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McKinley/Sullivan and Related Families

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Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Il - Ancestors at Rest

Calvary Catholic Cemetery,301 Chicago Ave, Evanston, IL, 847-864-3050, Established 1859 
Background: David Philip O'Leary interviewed Sept 30, 1900 about his father John - John O'Leary came to Chicago in 1836. Soon after he bought a farm of 40 acres
at Sunnyside and lived there from 1837 to 1840. While living there many of those who settled at Evanston passed their house in teams. They stopped and made their
acquaintances and when the O'Learys themselves moved to Evanston they found them settled on their various farms. Among them were Edward Murphy, John Carney,
Hathaway and others. In 1837 John O'Leary bought 160 acres in Ridgeville (situated in part where Calvary Cemetery now is) and in part south of the Cemetery and
north of the present Chicago city limits. In 1840 he moved to Ridgeville. In 1859 he sold 40 acres to Calvary Cemetery, this being the year the Cemetery was
established. Long ago, Mrs. Lynch (Ellen O'Leary Lynch, a daughter of John O'Leary) relates, a great oak stood at close to the spot where the gates of Calvary
Cemetery now are, and it was on the O'Leary's table, draped with the alter linens and placed under the canopy of the oak tree, that the first Catholic mass was offered
within Evanston's boundaries. David Philip O'Leary, one of John O'Leary's sons, was born in Evanston. His middle name was given him for Philip Rogers, a neighbor
(Note from Maryl: Philip Rogers was also his uncle, being married to Mary Ward Masterson Hickey Rogers, the sister of Margaret Masterson O'Leary, David Philip
O'Leary's mother. Phil and Mary are my G G Grandparents; John and Margaret are my G G Grand Aunt and Uncle). 
To learn more about the names on this page (mainly CONNERY, O'DONNELL, QUINLAN, TOUHY, McKINLEY), click here for my searchable surnames
database. 


Lot ___, Block ___, Section___ , purchased by _______________, __________, 19__ 

James Furlong
Apr 2, 1923
Jeremiah Quinlan
Oct 1, 1925
Josephine Furong
Apr 21, 1933
Elizabeth Furlong
Sept 1, 1939
Harry Raymond Furlong
Feb 19, 1968


Lot 35, Block 5U, Section __, purchased by Michael W. Quinlan, Apr 26, 1884, No. of Graves Odd 18 

Mary Quinlan Sage
Jan 1, 1915
Michael Wm Quinlan's daughter
Mary A. Croak
Jan 15, 1916
sister of Ellen & Elizabeth Croak
Theresa R. Sage
Mar 19, 1918
George Sage's wife
James A. Quinlan
Apr 5, 1920
married 1)Eliz.Croak; 2)Mame Riley 
George Sage
May 17, 1939
son of Mary & Frank Sage
James Quinlan 
Apr 5, 1920
son of James A. Quinlan
Alice Quinlan Donovan
Jan 21, 1903
daughter of Thos. A. Quinlan;died in childbirth
Elizabeth Croak Quinlan
Apr 4, 1910
wife of James A. Quinlan
John Henry Quinlan
Sept 8, 1895
married Ellen Croak
Mary Brasnahan Quinlan
Sept 12, 1901
wife of Michael Wm Quinlan
Michael Wm Quinlan
Mar 28, 1904
purchaser of lot;father of 13 children
Francis W. Sage
Sept 6, 1906
Age 1 Mo.
son of George & Theresa Sage
Frank Sage
Nov 3, 1904
husband of Mary Jane Quinlan (dtr of Mary & Mike)
Ellen Croak Quinlan
Apr 11, 1986
wife of John Henry Quinlan
Nellie A. Quinlan 
Oct 10, 1886 
8/6/20
Arthur J. Quinlan
July 21, 1885
1/3/15
Michael Croak
Apr 16, 1881
moved in Sept 29,1884,parents of Croak sisters 
Alice Eagan Croak
July 5, 1881
see abv;prev int N 253 U
Arthur J. Quinlan
Apr 2, 1877
child
moved in 9/29/1884; prev int 98 B
Richard J. Quinlan
Oct 13, 1882
moved in 9/29/1884; prev int N 253 U
Catherine Sage
Apr 23, 1884
daughter of Mary Quinlan & Frank Sage
Jessie M. McDonald
July 17, 1886


Lot 22, Block 2, Section C, purchased by Mary Masterson Rogers, Oct 31, 1863 
Edmund Rogers Touhy
Jan 13, 1895
Age 24
Mary's Grandson
Catherine Rogers Touhy
Oct 21, 1920
Age 77
Mary's Daughter
Grace Touhy Linn
Jan 24, 1923
*Age 43
Mary's Granddaughter
Joseph W. Touhy
Mar 12, 1952
*Age 77
Mary's Grandson
Maybelle V Touhy Blakeley
Feb 18, 1903
*Age 37
Mary's Granddaughter
Mary McKinley
May 14, 1904
Age 7 days
Mary's Great-Granddaughter
Patrick Leonard Touhy
Oct 18, 1911
Age 72
Mary's Son-in-Law
Infant of P. L. Touhy
July 3, 1884
Age 0
Mary's Grandchild
John Touhy
Aug 21, 1880
Age 4
Mary's Grandson
Philip McGregor Rogers, Jr.
Oct 21, 1869
Age 23
Mary's Son
Philip McGregor Rogers, Sr.
Dec 12, 1856
Age 44
Mary's Husband, moved in from Lincoln Pk Oct 22, 1863
Gerard Alan (Ed) McKinley
Jan 19, 1979
Age 62
Mary's Great-Grandson
Mary Ward Masterson Hickey Rogers
Mar 8, 1890
Age 88
Wife of Philip McGregor Rogers, Sr.

Note: Mary, widow of Philip Rogers Sr, is shown in Lot 20,Block 2,Section C, in Calvery records with the Murphys and Dowds, instead of Lot 22 which she
purchased. This would seem to be an error in the records. 
* age is estimated 
Lots 54 & 56, Block 10, Section C, purchased by Joseph Andrew O'Donnell, March 25, 1883; 13 graves 
Peter Coan
Feb 20, 1915
Husband of Jane O'Donnell
Michael J. O'Donnell
Dec 11, 1930
Son of Patrick and Catherine
Joseph Andrew O'Donnell
Dec 29, 1933
Son of Patrick and Catherine
Rose Languth O'Donnell
Sept 14, 1937
Wife of Michael O'Donnell
Rose Dugan O'Donnell
Aug 16, 1939
Wife of Joseph A. O'Donnell 
Ellen Nealis Donovan
Sept 22, 1908
Sister of Catherine Nealis O'Donnell
James Leonard
Dec 28, 1897
Son of Ellen Nealis Donovan
Amanda (Ann) Nealis
Sept 3, 1894
Age 56
Sister of Catherine Nealis O'Donnell
Catherine Nealis O'Donnell
Dec 28, 1904
Wife of Patrick O'Donnell
Joseph D. O'Donnell
Jan 14, 1963
Son of Joseph Andrew O'Donnell
Patrick Joseph O'Donnell
Apr 27, 1883
Previously interred Dec 17, 1881
Jane O'Donnell Coan
Mar 23, 1883
Sister of Patrick, wife of Peter
Joseph S. O'Donnell
Dec 17, 1980
Age 61
Son of Joseph D. O'Donnell

N-1/2 of Lot 14, Block 47, Section S, purchased by Simon Brown Jan 31, 1894 
Margaret Culligan Brown
Dec 4, 1916
Age 46
Tom Brown's Grandmother
Simon Brown
Aug 2, 1927
Age 64
Tom Brown's Grandfather
Ted Brown
Mar 7, 1959
Age 62
Tom Brown's Uncle
Baby Brown
Jan 31, 1894
Age 0
Tom Brown's Uncle




Lot 46, Block 17, Section T, purchased by W. F. O'Brien Dec 19, 1891 
Matthew L. O'Brien
Dec 19, 1991
Margaret Burke
Dec 6, 1892
Age 5 days
Twin daughter of Francis Ed Nealis Burke & Laura McGinley
Annie Burke
Mar 21, 1893
Age 4 months
Twin daughter of Francis Ed Nealis Burke & Laura McGinley



Lot 311, Block 13, Section T, purchased by John H. Burke Feb 9, 1897 
Ann McHale Burke
Nov 12, 1896
Tom Brown's GG Grandmother; related to John McHale, Archbishop of Tuam in mid-1800s
John Burke
Oct 15, 1898
Age 1 day


Lot 2, Block 21Y, purchased by Joe,Cath,Helena & Eliz. when Vin died Aug 22, 1935 
Moved on 12/10/35 from 325R: William M., Sr & Jr, Mary, Henry & John J. 
Mary Tobin Connery
Dec 16, 1896
Age 61
Mother of 16 Connerys 
William Martin Connery
1883
Age 50
Father of 16 Connerys
Henry Connery
Nov 2, 1927
Son of Wm and Mary
John J. Connery
Grandson of Wm&Mary,son of Francis D.
William Martin Connery,Jr. 
Jan 27, 1911
Son of Wm and Mary
Joseph F. Connery
Nov 23, 1835
Son of Wm and Mary
Vincent Connery
Aug 24, 1935
Son of Wm and Mary
Helena Connery
Feb 10, 1948
Daughter of Wm & Mary
Catherine A. Connery
Feb 20, 1950
Daughter of Wm & Mary
Elizabeth M. Connery
Sept 30, 1969 
Daughter of Wm & Mary

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Census - 1895 Rhode Island (Bristol Co.)




Index
James Tobin Family, John Tobin Family, Edward Tobin?, Frank Connery?, Thomas Tobin Family 
Moses Erwin Connery Family, Elizabeth (widow of John) Connery Family, Thomas Connery Family 
James H. Connery Family, Michael Tobin Family, Samuel Connery Family, Augustus P. Nerone Family 
William M. Nerone Family - Information from 1895 Census for Bristol, RI (compiled by HSMcK) 


Family 488, JAMES TOBIN (son of Thomas Tobin and Ellen Doherty) 
Name
Relation
BirthYr
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace 
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Tobin, James
head
18
M
47
Ire
Ire
Ire
Farmer
Yes
, Mary A.
wife
18
M
46
Ohio
Ire
Ire
Housewife
, Mary A. (Rogers) 
dau.
18
S
16
Bristol
Ire
Ohio
private
, William J.
son
18
S
04
Bristol
Ire
Ohio
, Annie
daughter
18
S
10
Bristol
Ire
Ohio
public
, Charles
son
18
S
12
Bristol
Ire
Ohio
public
, Ellen A.
dau
S
14
Bristol
Ire
Ohio
public
, Emma
dau
S
06
Bristol
Ire
Ohio
public



Family 300, JOHN TOBIN 
Name
Relation
BirthYr 
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Tobin, John
head
M
69
IRE
IRE
IRE
Retired
Yes
, Margaret
wife
M
34
Ire
IRE
Ire
Housewife
, Margaret T.
dau
S
35
Ire
Ire
Ire
Rubber Worker
, Helen E.
dau
S
41
Ire
IRE
Ire
Rubber Worker
, Jackanna
dau
S
39
Ire
IRE
Ire
Housework



Family 325, EDWARD TOBIN (is he related?) 

Family 336, FRANK CONNERY (is he related?) 

Family 90, THOMAS TOBIN (son of John Tobin & Margaret O'Connell, grandson of Thomas Tobin & Ellen Doherty) 
Name
Relation
BirthYr
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Tobin, Thomas
head
M
47
Ire
IRE
RI
Asst Foreman
Yes
, Sarah
wife
M
43
Prov
IRE
RI
, Thomas, Jr.
daughter
S
13
Bris
Ire
RI
public
, William
daughter
S
16
Bris
Ire
RI
public
, Agatha
daughter
S
20
Bris
Ire
RI
Asst Bookkeeper
, Gracie
daughter
S
08
Bris
Ire
RI
public
, John A.
daughter
S
18
Bris
Ire
RI
Printer



Family 523, Moses Erwin Connery (son of James H. Connery and Ellen Erwin) 
Name
Relation
BirthYr
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Connery, Moses E.
head
18
M
32
Bris
Ire
Ire
Farmer
Yes
, Annie Maria
wife
18
M
Bris
Canada
Ire
Housewife
, Charles
son
18
S
Bris
RI
RI
, James J.
son
19
S
08
Bris
RI
RI
private
, William L.
son
18
S
05
Bris
RI
RI



Family 362, Elizabeth Connery, widow of John Connery 
Name
Relation
BirthYr
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Connery, Elizabeth
head
w
Ire
Ire
IRE
Housewife
Connery, William F.
wife
s
21
Bristol
Ire
IRE
Clerk 
Rubberworks



Up to Top of Page 

Family 244, Thomas Connery (son of William Connery & Helena Bohan, wife Ellen Tobin is daughter of Thomas Tobin & Ellen Doherty) 
Name
Relation
BirthYr
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Connery, Thomas
head
18
M
57
IRE
IRE
IRE
Grocer
Yes
, Ellen (Tobin)
wife
18
M
IRE
IRE
IRE
Housewife
, Lena M.
dtr
18
S
25
Bristol
Ire
Ire
Millenery
, Margaret A.
dtr
18
S
15
Bristol
Ire
Ire
public
, Mary E.
dtr
S
21
Bristol
Ire
Ire
Clerk grocery
, Thomas J.
son
S
28
Bristol
Ire
Ire
Grocer



Family 128, James H. Connery (son of William Connery & Helena Bohan) 
Name
Relation
BirthYr 
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Connery, James H.
head
18
m
52
IRE
IRE
IRE
Farmer
Yes
, Helen (Ellen)T.
wife
18
m
50
IRE
IRE
IRE
Housewife
, John C.
son
18
s
15
Bristol
IRE
IRE
pub
, Levena B..
daughter
18
s
13
Bristol
IRE
IRE
pub
, Mabel H.
dtr
18
s
11
Bristol
IRE
IRE
pub
, May E. J.
dtr
18
s
28
Bristol
IRE
IRE
bookkeeper
, Richard
son
18
s
17
Bristol
IRE
IRE
, Sarah E.
dtr
18
s
20
Bristol
IRE
IRE

Up to Top of Page 


Family 344, Robert Connery 
Name
Relation
Birth 
Year
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Connery, Robert
Head
18
59
Ire
Ire
Ire
Carpenter
Yes
, Alicia.
Wife
18
Ire
"
"
Housewife
, Alicia
daughter
18
Bristol
"
"
pub
, Augustus 
son
18
"
"
"
pub
, Catharine
daughter
18
"
"
"
pub
, James
son
18
17
"
"
"
Rubber worker
, Margaret
daughter
18
25
"
"
"
Rubber worker
, Mary A.
dtr
21
"
"
"
Rubber worker
, Robert J.
son
19
"
"
"
Clerk,rubber works
, William
son
16
"
"
"
pub
, Thomas P.
son
21
"
"
"
Rubber worker



Up to Top of Page 
Family 330, Michael Tobin and Mary Frances Conroy (formerly Connery) 
Name
Relation
Birth 
Year
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Connery, Hannah J.
sister-in-law
s
26
Warren
Ire
Ire
Rubber worker
Connery, Lena V.
sister-in-law
s
22
Warren
"
"
Rubber worker
Tobin, Michael
Head
18
m
40
Ire
Ire
IRE
Undertaker
Yes
, Mary Frances (Conroy)
Wife
m
35
Warren
"
"
Housewife
, Mary G.
dtr
18
s
12
Bristol
Ire
Warren
pub
, Margaret
dtr
18
s
10
Bristol 
Ire
"
pub
, Josephine
dtr
18
s
04
Bristol
"
"
pub
, Hannah
dtr
18
s
08
Bristol
"
"
pub



Family 295, William Connery 
Name
Relation
BirthYr 
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Connery, William
Husband
29
Bristol
Ire
Ire
Clerk, 
Clothing Store
, Margaret
Wife
30
Colchester
Ire
Ire
Housewife
, Henrietta 
dtr
2/12
Bristol
RI
Conn
, Helen
dtr
04
Bristol
RI
Conn



Family 524, Samuel Connery (son of James Connery and Ellen Erwin) 
Name
Relation
BirthYr
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Connery, Samuel
Husband
18
m
25
Bristol
Ire
Ire
Teamer
, Ada A.
Wife
18
m
Bristol
RI
RI
Housewife
, Emily F.
Daughter
18
s
Bristol
RI
RI

Up to Top of Page 


Family 184, Augustus P. Nerone (son of Augustus Catan Nerone & Mary Ann Connery) 
Name
Relation
BirthYr
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Nerone, Augustus P.
Head
45
IRE
Portugal
Ire
Shoe Dealer
Yes
, Catherine E.
Wife
34
Winchester, 
Mass
Ire
Ire
Housewife
Nerone, Mary A. Connery
mother-in-law
66
IRE
Ire
Ire
Housework
, Maysie E.
sister
25
Bristol
Portugal
Ire
Telephone 
Operator

Family 109, William M. Nerone (son of Augustus Catan Nerone and Mary Ann Connery) 
Name
Relation
BirthYr
Married 
/Single
Age
Birthplace
BP of Dad
BP of Mom
Occupation
School
Naturalized
Nerone, William M.
Head
m
39
Warren
Portugal
Ire
Market
, Mary E.
Wife
m
37
Clinton
Eng
Eng
Housewife
, Mary L.
dtr
s
12
Bristol
RI
Mass
pub
, Augusutus C.
son
s
15
Bristol
RI
Mass
Clerk
pub
, Emma
dtr
s
07
Bristol
RI
Mass
pub

Immigration Ships of My Ancestors



Timeline of Immigration Dates 


1830 (about or before) - My GGG Grandparents James and Catherine McGregor Rogers brought their family (sons Philip, my GG
Grandfather (born Aug 15, 1812), Michael and Milton) from Co Louth or Co Dublin to Watertown, Jefferson Co, New York. Ship
unknown. 


1831, July 5 - My GG Grandmother Mary Ward Masterson Hickey (age 29) and probably her first husband James Fox Hickey (her
second husband was Philip Rogers above) from Gravesend, England to New York on Ship General Williams. National Archives,
Washington, D.C., Passenger Lists of vessels, arriving New York (1820-1897): May 23, 1831-July 5, 1831: microcopy #M-237 Roll
#15, List 181 (for 1831) should be checked for the passenger list. 


1833 (the Year of the 2nd Calereah - need to find out what this term means) - My GG Grandfather Michael William Quinlivan came to
New York (probably) from Co Clare (probably). Ship unknown. 


1851, Dec 8 - My GG Grandmother Ellen McNamara was brought from Tulla, Co Clare, Ireland to Meriden, Connecticut by her
relatives the McEnerins after the death of her parents. Famine Immigrants Arriving at the Port of New York 1846-1851, Vol. VII, p.
880, Dec 8, 1851, Ship Andrew Foster from Liverpool (partial list): 

Pat McEnerin, 45, male, Mason 
Bridget McEnerin, 34, wife 
Margaret McEnerin, 17, daughter 
Catharine McNamara, 18, niece 
Mary Cisserina McNamara, 16, niece 
Ellen McNamara, 12, niece; 
Harriet McNamara, 10, niece 
Michael McNamara, 8, nephew 
John McNamara, 6, nephew. 


