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ST JOHNS CEMETERY, MAURY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Compiled and Submitted by Mary Bob McClain Richardson,4/15/2005

Confederate Civil War Veterans

Buried at

St. John's Church

and

Story told by Samuel R. Watkins about St. John's and the Death of L.E. Polk

 during the Civil War

  

BECKHAM,  Col. Robert F.,  6 May 1837 - d.  5 Dec 1864.  "Chief of Artillery, Gen. Stephen D. Lee's Corps;  b. Culpepper Co., Va.;  mortally wounded at Columbia, Tenn. on 29 Nov 1864.; C.S.A. MCTC.)  Buried ST. JOHN'S CHURCHYARD CEMTERY.  On February 16, 1864  ROBERT F. BECKHAM was promoted to Colonel and ordered to GENERAL JOHN BELL, where he was assigned to the command of the artiller in Lieutenant General Stephen Dill Lee's corps.  During Hood's invasion of Tennessee he was mortally wounded near Columbia, Tennessee during an artillery exchange and died near Ashwood, Tennessee on December 5, 1864.  There were no records located in Sailor and Soldiers Systems site. (NARA)

 BROWN, Campbell, 27 Nov 1840 - d.  30 Aug 1893.  (Son James P. & Lizinka Campbell Brown;  General on R.S. Ewell's Staff, C.S.A.;  State Representative.; MCTC)  Buried ST. JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY.  Rank in 1 Lieutenant rank out 1st Lieutenant.  3 (Clack's) Tennessee Infantry, Co. E., also listed in 34th Tennessee Infantry (4th Confederate Regt Tenn Infantry) Co. I, Rank in 1st Lt. rank out Captain. (NARA)

 DUBOSE,  Prvt. Joel,  d. 29 Nov 1864.  "Wounded in Battle of Columbia, Tenn." (C.S.A.; MCTC).  Buried ST JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY.  No listing in Sailors and Soldiers Systems site.  (NARA)

 GRANBERRY, J.J. (Joseph J.),  d. 2 Jan 1882.  Age 44 years.  (Son Jas. M.'  Co. C., 3rd Tenn Inf., C.S.A.;  MCTC).  Buried ST. JOHN"S CEMETERY.  There is a John J Granberry listed in the Sailors and Soldiers files but no J.J. or Joseph J that this compiler could find as of 4-2005.  (NARA)

 HARPER, Lieut, John,  d.  9 Nov 1864.  "Co. K, 30th Ala Reg., died at St. John's."  (C.S.A.; MCTC). Buried ST. JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY.  30th Regiment, Alabama Infantry, Co K, Confederate side, rank in Lt. rank out unknown.  (NARA)

 HOWARD,  John William,  27 Apr 1847 - 14 Oct 1921.  ( Forrest's Cav., C.S.A.; MCTC). BURIED ST. JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY.  I was unable to tell which J.W., J., JOHN, JOHN W. WILLIAMS, was on the Sailors and Soldiers Systems' list. There were none listed in Forrest's Old Reg.  (NARA)

 JOHNSON, I.A., "Ike" (Isom Andrew), Dec 1840 - 31 Jul 1913.  (Son Richard & Keziah Mangrum Johnson;  Co. D., 19th Cav., C.S.A.'  MCTC).  Buried ST. JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY.   No listing in Sailors and Soldiers Systems .  (NARA)

 LITTLEFIELD,  William,  1 Feb 1845 - 15 Sept 1899.  (Corp. Co. C,  19th Tenn Cav., C.S.A.;  wounded at Resaca;  mar. Mary Polk Eastin on 24 Nov 1865.; MCTC).  Buried ST JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY.  19th (Biffle's) Regiment Tennessee Calvary Co. G & D, Confederate side, rank in Pvt. rank out Corporal.  Alternate name W.S. /Littlefield .  (NARA)

 MARSH, Lieut J.H.,  of Hardeman Co., Tenn.,  Aide to Gen. Strahl.  No dates given.  (C.S.A.; MCTC).  Buried ST JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY.  Capt. Polk's Battery, Tennessee Light Artillery, Co. G, Tennessee Artillery Corps, Confederate side, rank in 1 Lt. rank out 1 Lt.  J.H. MARSH also served with Scott's Co., Tennessee Light Artillery, (Bankhead's), no company #, Confederate side, rank in 1st Lt. rank out 1st Lt. and served with Tennessee Artillery Corps, (McCown's) Co. 2, Confederate side, rank in 2nd Lt. rank out 2nd Lt.  (NARA)

