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Are McGings All Related? It Seems Likely!

 

Although as of December 2016 it has been limited to just 3 male McGings, these each took a Y-DNA test, 1 at the 111 level, 1 at the 67 level and 1 at the 37 level and later upgraded to the 67 level.  These 3 are from families that claimed no common relation to each other via standard genealogy records examination.  DNA results says that they are indeed related.  Based on this information and the best records we can find, it is likely that this common ancestor existed around 1750-1820.  Which is on target with the data available from that period.

 

In cultures where surnames are passed from father to son, there is additional evidence beyond a DNA match that two men who share a surname are related. Y-chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) test results should be interpreted based on both this information and the actual results.

 

In addition, all tested McGings are of the Y-DNA Haplogroup R-M269

 

What Are Y-DNA Paternal Lineages Tests?

Your direct paternal lineage is the line that follows your father’s paternal ancestry. This line consists entirely of men.  Y-DNA follows the direct paternal line.

 

Your Y-chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) can trace your father, his father, his father’s father, and so forth. It offers a clear path from you to a known, or likely, direct paternal ancestor.

 

DNA Matching for Family History

 

Your Y-DNA may help you find genetic cousins along your direct paternal line. Planned comparisons are the best choice. To set up a planned comparison, select two men who you believe share a direct paternal ancestor. Have both men take a Y-DNA test. If they match exactly or closely, then the DNA evidence supports the relationship. If they do not match, the result is evidence refuting the relationship. When you discover a match outside of a planned comparison, you can still find your common ancestor with matches. To do so, use your known paternal genealogy. For each match, look first for a shared surname if you come from a culture where surnames have followed paternal lines. Then look for common geographic locations on the direct paternal line. Work through each of your ancestors on this line as well as their sons, their sons’ sons, and so forth. Comparing genealogy records is vital when using Y-DNA matching to help you in your research.

 

The Science of Your Direct Paternal Line

 

Your Y chromosome is a sex chromosome. Sex chromosomes carry the genetic code that makes each of us male or female. All people inherit two sex chromosomes. One comes from their mother and the other from their father. You and other men receive a Y chromosome from your father and an X chromosome from your mother. Men and only men inherit their father’s Y chromosome. Thus, it follows the same path of inheritance as your direct paternal line. Paternal line DNA testing uses STR markers. STR markers are places where your genetic code has a variable number of repeated parts. STR marker values change slowly from one generation to the next. Testing multiple markers gives us distinctive result sets. These sets form signatures for a paternal lineage. We compare your set of results to those of other men in our database. The range of possible generations before you share a common ancestor with a match depends on the level of test you take. A match may be recent, but it may also be hundreds of years in the past.

 

Your Ancestral Origins

Our Y-DNA marks the path from our direct paternal ancestors in Africa to their locations in historic times. Your ancestors carried their Y-DNA line on their travels. The current geography of your line shows the path of this journey. You can learn about the basics of your line’s branch on the paternal tree from your predicted branch placement. This information comes from scientists who study the history of populations across geography and time using Y-DNA. They use both the frequencies of each branch in modern populations and samples from ancient burial sites. With these, they are able to tell us much about the story for each branch. This traces back hundreds, thousands, or even tens of thousands of years. Your branch on the tree tells you where your paternal ancestors are present today and about their likely migration paths. This is your Y-DNA haplogroup.

Your Predicted Haplogroup is R-M269

Haplogroup R-M269 is the dominant lineage in all of Western Europe today. It is found in low frequencies in Turkey and the northern Fertile Crescent, while its highest frequencies are in Western Europe

 

Sidebar – Y-DNA testing versus Autosomal Testing (I.E. Ancestry, FTDNA, 23andme testing)

 

Y DNA passes down relatively unchanged while autosomal DNA is halved with each generation.  Look at the chart on generations following below – the percentage shown is also the amount of autosomal DNA you have of ancestors at those generations.  Y-DNA by comparison is passed almost unchanged making it easier to find a common male ancestor.  That is why these are two different tests and why one (Y-DNA) costs more than the typical autosomal test that finds cousins.

 

Remember. Except for Y-DNA, in theory, we receive half of the DNA of each ancestor that each parent received.  But it’s not exactly half.

 

Ancestral DNA isn’t divided exactly in half, by the “one for you and one for me” methodology. In fact, DNA is inherited in chunks, chunks that come in different sizes and often you receive all of a chunk of DNA from that parent, or none of it. Seldom do you receive exactly half of a chunk, or ancestral segment – but half is the AVERAGE.

 

Because we can’t tell exactly how much of any ancestor’s DNA we actually do receive, we have to use the average number, knowing full well we could have more than what the chart says our allocation of that particular ancestor’s DNA, or none that is discernable at current testing thresholds.

 

So, when doing autosomal DNA cousin testing, the best we can do is to use the percentage number and know that it’s close. In other words, if the table says you should carry 25% of that ancestor’s DNA, you may carry 35%, or 12.5% or even none based on how the actual mixing of the DNA took place.  BUT yes, on average, you should have that 25%. When I look at my brother’s DNA versus my own, we each have DNA from our parents that we share but we also have DNA exclusively; that is I have maternal and paternal DNA that my brother doesn’t have, and the same goes for him, having DNA I don’t have.

 

The cool thing is that DNA testing can be used to find family and relations and prove that people whith a common surname share common ancestors and are thereby blood cousins J

 

 

TEST RESULTS OF THE 3 TESTED MALES

 

67 Y DNA Result Genetic Distance       Tony is a match with Jim and John at 3. John and Jim are a match at 2

 

 

If two men share a surname, how should the genetic distance at 67 Y-chromosome STR markers be interpreted?