Bristol (Rhode Island) Phoenix, Sept 25, 1852 Vol. XVI, No. 6: Immigration from Ireland. Item: The Coleraine (Ireland) Chronicle
says: "Last year the emmigration from this country was 6,000 souls per week. This year, the number is nearly 8,000, and the tide is still
unbroken. There is no sign of cessation or diminuation, but the crowd to every port presses on, drawn by friends and hopes beyond the
Atlantic, pressed forward by the want and misery behind." 

1852, April 24 - My GG Grandfather William Martin Connery came to New York on the Ship Rip Van Winkle from from Liverpool. 
Also on this ship was the family of his future wife Mary Tobin, my GG Grandmother. 

National Archives, Washington, D.C., Passenger Lists of vessels, arriving New York (1820-1897): April 24, 1852-May 11, 1852:
microcopy #M-237 Roll #112, April 24, 1952, Ship Rip Van Winkle from Liverpool: 

Thomas Tobin, 45, m, Laborer, Ireland 
Ellen Tobin, 44, f 
Michael Tobin, 24, m 
Thomas Tobin, 20, m 
Mary Tobin, 18, f 
Daniel Tobin, 15, m 
Morgan Tobin, 11, m 
Ellen Tobin, 8, f 
James Tobin, 6, m 

Other Tobins on the same ship and crossing: 
Mary Tobin, 15 
John Tobin, 45 
Catherine Tobin, 21 
Thomas Tobin, 6 
Mary Tobin, 27 
Hannah Tobin, Infant 

Also on the ship Rip van Winkle was William (Martin) Connery, age 22, who would marry Mary Tobin, age 18, November 1, 1853 in
Bristol, RI. His brother Thomas Connery (about age 12 in 1852), who was to marry Ellen Tobin (age 8 in 1852) May 12, 1864, was said
to have been with him on the ship, but I believe William was the only Connery on the passenger list. From a notebook dated May 26,
1867 loaned by Aunt Elizabeth Connery about 1966: "William Martin Connery is my name. I came from Ashgrove, Bansha, County
Tipperary, Ireland by ship Rip Van Winkle to New York April 11, 1852" The notebook also listed names, birthdates, baptismal sponsors
for most of the fifteen children of William Martin Connery and Mary Tobin Connery. It was returned to Aunt Elizabeth after Maryl and
Helen copied the information from it. 

Thomas and Ellen Doherty Tobin (my GGG Grandparents) died only months after their arrival in the U.S. leaving behind young
children. They are buried in Lot 380, east half, New Grounds, St. Patrick's Cemetery, Douglas Ave., Providence, RI. In addition to
Thomas Tobin ("Thomas Tobin died July 2, 1852, aged 53 years, also his wife Ellen died September 19, 1852, aged 51 years" ) and his
wife, Ellen Doherty Tobin, the tombstone lists: Patrick, son of John and Margaret Tobin, died 18 October 1864, aged 16 years. At the
bottom of tombstone: "native of the parish of Barnlough, may their souls rest in peace". Thomas and Robert Connery, infant sons of
William Martin Connery and Mary Tobin Connery, are also buried in this lot. I wonder why the eight years difference in age between
what's on tombstone and passenger list info. Did immigrants have to claim to be younger in order to get passage? 


1849/52 - My G Grandfather John McKinley and his brother James came from Ballycastle, N. Ireland sailing from Liverpool to New
York City. Ship unknown. John and James went to Meriden, CT to work in Parker Brothers Iron Foundry. 


1851, Dec 8 - My GG Grandmother Ellen McNamara was brought from Tulla, Co Clare, Ireland to Meriden, Connecticut by her
relatives the McEnerins after the death of her parents. 

Famine Immigrants Arriving at the Port of New York 1846-1851, Vol. VII, p. 880, Dec 8, 1851, Ship Andrew Foster from Liverpool
(partial list): 

Pat McEnerin, 45, male, Mason; Bridget McEnerin, 34, wife; Margaret McEnerin, 17, daughter; Catharine McNamara, 18, niece; Mary
Cisserina McNamara, 16, niece; Ellen McNamara, 12, niece; Harriet McNamara, 10, niece; Michael McNamara, 8, nephew; John
McNamara, 6, nephew. 


1853, May 25 - Alexander and Daniel McKinley (brothers of James and John McKinley) came from Liverpool on the ship Australia and
arrived at Castle Garden (which was converted from an old amusement park on the tip of Manhattan), New York on July 5, 1853. 
Daniel died shortly after arriving in New York. Alexander went to Meriden, CT and joined up with his brothers John and 
James McKinley. 


1857, December - Alexander McKinley went back to Ireland to visit his parents Archie and Nancy McKINLEY. He returned to USA in
the summer of 1858. 


1860 (about) - My G Grandfather Patrick Leonard Touhy (with his brother John W. Touhy) came to NYC from Feakle, Co Clare. 
Surname could also be Tuohy, Touhey, Toohey, etc. 


1862 - William McKINLEY (brother of John, James and Alexander) came to U.S. (probably NYC) probably sailing from Liverpool. 


1863 - My GG Grandparents Archibald and Nancy MORRISON McKINLEY were brought to U.S. from Rathlin Island, Northern
Ireland by their oldest son John and came to live on his farm adjoining the farm his brother James in Postville, Grand Meadow Twnshp,
Clayton Co, IA. 

Rogers Park, Cook Co, IL



Click here for a link to Rogers Park Historical Society


This is a newspaper article (probably from a Chicago paper) from a scrapbook belonging to my Grandmother Alice Touhy McKinley (1878-1963). 
Her Grandfather was Philip McGregor Rogers, Sr. Rogers Park Annexed to City in 1893-Beautiful Home District Supplants Truck Farms and
Woods-Once a trading post and resting place for weary travelers, the growth of Rogers Park has kept pace with the rapid growth of Chicago during
the 19th century although it was a separate village until its annexation to Chicago in 1893. In 1816 the government traded the Indians 50,000 acres
of land north of the Indian boundary line, which is now Rogers Avenue, to get them to relinquish land south of the line. Zender Early Settler-Early
settlers were John Zender, who established Zender House Tavern at 6726 Ridge in 1809, a building which still exists although it has been remodeled
many times. (note: archives of Illinois Land Records show several purchases by Philip Rogers between 1841-1847) Philip Rogers bought the tract
now bounded by Touhy, Western, Ridge and Morse from the government for $1.25 an acre in 1836. Peter Smith in 1840 bought 115 acres along
Ridge from Pratt to Touhy and built a house at Farwell and Ridge, and John O'Leary's farm, north of the Rogers acreage was purchased in 1845. 
(Note: Philip's and John's wives Mary Masterson Rogers and Margaret Masterson O'Leary were sisters). In 1844 the Marshall farm at Ridge and
Jarvis and the Schreiber farm on Ridge were purchased. Dinner Slants Ridge-Mrs. Sarah Marshall, grandmother of John Marshall, is credited with
having put the present slant in Ridge Avenue. (note: seems like there should be more text after this). First Police Station in 1893. The first police
station in Rogers Park was established in 1893 at the time of annexation in the old village hall at the present location. At present the station is in
charge of Captain Harding who has over 200 men. Lieutenant Healy was the first fire chief for Rogers Park fire station which was organized in 1893
and housed for several years with the police. It moved to the present location on Greenleaf in 1916. From three firemen the force has jumped to two
fire companies, an engine and a hook and ladder company, and is equipped with the most modern fire fighting apparatus. H. C. W. Laubenheimer
was the Village Assessor-With the growth of Rogers Park there came a demand for books and a branch of the Chicago Public Library was formally
opened Dec 27, 1917 in a small building at 6925 North Clark. Gertrude Husintetter was librarian with three assistants. Mabel Maderwell succeeded
her. Lida Pirritte, the present librarian, took office in 1926. She has 14 assistants. The business organizations of Rogers Park have done much to
further the progress of the community by working for needed improvements. The Associations-Howard District Business Association organized five
years ago has been active in the Howard Street district, which was annexed to Chicago in 1915. The association helped secure the widening of
Paulina, the annexation of Sheridan from Rogers to Calvary in 1926, the new lighting system in 1925 and the stopping of North Shore trains at
Howard. At present it is working with Birchwood association to have a Chicago and Northwestern station at Howard. Clark Street and West -
Rogers-Park Clark Business Men's Association, organized in 1921, secured the cross town bus service for Rogers Park, installed festoon lighting
on Clark, secured a new hook and ladder for Rogers Park police, was instrumental in having County . . . (clipping ends).

Touhy Estate is Partitioned - Old Homestead Property in Block 1 is Awarded to Mrs. Blakely - To Build Country Club Hotel - Plans are Along for
New Lines for Sixty Shops and over 800 Fully Equipped Apartments - What remains of the original Philip Rogers estate in Rogers Park, bought from
the United States Government and the Indians in the days of old Fort Dearborn at from $1.25 to $5.00 an acre, was partitioned in the Circuit Court,
and filed for record this week, among the heirs of Philip Rogers and his daughter Catherine C. Touhy, known to old residents as Kate Rogers. The
division is under a final decree in the partition suit of Mabelle Rogers Blakely vs. Stephen Rogers Touhy, et al, and effects a settlement of the entire
estate. Those participating in the division under the decree of Judge E. M. Mangan sitting in the emergency court, are Mabelle Rogers Blakely,
wife of Addison Blakely, former Corporation Counsel to the City of Chicago; Stephen Rogers Touhy, Joseph W. Touhy, Mrs. Catherine C. Cullen,
Mrs. Casper E. Linn and Mrs. Alice B. McKinley, wife of Archibald A. McKinley, president of Western Alliance Insurance Company and brother of
ex-Speaker William McKinley of the Illinois legislature. Mrs. Addision Blakely receives the old homestead property in Block 1 of the original plat
of Rogers Park, which block was then (in 1878) bounded by Rogers Avenue (the old Indian Boundary Line) on the north by the section line (along
Ashland Boulevard, then Grand avenue) on the east, by Touhy Avenue on the South and by Green Bay road (now Clark street) on the west,
comprising over 40 acres in the one block making up the old Touhy homestead site, which has been one of the North Shore's landmarks for upward
of half a century. The Touhy home was one of the show places of the suburbs before the World's Fair, as well as the society Mecca of the North
Shore and to the cosmopolitan world stood for leadership in Chicago suburban social life. The unsubdivided remainder of this forty-acre tract,
awaeded by the decree of Judge Mangan and quit-claimed by the other heirs to Mrs. Blakely, has been subdivided into sixty-four lots and
designated by the Circuit Court Commissioners, Peter Phillip, Charles A. Wrightman and E. Orris Hart, as "Mabelle Rogers Blakely's Birchwood
Beach Park Subdivision in Block 1 of Rogers Park, frontage of 3,038.36 feet, and an available building frontage of over 5,000 ft. The lot frontage
estimated at $132 per front foot, considerably below the ordinary selling price of choice frontage in this Birchwood section, indicate a valuation of the
property alloted to her at upward of $400,000.00. This gives an average inside lot value of $500,000. An average rental of each security than it is
possible to obtain in the sky-scraper plans of the ordinary highgrade hotel. It is believed that a hotel only three stories high overlooking acres of
parks and drives with all the modern conveniences, private grounds and residence appearance, at small cost, will prive to be a popular venue. A
corporation will build and manage the property. Stephen Rogers Touhy receives the business corners of the estate along Clark street from Jarvis to Birchwood avenues and several blocks to the west of Clark Street and on Ridge Boulevard, which gives to him a still more extensive frontage but having a similar value. The Ridge property is to be built up with bungalows and large residences fronting on Ridge Blvd. It was at the intersection of Clark Street and Rogers avenue where the old Green Bay road tollgate was located and which is one of Chicago's historic spots. A committee representing the Chicago Historic Society are now negotiating with Mr. Addison Blakely and the Touhy heirs for the removal of the old court house stone and the remains of the old wayside inn at this corner to the Forest Preserve District of Chicago for preservation on account of their historic value. Rogers avenue, the old Indian Boundary Line, constituted the North . . . (clipping ends) 

(Article probably from Chicago area newspaper - Howard News?) Incorporators of Rogers Park Live in Street Names - Rogers Park's early history, the story of the old Indian Boundary Line, now Rogers Avenue, and the conversion of the birch forest district into the present residential and business district, will be recounted in the "Who's Who" of Rogers Park, to be issued soon as a special supplement of the Howard News. Rogers Park residents who have lived here for the past 40 years can recall shooting rabbits and ducks in the district, seeing deer running wild, and having picnic parties in the dense woods along the lake. The earliest settlement of the village dates back to 1836 when Philip Rogers acquired 1,600 acres from the government and moved here from Watertown, N.Y. Names of the incorporators who laid out the village in 1878 are familiar because of streets named for them and include Mr. and Mrs. Patrick L. Touhy, John V. Farwell, Luther L. Greenleaf, Stephen P. Lunt, Charles H. Morse, Isaac R. Hitt and Andrew B. Jackson. Old settlers or descendants of pioneer residents who know interesting stories about the district are asked to send
The Howard News the information. 

(Clipping probably from a Chicago area newspaper The North Shore News about 1906) Touhy-Kenilworth Avenue - Like Banquo's ghost, it will not
"down." Every four or five years the question of changing the name of Touhy avenue to something else bobs up and creates a ripple of excitement
in the Park. Heretofore the argus-eyed watchman of the early settler Celtic family, S. Rogers Touhy, has been able to head the proposition off
before it reached the city council; but last week the latter day settlers on that thoroughfare caught him napping, and succeeded in rushing an
ordinance through, changing the name to Kenilworth avenue, whereupon peititions and counter-petitions have been circulated, and the end, perhaps,
is not yet in sight. Mayor Dunne is reported as saying, like some party in Hamlet, "A plague on both your houses." The North Shore News, while
not particularly charmed with the name of Touhy for one of our principal avenues, still holds the same view expressed several years ago, that it is
unwise, not to say foolish, to be tinkering with the names of well known streets that stands for something local, which Kenilworth does not, and is
already in use prominently a short distance north. Surely some better name could have been selected if "Touhy" must be wiped out. 

(clipping from Evanston Index Dec 5, 1908) Want to Save Name - Effort in Rogers Park to Preserve Historic Street Intact - Is Monument to Touhy's -
The Dedicator is Daughter of Original Owner of That Tract - The older citizens of Evanston remember Patrick L. Touhy, who was Pat until he
married Catherine Rogers many years ago, settled at Rogers Park, where they built a big house just south of the Evanston lineand where their large
family has grown up. In the old days Mrs. Touhy and her children in their carry-all were very familiar sights on the Evanston streets. To them the
following article from the North Shore News of Rogers Park will be of interest: There is a street within the boundaries of Rogers Park that is called
by two different names. It is the thoroughfare lying midway between Chase and Estes avenues, and one portion of it is known as Touhy avenue, the
remainder as Kenilworth. Preserved the Name. In 1872 the ground upon which this street is laid was given to the city of Chicago without price by
Catherine C. Touhy, daughter of the original owner. The only condition attached to the gift was the provision that it should bear forever the name of
the donor. Two years ago the city council changed the name of a portion of the street in question to Kenilworth. Pressure is now being brought upon
that body to rescind its action and permit Touhy avenue to remain Touhy avenue. A few of the reasons why such action should be taken are
presented herewith, and we believe a majority of our Rogers Park readers will concur therein: Philip Rogers came to Chicago in 1834 and was one of
the sturdy pioneers who contributed to the early vigorous life of the city. Rogers Owned Large Tract. Rogers' holdings amounted to about 1,600
acres (note from Maryl: Phil also increased his property holdings with his marriage to Mary Ward Masterson Hickey, widow of James Fox Hickey,
who had extensive holdings in the Sunnyside neighborhood of northside Chicago) which he purchased from the U.S. government and which was the
northernmost settlement of the city and during those early years of peril he stood between the white man and the savage, protecting the earliest
settlers from Indian raids. The government made his north line the Indian Boundary Line of Chicago and that line is now called Rogers avenue in his
memory. Touhy avenue is named in honor of Catherine C. Touhy, Philip Rogers' oldest and only living child and was given to the principal avenue,
the section line street of the suburb, when Rogers Park was founded. Touhy avenue has been the name of the entire thoroughfare for upward of a
third of a century since September 10, 1872. Touhy avenue is the name of the greater length of the street now within the city limits and for many
miles beyond the western limits of the city. A Monument to Touhy. Touhy avenue was dedicated eighty feet in width as a monument to the
principal founder of the suburb and any change in the name is a breach of faith with Mrs. Touhy who contributed this liberal avenue and parkway in
consideration of the thoroughfare bearing her name. A change of name from Touhy avenue would be a lack of chivalry on the part of the council to a
woman who has been reputed to be the first white girl born on the north shore of Chicago. Any change from Touhy avenue may possibly result in a
legal cloud on all property fronting on this thoroughfare because of a failure of consideration for the dedication of the eighty foot street along this
section line. Every attempt made in the past to change this name has been opposed by the people on public hearing, and the stub end of Touhy
avenue was changed to Kenilworth two years ago only by slipping the change into the omnibus bill without any hearing on the matter whatever. Used
in Legal Papers. Touhy avenue is the name used in all legal documents, all transfers of title on the street, and in all plats and maps and surveys. 
Touhy avenue is the name preferred by the majority of frontage on the street. Touhy avenue is the only street of that name in the city or suburbs,
while there are three Kenilworths, resulting in confusion in the delivery of mail and to the north shore car line passengers. Touhy avenue, the
historic name of the street, the stub end has been named Kenilworth for only a short period of time. It would be as appropriate to change Clark
Street (named to commemorate George Rogers Clark's early expedition to Chicago) to Montmorency as to change Touhy avenue to Kenilworth. 
Commemorative names of the founders . . . (clipping ends) 

(Clipping probably from a Chicago area newspaper The Daily News?) Rogers Park Bought for $1.25 an Acre - New Yorker Obtained First Title in
1836, Two Years After Indians Ceded It (This is the ninetieth of a series of articles dealing with development of Chicago's various business,
residential, industrial and suburban neighborhoods. The articles appear on this pageon alternate Saturdays.) By Harry M. Beardsley. From
Watertown, a little mill town situated at the falls of the Black River in northwestern New York, there came to the Chicago territory early in the 1830s
two pioneers, who have left their impress on the city. One of these was Justin Butterfield, a lawyer and politician, whose name is perpetuated in
Butterfield road running into Du Page County, and whose granddaughter recently sold part of the old Butterfield estate, the nine acres comprising
and surrounding the Logan Square ball park. The other pioneer from Watertown was Philip Rogers, farmer, whose name is perpetuated in Rogers
Park, now one of Chicago's most popular residential sections. Rogers arrived in Chicago about 1834, and in 1836 he purchased from the government
1,600 acres of land that is now included in the neighborhood bearing his name and in South Evanston. Log Cabin First Residence. Not far from the
present intersection of Western and Lunt avenues Rogers built his home, a crude one-room log cabin, and to the rear, as soon as he was able, he set
out an apple orchard extending east and north from the house on the fertile ground that sloped gently back to the ridge. On a lot that once was a part
of this old orchard, The Daily News will build one of the three model homes. The location is just west of the northeast corner of Lunt and Pingree
streets. The old Rogers cabin faced west, looking off over a long stretch of low swamp land. In exceptionally dry summers Philip Rogers could glean
a fair crop of marsh grass hay from this land, but in normal years it was worth less. For that matter, none of his land except that on the ridge was
considered particularly desirable. He had paid $1.25 per acre for it. Enjoys City's Biggest Boom. For the last two years Rogers Park has been the
center of the liveliest building boom in Chicago's history. More apartments have been built within its limits than in any other section of the city, and
long with the apartments have come hotels. stores, offices, banks, theaters, and scores of big public garages. The lake, combined with quick
transportationby elevated and automobile routes to the loop, has drawn thousands of apartment dwellers to the eastern section of Rogers Park. 
Farther west, the individual homebuilder and the two and three-apartment builders have been busy. Rogers Park now had a population of
approximately 75,000 people. Philip Rogers' holdings are interesting historically because they are traversed by the northern Indian boundary line. 
Starting at the lake shore near the northern limits of Rogers Park, this line extends south and west to the Fox river, parallel with a similar line cutting
through the northern extremity of Lake Calumet. The territory included between these lines, including practically all of the site of Chicago was
ceded to the federal government by the Indians in 1834. Want to Extend Rogers Avenue. Rogers Avenue is not the onlt street in Rogers Park that
is rich in historical associations. Clark street is laid out along the old military road from Chicago to Green Bay. Before there was a military road an
Indian trail wended its way from Chicago northward over the same route. As late as 1880, Clark street was a toll road, and a toll gate barred the way
at Rogers avenue. Farwell, Touhy, Greenleaf, Lunt and Morse avenues, were named for some of the original incorporators of Rogers Park. The
village was incorporated in 1878 by Mr. and Mrs. Patrick L. Touhy. (Mrs. Touhy was the daughter of Philip Rogers). Jogn V. Farwell, Luther L.
Greenleaf, Stephen P. Lunt, Charles S. Morse, and Andrew B. Jackson. Long before this there had been a village named "Ridgeville" located on the
ridge along the present border line between Rogers Park and South Evanston. 