 MARTIN,  Thomas Granville,  27 Sep 1831 - d.  10 Aug 1912. (Son George W. & Narcissa Pillow Martin;  Mar. lst Mary Mayes Wingfield & wnd Larissa Kittrell; Co. A, 9th Tenn Cav., C.S.A.; MCTC).   Buried ST. JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY. .  Rank in Pvt. rank out Pvt. 9th Tn Cavlary Co. A, Confederate side. (NARA)

McMURRAY,  Lieut.  Welborn,  24 Nov 1843 - 25 Mar 1864.  C.S.A.; MCTC).  Buried ST. JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY.  20th Tennessee Infantry, Co. B, Confederate side, rank in 2nd Lt. rank out 2nd Lt.  (NARA)

POLK,   Lieut. Rufus K.  31 Oct 1843 - 27 Aug 1902.  "Son George W. & Sally L.";  Lieut. 10th Inf., C.S.A.;  mar. to Margaret Phillips on 28 Apr 1881; MCTC).  Buried ST JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY. 10th Tennessee Infantry, Co. E, Confederate side, rank in 2nd Lt. rank out 1st Lt.  (NARA)

 POLK,  William,  1 Feb 1839 - 5 Apr 1905.  "Maj. 48th Tenn Reg., C.S.A."; MCTC).  Buried ST. JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY.  48th Reg Tn Infantry (Voorhies) Co. ? rank in Adjutant rank out Adjutant/  4th5th Consolidated Regiment, Tennessee Infantry Co. F & S rank in Major rank out Major/  3rd Reg Tn Infantry (Clack's) Co. D. rank in Sgt. Major rank out Major.  (NARA)

 SEYMORE,  J.A.,  17 Feb 1837 - d.  21 Nov 1864.  "Barker's Co., Forrest's Old Reg., C.S.A.;  d. Fayette Co.";  MCTC).    Buried ST JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY.  Not listed in Sailors and Soldiers Systems site.  (NARA)

 YEATMAN,  Henry C.,  22 Sep 1831 - 1 Aug 1910.  "B. Nashville,  d. Hamilton Place."  (Colonel, C.S.A.; MCTC).    Buried ST. JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY.  No listing in Sailors and Soldiers Systems site.  (NARA)

 Unknown, Col......YOUNG,  Col.  .............,   " of Texas, Killed Franklin, Tenn.,  30 Nov 1864.  Buried ST. JOHN'S CHURCH CEMETERY.   Unable to identify on Sailors and Soldiers Systems site.  (NARA) (The partially identified Texas officer killed at Franklin and buried at St. Johns is likely Lt. Col. Robert B. Young of the 10th Texas Infantry.; [from: Paul, 4 Jan 2009])

 

