My Family History web pages

Welcome to my family history web page. As my genealogy work expands, I've needed to expand the page.
Please click the appropriate link below to go to the family page you are interested in.

Panther

- Including Birk, Klumpp, Traub and Hanle families, along with related families in the towns of Moesbach, Stadelhoffen and Erlach, Baden, Germany.

Bixenman

- Including the Miller family


See my entire family tree. (Documentation not included.)


My genealogy blog can be found here.

Here are the most popular posts to my blogs, based on hits/views and overall response, ranked in order from most recent to oldest:

German Church Record Basics - Part 2 - Latin Records - Samples of words from Latin church books in Germany including how they look, the transliterated word in the text, the translation and explanation, if needed. This should help you make sense of what you find in German church books prior to about 1800.

German Church Record Basics - Part 1 - German Records - Samples of words from German church books including how they look, the transliterated word in the text, the translation and explanation, if needed. This should help you make sense of what you find in German church books after about 1800.

What Constitutes Proof? - My list of all circumstantial evidence pointing to the parents of my great-grandmother, Elizabeth Dunzinger and their family in New York and Wemding, Bavaria. It asks the question, is a lot of circumstantial evidence enough to constitue proof of this connection? This post was mentioned by Drew Smith and George Morgan in their "Genealogy Guys" podcast and by Lisa Louise Cooke in her "Genealogy Gems" podcast.

Who Finds Who? - The story of the discovery of the grave of my great-great-great-grandfather, Johannes Heinrich Kempker, in St. James Cemetery, St. Paul, Lee County, Iowa and it's near discovery by the son of my cousin when he literally tripped over it and still didn't see it. The writing on the stone is pretty difficult to make out, especially if you're a boy and it's freezing cold out. Photos his father took document how close he was to finding it.

Elizabeth Dunzinger Possibly Found - The announcement of my discovery of the 1855 New York State Census record showing one Elizabeth Dunzinger, of the correct age to be my great-grandmother, in New York City along with information on her family.






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