( Clipping probably from a Chicago newspaper The Rogers Parker? dated Sept 30, 1922) - Rogers Park Has a Historic Past - Ninety years ago
before Chicago was yet a village, Philip Rogers, from New York state, was attracted by the boundless beauty of the north shore of Lake Michigan. 
When he had a wilderness of land lying about old Fort Dearborn from which to select, he cast his lot with the forest of birch trees and oaks on the
present site at Rogers Park. He loved to stand on Ridge Road overlooking Lake Michigan and point to the beautiful wooded shore stretching out
before him as the future residence district of what would some day be the greatest metropolis of the greatest producing region of the world. Having
assisted in planning some of the work of the Erie Canal, he saw the practicability and prophesied the actuality of the drainage and boat canal wich
now cuts through the Skokie and runs along the old Rogers buildings on the west side into the north branch of the Chicago river. Forty years later,
his daughter Catherine, with her husband, Patrick Leonard Touhy, laid out Rogers Park to perpetuate the memory of Philip Rogers, pioneer. Mr.
Touhy interested John V. Farwell, Charles H. Morse, Luther V. Greenleaf, Stephen P. Lunt, and Andrew B. Jackson in the plan. These men formed
the syndicate to buy up the necessary land adjoining the Rogers estate to form Rogers Park, extending from the lake to the west ridge. The section
line street was named after P. L. Touhy, and is called Touhy Road for miles west of Chicago into the country. Each of the others also commemorated
his part in the work by giving an avenue his name. Each of the streets was eighty feet wide and extending into the lake to give the whole village an
unobstructed view of and access to the lake short. The old residence lots all front north and south so the lake may be seen from the front bay
windows. This feature of beauty, wide avenues with overhanging trees, making a vista of which the ever-rolling waves of Lake Michigan form a part,
was one of the wise provisins of city building that Rogers Park along enjoys and of which the residents are only now beginning to realize the beauty. 
Name Road After General Sheridan. P. L. Touhy named Sheridan Road after Gen. Phil Sheridan, who was a frequent visitor at the old homestead,
with Gen. Mulligan, Gen. Wm. T. Sherman, Charles Parnell Stewart, T. P. O'Connor, John Fitzgerald, the elder Harrison, Gov. John W. Palmer,
Senator Farwell, Melville W. Fuller, late chief justice, and many others that made the name of Rogers Park well known on two continents. Attracts
Loyola University. The remarkable beauty of Rogers Park drew the new Loyola University, the head school of the Jesuits in the new world, to the
waters of the north shore, where the vast expanse of the lake would add charm and freedom to the classic gardens of the school and the Loyola
Club. These grounds were located for the Jesuit order by a committee headed by Walter Banks Rogers, a member of the Rogers family from
Kentucky, who planned the site for the institution when Philip Rogers eldest grandaughter (Maybelle) was in the Florissant convent where Father
Rogers was spiritual director. Building after building will be added to the architectural group. The university will spend millions in bringing the
grand conception of the founders into completion. A mile west of the university are the grounds of the Edgewater Golf Club with its $200,000 club
house, and a mile north is the Birchwood Country Club. Prominent citizens of Chicago are building expensive homes along Rogers Park's avenue at
the rate of 500 homes a year, according to the statistics of the building department. Expensive churches and schools dot the four square miles that
comprise Rogers Park, Chicago's northernmost residence district, the latest schools being built are the St Margaret . . . (clipping ends) 

( Clipping probably from a Chicago newspaper The Rogers Parker? dated Sept 30, 1922) Old Settler's Recommend - My people came to Rogers
Park in 1842. I have carefully observed the growth of our beautiful community. surely there is no more desirable portion of Chicago for a person to
live in. Since the formation of St. Margaret Mary's Parish, real estate and homing conditions have been stabilized, and I look for a steady healthy
growth in ground valuations. I have bought and sold several pieces of real estate through the Roger Park Home Association, and do not know of a
more profitable and praiseworthy manner of so doing, and I sincerely recommend it to all. (Signed) Jacob Phillip, 7341 Barton
Avenue 

(news clipping Aug 17 (about 1925) Relic of Old Chicago (Chicago, Aug 17) Far up on North Clark Street, a few blocks from the Evanston line, are
the ruins of the old Rogers homestead, where lived for many years one of our pioneer families. Rogers Park is named after this family, so is Rogers
Park, which marks the old Indian boundary line. Up to within a few years ago the stately old house (note: called The Oaks by the Touhys, I think)
stood in the midst of a large lawn surrounded by big trees and flowering shrubs. The dignified old house had, no doubt, seen many changes from the
days when this section was "in the country," and a good half day's jog behind old Dobbin from town. On the lawn at that time stood a large round
limestone ornament, about four feet high, a relic of the Chicago fire. This was one of a number of such ornaments which surmounted the old
courthouse destroyed in that fire. It is easy to picture the many conversations which took place on the lawn about this historic stone, when on
peaceful Sunday afternoons, friends "from the city" drove out to call. The many incidents thus recalled and discussed by these pioneers would make
a valuable history of early Chicago if there had been any way to have preserved them. Now the old house has succumbed to the ravages of time and
progress. Nothing remains but a hole in the ground strewn with crumbling bricks and mortar. The old stone ornament lies tumbled over and partly
hidden in a tangle of lilac and wild currant bushes. Soon the chugging of the steam shovel and the rumble of trucks will, no doubt, will herald the
advent of a new apartment building on this historic site and this relic of early Chicago days will be carted off as so much rubbish and consigned to
some dump as "filling". A duplicate of this stone may be seen in front of the Academy of Sciences in Lincoln Park. This, too, came from the old
courthouse at the time of the fire. Who will take steps to rescue this time honored relic of early Chicago and set it up in a place of dignity, perhaps as
a companion to the one in Lincoln Park? Perhaps the Chicago Historical Society, the D.A.R. or some similar organization will be glad to do this. L.
W. Wahlstrom 

(Thursday, Aug 12, 1926 - note: Philip Rogers was born Aug 15, 1812 in Co Louth, Ireland-died Rogers Park, IL Dec 13, 1856) Indians in Park
Centuries Ago-Philip Rogers First Settler 90 Years Ago-In a century Rogers Park has evolved from a Pottawattamie Indian camping ground to a
community of 70,000 containing progressive business districts and offering living conditions and beauty of surroundings that have established this
district as an ideal business and home center. Ninety years ago Philip Rogers came from Watertown, N.Y. and built the first log cabin on Ridge, then
an Indian trail. Rogers Park, at a later date, received its name from its first white settler. Incorporated as a village in 1878, it was annexed to
Chicago April 4, 1893. Up until a few years ago Rogers Park land was the last thing that anyone wanted, and it was to be had in many instances on
the bare promise of the purchaser to improve the property and pay for the lot later. Today land values have jumped sky high and lots purchasable a
few years ago for a few hundred dollars are now bringing thousands. The last 15 years have seen a great change, for today large apartment
buildings, immense theatres, thriving places of business occupy the prairie of the past. Business associations, such as Howard District Business,
Loyola-Sheridan, Devon-Clark and countless clubs and societies, as well as prominent and influential citizens have also shared in the promotion and
progress of the territory. 

The following article is from the Chicago Tribune January 13, 1966: School Named for Early Settler--Rogers owned Trading Post, Vegetable Farm
[Another in a series of articles about persons for whom schools are named] by Joseph Brisben. The first setler in the area of Rogers School, 7345
Washtenaw Avenue, was Philip Rogers, the man for whom the school was named. Rogers, who once owned all the land in an area bound by Lake
Michigan, Juneway Terrace, and Ridge and Devon Avenues, lived with his family in a house on the northwest corner of what is now Rogers Avenue
and Clark Street. He also operated a charcoal factory and a vegetable farm. His home life and industry set the tone for what is now the Rogers
Park neighborhood. During a conversation recorded in 1929, his grandson, the late S(tephen) Rogers Touhy, said only fate caused Rogers to settle
in the area. Arrived in 1834. In the winter of 1834 when Rogers and his brothers (Michael, Milton??) arrived in Chicago from Ireland (note: they
actually arrived from Watertown, Jefferson County, NY which they came to as children from Dublin or Co Louth, Ireland), they were upset by
Chicago's narrow, muddy streets and its filthy, wooden wharves. The icy, windy weather blew thru their homespun clothing. Because the lake was
frozen and the boats, the most expedient means of transportation, were drydocked, the brothers were forced to remain for the winter. Rogers
learned that Indians, who hunted along the Calumet river in the summer, camped to the west of the ridge where Ridge Avenue is. He decided that it
was the ideal spot for a trading post. Touhy said his grandfather bought 600 acres from the government that spring and established the post. When
the Indians moved west, Rogers cleared his land for farming by forming the charcoal company. Attract More Settlers. The industry attracted more
settlers. A town grew. The Chicago and Milwaukee Railroad bought land from Rogers for a line. When he died, Rogers owned 1,600 acres. 
Rogers Park had a population of 600. Rogers Park mushroomed after the great fire in 1871 which destroyed thousands of homes. It became a
village in 1878, and Touhy's father, Patrick Touhy, was subdividing the family's land and selling for $12 a foot. Rogers Park became part of Chicago
in 1893. 

David Philip O'Leary interviewed Sept 30, 1900 about his father John - John O'Leary came to Chicago in 1836. Soon after he bought a farm of 40
acres at Sunnyside and lived there from 1837 to 1840. While living here many of those who settled at Evanston passed their house in teams. They
stopped and made their acquaintances and when the O'Learys themselves moved to Evanston they found them settled on their various farms. 
Among them were Edward Murphy, John Carney, Hathaway and others. In 1837 John O'Leary bought 160 acres in Ridgeville (situated in part
where Calvary Cemetery now is) and in part south of the Cemetery and north of the present Chicago city limits. In 1840 he moved to Ridgeville. In
1859 he sold 40 acres to Calvary Cemetery, this being the year the Cemetery was established. David Philip O'Leary, one of John O'Leary's sons,
was born in Evanston. His middle name was given him for Philip Rogers, a neighbor (Note from Maryl: Philip Rogers was also his uncle, being
married to David Philip O'Leary's mother Margaret Masterson O'Leary's sister (Mary Ward Masterson Hickey Rogers)). John O'Leary took up
his first piece of land from the government. Later he bought other land of Wm B Ogden and Edward Devlin. The latter was a brother of John
Devlin, the first sheriff in Chicago. David P O'Leary was born June 26, 1853. Oct. 24, 1900, D. P. O'Leary says that his father John O'Leary
started for California in November 1850. He thinks he did not go with the party made up of the Crains and others. He returned Aug 22, 1852 having
been fairly successful in gold mining. While he was there he sent home $1,000 and brought $1,600 with him. Nov 23, 1900 B J Hill says they first
settled near the Britton place (see "Taverns") 

(newspaper clipping probably Chicago Suntimes 1950s) Historic Chicago Sites by John Drury - Indian Boundary Line - After the War of 1812, when
Chicago was still a small frontier settlement of fur traders slowly recovering from the outrafe of the Fort Dearborn massacre, a number of treaties
were made with Indian tribes in which the redmen ceded tracts of land to the whites. One of these treaties was negotiated in 1816 and this set up
boundary lines around the Chicago region. This treaty is today explained by an historical tablet on the side of a three-story apartment building at the
northeast corner of Rogers avenue and Clark street at the extreme northern edge of Chicago. It was placed here because Rogers avenue, which
runs diagonally through the residential section of Rogers Park; constitutes a portion of the original Indian boundary line. Before becoming a
boundary line, it was an old Indian trail. That line began at the lake shore and extended southwesterly to the Fox River. A similar diagonal line,
marking the southern boundary agreed to in the treaty, began at Lake Calumet. Within this area Chicago was founded and grew to become the
fourth largest city in the world. After the Black Hawk Wat of 1832, howeer, this treaty was dissolved when all of the Indian tribes agreed to move
west of the Mississippi River. The historical tablet explains that three outstanding men in Middle Western history negotiated the Chicago boundary
treaty with the Indians. They were Ninian Edwards, who was then serving as governor of Illinois Territory; William Clark, superintendent of Indian
affairs, and governor of Missouri territory, and Col. Rene Auguste Chouteau, Indian trader who helped found St. Louis. Clark, incidentally, was a
brother of George Rogers Clark, after whom Clark St is named. When the Indians moved away, the country north of Chicago gradually became
settled by farmers and in time the township of Lake View was formed. At this period, Philip Rogers, early Chicago settler, bought 1,600 acres in the
Lake View region and this became the Rogers Park of today. The whole township of Lake View was annexed to Chicago in 1889 and this is now the
North Side of the city. Before the annexation a toll gate was in operation for many years at Rogers avenue and Clark Street. A sketch of this gate
and the keeper's house next to it, by the late William H. Schmedtgen, "father" of newspaper illustration, is in the possession of the
Ravenswood-Lakeview Historical Society. A reminder of the Indian tribes who once roamed this regionis found i the names of various small parks in
the neighborhood -- Chippewa, Pottawatomie and Indian Boundary Line park. (This is the 36th in a series. Readers are invited to submit
suggestions). 

(old article from Alice B. Rogers Touhy McKinley's scrapbook; looks like a generic vanity job) A Corner in Ancestors -- The Rogers Family by
Eleanor Lexington - The name Roger, Rogers, or Rodgers is derived from the word Hruod in Frank. Hrother in the North and Ruhm in the modern
German, meaning fame or glory. In the German it is Roger or Rudiger; in Spanish it is Rogerio, and in Italian, Ruggiero. Historical tradition
associates the name with all that is true and noble. A meaning ascribed to it is "one whose word is reliable." 
It has been claimed that the name is derived from the French. Since we read athat Roger I, Count of Sicily and Calabria, and the founder of the
Norman dynasty in those the founder of the Norman dynasty in those countries, was born in Normandy, France about 1031. This suggests tht the
English Rogers families were possibly originally Norman French, and went to England with William the Conqueror. 
Of early ancestors there was Aaron Rogers, a merchant of Rome, Italy, who in the year 1300, in consequence of religious persecution, fled for
his life and took up his residence in London. There he resumed his business as a merchant and became rich. He was the great-grandfather of the
first Protestant martyr in the reign of Queen Mary -- John Rogers, who was prebendary of St Paul's Cathedral and was burned at the stake at
Smithfield, Feb 4, 1555. His grandson, James Rogers, was one of the first settlers in this country. 
Thomas Rogers and his son Joseph came over in the Mayflower, but Thomas died soon after his arrival. His other children cam later, and all
settled in Plymouth. another immigrant was George Rogers, who came from Ireland. It is recorded of another George Rogers that he was "born on
the sea and rocked in a tortoise-shell cradle." 
The fact that James Rogers, the immigrant, was chosen to fill many important positions in Connecticut, where he lived, shows the estimation in
which he was held by the community. He was deputy to the court of elections and representatiave to the general court seven times within about as
many years. Governor Winthrop showed his esteem for him in various ways. For many years prior to 1666 James Rogers carried on by far the most
exensive foreign and domestic trade of any man in New London or pissibly in Connecticut. 
Samuel Rogers, the first settler in New Jersey of the name, had five children. One, woman, married Francis Hopkinson, signer of the
Declaration of Independence. Their son was Joseph Hopkinson, author of the words of the national air, "Hail, Columbia!" 
Joseph, son of Samuel Rogers served with credit in the revolutionary army. His sister Elizabeth married Colonel Joseph Borden, the founder of
Bordentown, N.J. and a zealous patriot. In 1778 his house was burned by the British. A guard was placed about the dwelling to insure its destruction
and during the progress of the flames a British officer expressed to Mrs. Borden his sympathy for her private misfortunes. She replied: "I thank
you, sir, but this is the happiest day of my life. I know you have given up all hope of reconquering my country or you would not this wantonly
devastate it." 
Robert Rogers was the celebrated "Ranger" who did great service in the French and Indian wars. Richard, his brother, was also in the
"ranger" service. He was first lieutenant under his brother Robert in 1756; later, in the same year, he was appointed captain of a second company
of rangers. Another brother, James, also a ranger, was in the ifamous expedition to Fort George in January, 1757. A John Rogers served in the
revolution, holding rank as lieutenant. In 1675, John Rogers, son of one of the first settlers, founded the sect called after his name Rogerenes. One
of the characterizations of the sect -- which resembled the Baptist -- was to give no remuneration for religious services, believing that ministers
should support themselves by secular employment. The Rogerenes also considered that the directions regarding the healing of the sick in the first
years of Christianity were intended for believers of all ages. Consequently, they did not employ physicians or depend upon medicines. In case of
serious illness, they obeyed the injunction of St James regarding prayer and annointing with oil. 
A Bible, which it is alleged, beonged to the martyr, is carefully in the archives of Alfred University, N.Y. It had been burned; the first part to the
thirty-eighth chapter of Exodus is gone and the tradition is that this book was also burned at the stake, with its owner, though not destroyed. 
The book, being saved from the flames, was concealed in a feather bed during the rest of Mary's reign. James Rogers, who brought it to this
country, used it as a pillow in his travels in the wilderness as talisman to protect him from the the nightly attacks of the savages. The Bible is
supposed to be one of Cranmer's first edition. 
The Rogers are a sturdy and a long-lived race. Daniel Rogers, the centerarian, could do a full day's mowing when he was 95 years old. At the
age of 100, "he ran away from home, a distance of four miles to visit a friend." It was the busy haying season and his children could not take the
trouble to accommodate him with any means of convetance. The same year he was presented with his first paid of spectacles. He died in 1772 at the
age of 106 years. 
In one family of ten brothers and sisters seven lived to be 100 years and over. The youngest was 85; the average age was 90 years, and the
aggregate ages of the ten was 988 years. 
A curious coincidence in regard to a certain James Rogers is that he was contemporary with another James Rogers. Each had a wife named
Mary, the wives died about the same time and each James married a second wife about the same time. 
The Rogers' arms bear a conventionalized fleur-de-lis in chief, a star in base, with a helmet for crest. The earliest crest of the Rogers'
escutcheon was a fleur-de-lis, and the first motto, "Nos Nostraque Deo," which freely interpreted means "Ourselves and our possessions to God." 
A sheaf of wheat was sometimes represented on the shield. 

