following interpreter were instrumental in "averting diaster": Louis Richard, Louis Bordeaux, John Brugier, Joseph Bissonette Jr., and Louis Robideaux. [Allen, "Red Cloud and the U.S. Flag, pg. 300].10 Louis's occupation: He was a US. Army Scout.
"Jules Ecoffey, from the nearby Three Mile Ranch; Baptiste "Big Bat" Pourier, a scout and interpreter often on the Fort Laramie rolls who was living along the Chugwater Creek; and Louis Richard, another Fort Laramie regular and an intimate friend of Chief Red Cloud. Before Crook departed from Fort Laramie, the list of scouts reached nearly forty. Most were mixed-bloods hired from the settlements below Fort Laramie and from the Red Cloud Agecy. All were put in charge of Major Thaddeus Harlan Stanton, a paymaster in the department who doubled as troubleshooter and frequent chief of scouts for Crook.26" [Hedren, Paul L. , Fort Laramie in Eighteen Seventy-six: ,1988, pp.59-60] at Dakota Territory, USA, in 1876.5 Louis was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on July 1, 1892.2 Louis was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1894.7 Louis was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1895.8 Louis was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA, in 1896.4 Louis died after 1904. His was allotted land on May 7, 1918 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA,
; This record may pertain to Louis:

NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE
POURIER LOUIS 06 040N 043W 030 160 253400 PA 629150 05/07/1918.6

Children of Louis Francis Richard and Jennie Renault
Louise Richard+ b. 1870, d. after 19262,7,8
Charles Richard b. 18732,7,8
Louis Richard Jr. b. 18752,7
Jennie Richard b. 18774,2,7,8
Millie Richard+ b. 18792,7,8
Alfred Richard b. 18812,7,8
Angeline Richard+ b. Aug 31, 1885, d. Dec 9, 19712,8
Samuel Richard b. Jan, 18934,7,8

Citations

  1. [S147] Phyllis White Eyes-Cordier-DeCory, Mike Stevens.
  2. [S556] 1892.
  3. [S121] Catherine Price, Chiefs, headmen, and warriors : Oglala politics, 1851-1889.
  4. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  5. [S254] Paul L. Hedren, Fort Laramie and the Sioux War of 1876.
  6. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.
  7. [S269] 1894.
  8. [S561] June 30th 1895.
  9. [S6] Hila Gilbert, Big Bat Pourier: guide & interpreter, Fort Laramie, 1870-1880..
  10. [S133] Charles W. Allen, Red Cloud and the U.S. Flag.

Louis Richard Jr.1,2 (M)
(1875 - ), #10617
Pop-up Pedigree

     Louis Richard Jr. also went by the name of Lou Richard.1 The nationality of Louis Richard Jr. was Oglala Lakota Sioux.1,2 Louis was born in 1875.1,2 He was the son of Louis Francis Richard and Jennie Renault.1,2 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on July 1, 1892 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.1 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1894 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.2 He was listed as "son" and residing in the home of Louis Francis Richard on the U.S. Indian Census Rolls taken on June 30, 1895 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA.3

Citations

  1. [S556] 1892.
  2. [S269] 1894.
  3. [S561] June 30th 1895.

Louis Richard Jr.1,2,3,4 (M)
(1874 - ), #18779
Pop-up Pedigree

     The nationality of Louis Richard Jr. was Oglala Lakota Sioux.4,1 Louis Richard Jr. was born in 1874.1 He was the son of Louis Richard Sr.. Another source states that his was also listed with a birthdate in 1875.4 He married Eva (?) circa 1894.3,1,4 Louis was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1895.4 Louis was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, USA, in 1896.3 Louis was listed as the "Head of the Household" on the US Indian Census Rolls at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Pass Creek District, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA, on June 30, 1904.1 He was allotted land on May 7, 1918 at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Shannon Co., South Dakota, USA; This record may pertain to Louis:

NAME MERIDIAN TWP RANGE SECTION ACREAGE TYPE CASETYPE DOCID DATE

POURIER LOUIS 06 040 N 043 W 030 160 253400 PA 629150 05/07/1918.2

Child of Louis Richard Jr. and Eva (?)
Dora Richard b. May, 18953,4

Citations

  1. [S159] 1904.
  2. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.
  3. [S158] June 30th, 1896.
  4. [S561] June 30th 1895.

Louis Richard Sr.1 (M)
(circa 1854 - ), #21399

     Louis Richard Sr. was born circa 1854.

Child of Louis Richard Sr.
Louis Richard Jr.+ b. 1874

Citations

  1. [S80] Bureau of Land Management, Shannon Co. SD -- Federal Land Records.

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Mike Stevens
PO Box 1062

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