St. John's

Tut, tut, Johnny; all that sounds tolerable nice, but then you might want some favor from Uncle Sam, and the teat is too full of milk at the present time for us to turn loose. It's a sugar teat, Johnny, and just begins to taste sweet; and, besides, Johnny, once or twice you have put us to a little trouble; we haven't forgot that; and we've got you down now--our foot is on your neck, and you must feel our boot heel. We want to stamp you a little--"that's what's the matter with Hannah." And, Johnny, you've fought us hard. You are a brave boy; you are proud and aristocratic, Johnny, and we are going to crush your cursed pride and spirit. And now, Johnny, come here; I've something to whisper in your ear. Hold your ear close down here, so that no one can hear: "We want big fat offices when the war is over. Some of us want to be presidents, some governors, some go to congress, and be big ministers to 'Urup,' and all those kind of things, Johnny, you know. Just go back to your camp, Johnny, chase round, put on a bold front, flourish your trumpets, blow your horns. And, Johnny, we don't want to be hard on you, and we'll tell you what we'll do for you. Away back in your territory, between Columbia and Nashville, is the most beautiful country, and the most fertile, and we have lots of rations up there, too. Now, you just go up there, Johnny, and stay until we want you. We ain't done with you yet, my boy--O, no, Johnny. And, another thing, Johnny; you will find there between Mt. Pleasant and Columbia, the most beautiful country that the sun of heaven ever shone upon; and half way between the two places is St. John's Church. Its tower is all covered over with a beautiful vine of ivy; and, Johnny, you know that in olden times it was the custom to entwine a wreath of ivy around the brows of victorious generals. We have no doubt that many of your brave generals will express a wish, when they pass by, to be buried beneath the ivy vine that shades so gracefully and beautifully the wall of this grand old church. And, Johnny, you will find a land of beauty and plenty, and when you get there, just put on as much style as you like; just pretend, for our sake, you know, that you are a bully boy with a glass eye, and that you are the victorious army that has returned to free an oppressed people. We will allow you this, Johnny, so that we will be the greater when we want you, Johnny. And now, Johnny, we did not want to tell you what we are going to say to you now, but will, so that you'll feel bad. Sherman wants to 'march to the sea, while the world looks on and wonders.' He wants to desolate the land and burn up your towns, to show what a coward he is, and how dastardly, and one of our boys wants to write a piece of poetry about it. But that ain't all, Johnny. You know that you fellows have got a great deal of cotton at Augusta, Savannah, Charleston, Mobile, and other places, and cotton is worth two dollars a pound in gold, and as Christmas is coming, we want to go down there for some of that cotton to make a Christmas gift to old Abe and old Clo, don't you see? O, no, Johnny, we don't want to end the war just yet awhile. The sugar is mighty sweet in the teat, and we want to suck a while longer. Why, sir, we want to rob and then burn every house in Georgia and South Carolina. We will get millions of dollars by robbery alone, don't you see?"113

   PINE MOUNTAIN

DEATH OF GENERAL LEONIDAS POLK

General Leonidas Polk, our old leader, whom we had followed all through that long war, had gone forward with some of his staff to the top of Pine Mountain, to reconnoiter, as far as was practicable, the position of the enemy in our front. While looking at them with his field glass, a solid shot from the Federal guns struck him on his left breast, passing through his body and through his heart. I saw him while the infirmary corps were bringing him off the field. He was as white as a piece of marble, and a most remarkable thing about him was, that not a drop of blood was ever seen to come out of the place through which the cannon ball had passed. My pen and ability is inadequate to the task of doing his memory justice. Every private soldier loved him. Second to Stonewall Jackson, his loss was the greatest the South ever sustained. When I saw him there dead, I felt that I had lost a friend whom I had ever loved and respected, and that the South had lost one of her best and greatest generals. His soldiers always loved and honored him. They called him "Bishop Polk." "Bishop Polk" was ever a favorite with the army, and when any position was to be held, and it was known that "Bishop Polk" was there, we knew and felt that "all was well." GOLGOTHA CHURCH--GENERAL LUCIUS E. POLK WOUNDED On this Kennesaw line, near Golgotha Church, one evening about 4 o'clock, our Confederate line of battle and the Yankee line came in close proximity. If I mistake not, it was a dark, drizzly, rainy evening. The cannon balls were ripping and tearing through the bushes. The two lines were in plain view of each other. General Pat Cleburne was at this time commanding Hardee's corps, and General Lucius E. Polk was in command of Cleburne's division. General John C. Brown's division was supporting Cleburne's division, or, rather, "in echelon." Every few moments, a raking fire from the Yankee lines would be poured into our lines, tearing limbs off the trees, and throwing rocks and dirt in every direction; but I never saw a soldier quail, or even dodge. We had confidence in old Joe, and were ready to march right into the midst of battle at a moment's notice. While in this position, a bomb, loaded with shrapnel and grapeshot, came ripping and tearing through our ranks, wounding General Lucius E. Polk, and killing some of his staff. And, right here, I deem it not inappropriate to make a few remarks as to the character and appearance of so brave and gallant an officer. At this time he was about twenty-five years old, with long black hair, that curled, a gentle and attractive black eye that seemed to sparkle with love rather than chivalry, and were it not for a young moustache and goatee that he usually wore, he would have passed for a beautiful girl. In his manner he was as simple and guileless as a child, and generous almost to a fault. Enlisting in the First Arkansas Regiment as a private soldier, and serving for twelve months as orderly sergeant; at the reorganization he was elected colonel of the regiment, and afterwards, on account of merit and ability, was commissioned brigadier-general; distinguishing himself for conspicuous bravery and gallantry on every battlefield, and being "scalped" by a minnie ball at Richmond, Kentucky-- which scar marks its furrow on top of his head today. In every battle he was engaged in, he led his men to victory, or held the enemy at bay, while the surge of battle seemed against us; he always seemed the successful general, who would snatch victory out of the very jaws of defeat. In every battle, Polk's brigade, of Cleburne's division, distinguished itself, almost making the name of Cleburne as the Stonewall of the West. Polk was to Cleburne what Murat or the old guard was to Napoleon. And, at the battle of Chickamauga, when it seemed that the Southern army had nearly lost the battle, General Lucius E. Polk's brigade made the most gallant charge of the war, turning the tide of affairs, and routing the Yankee army. General Polk himself led the charge in person, and was the first man on top of the Yankee breastworks (_vide_ General D. H. Hill's report of the battle of Chickamauga), and in every attack he had the advance guard, and in every retreat, the rear guard of the army. Why? Because General Lucius E. Polk and his brave soldiers _never_ faltered, and with him as leader, the general commanding the army knew that "all was well."