Cemetery located at St. Thomas Churchyard (CE) at Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland, Includes members of St. Mary’s Roman Catholic
Church, Copied 06 September 1993 by Patricia (McCurdy) Townsend

Information shared by McCurdy researcher Patricia McCurdy Thompson. Any errors are mine. My probable ancestors are marked with an asterisk *, Maryl 


1. Here erected by John Weir of Kinkeal* 
in memory of his father Alex r who 
departed this life 8 Nov 1840 aged 66 years 
Also his son James who departed this life 
22 May 1811 aged 24 years 

2. Here lies the body of Dan l Weir* 
who departed this life the 30th day 
of May 1774 aged 64 years 

3. Miminisse 
Eliza R. Browning the beloved wife of 
Robert Easdale - drowned by the wreck 
of the Cambria - cast ashore on this island 
and interred here age 29 yrs 8mos 6 days 
“Her sun went down while it was yet day 
but ---------- to live was ----- 

4. In memoriam 
Bridget Cecil a loving wife and mother 
died 11 Sept 1977 aged 64 yrs 
and Douglas a dear husband and father 
died 5th May 1985 

5. Anderson (stone fallen over, no other inscription showing) 

6. Sacred Heart of Jesus (this stone is off its’ pedestal) A small cross located 
Have Mercy on the souls of behind the large stone - IHS 
Patrick Anderson 
The Station Rathlin Island 
who died 9th Feb 1870 
and his wife, Mary 
who died 16 July 1870 

7. In loving memory of 
Paddy Black died 3rd Aug 1986 aged 80 yrs 

8. (a broken stone lying on top of the above grave) 
Here lieth the body of 
Daniel McCurdy of Clagin 
who departed this life 2 Nov 1832 aged 69 years 

9. Pray for the soul of 
John Black, Glacklugh 
died 6th Jan 1920 aged 88 years 
And his son, James Black 
died 15th March 1919 aged 50 yrs 
Also his grand daughter, Kate Black 
died 4 March 1920 aged 22 yrs 

10. Erected by Daniel Black 
in memory of his wife, Jane 
who died 3rd October 1875 aged 60 years 

11. Here lieth the body of 
John Black, late of Ballycarry 
who departed this life the 3rd 
of December 1807 aged 57 years 

11a. In loving memory of a dear husband & father 
Kevin Black, late of Clacklugh & Dublin 
died 28th Jan 1990 
On his soul sweet Jesus have mercy 

11b. an unmarked stone in this plot 

11c. The Burying Ground of 
Arch d Morrison of Kincall* 
Here lieth the remains of Jane Morrison, 
his wife, who departed this life the 
15th Dec 1827 aged 56 yrs 
Also, Catherine Hunter, his daughter 
who departed this life the 3rd day of 
Nov 1830 aged 27 years 

12. Erected in fond memory of 
John Anderson - Shandragh 
drowned 11. 7. 1892 aged 67 yrs 
His daughter, Mrs. McConnaghie 
died 21. 5. 1895 aged 33 yrs 
and of his son, James 
died 21. 1. 1900 aged 33 yrs 
Michael Anderson died 8th Sept 1968 
aged 73 yrs 
his wife Elizabeth 
died 18 Sep 1991 aged 78 yrs 
their dau Annie died 19th Mar 1954 aged 4 yrs 
13. A wooden cross - R I P (no other marking) 

14. OUIG 
McFaul, Brendan 
died 7 - 12 - 91 

15. Of your charity pray for the repose of the souls of 
James Black of Ouig 
who died 20th April 1874 
his wife Ann Black 
died 15th Jan 1881 
Ellen McFaul 
died 29 Dec 1903 
her husband Alexander McFaul 
died 4th Nov 1905 

16. Neil McKretrick’s Burying Place 

17. James Horran’s Burying Ground 
of Ogue Here lyeth the body of 
Susanna Horran who departed this life 
the 15th of May 1812 aged 77 yrs 

18. A Sailor of the Great War 
“Known unto God” 

19. J. J. Walton 
Petty Officer 2nd Cl RN 130152 
13 January 1915 

20. Three Sailors of the Great War 
HMS VIKNOR 
13 January 1915 
“Known unto God” 

21. Three Sailors of the Great War 
HMS VIKNOR 
13th January 1915 
“Known unto God” 

22.McCurdy 
Brockley 
In loving memory of Dan 
who died 31 July 1982 aged 87 yrs 
and his daughter Mary Margaret 
who died 23rd April 1946 aged 7 1/2 yrs 
His wife, Tessie 
who died 17 Aug 1990 aged 77 yrs 

23. Pray for the soul of 
Daniel McCurdy Glackaharan 
who died 8th April 1913 
and his wife Margaret McCurdy 
who died 5th June 1952 aged 92 yrs 
and son Daniel Francis 
who died 18 Nov 1983 aged 82 yrs 

24. Patrick McCurdey’s Burying Ground (this stone is lying on top of #23) 
of South Kinraver 
Here lieth the remains of his daughter Catrine 
who departed this life 21 Sept 1807 aged 22 yrs 

25. In memory of ------ Cecil 
Vincent loving husband & father 
drowned 21st Jan 1983 aged 41 yrs 

26. Here lieth the body of 
Neal McCurdy who departed this life 
Jul 24th 1779 aged 56 yrs 

27. Here lieth the body of 
Daniel McCurdy late of Kilpatrick 
who departed this life the 
5th of May 1818 aged 63 yrs 

28. Erected by Charles McCurdy 
to the memory of his father 
Francis McCurdy who died 
10th Oct 1804 aged 42 yrs 
Also John McCurdy son of Dugal McCurdy 
of Ballycarry died 24th Dec 1808 aged 4 yrs 
Peggy McCurdy 21 Feb 1829 aged 14 yrs 
Nancy McCurdy 26 Feb 1835 aged 14 yrs 

29. Of your charity pray for the souls of (also 4 unmarked stones in this plot) 
Alex r Black Kinraver 
Also his wife Mary 
and their son John 
died 6th July 1934 

30. Erected by Dunkin Black 
in memory of his father, John 
late of Middle bally ghaol 
who departed this life 
20th Jan 1837 aged 87 yrs 
Also his mother, Mary 
1st April 1840 aged 80 yrs 

31. Kelly - Coolangrock (there are 5 unmarked stones in this plot) 
Margaret 18 3 25 
Charlie 13 4 48 
John 1 8 57 
David 4 4 86 

32. unmarked stone 

33. unmarked stone 

34. This stone erected to the memory of 
Arch d Christey, late of Cabbal Bay 
by his son, Michael of Drumnahairan 
1827 

35. Erected by James McFall of Byan---- 
in memory of his daughter, Nancy McFall 
died in May ---- 
Also his mother, Nancy McFall 
died March 1811 aged 61 years 

36. In memory of 
Sarah McQuilkin 
died 2nd Oct 1968 
Her husband Daniel 
died 22 April 1976 

37. Erected to the memory of 
John Wilkinson of Ballycarry 
who died 27th Jan 1863 aged 72 yrs 
Also his father Dan l 
who died 22nd January 1849 aged 85 yrs 

38. Pray for the souls of 
James McCouaig 
died 16th Jan 1928 
his wife Mary Ann 
died 6th Aug 1936 
their son Robert 
died 1st Feb 1942 

39. In loving memory of 
Michael Alexander McQouaig 
Mount Grand 
died 21st Feb 1977 aged 86 yrs 

40. In loving memory of 
John McCouaig - Carravindoon 
died 1916 aged 75 yrs 
Also his daughter Florence Smyth Park 
died 17th Nov 1975 aged 86 yrs 
and her son John 
died 4th Mar 1942 aged 16 yrs 

41. Here lieth the body of (this ston lying on plot #40) 
Neal McQuaig who departed this life 
March the 17 aged 74 - year 1799 

42. Erected by Laughlin McCurdy 
in memory of his beloved wife 
Mary McCurdy Late of Belfast 
who died 2nd Nov 1922 aged 56 yrs 
The above named Laughlin McCurdy 
who died 1948 aged 77 yrs 
His daughter Mary (Lily) McCouaig 
Mount Grand who died 
3rd July 1977 aged 76 years 

43. Here lieth the body of 
Patrick Anderson late of Balnavargan 
who departed this life 
June the 5th 1800 aged 30 yrs (may be 50 yrs) 
44. In loving memory of 
Margaret Mary Scott 
beloved wife of John J. Scott 
who died 7th Dec 1928 aged 28 yrs 

45. Hear lies the body of 
John Anderson late of Kinkeel 
who departed this life 
Jan the 12th 1810 aged 87 yrs 
Erected by his son Michael 

46. Here lyeth the body of 
James mcMullan who departed this life 
14th --- 1766 aged 3 yrs son to 
John McMullan ----------- 
from the County of Londonderry 

47. Here lieth the body of 
John McQuig late of Ouig 
who departed this life 
Feb 22, 1824 aged 38 yrs 

48. In memory of 
James McCurdy 
died 27 Aug 1951 
his son Patrick 
died 12th Jul 1930 
Also his son Joseph 
died 6th June 1945 

49. An appointed Burying Place for 
Daniel McCarter of Ballyno and his family 
Here lieth the body of the said 
Daniel McCarter 
who departed this life Sept 4th 1816 aged 79 

50. In loving memory of 
John McCurdy 
died 20 May 1938 aged 73 yrs 
His wife Ellen 
died 12th Feb 1959 aged 78 yrs 
their son James 
died 14th March 1977 

51. S. P. McCurdy 
Seaman Corps LI SX 181806 
12 April 1943 aged 24 
HMS EUROPA 

52. McCurdy - Ouig 
Alex 4 - 2 - 76 

53. Martin Horans Burying Place 
Here lieth the body of his son 
John Horan who departed this life in 
July 1793 aged 3 quarters 

54. Sacred to the memory of 
Letitia McCouaig late of Ouig 
who departed this life on the 
23rd June 1871 aged 13 yrs 
Neal died 16 Aug 1942 
his wife Josephine 
died 24 Dec 1969 

55. Pray for the repose of the soul of 
Tony died 27 March 1984 aged 60 yrs 
McCuaig 

56. Pray for the soul of 
Neil McFaul 
died 24th March 1964 
His wife Mary 
died 18 May 1992 aged 88 yrs 

57. McFaul 
Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on the souls of 
Daniel who died 6th June 1948 (may be 1940) 
And his wife Mary Ann 
who died 3rd May 1965 
Also their sons 
Dan who died 25 Jan 1973 
and James who died 10 Dec 1976 
and John Joseph who died 10 Dec 1976 
and Charles Fulton who died 10 July 1983 

58. An appointed Burying Place for 
Hugh McKague and family 
Here lyeth the body of 
Ann McKague who departed this life 
6th of June 1811 aged 5 years 

No longer in the cemetery but on a transcript located on Rathlin Island. Note from Maryl - This stone is said to have fallen over on its face. 

Daniel McKinley’s Burying Place* 
of Cregmacagan 
Here lieth his son Pat k 
who died August 9, 1779 aged 18 


Cemetery Inscriptions from Rathlin Island 
no date (received from Kathryn McFaul of Rathlin) 

Pray for the soul of 
Neil McFaul 
died 24th March 1964 
his wife, Mary died 18 May 1992 aged 88 yrs 

McCuaig 
Pray for the repose of the soul of Tony 
died 27th March 1984 aged 60 years 

Sacred to the memory of 
Letitia McCouaig 
late of Ouig 
who departed this life on the 
23rd of June 1874 aged 13 years (may be 1871) 

Neal died 16th Aug 1942 
his wife Josephine 
died 24th 1989 

Martin Horans Burying Place 
Here lieth the body of his son 
John Horan who departed this life in 
July 1793 aged 3 quarters 

McCurdy - Ouig 
Alex 2.2.76 (may be 4.2.76) 

An Appointed Burying place for 
Hugh McKague and Family 
here lieth the body of 
Ann McKague who departed this life the 
6th of June 1811 aged 5 years 

Jesus Have Mercy on the Soul of 
Daniel who died 6th June 1940 (may be 1948) 
and his wife Mary Ann 
who died 3rd May 1965 
also their sons 
Dan who died 25th January 1973 
and James who died 10th December 1976 
and John who died 10 December 1976 
and Charles Fulton who died 10 July 1983 

Daniel McKinley’s Burying Place (this stone no longer in cemetery 
of Cregmacagan as of 06 Sep 1993) Pat Townsend 
Here lieth his son Pat’k 
who died August 9, 1799 aged 18 

In Loving Memory of 
John McCurdy 
died 20th may 1938 aged 73 years 
his wife Ellen 
died 12th Feb 1959 aged 78 years 
their son James 
died 14th March 1977 aged 66 years 

S. P. McCurdy 
Seaman RIVPS LISX 181806 
HMS EUROPA 
12th April 1943 aged 24 

Here lieth the body of 
Patrick Anderson late of Balnavargan 
who departed this life 
June the 5th 1806 aged 50 years (may be 1800) (may be 30 years) 

In loving memory of 
Margaret Mary Scott 
Beloved wife of John J. Scott 
who died 7th December 1926 aged 28 years (may be 1928) 

Here lieth the body of John Anderson 
leat of Kinkeel who departed this life 
Jan’r the 12th 1810 aged 87 years 
Erected by his son Mich’l 

This stone erected to the memory of 
Arch’d Christy 
late of Cabbal Bay 
by his son Michael of Drumaharran 
1827 

Here lyeth the body of 
James McMullen 
who departed this life the 14th ---- 1736 aged 3 years 
son to John McMullan from the County of Londonderry 

Here lieth body of 
John McQuig 
late of Ouig 
who departed this life 
February the 22nd 1824 aged 38 years 

In memory of 
James McCurdy 
died 27th August 1951 
his son Patrick 
died 12th July 1930 
also his son Joseph 
died 6th July 1945 

An Appointed Burying Place for 
Daniel McCarter of Ballyno 
and his family 
here lieth the body of the said Daniel McCarter 
who departed this life Sept 4th 1816 aged 79 

Erected by James McFall of Byan---- 
in memory of his daughter 
Nancy McFall 
died in May ---- 
Also his mother Nancy McFall 
died March 1811 aged 61 years 

In memory of 
Sarah McQuilkin 
died 2nd October 1968 
her husband Daniel 
died 22nd April 1976 

Erected by Dunkin Black 
in memory of his father 
John late of Middle Bally ghaol 
who departed this life 
20th Jan 1837 aged 87 years 
Also his mother Mary 
1st April 1840 aged 80 years 

In memory of 
Vincent Cecil 
Loving husband and father 
drowned 21st Jan 1983 aged 41 years 
Here lieth the body of 
Neal McCurdy 
who departed this life 
Jul 24th 1779 aged 56 years 

Erected by Laughlin McCurdy 
in memory of his beloved wife 
Mary McCurdy (late of Belfast) 
who died 2nd November 1922 aged 50 (may be 56 yrs) 
the above named 
Laughlin McCurdy 
who died 1948 aged 77 years 
his daughter Mary (Lily) McCouig 
(Mount Grand) 
who died 3rd July 1977 aged 76 years 

Kelly - Coolnagrock (also five unmarked stones) 
Margaret 18.3.25 
Charlie 13.4.48 
John 1.8.57 
David 4.4.86 

Pray for the soul of 
Daniel McCurdy - Glackaharan 
who died 8th April 1919 
and his wife 
Margaret McCurdy 
who died 5th June 1952 aged 97 years 
and son Daniel Francis 
who died 18th Nov 1983 aged 82 years 

Flat stone in same plot 

Patrick McCurdys Burying ground of South Kinraver 
here lieth the remains of his daughter 
Catrine who departed this life 
21 Sept 1807 aged 22 years 

McCurdy - Brockley 
in living memory of Dan 
who died 31st July 1982 aged 87 years 
and his daughter Mary Margaret 
who died 23rd April 1946 aged 7 1/2 years 

James Horrans Burying Ground of Ougue 
her lyeth the body of Susana Horran 
who departed this life the 
15th of May 1812 aged 77 years 

The Burying ground of 
Archibald Morrison of Kincael 
here lyeth the remains of 
Jane Morrison his wife 
who departed this life the 
15th Dec 1827 aged 56 years 
Also Catherine Hunter 
his daughter who departed this life 
3rd day November 1830 aged 27 years 

ANDERSON 

Sacred Heart of Jesus 
Have Mercy on the souls of 
Patrick Anderson 
The Station Rathlin Island 
who died 9th February 1970 
and his wife Mary 
who died 16th July 1970 

Erected to the memory of 
John Wilkinson of Ballyeary 
who died 27 Jan 1863 aged 72 years 
Also his father Dan’l who died 
28th January 1849 aged 83 years (may be 85 years) 

Pray for the souls of 
James McCouaig 
died 16th Jan 1926 (may be 1928) 
his wife Mary Ann 
died 6th August 1936 
their son Robert 
died 1st Feb 1942 

All in one plot 

In loving memory of 
Michael Alexander McCouaig 
Mount Grand 
died 21st Feb 1977 aged 86 years 

(flat slate - hand carved) 
Here lieth the body of 
Neal McQuaig 
who departed this life 
March the 17th aged 74 Year 1799 

In loving memory of 
John McCouaig - Carrivandoon 
died 1916 aged 75 years 
also his daughter 
Florence Smyth Park 
died 17th Nov 1975 aged 86 years 
and her son John 
died 4th March 1942 aged 16 years 

Here lieth the body of 
Daniel McCurdy 
late of Kilpatrick 
who departed this life the 
5th of May 1818 aged 63 years 

Erected by Charles McCurdy 
to the memory of his Father 
Francis McCurdy 
who died 10th Oct 1804 aged 42 years 
Also John McCurdy 
son to Dugal McCurdy of Ballycarry 
died 24th Dec 1808 aged 4 years 
Pegy McCurdy 
21 Feb 1829 aged 14 years 
Nancy McCurdy 
26 Feb 1855 aged 14 years (may be 1835) 

Of your charity (also 4 unmarked stones in this plot) 
Pray for the souls of 
Alex’r Black 
Kinraver 
also his wife Mary 
and her son John 
died 6th July 1934 

Here erected by John Weit of Kinkeal 
in memory of his father Alex’r 
who departed this life 
8th Nov 1840 aged 56 years 
Also his son James 
who departed this life 22nd May 1811 aged 24 years 