 

Genetic Distance

Relationship

Interpretation

0

Very Tightly Related

A 67/67 match between two men who share a common surname (or variant) means they share a common male ancestor within the genealogical time frame. Their relatedness is extremely close. All confidence levels are well within the time frame that surnames were adopted in Western Europe with the common ancestor predicted, 50% of the time, in three generations or less and with a 90% probability within five generations. Very few people achieve this close level of a match.

1 or 2

Tightly Related

A 65/67 or 66/67 match between two men who share the same surname (or a variant) indicates a close relationship. It is most likely that they matched 36/37 or 37/37 on a previous Y-DNA test. Very few people achieve this close level of a match. All confidence levels are well within the time frame that surnames were adopted in Western Europe.

3 or 4

Related

A 63/67 or 64/67 match between two men who share the same surname (or a variant) means that they are likely to share a common ancestor within the genealogical time frame. The common ancestor is probably not extremely recent but is likely within the range of most well-established surname lineages in Western Europe. It is most likely that they matched 24/25, 36/37, or 37/37 on previous Y-DNA tests, and mismatches are within DYS458, DYS459, DYS449, DYS464, DYS576, DYS570, and CDY.

 

 

 

But what does that mean?  For that, consider the calculator found at http://www.moseswalker.com/mrca/calculator.asp?q=2.

 

At a Y-DNA 67 level, Tony, Jim and John are a match at 3 (64 of 67).  And Jim and John are a match at 2 (65 of 67). At this level of testing, we get the following:

 

 

 

Generations to MRCA

Probability of
Relationship %

67 of 67


Matches

66 of 67


Matches

65 of 67


Matches

64 of 67


Matches

63 of 67


Matches

62 of 67


Matches

25

0.6

1.8

3.1

4.5

5.9

7.4

30

0.7

2

3.4

4.8

6.4

7.9

35

0.9

2.2

3.7

5.2

6.8

8.4

40

1

2.4

4

5.6

7.2

8.9

45

1.1

2.7

4.3

6

7.7

9.4

50

1.3

3

4.7

6.4

8.1

9.9

55

1.5

3.2

5

6.8

8.6

10.4

60

1.7

3.5

5.4

7.2

9.1

11

65

1.9

3.9

5.8

7.7

9.6

11.6

70

2.1

4.2

6.2

8.2

10.2

12.2

75

2.4

4.6

6.8

8.8

10.9

12.9

80

2.8

5.2

7.4

9.5

11.6

13.8

85

3.3

5.8

8.1

10.4

12.6

14.8

90

4

6.6

9.1

11.5

13.8

16.1

95

5.1

8.1

10.8

13.3

15.8

18.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Based on Y-DNA 67 testing, we see that John and Jim share a common great grandfather (95% at 10 generations back) and that Tony also does but his great grandfather was further back (95% at 14 generations), meaning that Tony’s ancestor is the older one, a forefather of the ancestor Jim and I share (meaning Tony’s ancestor is the ancestor of the 3 of us, but also he had multiple sons and Jim and I come from one line of one of those sons, and Tony must come from a line from a different brother (otherwise we’d have a 1 or zero match).

But with more data (that is why 67 testing is about the minimum, and 111 gets expensive but would supply even more accurate data) we can see that now the distance between me and Tony means our most common recent ancestor (assuming 100% accuracy) lived about 14 generations ago (or sooner)

What does that mean, 14 generations ago (and remember, 14 is for 100% accuracy, it is 50/50 that the common ancestor was 6-7 generations ago.  But what is that in years?

 

YEAR

 

NUMBER 

PERCENTAGE 

 

OF YOUR 

OF DNA AND SAME 

 

ANCESTORS

SURNAME

Birth Year

1950

 

 

1 generation back: 

1925

2

50.00%

parents

2 generations back: 

1900

4

25.00%

grandparents

3 generations back: 

1875

8

12.50%

great-grandparents

4 generations back

1850

16

6.25%

5 generations back

1825

32

3.13%

6 generations back

1800

64

1.56%

7 generations back

1775

128

0.78%

8 generations back

1750

256

0.39%

9 generations back

1725

512

0.20%

10 generations back

1700

1024

0.10%

11 generations back

1675

2048

0.05%

12 generations back

1650

4096

0.02%

13 generations back

1625

8192

0.01%

14 generations back

1600

16384

0.01%

So, at this time we can say that the McGing’s tested seem guaranteed have a common ancestor in 1600, but the odds are good that our common ancestor could have actually lived sometime about 1750 - 1775. And we know there were McGings around Dublin then…..

Now if we can get more male McGing’s from lines that are not related to the three of us to test their Y-DNA at a minimum of 67, we can see if the results can confirm this hypothesis. (Getting more from mine, Jim’s or Tony’s known relations won’t do much good as it’ll just repeat what we already know.)

There is another kind of Y-DNA test that looks much further back, looking to see when the small branch of a family broke off from the ancestors before.  In our case, when did the Y DNA of the McGings first appear, and where did it come from? That testing is currently in process, but so far it shows that, of those other men tested, I more closely match 2 men whose families were from Tyrone and later Fermanagh. These men are not McGings, and the match goes back a thousand years, but McGings and these fellas are linked by a common ancestor and I’m hoping to get an estimate when about the “unique” McGing DNA appeared.  With some luck we can get a rough idea of where we came from before we ended up in Mayo.

 

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