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ALLEN/CARPENTER CEMETERY, (Apple Hill Road), GILES COUNTY, TENNESSEE


 
Allen-Carpenter Cemetery behind a chain link fence, but infested with heavy brush.


Mapping the location      Area photos

Location: Highway 64 West, right into Campbellsville Road, right into Minnow Branch Road which becomes Apple Hill Road. Left side of road, enclosed by a chain link fence upon the slope about 200 yards from the road in a pasture.

ALLEN, Addison, son of J. I. & M. A. Allen, 5 Sep 1893 - 30 May 1903
ALLEN, J. I. Allen, 22 May 1851 - 21 Mar 1931.
ALLEN, Mary A., 19 Feb 1869 - 5 Jan 1940.
ALLEN, Ruby W. , 11 May 1895 - 9 Mar 19_ _(?).
CARPENTER, Julia A., 4 May 1826 - 26 Feb 1910.
CARPENTER, Michael, 18 Oct 1817 - 14 May 1889.
CARPENTER, W. E., 10 Sep 1861 - 15 Jun 1914 (field rock).

Commentary from the surveyor

I tried to get permission to visit this cemetery on 5 Nov 2009 by was met by vicious dogs when I drove up the driveway. What do you do? Risk awaking a night shift worker, by blowing your horn? Being a polite southerner, I chose to drive away, but was able to get a distant photo of the cemetery from the public road. I got out and quickly snapped the photo. The same dogs stormed down the hill and came at me to attack, but I was quick enough to scramble back into the safety of my car. I cringe to think what the outcome of this would have been if an innocent lady pushing a baby stroller came down that road.  Well, it is clear to me that vicious dogs must be restrained, at least behind fences.

Writings and tales of folks buried in the Allen - Carpenter Cemetery
As told to Debra by her past family members.

There were  3 lost graves in this cemetery that I (Debra) am aware of.  When Civil War Union soldiers were present this story as told by my Cousin, in her 80s said; they (soldiers) took everything, they could, food, blankets, etc. typical of an invading army.
Sadly this incident took place on the soldiers watch. A little black boy, was told by the soldiers to get upon a table and dance. While that in itself was no crime, they wouldn't let the child down,  but she said that the child literally danced on that table until he collapsed. It was thought by all that he danced himself to death. This story was passed down to her from my Great-Grandparents. The second person an unknown older black man,  who lived on the farm and worked here for sustenance is interred here also. He was probably not paid that much, but was fed, and had a place to sleep. When he passed away he was also buried here.  The third, a white baby with a name which sounded something like Sturgeon, but I cannot say for sure. She named the parents as well. I will get you that information if possible. The baby was born 5 months premature, and most likely stillborn. The family dug a small grave for the baby where Mary Ann is buried above her casket and had a small service, although she said there was no name. Their graves of the two blacks were then marked by common stones right next to the fence. She saw those as a child. The stones may be gone now.

Photographed from the road 5 Nov 2009. Added here 16 Nov 2009 by Wayne Austin from the book Giles County Cemeteries transcribed by Faye Bradford.  Revised 14 Feb 2013 to add Debra's family information.