Here ----- 
lieth the ----- 
body of Dan ‘l Weir* 
who departed this life the 
30th day of May 1774 aged 64 years 

Of your charity pray for the 
repose of the souls of 
James Black of Ouig 
who died 20th April 1874 
his wife Ann Black 
died 15th Jan 1881 
Ellen McFaul 
died 29th Dec 1903 
her husband 
Alexander McFaul 
died 4th Nov 1905 

In fond remembrance of 
John Anderson - Shanndragh 
drowned 17.7.1892 aged 7? years (may be 67 yrs) 
his daughter Mrs. McConaghie 
died 21.5.1895 aged 33 years 
and of his son James 
died 21.1.1900 aged 33 years 
(Now includes) 
Alec Anderson - Craiggmacagan 
died ------ 
also includes (06 Sep 1993) 
Michael Anderson 
died 8th Sept 1968 aged 73 years 
his wife Elizabeth 
died 18 Sept 1991 aged 78 years 
their daughter Annie 
died 19th Mar 1954 aged 4 years 

Here lieth the body of 
John Black late of Ballycarry 
who departed this life the 
3rd Dec 1807 aged 57 years 

Erected by Daniel Black 
in memory of his wife Jane 
who died 3rd October 1875 aged 60 years 

Pray for the souls of 
John Black - Glacklugh 
died 6th Jan 1920 aged 88 years 
and his son James 
died 15th March 1919 aged 50 years 
also his grand daughter Kate 
died 4th March 1920 aged 22 years 

---- lieth the body of 
Daniel McCurdy late of Clagin 
who departed this life 
2nd November 1832 aged 69 years 

In memory of 
Bridget Cecil 
a loving wife and mother 
died 11th Sept 1977 aged 64 years 
(also now includes husband Dougald 
5 May 1987 (may be 1985) 

A Sailor of the Great War 
Royal Navy 
Known Unto God 

Erected in the memory of 
Mary wife of James Williamson 
late of Cable 
who departed this life 
16th Oct 1868 aged 65 years 
Also his son Charles 
who died at Demerara 
17th Sept 1864 aged 25 years 

In loving memory of 
our dear mother 
Leah McCourt 
died 16th June 1982 
God Bless 

Erected by Andrew Hardison 
in memory of his wife Ellen 
who died 16th August 1878 aged 75 years 

HW Holder 
Stoker 1st Class 2806 76 
HMS RACOON 
9th January 1918 age 41 

RICAPELLA 
SEROLTO IL 12 ACOSTO 1940 

MORTO PERLA PATRIA 

Three Sailors of the Great War 
HMS VICNOR 
13th January 1915 

Known Unto God 

Three Sailors of the Great War 
HMS VICNOR 
13th January 1915 

Known Unto God 

J J Walton 
Petty Officer 2nd RN1301152 
HMS VICNOR 
13th January 1915 

A Sailor of the Great War 
Royal Navy 

Known Unto God 

65 7674 Sergent 
R A Ashmore 
OBSERVER 
Royal Air Force 
6th July 1942 age 28 
His life treasured memory 

In loving memory of 
John Smyth Park 
died 2nd Nov 1974 aged 87 years 
His brother Duncan 
died 9th Jan 1962 aged 61 years 
and Daniel - Ballynagard 
died 3rd April 1977 aged 79 years 

Erected by 
HSH 
Prince Albrecht of Waldeck 
In memory of his faithful servant 
Carl Piel who died Sept ---- 

Albert Glass 
died 12 May 1- 79 
Aged 84 years 

The Gage Graves 

Sacred to the memory of 
Robert Gage Esq. 
Proprieter of this Island 
who departed this life on the 
11th Sept 1801 on the 62nd year of his age 

Richard Stewart Gage JP 
Captain 
Royal Dublin Fusiliers 
Oct 30th 1909 Aged 47 

Sacred to the memory of John 
Third son of the Revd Robert Gage 
who departed this life 
2nd Feb 1829 
in the 10th year of his age 

“HIC. JACET. JACOB 
VS. BODIUS. AND 
REAE . LISMORE 
EPISCOPI . FILIUS 
CUM . VXORE 
CHRISTINA . CA 
MPBELLA . QUI 
OBIT . NONO . DIE 
DECEMBer . AN 
NO . DOM. 1665 

Translation: Here lies James Boyd, the son of Andrew, Bishop of Lismore (and) 
his wife Christina Campbell; who died on the ninth day of December 
in the year of our Lord 1665. 

MEMINISSE 
Eliza R. Browning 
the beloved wife of 
Robert Easdale 
drowned by the wreck of the Cambria 
cast ashore on this Island and interred her 
age 24 years and 3 months and 6 days 

Excerpt - Parish of Rathlin Island, Diocese of Connor, Rev’d Rob’t Gage, Incumbent
Guy P LeStrange, Comm (unclear), See Grant of Tithes to Comms of First _________ dated 22nd May, 1756 (with leases of tithes), Sept 22, 1834

Information shared by McKinley researcher Catherine Emery. Any errors are mine, Maryl

Conventions: Townland in all caps, names of Occupiers in upper and lower case, 'r, 's, 'd, 'k and 'l are used to indicate a raised letter used for abbreviation. If
anyone reading this wants to send me the code to do this correctly, I'd be grateful. My probable ancestors are marked with an asterisk *. 

In the right column, I have added notes that HSMcK took on Film #258749, which includes Co Antrim, Ballycastle 1861, Ballymena 1862, Ballymoney 1861,
Belfast 1861, First General Valuation of Northern Ireland, Co Antrim, Vol. III, Barony of Cary, Union of Ballycastle, 136 Rathlin Island, page 102-105. 

1834 1861 
ROONIVOOLIN ROONIVOOLIN 
1 Alex'r Morrison* Alexander Morrison* 
2 Alex'r Weir* John McQuaig 
3 Ja's McKinley* John McKinley* 
4 Dan’l McCormick 
5 Neal McCay 

DEMESNE 
6 John Horan 
7 James Black 
8 Edw'd Horan 
9 Mich'l McQuig 
10 W Griffith 
1 Moses McQuig 

GLEBE Rev’d R Gage 

CARRAVINDOON CARRAVINDOON 
55 Neal McQuig Alexander Weir* 
Pat McHargy 
Mich’l McCurdy 
6 John Anderson 
Pat Morrison* Patrick Morrison* 
7 John McQuig 
8 Alex'r McQuig Robert McQuaig 
Neal McQuig 
Pat MacKinlay* 

CARRIVINALLY CARRIVINALLY 
9 Hugh McKey 
John Lamont 
60 Widow Morrison* Catherine Morrison* 
1 John Morrison* Archibald Morrison* 
Mich’l Hunter 

(line cut off on copy) 

CRAIGMACAGAN CRAIGMACAGAN 
47 Alex'r McPhall John McKinley* 
8 John Black 
Alex'r Chrisby 
9 Dan’l McArthur 
50 Neal McCurdy 
Alex'r McGuilkin 
Pat Craig 
1 Mountain Common to this town 

KINKEEL 
2 Alex'r Weir* (copied from tombstone at St Thomas Catholic Church, Rathlin in 1967 by Helen and Maryl: "Erected by John Weir of Kinkeal in memory of his
son Alexander who departed this life 8 November 1840 aged 56") 
Mich’l Anderson 
Doug’l Anderson 
Neal Craig 
3 Martin Horan 
Dug’l Anderson 
Mich’l Anderson 

BALLYGILL NORTH 
Alex'r McCurdy 
Archibald do ("do"meaning ditto = McCurdy) 
Archibald Black 
John McCurdy 
James Black 

BALLYGILL EAST 
8 Laughlin Black 
Bryan Black 
Widow Black 
John Black 
Dan’l Morrison* 

BALLYGILL MIDDLE 
9 Arch’d Morrison* (Also from St Thomas Catholic Church Cemetery, Rathlin: "The burying ground of Archie Morrison of 
Kincale. Here lieth the remains of Jane Morrison, his wife, who departed this life 15 December 1827 aged 56 years. Also 
Catherine Hunter, his daughter who departed this life the 3rd day of November, 1830 aged 27 years") 
Dan’l McCurdy Archibald Morrison is still in Ballygill Middle in 1861 
Arch’d McCurdy 
Alex'r McArthur 
Arch’d Black 

BALLYGILL SOUTH 
Pat’k Black 
Dan’l McFall 
11 Gilbert Black 
Laughlin Black 

12 Hugh McConoughy 

BALLYCARRY BALLYCARRY 
Doug'l McCurdy Donald McKinley* 
Jm's McQuilhen 
Dan’l McKinlay* (Also copied from St Thomas Catholic Church, Rathlin: "Daniel McKinley's burying place of Cregmacagan (note: Craigmacagan was a
settlement on Rathlin Island). Here lieth his son Patrick who died 2 August 1792 aged 18 years. Also the said Daniel who died 1811(?). Also his son James who
departed this life 22 May 1841 aged 24 years") 

40 Neal McCurdy 
Allan McQuinland 

1 Laughlin Black 

2 Arch’d Morrison* 

3 Pat’k McQuig 
Alex'r Anderson 
Wm Anderson 
Alex'r Black 

COOLNAGROCK 
4 Dan'l Black 
Dan’l McCoy 
Mich’l McQuilkin 
5 Wm McDonnell 

Signed this 30th day of August 1834 Guy P LeStrange?, Commissioner? 

Rathlin Island, County Antrim

Lewis Topographical Dictionary, 1837 (edited excerpt): RATHLIN, an Island and parish in the barony of Carey, county of Antrim, and province of
Ulster, 6-1/2 miles north from Ballycastle; containing 1,039 inhabitants. This island, which is situated off the northern coast of Antrim, nearly
opposite to the town of Ballycastle, and which is regarded as the Ricnia of Pliny and the Ricina of Ptolemy, has received various appellations from
different writers. By the Irish historians it is called Recarn, or Recrain; by Buchanan, Raclinda; by Mackenzie, Rachri; by Ware, Raghlin; and
Raghery by Hamilton, who derives that name from Ragh Erin, signifying the "fort of Erin." Its present name, which has been adopted by all modern
writers, is but a slight modification of that given to it by Ware. St. Comgall is said to have landed in this Island with the intention of founding a cell,
but was expelled by a band of soldiers. In the sixth century, however, a church was founded here by St. Columba, who placed it under the
superintendence of St. Colman. But the foundation of this religious establishment is by some writers attributed to Lugard Laither, who was abbot
about the year 590, and by others to St. Legene, abbot of Hy, by whom it was repaired about the year 630. In 790, a body of Danish pirates, in their
first descent upon the coast, laid waste the whole island and destroyed the monastery, which was soon afterwards restored; it was again destroyed in
973, by the Danes, who martyred the abbot, St. Feradach; since which time no notice of it occurs. King John granted the island to Alan of Galway,
and Robert Bruce, when driven from Scotland by the success of Baliol, his competitor for the crown, took refuge here, when he fortified himself in a
castle, of which a fragment still remaining bears his name. In 1558, the Earl of Sussex, then Lord-Deputy, attacked the Scots who had taken
possession of the island and expelled them with great slaughter; and so much did the place suffer from the repeated savages of the English and
Scots, that it is stated in a manuscript history of the country to have been totally uninhabited in 1580. 

The island is about six miles and a half in length, and about a mile and a half in breadth near the centre; the eastern position curves towards the main
land, from the nearest point of which it is about three miles distant, forming a small enclosure which is called Church Bay. It comprises, according to
the Ordnance survey, 3398-3/4 statute acres, including 30-1/2 acres under water: about three-fourths consist of rocks and stony pasture, and the
remainder of arable land of medium quality. It is fully exposed exposed to the northern ocean, and the tides running here with great impetuosity, the
sea is often so rough as frequently to deter tourists from visiting it. The western side is rocky and mountainous, and the appearance of the coast
strikingly magnificent; brown rocks and still darker masses of basaltic pillars are in some places contrasted with chalk cliffs; on the northern side the
precipices towards the sea rise to the height of 450 feet without any projecting base. The soil is a light mould, intermixed with fragments of basalt and
limestone; the valleys are rich and well cultivated, and arable land, meadows, and a variety of rocky pastures are scattered over the whole island.
The substratum of nearly the whole island is basalt and limestone, and on the eastern side especially it forms beautiful ranges of columns, differing
from those of the Giants' Causeway onlyin their dimensions, and in the greater variety of their arrangement, being found in the same places
perpendicular, horizontal, and curved. Considerable beds of hard chalk extend for some distance along the southern shore, and in some places, as
near as Church bay, where they are intersected by basaltic dikes, the hard chalk or limestone is found to possess phosphoric qualities; beds of
puzzolana are also found here, and on the shores a substance resembling pumice stone. Mr. Hamilton traces a vein of coal and iron-stone passing
under the sea from the mines at Ballycastle to this island, which he thinks has been separated from the opposite coast by some convulsion of nature.
Barley of excellent quality and cattle are sent off from this place; the former is chiefly purchased by Scottish merchants. Kelp was formerly made in
great quantities; its manufacture was the chief source of wealth to the inhabitants, but since the bleachers have discontinued the use of it, there is
very little demand; the chief markets for it are Campbelltown and Glasgow. There are two storehouses, one for kelp and one for barley, erected by
the Rev. Mr. Gage, proprietor of the island, for the purpose of collecting the produce of his tenantry; there is also a mill for grinding oats. The
horses, cattle, and sheep are all small. Church bay, though affording good anchorage, is entirely exposed to the violence of the western winds, during
the prevalence of which no vessel can ride here in safety; the only other havens are some small creeks on the eastern side of which the principal is
Port Usher, where the small craft belonging to the island shelter during the winter. The inhabitants of this part of the island are principally fisherman,
who make short voyages and carry on a little trade by way of barter; they all speak the English language; but in the western part of the island the
Irish language is universal, and the inhabitants, from want of intercourse with strangers, have many peculiarities; they are a simple, laborious, and
honest people, entertaining an ardent affection for their island, which alone they regard as their country, and speak of Ireland as of a foreign land.
They are very dexterous in seeking for the nests of sea fowl, for which purpose they swing themselves down the face of the precipices by means of a
rope secured to a stake on the summit. Both Catholics and Protestants generally live together in the greatest harmony, undisturbed by the difference
of religion; they frequently intermarry; scarcely was an individual ever known to emigrate formerly, but many young men have gone to America of
late years. There is neither any town nor regular village; the dwellings of the inhabitants are irregularly scattered throughout the island. The
proprietor, the Rev. R. Gage, is constantly resident and acts as magistrate. A coast-guard station for one officer and six men, one of the eight that
constitute the district of Ballycastle, has been established here. 

The living is a rectory, in the diocese of Connor and in the patronage of the Bishop; the tithes amount to 60 pounds, which is augmented with 27.14
pounds from Primate Boulter's fund. The glebe-house has been condemned as unfit for residence, and the curate has a house and garden rent-free
provided by the incumbent, who pays him a stipend of 60 pounds. The glebe comprises 15 acres, valued at 18.15 pounds per ann., making the gross
income of the benefice 106.9 pounds. The church, towards the erection of which the late Board of First Fruits contributed a gift of 800 pounds, is a
neat small edifice with a square tower, erected in 1815. The R. C. chapel is a plain building. About 180 children are taught in three public schools.
There are some slight remains of the ruined fortress called Bruce's castle, of the original foundation of which there is nothing upon record. Nearly in
the centre of the island are some small tumuli; in one of these was found a small stone coffin, near which was an earthen vessel, and a considerable
number of human bones; and on the small plain where these tumuli are placed have been found brazen swords, spear-heads, and a large fibula, which
are deposited in the museum of Trinity College, Dublin. Near the Black Rock, on the south of Church bay, are four remarkable caverns, which,
though penetrating a basaltic mass and at a point remote from any calcareous formation, have calcareous stalactites depending from the roof, which
by their continued dropping have deposited an incrustation, about an inch in thickness, on the floor beneath. 

Rathlin Island is in Co Antrim, Ulster Province, in 1853 there was both a Church of Ireland and a Roman Catholic church, civil parish was Rathlin, Church of Ireland
records start 1845. 

Surname Origins

Source: Go Ireland - Genealogy 

Though Tobin is not an indigenous Gaelic Irish name the family may be regarded as completely hibernicized. Originally of
Aubyn in France, they were first called de St. Aubyn. They came to Ireland in the wake of the Norman invasion and by 1200
they were settled in Counties Tipperary and Kilkenny, whence they spread in course of time to the neighbouring counties of
Waterford and Cork. While not really numerous compared with some others in the same category, such as Walsh, Roche and
Power, they are still to be found to-day in considerable numbers in the counties mentioned above, but very few in any other
part of the country. The Tobins became so influential in Co. Tipperary that in mediaeval times the head of the family was
known as Baron of Coursey, though this was not an officially recognized title. Clyn in his Annals states that in the fourteenth
century the Tobins were a turbulent sept more dreaded by the English settlers than the native Irish. The place Ballytobin near
Callan (Co. Kilkenny) took its name from them. No outstanding person of the name appears in the pages of Irish Political,
military or cultural history, but James Tobin represented Fethard in the Parliament of 1689. Tobin appears frequently as a
name in the Ormond archives and there have been also one or two minor poets in the family. Several Tobins were among the
Wild Geese. A branch of the family, returning to the country of its origin, became established at Nantes where so many Irish
emigrant familles settled. The best known of this branch was Edmund, Marques de Tobin (1692-1747), who was killed in action
in the War of Austrian Succession while in the service of Spain. Another branch of the Irish Tobins settled in Newfoundland
and have prospered there. 

(O)Doherty, (MacDevitt) Doherty is an example of a surname in which the resumption of its prefix O during the recent century
has been very marked. Comparing the statistics of 1890 with 1955 we find that in the former year in Ireland out of 465 births
registered only eight I.e less than two per cent were O'Doherty: at the present time the proportion is approximately fifty per
cent I.c those calling themselves Doherty and O'doheryt are about equal. Alternative spellings such as Dogherty and Dougherty
are rarely met with nowadays. In Munster Doherty is often not O Dochartaigh but O Dubhartaigh: this is more correctly
anglicized Doorty in west Clare. In Oriel Dorritty is an occasional synonym. Many Irish surnames in their anglicized forms
present problems in regard to their origin. Doherty, however, is simple and straightforward. In Irish O Dochartaigh, which is
said to be derived from the word dochartach meaning obstructive, this large and powerful sept is of the same stock as the
O'Donnells. Originating in the barony of Raphoe, Co. Donegal, the O'Doherty chiefs extended their territory till they became
Lords of Inishowen in the fourtenth century, but they were greatly reduced as a result of the ill-timed rebellion of Sir Cahir
O'Dougherty in 1608. The great majority of the present day bearers of the name live, or at least were born, in Donegal or the
areas adjacent to that county. Their numbers give them the fifteenth place in the list of the commonest names in Ireland.
>From David O'Doherty, a chief of Cinel Conaill, who was killed in 1208, descend the MacDavitts (in Irish MacDaibhid, son of
David), who are numerous in Inishowen. Notable people of the name have been very numerous in every walk of Irish life. Sir
Cahir O'Dougherty (1687-1608), has already been mentioned; we may also cite in politics John Dougherty (1783-1850), M.P.,
notorious as the Crown prosecutor in the Doneraile Conspiracy case and subsequently Lord Chief Justice, and Kevin Izod
O'Dhoerty (1823-1905), Young Irelander; in art William James O'Doherty (1835-1868), the sculptor; and in literature Thomas
Dogherty (d. 1805), legal writer, and Mary Anne O'Doherty (1826-1910), the wife of Kevin Izod O'Doherty. 