Well, this evening of which I now write, the litter corps ran up and placed him on a litter, and were bringing him back through Company H, of our regiment, when one of the men was wounded, and I am not sure but another one was killed, and they let him fall to the ground. At that time, the Yankees seemed to know that they had killed or wounded a general, and tore loose their batteries upon this point. The dirt and rocks were flying in every direction, when Captain Joe P. Lee, Jim Brandon and myself, ran forward, grabbed up the litter, brought General Polk off the crest of the hill, and assisted in carrying him to the headquarters of General Cleburne. When we got to General Cleburne, he came forward and asked General Polk if he was badly wounded, and General Polk remarked, laughingly: "Well, I think I will be able to get a furlough now." This is a fact. General Polk's leg had been shot almost entirely off. I remember the foot part being twisted clear around, and lying by his side, while the blood was running through the litter in a perfect stream. I remember, also, that General Cleburne dashed a tear from his eye with his hand, and saying, "Poor fellow," at once galloped to the front, and ordered an immediate advance of our lines. Cleburne's division was soon engaged. Night coming on, prevented a general engagement, but we drove the Yankee line two miles.

Hold your ear close down here, so that no one can hear: "We want big fat offices when the war is over. Some of us want to be presidents, some governors, some go to congress, and be big ministers to 'Urup,' and all those kind of things, Johnny, you know. Just go back to your camp, Johnny, chase round, put on a bold front, flourish your trumpets, blow your horns. And, Johnny, we don't want to be hard on you, and we'll tell you what we'll do for you. Away back in your territory, between Columbia and Nashville, is the most beautiful country, and the most fertile, and we have lots of rations up there, too. Now, you just go up there, Johnny, and stay until we want you. We ain't done with you yet, my boy-- O, no, Johnny. And, another thing, Johnny; you will find there between Mt. Pleasant and Columbia, the most beautiful country that the sun of heaven ever shone upon; and half way between the two places is St. John's Church. Its tower is all covered over with a beautiful vine of ivy; and, Johnny, you know that in olden times it was the custom to entwine a wreath of ivy around the brows of victorious generals. We have no doubt that many of your brave generals will express a wish, when they pass by, to be buried beneath the ivy vine that shades so gracefully and beautifully the wall of this grand old church. And, Johnny, you will ......("Co. Aytch"; Watkins, Samuel R.; pg 80.)

 

References:

MCTC - Maury County Tennessee Cemeteries by Fred L. Hawkins, for listings.

NARA - http://www.gutenberg.org/catalog/world/readfile?fk_files=87767                 

HUGH COOPER 1720-1793 FISHING CREEK SO. CAROLINA and HIS DECENDANTS; Roberts, Lillian Lesbia Word, McElheny Publishing Co., Ft. Worth, Tx., 1976.

Special thanks to Wayne Austin for his encouragement and editing.