Foley is an old Irish surname about which some confusion has arisen because there is an important family of Worcestershire
called Foley, which is usually regarded as English, though Bardsley thinks it was originally Irish. for example it is the arms of
this English family which are often erroneously ascribed to Gaelic Foleys. In this article these English Foleys can be
disregarded, though it is not unlikely that a few of them came to Ireland at various times as settlers. The Irish Foleys are very
numerous and this name is among the sixty most common in Ireland with an estimated population of about ten thousand
souls. Most of these are found in the original habitat of the sept, viz. Co. Waterford, and they have spread across the southern
part of the country to Counties Cork and Kerry. The name is presumably derived from the Irish word foghladha meaning a
plunderer, and is written O foghladha, being anglicized more phonetically than the usual Foley as Fowloo in some places in Co.
Waterford, and sometimes grotesquely as Fowler. The name is never seen with its prefix O nowadays. The surname MacSharry
has been anglicized Foley in some parts of Ulster in the mistake belief that it is derived from the word searrach - a fool. John
Henry Foley (1818-1874), sculptor, many of whose statues adorn the streets and squares of Dublin, attained international fame
in this sphere; his brother Edward Foley (1814-1874) was also a talented sculptor. Rev. Daniel Foley (1815-1874), of Dublin
University, compiled and published an Irish Dictionary . Samuel Foley (1655-1695) was another prominent Protestant
ecclesiastic. The Catholic church has an eminent bearer of the name in Maoliosa O'Foley, Archbishop of Cashel, who died in
1131. In modern times Alan James Foley (1835-1897) made a name as a singer under the pseudonym of Signor Foli. 

(O)Lennon, Linnane, Leonard, (Linnegar; MacAlinion) The normal form of Lennon in Irish is O Leannain, or O Lionnain,
but confusion arises because these Gaelic names have been anglicized Leonard and Linnane, while the Irish surnames O
Lonain (Lenane) and even O Luinin (Linneen) are also sometimes Lennon or Leonard in English. Of these Lennane, or
Linane, belongs to the Corca Laoidhe group and was situated near Glandore Harbour. O Leanain in, but not of, Hy Many, is
still found in Co. Galway as Lennon, while the same name belonging also to a Hy fiachra sept of Co. Mayo is now usually
called Leonard: their position is shown on the Connacht map at the end of the book. Historically O'Lennon of Fermanagh is
the only Lennon sept of importance. They were erenaghs of Lisgoole near Enniskillen and produced many distinguished
ecclesiastics: no less than six of them are mentioned by the Four Masters as priors or canons of Lisgoole between 1380 and
1466; while to-day the name is closely associated with the church, an unusually large proportion of persons of the name being
priests. Apart from these the most noteworthy are John Lennon (1768-1846), whose daring feats with his ship Hibernia are part
of American history 1812-14; John Brown Lennon (1850-1923) the American Labour leader; and John Lennon, an outstanding
member of the Beatles group, assassinated in 1980, became well known outside Ireland not only as a talented musician but also
for his connection with the Peace Movement. O Luinin, mentioned above, also belongs to Co. Fermanagh and is now almost
indistinguishable from O Leannain, except where, strangely enough, it has been anglicized Linnegar. Leonard, itself a
well-known indigenous English surname, is remarkable in Ireland for the fact that it is used as the synonym or anglicized
equivalent of a greater number of quite distinct Gaelic surnames than almost any other. In addition to the three distinct
sept names mentioned above, there is the royal family of Mac Giolla Fhinnein - son of the follower of St. Finnian - also
anglicized as MacAlinion. >From this stock come many of our Irish Leonards, at any rate those associated with West Ulster
(Donegal and Fermanagh). they are descended from Giolla Finnein O'Muldory, as are the once powerful family of O'Muldory
whose head was chief or lord of Lough Erne. Another family which sometimes, rather strangely, anglicized their name as
Leonard was that of MacGiolla Seannain (the saint in this case is St. Senan, not St. Finnian) this name being corrupted in Irish
to Maguinn-seanain and usually anglicized as Nugent. The Registrar-General's returns show that, in addition to the foregoing,
Lenaghan and even Nanany are found as synonymous with Leonard in English. No person of the name Leonard has
distinguished himself in the political, military or cultural life of Ireland (or for that matter in England either). 

It must be emphasized at once that the name Lynch, which is among the hundred commonest surnames in Ireland, is of dual
origin. Lynch is used as the anglicized form of the native Gaelic names O Loingsigh, and also of the Norman de Lench. the
Norman family of Lynch, though far less numerous than their Gaelic name-sakes, have been more prominent on account of
their predominance in the affairs of Galway city, where they were the most influential of the "Tribes". In the hundred and
seventy years which elapsed between 1484, when Dominick Lynch procured the city's charter from Richard III, and 1654, when
Catholics were debarred from civic offices, no less than eighty-four mayors of Galway were of the family of Lynch. Dominick's
son, Stephen Lynch, was in turn responsible for obtaining from Pope Innocent VIII the Bull which established that unique
ecclesiastical institution, the Wardenship of Galway. Many of the Wardens were Lynches. The Galway family also produced a
number of distinguished ecclesiastics, the most famous of whom were Rev. John Lynch (1599-1673), the author of Cambrensis
Eversus: the centenarian Archbishop of Tuam, Most Rev. James Lynch, D.D. (1611-1676), the author of many works in
Spanish ; and Rev. Dominic Lynch (d. 1697), the Dominican philosopher. Of all the Galway Lynches the one most likely to be
remembered by any visitor to that city is James Lynch, the stern mayor who in 1493 felt it his duty to hang his own son for an
offence for which the penalty was death: the spot where this event took place, known as the gate of the Old Jail, with its tragic
inscription, is still pointed out and the story retold. it should be noted, however, that some modern Galway historians have
suggested that this story may be apocryphal. Nearby is Lynche's Castle which was built in 1320. After the coming of the
Normans, the Leyns (Lynch) family was first settled in Meath, where Lynch's knock, the site of a battle in 1647, perpetuates
their occupation. It was a branch of this family that migrated to Galway in the early fifteenth century. The arms illustrated on
Plate XIX are those of the Lynches of Galway. Branches of this family have been prominent among the modern landowners in
Co. Galway under the hyphenated names Lynch-Blosse and Blosse-Lynch. the Gaelic Lynches, formerly often called O'Lynch,
comprise a number of quite distinct and independent septs, most of which were submerged as such after the Anglo-Norman
invasion but whose descendants are still to be found in their several places of origin. The Thomond sept produced Clare-born
Patrick Lynch (1757-1818), linguist and Gaelic scholar. The Sligo sept has Alan O'Lynch, noted Dominican Prior of Kildare
(1411), to its credit. From that of Breffny came Dr. John Joseph Lynch (1816-1888), Bishop of Toronto, the first Catholic
ecclesiastical dignitary to attend a British royal levee since the time of James II. Col. Charles Lynch (1736-1796), from whose
name the American word to lynch, or "lynch law", was coined, was son of another Charles Lynch, scion of the northern sept
whose head in early mediaeval times was chief of Dalriada. The Lynches of Co. Donegal are properly Mac Loingseachain
*Lynchehaun); those, O Loingsigh (of Lynch), now numerous in Cork, Kerry and Limerick, probably stem from the septs of
the name located in Corca; Laoidhe and in Owney. Thomas Lynch (1749-1779), the youngest of the signatories of the American
Declaration of Independence, was of an Irish family which had then been three generations in America. Count John Baptist
Lunch, a peer of France, was grandson of an officer who went to that country with James II: he lost all in the French revolution
but later recovered some of his property. General Isodore Lynch, who joined the revolutionary army, had a distinguished
military career in the French service. Patrick (Patricio) Lynch (1824-1886) "son of a wealthy Irish merchant" who first saw
service in the British navy, has been described as "the foremost Chilean naval hero". Finally we may mention Hannah Lynch
(1862-1904), a leading figure in the Ladies' Land. 

In Co.. Clare, the homeland of the MacNamaras, the name is very numerous. In fact in everyday speech it is usually
abbreviated to simple Mac: this is interesting, because another Mac name, MacMahon, comes first in the numerical list of Co.
Clare names, considerably ahead of MacNamara, which has second place, yet the abbreviation is never applied to MacMahon.
The sept of MacNamara was, after the O'Briens, the most important and powerful of the Dalcassians of Thomond. They were
hereditary marshals to the O'Briens and had the privilege of inaugurating the chief of the O'Briens who was, of course, often a
king. The sept was originally confined to a small territory, but by the end of the eleventh century they had become lords of
Clancullen (which comprises a great part of East Clare) and they are so described by the Four Masters many times at various
dates between 1099 and 1600. The sept in due course became two - the chief of West Clancullen (barony of Bunratty) being
MacNamara Fyne (i.e, fionn, fair), and the chief of East Clancullen (baronies of Upper and Lower Tulla) MacNamara Reagh
(i.e, riabhach, swarthy or grizzled). They were to a great extent dispossessed in the Cromwellian debacle, but one family,
resident until quite lately at Ennistymon, became Protestants and were extensive landlords up till the Land Act of 1903. The
history of Clare is full of the name MacNamara: among other notable acts they founded the Franciscan Abbey of Quin in
1402. After a period of obscurity they emerged into fame or notoriety in the eighteenth century. Donough MacNamara (d.
1814), better known by the Gaelic form of his name - Donnchadha Rua Mac Conmara - was born at Cratloe in East Clare,
educated as a priest, expelled, led a wild life and is one of the best known of the Gaelic poets. His contemporary, another
Clareman, Admiral James MacNamara (1768-1826) was tried for murder following a duel over a dog and was acquitted.
Thomas "Fireball" MacNamara was a duellist pur sang, whose career in France is reminiscent of the "Three Musketeers"; he
eventually became a highwayman as well as a Clare rebel and ended on the scaffold about the year 1710. Two other
MacNamaras were noteworthy in France at the time of the French Revolution, particularly Count MacNamara, naval
commander and diplomatist, who was assassinated in 1790 on account of his royalist sympathies. For a note on the name of
the well-known playwright Brinsley MacNamara see page 40. Mac Conmara, the Irish form of this name, is derived from the
words cu (hound) and na mara (of the sea). The forename Cumara was at one time found in connexion with the surname Mac
Conmara, and was the name of the eponymous ancestor of the sept, who was twenty third in descent from Cormac Cas. 

Though the name Morris is essentially English, it has been used, as also has Morrison, as an anglicized form of O Muirgheasa,
a sept of the Ui Fiachrach (Co. Sligo), where, however, the Norman form Morrissey is now rarely met with. O Muirghis is an
abbreviation of this; Morris is also used as an abbreviation of Fitzmaurice (in Irish Mac Muiris), the Fitzmaurices being
celebrated as a branch of the Geraldines and lords of Lixnaw in Kerry. Fitzmaurice was also the surname adopted by a branch
of the Prendergasts in Co. Mayo. The family of Morris whose arms are illustrated in Plate XXII are of Norman origin. when
they first came to Ireland they were known as de Marries, or by its Latin equivalent de Marisco (see Morrissey below). In 1485
a branch of this stock settled in Galway City where they became one of the "Tribes of Galway", and from that date until the
submergence of Catholic Ireland in Cromwell's time, they were prominent in the commercial and social activities of Galway,
though surprisingly few of them held municipal office: those who did so are recorded as mares, Mareis and Maries, but in no
case in the modern form Morris up to 1654, when the Catholic Corporation was suppressed. The Fitzmaurices of Kerry were
very prominent in the wars against the Elizabethan invaders in the sixteenth century, notably James Fitzmaurice (1530-1579),
two Thomas Fitzmaurices (1502-1590 and 1574-1639), and Patrick Fitzmaurice (1550-1600). Of men called Morris the best
known is Rev. Francis Orpen Morris (1810-1893), author of British Birds and other standard works on natural history, who was
born in Co. Cork. Hervey Montmorency Morres (1767-1839), Tipperary born officer in the Austrian and the French armies,
was a United Irishman and took a leading part in the 1798 insurrection. >From Galway there was Michael Morris (1827-1901)
the Judge, who was created a peer in his old age. Michael Morris, Lord Killanin, President of the International Olympic
Committee (1972-1980), is grandson of Michael Morris, the first holder of the title. 

Bohan (O) BOHAN, Bohane, BOHANNON Today Bohan is a fairly common name, found chiefly in countiesGalway and
Leitrim, while Bohane, is rare and confined to families of Co. Cork origin. These modern spelling distinctions are strong in the
"census" of 1659 Boughan appeared as one of the principal Irish names in West Carbery, Co. Cork, while Bohane was
numerous in Co. Leitrim. At that time the greatest number of people of the name were living in Co. Kildare: Boughan was,
after Kelly, the commonest name in the barony of Offaly in that county, having 40 families, compared with 26 for Byrne and
20 each for Dempsey, Doolin and Murphy. This is the area to which the name Behan (q.v.) belongs. The enumerators in the
1659 "census" were careless about spelling and it is possible that Beaghan and Boaghan could have been confused. It is 
definitely not a misprint for Beaghan, because the "census" states that 37 of these were spelt Boaghan and 3 Boghan. In the
Fiants of a hundred years earlier Beaghan and O'Beehan occur chiefly in Co. Kildare, O'Boughan is in Co. Cork, O'Bohen in
Co. Leitrim, while the O'Boughans in the lists again introduce an element of uncertainty being from the Offaly and north
Tipperary area. Bohan is Ó Buadhacháin in Irish, the root word from which it is derived being buadh, meaning victory. This
takes the form Bohannon in Clare and south Connacht. In Ulster Bohannon is a variant of Buchanan, a well known Scottish
surname, which has many synonyms including Mawhannon, MacWhannon and even sometimes Mawhinney. In Co. Cork some
families of Bohane have adopted the form Bowen. Bowen is normally Welsh (from Ap Owen) or a modern form of the Norman
surname de Bohun. The best known person of the name was Edward Bohane (1873-1940) who more than anyone else was
responsible for the remarkable progress in our own time of the old-established Royal Dublin Society. At the present time the
Breens are distributed widely throughout Ireland. They are always called simply Breen though originally they were both
MacBreens and O'Breens. The former, MacBraoin in Irish, were an Ossory sept seated near Knocktopher in Co. Kilkenny; but
after the Anglo-Norman invasion they were dispersed by the Walshes and sank in importance. Though in 1659 they were noted
as still numerous in Ossory - the prefix Mac had even then been dropped - Co. Wexford, adjacent to Co. Kilkenny, is the area
in which the name Breen is now chiefly found, and it is reasonable to assume that these are MacBreens. The most important
O'Breen (O Braion) sept in mediaeval times was that possessed of territory in Counties Westmeath and Offaly near
Athlone. Their chief was Lord of Brawney. As late as 1421 O'Breen of Brawney is mentioned in a contemporary document
with O'Conor and MacMorogh as a great chieftain of the Irish nation. The name Breen is seldom met with in that area to-day.,
but it is said to be now disguised there under the alias O'Brien. The infamous Jemmy O'Brien of 1798 notoriety was an
O'Breen , not an O'Brien of Thomond. It is also a fact that a comparable corruption occurred in the case of the O'Breens of
north connacht who in course of time became Bruen in Co. Roscommon, a name fairly common there now (which Breen is
not), and Browne in Mayo. William Browne (1777-1857), of Foxford, famous Argentine admiral, was possibly of the Connacht
O'Breens (see Browne). Finally the name has been common in Co.. Kerry, at least since the seventeenth century. Henry H.
Breen (1805-1882), the poet, was a Kerryman. Francis Breen, the 1798 rebel, was from Co. Wexford. The Brawney sept is
represented in history by Tighearnach O Braoin, the annalist, who died at Clonmacnois, where he was Abbot, in 1088, and by
Donal O'Breen, Bishop of Clonmacnois from 1303 to 1324. Elizabeth Breen was one of the Irish nuns arrested in France in
1793 during the Terror. Patrick Breen (d. 1808), whose diary of the Donner exploration party is remarkable for its stark
realism, was born in Ireland. The best known modern bearer of the name was Dan Breen, one of the most prominent fighters
on the Irish side during the War of Independence 1916-1921. 

(O)Doherty, (MacDevitt) Doherty is an example of a surname in which the resumption of its prefix O during the recent century
has been very marked. Comparing the statistics of 1890 with 1955 we find that in the former year in Ireland out of 465 births
registered only eight I.e less than two per cent were O'Doherty: at the present time the proportion is approximately fifty per
cent I.c those calling themselves Doherty and O'doheryt are about equal. Alternative spellings such as Dogherty and Dougherty
are rarely met with nowadays. In Munster Doherty is often not O Dochartaigh but O Dubhartaigh: this is more correctly
anglicized Doorty in west Clare. In Oriel Dorritty is an occasional synonym. Many Irish surnames in their anglicized forms
present problems in regard to their origin. Doherty, however, is simple and straightforward. In Irish O Dochartaigh, which is
said to be derived from the word dochartach meaning obstructive, this large and powerful sept is of the same stock as the
O'Donnells. Originating in the barony of Raphoe, Co. Donegal, the O'Doherty chiefs extended their territory till they became
Lords of Inishowen in the fourtenth century, but they were greatly reduced as a result of the ill-timed rebellion of Sir Cahir
O'Dougherty in 1608. The great majority of the present day bearers of the name live, or at least were born, in Donegal or the
areas adjacent to that county. Their numbers give them the fifteenth place in the list of the commonest names in Ireland. From
David O'Doherty, a chief of Cinel Conaill, who was killed in 1208, descend the MacDavitts (in Irish MacDaibhid, son of
David), who are numerous in Inishowen. Notable people of the name have been very numerous in every walk of Irish life. Sir
Cahir O'Dougherty (1687-1608), has already been mentioned; we may also cite in politics John Dougherty (1783-1850), M.P.,
notorious as the Crown prosecutor in the Doneraile Conspiracy case and subsequently Lord Chief Justice, and Kevin Izod
O'Doherty (1823-1905), Young Irelander; in art William James O'Doherty (1835-1868), the sculptor; and in literature Thomas
Dogherty (d. 1805), legal writer, and Mary Anne O'Doherty (1826-1910), the wife of Kevin Izod O'Doherty. 

The O'Donnells have always been both numerous and eminent in Irish life. they are of course chiefly associated with
Tirconnaill (Donegal) the habitat of the largest and best known O'Donnell sept; but, as the present distribution of persons of
the name implies, there were quite distinct O'Donnell septs in other parts of the country, two of which require special mention,
viz., that of Corcabaskin in West Clare, and another, a branch of the Ui Maine (Hy Many) in Co. Galway. All of these descend
from some ancestor Domhall (anglice Donal) and are O Domhnaill in Irish. The Donal particularized in the case of the great
Tirconnaill sept, who died in 901, was himself descended from the famous Niall of the Nine Hostages. Their predominance
only dates from the thirteenth century: prior to that they were located in a comparatively restricted area around Kilmacrenan,
Co. Donegal. With a total of nearly 13,000 the O'Donnells are among the fifty most common names in Ireland. They have
produced many illustrious figures in Irish history, as soldiers, churchmen, authors and politicians. The most famous was Hugh
Roe O'Donnell (Red Hugh) (1571-1602), chief of the Name, whose escape from captivity in Dublin Castle makes an adventure
story beloved of young and Old. After several brilliant victories over the English army he participated in the disaster at
Kinsale and, retiring to Spain, was poisoned, it is said, by one Blake, an English agent. Hugh Balderg O'Donnell (d.1704),
Daniel O'Donnell (1666-1735), Calvagh O'Donnell (d. 1566) and Manus O Donnell (d. 1654), were other soldiers of note in
Ireland and on the continent. Rory O'Donnell, first Earl of Tyrconnell, (1575-1608), of the "Flight of the Earls" and Sir Niall
Garv O'Donnell (1569-1626), whose activities in Ireland caused him to spend 27 years incarcerated in the Tower of London,
were close relatives of Red Hugh, as was the adventurous Mary Stuart O'Donnell (1608-1649). The Annals are full of the
exploits of O'Donnell chiefs and military leaders in the north-west of Ireland, while in more recent times notable O'Donnells
have been Frank Hugh O'Donnell, M.P. (1848-1916), John Francis O'Donnell (1837-1874), of the Nation and at least three
remarkable ecclesiastics, viz. Dr. James Louis O Donnell, bishop, "the apostle of Newfoundland", Father Hugh O'Donnell
(1739-1814), first P.P. of Belfast, and Cardinal Patrick O'Donnell (1856-1927), at one time descended from our Tirconaill
O'Donnells. In Irish O'Sullivan is O Suileabhain. The derivation of the name is in dispute among scholars. There is no doubt
that the root word is suil (eye), but whether it is to be taken as one-eyed or hawk-eyed must be left an open question. While not
quite as numerous as Murphy and Kelly, Sullivan, which is by far the commonest surname in Munster, comes third in the list
for all Ireland. Almost eighty per cent of the Sullivans (or O'Sullivans) in Ireland to-day belong to the counties of Cork and
Kerry, the remaining being mostly of Co. Limerick, or of the city of Dublin, in which, of course, families from all the four
provinces are found. Thus the O'Sullivans, as is almost always the case with the great Gaelic septs, are still concentrated in or
near their ancient homeland. It was not until after the Anglo-Norman invasion that the O'Sullivans came to the fore. Their
origin, however, is illustrious: descended from Eoghan (Owen) Mor, the father of the famous Oilioll Olum, they were with the
O'Callaghans, the MacCarthys and the O'Keefes, one of the leading families of the Munster Eoghanacht. Some at least of them
were lords of a territory near Cahir prior to the invasion: from 1200 onwards, however, they are to be found in the extreme
south-west of Munster. There they became very numerous and powerful, dividing into a number of branch septs of which
O'Sullivan Mor and O'Sullivan Beare were the most important. The former had his principal castle at Dunkerron on the shore
of Kenmare Bay, the latter was lord of the modern baronies of Beare and Bantry. Though seldom appearing in any of the
Annals before 1400, they were prominent in the sixteenth century. Outstanding at that period was Donal O'Sullivan Beare
(1560-1618), hero of the siege of Dunboy and particularly famous for his almost incredibly hazardous march to Ulster after the
disasters of the battle of Kinsale and the capture of Dunbly. His nephew, Philip O'Sullivan Beare (1590-1660), was a soldier in
the Spanish army, but is better known as a historian: his Historiae Catholicae Iberniae Compendium recounts the events of the
Elizabethan wars as told to him by his uncle and other participants. From a junior branch came Col. John William O'Sullivan
(b. 1700), close companion of "the Young Pretender" in his Rebellion of 1745. Since his time the name has been made famous
by many O'Sullivans and Sullivans. In the field of literature Owen Roe O'Sullivan (1748-1784) and Tadgh Gaolach O'Sullivan
(d. 1800) were two of the best of the eighteenth century Gaelic poets: Humphrey O'Sullivan (1780-1837) kept a most interesting
diary in Irish which has been partially published by the Irish Texts Society; the brothers A.M. Sullivan (1830-1884), and
T.D. Sullivan (1827-1914), as well as being authors of note, were leading Nationalist M.P.'s the former being a Young
Irelander in 1848. On the stage Barry Sullivan (1821-1891), and Charles Sullivan (1848-1887), were celebrated actors, and
Maureen O'Sullivan is famous to-day in the same sphere, while Sir Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900), of the Gilbert and Sullivan
operas, was of Irish descent. If we add, from a very different sphere, John L. Sullivan (1858-19187), perhaps the best known
pugilist of all time, we have recorded but a tithe of the O'Sullivans of note to be found not only in Ireland itself but also in the
Irish Brigades, in the French Revolution (on both sides) and in the history of the United States. O)Quinlan, quinlevan,
Kindellan Quinlan is the Munster form of the Gaelic O Caoindealbhain which, in Leinster, where the sept originated, was
usually anglicized as Kindellan, and in modern times as Conlan and Connellan (q.v.) They were of distinguished origin, being
of the southern Ui Neill, and the senior line of the descendants of Laoghaire, King of Ireland in St. Patrick's day. The sept,
originally located in north Meath, was much reduced by the Anglo-Norman invasion, but they retained property there until the
defeat of James II. At that time the form of the name in use in Co. Meath was Kindellan and this has been retained in Spain, 
the country in which they settled as exiles. The Kindellans have been prominent in Spain since then. John Ambrose Kindellan
(1750-1822) was a noted general in the Spanish army and General Alfredo Kindelan was an important member of Gen.
Franco's Cabinet in that country. The branch which settled in North Tipperary became Quinlan in English. The Quinlans are
among the more numerous Irish families in Co. Tipperary in the 1659 census and do not appear as such elsewhere in it.
Timothy Francis Quinlan (b. 1861), the Australian politician, was born in Co.. Tipperary. The name is now almost confined to
Munster, particularly Counties Cork, Limerick and Tipperary; in Clare it is also found but under the synonym Quinlevan. 

MacRory, Rogers, MacCrory In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, as evidenced by the Tudor Fiants, by the census of
1659 and other records, the name MacRory was both numerous and ubiquitous; now it is rare. This is no doubt partly due to
the fact that in the southern half of the country it has been turned into the common English name Rodgers or Rogers; it can
also be ascribed to the ephemeral nature, outside its own proper territory, to which reference will be made hereunder, of the
surname MacRory, I.e Mac Ruaidhri, son of Rory. This like MacTeige and MacCormac, was, at least up to the middle of the
seventeenth century, frequently used for one generation only. In Co. Clare, for example, many of the people who appear in the
records as MacRory were O'Briens, MacNamaras and MacMahons. Later some resumed their real patronymic but a
larger number became Rodgers, thus obscuring their Dalcassian origin. The true Gaelic sept of MacRory belongs properly to
Co. Tyrone. A branch of this was established in Co. Derry where they became erenaghs of Ballynascreen in the barony of
Loughlinsholin. Cardinal MacRory (1861-1945) was of this sept. MacRorys are still found in Counties Tyrone and in the
Connacht county of Leitrim, while MacCrory and MacGrory are synonyms in parts of Ulster. In the fourteenth century some
families of MacRory came to Ulster from Scotland as gallowglasses. If any descendants of these are left they are now
indistinguishable from the native Ulster MacRorys. 

Research Starting Points



Much of the information in these notes was gleaned from mail list postings by helpful genealogists. Conagher near Ballymoney in Co Antrim was
the ancestral home of President William McKinley’s family. The President was of Scotch-Irish heritage. The name evolved from the Scottish
MacKinlay to the Irish McKinley with John (the Trooper born abt 1671) McKinley’s move to Ireland as an English mercenary. President
McKinley’s paternal ancestors were from The Annie, Perthshire, Scotland, and eventually settled in Ireland. The first of the line to emigrate to
America was David McKinley, a weaver, the President’s GGG Grandfather, who in 1743 settled in York Co, Pennsylvania. 

The McKinley family was from Ballycastle, a sea-port, market and post-town, in the parish of Ramoan, and Rathlin, an island and parish, both places
located in the baroney of Carey, county of Antrim, and province of Ulster. The family originated in Scotland, possibly Grennock, and were
shipbuilders. If the second gathering of the McKinleys booklet is correct, the immigrant McKinleys, who settled in Ireland from Scotland arrived
about 1715 at Fair Head, Co Antrim near Ballycastle. The following inscriptions were copied from the crumbling headstones at St Thomas Catholic
Church, Rathlin Island in 1967 and probably belong to McKinley ancestors, although their relationship has not been documented. "Daniel
McKinley's burying place of Cregmacagan (note: Craigmacagan was a settlement on Rathlin Island). Here lieth his son Patrick who died 2 August
1792 aged 18, Also the said Daniel who died 1811(?)" 

The McKINLEYS also lived in Ballycastle, Co. Antrim. McKINLEYS came to U.S. (Meriden, CT) about 1851. By 1962, they were living on farms in
Postville, IA. 

"Erected by John Weir of Kinkeal (note: Kinkeal was a settlement on Rathlin Island) in memory of his son Alexander who departed this life 8
November 1840 aged 56 years. Also his son James who departed this life 22 May 1841 aged 24 years" 

"The burying ground of Archie Morrison of Kincale. Here lieth the remains of Jane Morrison, his wife, who departed this life 15 December 1827
aged 56 years. Also Catherine Hunter, his daughter who departed this life the 3rd day of November, 1830 aged 27 years" 


The ROGERS and McGREGOR families were from Co. Louth and came to U.S. (Watertown, NY) about 1825. Philip ROGERS about 1841
purchased 1600 acres in Chicago that is known today as ROGERS Park. 

The MASTERSONS and BREENS (of Bally Breen) were from Co Carlow. 

The O'DONNELLS were from Ballina and Ardnaree (Moss Grove), Co. Mayo; NEALIS'S and RAES were from Crossmolina (Rake St Cemetery),
Co. Mayo. O'DONNELLS came to U.S. about 1864. 

The McNAMARAS and McENERINS were from Tulla, Co. Clare. The TOUHYS and LEONARDS were from Feakle, Co. Clare. McNAMARAS
and McENERINS came to U.S. on the ship Andrew Foster in Dec 8, 1852. TOUHYS came about 1860. 

The CONNERY, TOBIN and DOHERTY families were from Bansha (Ash Grove), Co. Tipperary and came to U.S. on the Rip Van Winkle, April 11,
1852. 

The SULLIVAN (Boetius) family was from Killarney and Kenmare, Co. Kerry. Woulfe mentions Boetius as the anglicized form of Baot~g~alac –
Behellagh, Beolagh -? Boetius, Bowes from the composite form ‘baot~’ –vain, foolish – and ‘galac~’ –valorous – a name peculiar to the MacEGANS,
O’DALYs, and a few other families – (Latin = Boetgalachus, Boetius) – also notes it was known particularly in Co Kerry. Batt and Bat are
commonly seen as diminutives of Bartholomew. Some of the other given names in our family translate as follows: Dionysius = Denis, Helena =
Ellen, Jacobus = James, Guiliemus = William, Owen in Latin is Eugenius = Eugene. 

The SULLIVAN (Roger) family was from Reen, Kenmare, Co. Kerry. Both families came to U.S. (Belvidere, IL) about 1859. 

If you are researching these surnames and/or locations, let's share info; please email me at mhook@avana.net 

McKinley/Sullivan Family Timeline

Click here for an in-depth Ireland timeline site 

1649 - Oliver Cromwell imposes English authority on Ireland. Cromwell repays his soldiers and investors in the war effort with land confiscated
largely from the Anglo-Irish Catholics of the Irish midlands. 

1654-1656 - A civil survey is recorded of major landholders. 
1659 - A census is made of all major landowners. 
1663-1666 - Hearth money rolls registered for property owners. 
1740 - Protestant householders in counties Antrim, Armagh, Donegal, Londonderry 
and Tyrone are listed. 
1749 - A census of most of County Roscommon, part of County Sligo, and nine 
parishes of County Galway is taken. 
1750 - Catholic inhabitants of County Tipperary were taxed. 

1799 - Thomas TOBIN is born in Barnlough, Kilmoyler Parish, Co Tipperary. 

1800 - William Connery is born in Bansha, Co Tipperary. 

1801 - Ellen DOHERTY is born in Barnlough, Kilmoyler Parish, Co Tipperary. 

1801 - The Act of Union between Great Britain and Ireland abolished the Irish legislature and created the United Kingdom of Great Britain and
Ireland. 

1802-1803 - A census of Protestant parishoners was made, records of 28 parishes still survive. 

1805, Mar 25 - Archibald McKINLEY is born to John and MARY WEIR McKINLEY, probably on Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland. 

1805 - Michael MacNAMARA, son of Michael (a merchant) is born in Co Limerick. 

1807 - Michael William QUINLIVAN is born somewhere in Co Clare. Helena Maria BOHAN is born in Bansha, Co Tipperary. 

1811? - Daniel McKINLEY dies and is buried at St Thomas Church, Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland. 

1812, Aug 15 - Philip McGREGOR is born to James and Catherine McGREGOR ROGERS in Co Louth, Ireland. 

1816 - U.S. Government purchases land now covered by the greater part of Chicago from the Chippewa and Ottawa Indians. The northern limit of
the land is called the Indian Boundary Line. 

1819 - Mary BRASNAHAN born on Chamber St, Brooklyn, NY to Thomas BRESLEHAN and wife. 

1820-1830 - 50,000 Irish immigrants enter the United States. 

1821 - A general population census is taken of Ireland (most of which was destroyed by fire in 1922). 

1821 - U.S. Government purchases land north of the Indian Boundary Line (now covered by the North Shore Suburbs of Chicago, IL) from the
Chippewa, Ottawa and Pottawotamie Indians. 

1823 - Michael MacNAMARA is elected a scholer of Trinity College, University of Dublin and has a B.A. degree conferred on him in 1826. 

1824-1838 - Tithe applotments (or tax lists) are compiled. 

1827 - Archibald McKINLEY and Nancy (Ann) MORRISON are married probably Rathlin Island or Ballycastle, Northern Ireland. 

1827, Dec 15 - Jane MORRISON dies and is buried by her husband Archie MORRISON at St Thomas Church, Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland. 

1828, May 7 - William Connery and Helena Maria Bohan are married in the Church of the Annunciation, Parish of Bansha, Co Tipperary. 
Witnesses are John Bohan and Mary Keating. 

1829, Apr 24 - John McKinley is born to Archibald and Nancy MORRISON McKINLEY probably Rathlin Island or Ballycastle, Northern Ireland. 

1829 - The Irish Emancipation Act lifts penalties for Catholics and Presbyterians. 

1830-1840 - 237,000 Irish immigrants (including James ROGERS family from Co Louth and Michael William QUINLIVAN from Co Clare enter the
United States. 

1831 - Catherine NEALIS is born in Crossmolina, Co Mayo, Ireland. 

1831, July 5 - Mary Ward MASTERSON (Mrs. James Fox Hickey) arrives in NYC on the Ship General Williams. 

1833 - Michael William Quinlivan (age 26) comes to US (NYC?) from Co Clare, Ireland (the 2nd Calereah). 

1833 - Old Green Bay Road, the first road north from Chicago to Milwaukee is laid out. 

1833, Nov 11 - William Martin CONNERY is born to William CONNERY and Helena Maria BOHAN at Ashgrove, Bansha, Co Tipperary. 

1838 - Poor Relief for Ireland enacted. 

1840-1850 - The Great Famine strikes Ireland, more than 1,000,000 Irish men and women emigrate. 

1840-1850 - 800,000 Irish immigrants enter the United States. 



1834 - Patrick Joseph O'DONNELL is born to Patrick O'DONNELL, Sr. and Maria GARDNER in Ballina, Co Mayo. 

1834/36 - Philip McGregor ROGERS and his brothers (Michael, Milton?) arrive in Chicago. 

1836, Jun 30 - Mary TOBIN is born to Thomas and Ellen DOHERTY TOBIN in Barnlough, Kilmoyler Parish, Co Tipperary. 

1837 - Michael Wm Quinlivan(Quinlan) and Mary Brasnahan(Breslin) are married in St James Church, Brooklyn, NY by Father J. Walsh. 

1839/1842, Mar 17 - Patrick Leonard TOUHY born in Feakle, Co Clare, Ireland to Unknown TOUHY and Unknown LEONARD. 

1840 - Philip McGregor ROGERS purchases land at Government Sale and builds his log cabin, the first structure on old Green Bay Road (later
known as Ridge Boulvard). By the time of his death in 1856, he owns 1,600 acres (sites of the suburbs later known as Rogers Park, Ravenswood,
Sheridan Park and Sunnyside Park). 

1841, Jan 8 - Michael Wm Quinlivan takes out his intention papers in Fairfield, CT. 

1841, July 4 - Ellen McNAMARA is born in Tulla, Co Clare, Ireland. 

1843, March 1 - Michael Wm Quinlivan received his final intention papers in Superior Court of Fairfield Co, CT, Wm Noble, Clerk of said Court. 

1845 - Michael Wm Quinlivan votes for James K Polk. 

1846 - All of Ireland is mapped for the first time, many county boundaries finally defined. 

1847 - John McKINLEY returns to Scotland to work as a shipbuilder as had his ancestors before him. 

1848, Jan 24 - Gold is discovered at Sutter's Mill, California. 

1848-1864 - A householder list (Griffith's Valuation) is compiled of every householder and land owner/renter. 

1849/52 - John and James McKINLEY come to Meriden, CT to work in Parker Brothers Iron Foundry. 

1850 - Tenant-Right League founded, it's goals were: fair rent, fixity of tenure and free sale. 

1851 - Government census taken, most of which was destroyed in a fire in 1922. 

1852 - Tenement Act provides for a uniform evaluation of property for tax purposes. 

1851, Dec 8 - Orphaned McNAMARA children are brought to NYC by their Uncle Pat McENERIN on the Ship Andrew Foster. They settle in
Meriden, CT. 

1852, Apr 24 - TOBIN (including 9 children) family and William Martin CONNERY arrive in NYC on the Ship Rip Van Winkle and settle in Rhode
Island. The TOBIN parents Thomas age 53 and Ellen age 51 die within months of arrival (Jul 2, 1852 and Sep 19, 1852, respectively) and are buried
in St Patrick's New Grounds, Providence, RI. 

1853, May 25 - Alexander and Daniel McKinley leave Liverpool on the ship Australia and arrive at Castle Garden (which was converted from an old
amusement park on the tip of Manhattan), New York on July 5, 1853. Daniel died shortly after arriving in New York. Alexander went to Meriden,
CT and joined up with his brothers John and James McKINLEY. 

1853, Nov - John McKinley purchases a family bible in Meriden, CT. Patricia McKINLEY WOLF last had this bible. 

1853, Nov 11 - William Martin CONNERY and Mary TOBIN are married in Bristol, RI. 

1856, Dec 13 - Philip ROGERS dies in Chicago and is buried in Lincoln Park (moved to Calvary Cemetery, Evanston in 1863). Rogers Park has a
population of 600. 

1857, Spring - James and John McKINLEY travel by ship down the eastern coast of North America and cut across the Isthmus of Panama on land to
reach the California gold fields (Grass Valley/Placerville). The brothers locate a small mine and use their earnings to purchase adjoining farms in
Grand Meadow Twnshp, Clayton Co, IA in about 1860. 

1857, December - Alexander McKinley went back to Ireland to visit his parents Archie and Nancy McKINLEY. He then left Ireland in the summer
of 1858 and went to California, following in his brothers (John and James) footsteps, working the gold mines. 

1858 - Probate Act changes jurisdiction from the Church of Ireland to the newly-established Court of Probate. 

1860 - Patrick Leonard Touhy (with his brother John W. Touhy) came to NYC and engaged in the carpet business with Hiram Anderson, with whom
Patrick remained up to 1864 when he enlisted in the New York Cavalry. 

1860, March 17 - Alexander McKinley becomes an American citizen in Nevada County, California. 

1861 & 1871 - Ireland Censuses were taken and then destroyed by order of the government. 

1862 - William McKINLEY comes to U.S. (probably NYC) probably sailing from Liverpool. 

1862, Mar 23 - Maria Theresa O'DONNELL, daughter of Patrick Joseph (a horsebreaker) and Catherine NEALIS O'DONNELL is baptized in
Kilmoyler Parish, Ballina, Co Mayo with sponsors Michael Nealis and Eliza Murphy. 

1862 - William Martin CONNERY moves his family to from Bristol, RI to Chicago. He works for a time on the construction of a pier in the Chicago
River and later engaged in the work of bridge building on the railroad. 

1863 - Archibald and Nancy MORRISON McKINLEY are brought to U.S. from Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland by their oldest son John and come
to live on his farm adjoining the farm his brother James in Postville, Grand Meadow Twnshp, Clayton Co, IA. 

1863 - Philip McGregor Rogers, Jr. dies at the age of 21 as a result of wounds received in the War between the States and is buried in Calvary
Cemetery, Evanston, IL. This date may be in error; he may have died in 1869. 

1864 - Patrick Leonard TOUHY enlists Sept 10, 1864 as a private in Company A, 10th Regiment, New York Cavalry at Poughkeepsie, NY, is
wounded while on picket near Prince George County, West Virginia Nov 20, 1864, and is discharged in compliance with G.O. No. 94, War Dept, June
3, 1865. Enlistment papers describe him as a farmer born in Ireland, age 21 years, height 5' 5", eyes black, hair dark, fair complexion. 

1865 - Patrick Leonard came to Chicago and first opened a grocery at the corner of Market and Illinois streets. Then he formed a copartnership
with Alexander Henderson and Philip McGregor Rogers, as the firm of Touhy, Henderson and Co., which continued up to 1867, when he came to
Rogers Park. 

1865, May 5 - James Patrick Connery is born to William Martin Connery and Mary Tobin, their seventh son and the first of their children to be born
after their move from Bristol, RI to Chicago. 

1865, Sept 15 - Patrick Leonard TOUHY and Catherine Camilla ROGERS are married. 

1865, October - Alexander McKINLEY goes to Postville, IA to work on his brother John's farm in Grand Meadow Township until 1866 when he
opened a General Store in Clermont, IA. 

1866 - Patrick Joseph O'DONNELL brings his wife Catherine Nealis and children Maria, Joseph and Michael to Chicago from Ballina, Co Mayo. 

1868 - Irish Reform Bill passes British Parliament, allows a million more men the right to vote. 
1869 - Disestablishment Act deprives the Irish Church of property and authority. 
1870 - Irish Land Act provides protection for tenants. 

1869, July 4 - John McKINLEY and Ellen McNAMARA are married in St Peter's Church, Postville, IA. John's brother James had previously
married Ellen's sister Mary Cisserina McNAMARA 

1869-1870 - Patrick Leonard Touhy and Catherine Rogers Touhy build "The Oaks" in Rogers Park. 

1871 - At the time of the Chicago Fire William Martin CONNERY ran a grocery store at the corner of DesPlaines St and Grand Avenue. Shortly
after the fire, he established a coal business in the same block on which his grocery store was located. 

1871, Dec 16 - Archibald Alexander McKINLEY is born to John and Ellen McNAMARA McKINLEY on the family farm in Postville, IA. 

1876, Oct - Daniel TOBIN becomes a naturalized U.S. citizen in Providence, RI. 

1877, Nov 20 - Helena Maria Bowen Connery dies in Bristol, RI age 70 years. 

1878 - Rogers Park becomes a village. 

1880, Jan - James TOBIN becomes naturalized U.S. citizen in Providence, RI. 

1880, Nov 20 - Nancy MORRISON McKINLEY dies and is buried in St Peters Cemetery, Clermont, IA. 

1880 - Census shows John and James McKinley's families living on their farms in Grand Meadow Twnshp, Clayton Co, IA. James (44) is a farmer,
Mary (42) is keeping house, their 15 year old son is farming, four younger children are at school. They have a 14 year old servant girl. John (52) is
farming, Ellen (38) is keeping house, six children under 10 are at school, grandparents Archie and Ann, both 75, are living with the family and there is
male servant age 19 listed. Census shows Eugene William Sullivan family living in Belvidere, Boone Co, IL. Eugene (44) is a traveling merchant,
Mary (42) is keeping house, Boetious (21) is a lawyer, Roger (18) is apprenticed to a mechanic, six younger children are at home. Census shows
William Martin Connery family living at 48 W. Indiana in Chicago, Cook Co, IL. William (45) is a laborer, Mary (43) is keeping house, William (25),
John (19) and Michael (16) are working at a coal and wood yard, nine younger children are in school or at home. The youngest (Aunt Elizabeth) is
eight months old. 

1881 - William Martin CONNERY buys a farm near Jewel Junction, IA and moves his family there because of ill health and the feeling that he would
like his children to grow up in the country. 

1881, Dec 16 - Patrick Joseph O'Donnell dies and is buried in Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, IL. 

1883 - William Martin Connery dies Aug 27, 1883 at 48 W. Indiana St. (his brother-in-law Morgan Tobin's house) and is buried at Calvary Cemetery,
Evanston, IL. 

1883, Sept 15 - North side dry goods store of J. W. Touhy & Co. opens (P. L. Touhy is a partner). 

1893 - Rogers Park is annexed to the City of Chicago. 

1895 - Archibald Alexander McKINLEY graduates with a B.A. from the University of Iowa. 

1896, Dec 14 - Mary TOBIN CONNERY dies and is buried in Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, IL. 

1898 - The administrative counties of Irelandare formed. 

1899 - Archibald Alexander McKINLEY graduates with a law degree from Lake Forest University. 

1889, Jan 4 - Archibald McKINLEY dies and is buried in St Peters Cemetery, Fayette Co, Clermont, IA. 

1889, July 29 - Mary Loretta CONNERY is born to James Patrick CONNERY and Maria Theresa O'DONNELL CONNERY in Chicago, IL. 

1900 - Census shows John (71) and Ellen (59) McNAMARA McKINLEY living on Greene St, Postville, Allamakee Co, IA with Catherine E. (26),
James J. (22) and William M.(21). 

1900, July 9 - Margaret MASTERSON O'LEARY (sister of Mary MASTERSON ROGERS) dies in Chicago. 

1901 - A government census of Ireland was taken, this one survives today. 

1904, Dec 28 - Catherine NEALIS O'DONNELL dies and is buried in Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, IL. 

1907, Jan 21 - John McKINLEY dies and is buried at St Peters Cemetery, Fayette Co, Clermont, IA. 

1911 - Second surviving Ireland census. 

1911, Oct 16 - Patrick Leonard TOUHY dies and is buried in Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, IL. 

1916, Jan 18 - Catherine ROGERS TOUHY dies and is buried in Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, IL. 

1916, Sept 18 - Gerard Alan McKINLEY is born to Archibald Alexander and Alice TOUHY McKINLEY. 

1916 - Irish Great Easter Rebellion suppressed by the British. 
1917 - Irish Republic adopts a constitution. 

1920, Aug 1 - Helen Marie SULLIVAN is born to Boetius Henry and Loretta CONNERY SULLIVAN. 
1921 - Irish Free State becomes an independent member of the British Commonwealth. 
1922 - Public Record Office and Four Courts fire destroys many irreplaceable Irish records. 

1929, June 30 - James Patrick CONNERY age 64 dies and is buried in Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, IL. 

1929, Aug 13 - Ellen McNAMARA McKINLEY dies and is buried at St Peters Cemetery, Clermont, IA. 

1932, Dec 8 - Maria Theresa O'DONNELL CONNERY dies and is buried at Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, IL. 

1937, June - Gerard Alan McKINLEY graduates with a B.A. from Yale University. 

1941, June - Helen Marie SULLIVAN graduates with a B.A. from Northwestern University. 

1941, Dec 28 - Helen SULLIVAN and Gerard McKINLEY are married in Chicago, IL. 

1942-45 - Gerard McKINLEY serves on the U.S. Castor in the Pacific, WWII. 

1948 - Republic of Ireland Act establishes a free country independent of Britain. 

1960, May 7 - Archibald Alexander McKINLEY dies in Washington, D.C. and is buried in All Saints Cemetery, IL. 

1961, Feb - Boetius Henry SULLIVAN dies and is buried in Mt Carmel Cemetery, Riverside, IL. 

1962, May 3 - Loretta CONNERY SULLIVAN dies and is buried in Mt Carmel Cemetery, Riverside, IL. 

1963, June 5 - Alice Beatrice TOUHY McKINLEY dies in Washington, D.C. and is buried in All Saints Cemetery, IL. 

1971 - Helen SULLIVAN graduates with an M.A. from Northwestern University. 

Hook/Kling Family Timeline



1823 - Mary Agnes LYNCH born in Co Kerry. 

1826 - James HOOK born near Hook Head Co Wexford. 

1832, Feb 1 - Charles PHILIPPS born in Aschbach, Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France. 

1841, Feb - Bertha WEBER is born in Baden, Germany to . 

1850 - James HOOK comes to U.S., settles in Boston. 

1865, Apr 25 - Charles PHILIPPS and Bertha WEBER married at St. Michael's Catholic Church in Buffalo, NY . 

1807 - Michael William QUINLIVAN is born somewhere in Co Clare. 

1811? - Daniel McKINLEY dies and is buried at St Thomas Church, Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland. 

1812, Aug 15 - Philip McGREGOR is born to James and Catherine McGREGOR ROGERS in Co Louth, Ireland. 

1816 - U.S. Government purchases land now covered by the greater part of Chicago from the Chippewa and Ottawa Indians. The northern limit of
the land is called the Indian Boundary Line. 

1819 - Mary BRASNAHAN born on Chamber St, Brooklyn, NY. 

1821 - U.S. Government purchases land north of the Indian Boundary Line (now covered by the North Shore Suburbs) from the Chippewa, Ottawa
and Pottawotamie Indians. 

1823 - Michael MacNAMARA is elected a scholer of Trinity College, University of Dublin and has a B.A. degree conferred on him in 1826. 

1827 - Archibald McKINLEY and Nancy (Ann) MORRISON are married probably Rathlin Island or Ballycastle, Northern Ireland. 

1827, Dec 15 - Jane MORRISON dies and is buried by her husband Archie MORRISON at St Thomas Church, Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland. 

1829, Apr 24 - John McKinley is born to Archibald and Nancy MORRISON McKINLEY probably Rathlin Island or Ballycastle, Northern Ireland. 

1831, July 5 - Mary Ward MASTERSON (Mrs. James Fox Hickey) arrives in NYC on the Ship General Williams. 

1833 - Old Green Bay Road, the first road north from Chicago to Milwaukee is laid out. 

1834/36 - Philip McGregor ROGERS and his brothers (Michael, Milton?) arrive in Chicago. 

1836, Jun 30 - Mary TOBIN is born to Thomas and Ellen DOHERTY TOBIN in Barnlough, Kilmoyler Parish, Co Tipperary. 

1839, Mar 17 - Patrick Leonard TOUHY born in Feakle, Co Clare, Ireland. 

1840 - Philip McGregor ROGERS purchases land and builds his log cabin, the first structure on old Green Bay Road (later known as Ridge
Boulvard). By the time of his death in 1856, he owns 1,600 acres (sites of the suburbs later known as Rogers Park, Ravenswood, Sheridan Park and
Sunnyside Park). 

1841, July 4 - Ellen McNAMARA is born in Tulla, Co Clare, Ireland. 

1847 - John McKINLEY returns to Scotland to work as a shipbuilder as had his ancestors before him. 

1850/52 - John and James McKINLEY come to Meriden, CT to work in Parker Brothers Iron Foundry. 

1851, Dec 8 - Orphaned McNAMARA children are brought to NYC by their Uncle Pat McENERIN on the Ship Andrew Foster. They settle in
Meriden, CT. 

1852, Apr 24 - TOBIN family and William Martin CONNERY arrive in NYC on the Ship Rip Van Winkle and settle in Rhode Island. The TOBIN
parents Thomas and Ellen die within months of arrival (Jul 2, 1852 and Sep 19, 1852, respectively) and are buried in St Patrick's New Grounds,
Providence, RI. 

1853, Nov - John McKinley purchases a family bible in Meriden, CT. Patricia McKINLEY WOLF last had this bible. 

1853, Nov 11 - William Martin CONNERY and Mary TOBIN are married in Bristol, RI. 

1856, Dec 13 - Philip ROGERS dies in Chicago and is buried in Lincoln Park (moved to Calvary Cemetery, Evanston in 1863). Rogers Park has a
population of 600. 

1857, Spring - James and John McKINLEY travel by ship down the eastern coast of North America and cut across the Isthmus of Panama on land to
reach the California gold fields (Grass Valley). The brothers locate a small mine and use their earnings to purchase adjoining farms in Grand
Meadow Twnshp, Clayton Co, IA in about 1860. 

1862, Mar 23 - Maria Theresa O'DONNELL, daughter of Patrick Joseph (a horsebreaker) and Catherine NEALIS O'DONNELL is baptized in
Kilmoyler Parish, Ballina, Co Mayo with sponsors Michael Nealis and Eliza Murphy. 

1863 - Archibald and Nancy MORRISON McKINLEY are brought to U.S. from Rathlin Island, Northern Ireland by their oldest son John and come
to live on his farm adjoining the farm his brother James in Postville, Grand Meadow Twnshp, Clayton Co, IA. 

1863 - Philip McGregor Rogers, Jr. dies at the age of 21 as a result of wounds received in the War between the States and is buried in Calvary
Cemetery, Evanston, IL. This date may be in error; he may have died in 1869. 

1864 - Patrick Leonard TOUHY enlists Sept 10, 1864 as a private in Company A, 10th Regiment, New York Cavalry at Poughkeepsie, NY, is
wounded while on picket near Prince George County, West Virginia Nov 20, 1864, and is discharged in compliance with G.O. No. 94, War Dept, June
3, 1865. Enlistment papers describe him as a farmer born in Ireland, age 21 years, height 5' 5", eyes black, hair dark, fair complexion. 

1866 - Patrick Joseph O'DONNELL brings his family to Chicago from Ballina, Co Mayo. 

1869, July 4 - John McKINLEY and Ellen McNAMARA are married in St Peter's Church, Postville, IA. John's brother James had previously
married Ellen's sister Mary Cisserina McNAMARA 

1871, Dec 16 - Archibald Alexander McKINLEY is born to John and Ellen McNAMARA McKINLEY on the family farm in Postville, IA. 

1876, Oct - Daniel TOBIN becomes a naturalized U.S. citizen in Providence, RI. 

1878 - Rogers Park becomes a village. 

1880, Jan - James TOBIN becomes naturalized U.S. citizen in Providence, RI. 

1880, Nov 20 - Nancy MORRISON McKINLEY dies and is buried in St Peters Cemetery, Clermont, IA. 

1880 - Census shows John and James McKinley's families living on their farms in Grand Meadow Twnshp, Clayton Co, IA. James (44) is a farmer,
Mary (42) is keeping house, their 15 year old son is farming, four younger children are at school. They have a 14 year old servant girl. John (52) is
farming, Ellen (38) is keeping house, six children under 10 are at school, grandparents Archie and Ann, both 75, are living with the family and there is
a 19 male servant listed. Census shows Eugene William Sullivan family living in Belvidere, Boone Co, IL. Eugene (44) is a traveling merchant,
Mary (42) is keeping house, Boetious (21) is a lawyer, Roger (18) is apprenticed to mechanic, six younger children are at home. Census shows
William Martin Connery family living at 48 W. Indiana in Chicago, Cook Co, IL. William (45) is a laborer, Mary (43) is keeping house, William (25),
John (19) and Michael (16) are working at a coal and wood yard, nine younger children are in school or at home. The youngest (Aunt Elizabeth) is
eight months old. 

1883 - William Martin Connery moves his family to a farm near Jewel Junction, IA. 

1893 - Rogers Park is annexed to the City of Chicago. 

1895 - Archibald Alexander McKINLEY graduates with a B.A. from the University of Iowa. 

1896, Dec 14 - Mary TOBIN CONNERY dies and is buried in Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, IL. 

1899 - Archibald Alexander McKINLEY graduates with a law degree from Lake Forest University. 

1889, Jan 4 - Archibald McKINLEY dies and is buried in St Peters Cemetery, Clermont, IA. 

1900 - Census shows John (71) and Ellen (59) McNAMARA McKINLEY living on Greene St, Postville, Allamakee Co, IA with Catherine E. (26),
James J. (22) and William M.(21). 

1900, July 9 - Margaret MASTERSON O'LEARY (sister of Mary MASTERSON ROGERS) dies in Chicago. 

1907, Jan 21 - John McKINLEY dies and is buried at St Peters Cemetery, Clermont, IA. 

1911, Oct 16 - Patrick Leonard TOUHY dies and is buried in Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, IL. 

1916, Jan 18 - Catherine ROGERS TOUHY dies and is buried in Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, IL. 

1916, Sept 18 - Gerard Alan McKINLEY is born to Archibald Alexander and Alice TOUHY McKINLEY. 

1920, Aug 1 - Helen Marie SULLIVAN is born to Boetius Henry and Loretta CONNERY SULLIVAN. 

1929, Aug 13 - Ellen McNAMARA McKINLEY dies and is buried at St Peters Cemetery, Clermont, IA. 

1937 - Gerard Alan McKINLEY graduates with a B.A. from Yale University. 

1941 - Helen Marie SULLIVAN graduates with a B.A. from Northwestern University. 

1941, Dec 28 - Helen SULLIVAN and Gerard McKINLEY are married in Chicago, IL. 

1942-45 - Gerard McKINLEY serves on the U.S. Castor in the Pacific, WWII. 

1960, May 7 - Archibald Alexander McKINLEY dies in Washington, D.C. and is buried in All Saints Cemetery, IL. 

1961, Feb - Boetius Henry SULLIVAN dies and is buried in Mt Carmel Cemetery, Riverside, IL. 

1962, May 3 - Loretta CONNERY SULLIVAN dies and is buried in Mt Carmel Cemetery, Riverside, IL. 

1963, June 5 - Alice Beatrice TOUHY McKINLEY dies in Washington, D.C. and is buried in All Saints Cemetery, IL. 

1971 - Helen SULLIVAN graduates with an M.A. from Northwestern University. 

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