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Ancient Uladh
Kingdom of Ulster


Uladh * Kings of Uladh * Annals of Uladh
Airghialla * Northern Ui Neill * Northern Ui Neill Kings

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Background on Uladh

Some of the early "references" of tribal names in Ulster come to us from scholars translating the map of Ireland that Ptolemy provided in the middle of the 2nd century. Little is known of these tribal names, or exactly where and if they existed under these names. For purposes of sharing one version of these translations the following paragraph is drawn from Samuel Lewis in the early 19th century.

About the time of Ptolemy (c.150 AD) the tribes of the Vennicnii and the Rhobogdii are translated to be near the modern county of Donegal, prior to the arrival of the sons of Niall in the 4th century, that is Eoghan of Cenél Eóghain, Conall Gulban of Cenél Conaill, Enda of Cenél nEnnae and Cairbe of Cenél Cairpre. Ptolemy also mentions the country of the Darnii, or Darini, possibly in the present county of Derry, prior to the rise of the O'Cathains, a branch and tributary to the O'Nialls (Northern Uí Neill). In the present county of Antrim the Darnii or Darini are also inferred from Ptolemy, prior to the rise of the Dal Riata in that area. In the present county of Tyrone, the Scoti and sometimes the Erdini are said to be translated from Ptolemy's early map, prior to the rise of power of the Cineal Eoghain (Tir Owen, Tyrone). The present county of Down and southern Antrim has traditionally been known under the name Ulagh, with the Voluntii or Uluntii inferred from Ptolemy, prior to the rise of the Dal Fiatach and Dal nAraide branches of Ulidia. The Uí Eathach Cobha were also prominent in Down in descent from the Dal nAriade. Modern county Armagh, the home of the ancient capitol of Ulidia (Uladh), that is Emhain Macha, was mentioned by Ptolemy as home to the Vinderii and Voluntii, prior to the establishment of Oirgialla by the three Collas in the 4th century. It has also been translated from Ptolemy that the Scoti inhabited modern county Monaghan, and that the Erdini (Ernaigh) may have inhabited modern counties Fermanagh and Cavan.

The folklore of early Uladh (eastern Ulster) is recorded in many of the early Irish Annals, which include such volumes as the Annals of Ulster, the Annals of the Four Masters, etc. This folklore cites Ir, the fifth son of King Milesius (from Spain), as progenitor of some of the earliest tribes of Ulster. Ir and his brothers, Heber and Heremon, were claimed to arrive in Ireland with an expeditionary force from anywhere between the 17th to the 6th centuries B.C., and to have spawned many of the noble families of Ireland. Thus is one of the earliest and more enduring of Irish legends, that of the Milesian race.

Other than the tribes of Uladh, the central and western portions of the province of Ulster were, by the 4th and 5th centuries, held by the clans of the Airghialla, as well as the powerful northern Uí Neill clans of the Cenel Eoghain and Cenel Conaill, among others in this group. This page will focus on the eastern portion of the province of Ulster, often referred to as the territory of the Ulaid and Cruithne.

An ancient territory in Ulster, referred to in these texts as Uladh, Ulaid and Ulidia, was noted to be the home of the Ulaid and the Cruithne tribes, e.g. the Dál Fiatach, Dál Araidhe, Uí Eathach Cobha, Conaille Muirtheimhne, Leth Cathail, and the Dál Riada, among others. An ancient cultural center for the Ulaid was at Emhain Macha, in modern county Armagh, before being driven east by the incursion of the three Collas. A later center for the Dál Fiatach was established at or near modern Downpatrick in county Down.

The ancient Uladh genealogies cite Clann Conaill Cernaich, of the line of Ir, a quo Dál n-Araide, and the Úi Echach Ulad, and the Conaille Murthemni, and the Laígsi Laigen (of Leinster), and the Sogaine (of Connacht). The Dál Fiatach (Clan Con Ruí, probably named from Fiatach Finn) and the Dál Riata (named from Cairbre Riada) are cited in the line of Heremon.

The Uí Eochadha, later anglicized as Haughey, O'Hoey and Hoy, were noted chiefs of Uladh (Ulster) in the 10th century. The ancestors of the Uí Eochadha were lords in the county Down and south Antrim area for many centuries. It is interesting to review the extensive list of the kings and lords of Uladh (Ulidia) over many centuries as noted in the early Irish Annals and Genealogies below.

By the time of the Norman Invasion in the late 12th century the Mac Mac Duinnshléibhe (MacDonlevy) sept, named for their late 11th century ancestor Donn Slébhe Ua h-Eochadha, were chiefs of Uladh. The end of many centuries of Ulidian power, although dramatically reduced in the 4th and 5th centuries, came with the defeat of the MacDonlevys by John de Courcy in 1177.

The Magennis (MacGuinness) sept, lords of Iveagh, are stated to be descended from the Dal Araidhe. Their lineage cites ancestry from Saran, a 5th century chief of Dal Araidhe during the time of St. Patrick, and continues through the line of the Eathach Cobha of the Iveagh area of County Down.

Other septs included on the list of Ulster Kings included a MacMahon (MacMathghamhna) sept, lords of Oriel; a Lawlor (O Leathlobhair) sept; and an Ua Flaithrí sept.


The Tribes of Uladh
as cited in the genealogies and annals


Uladh, Ullagh, Ulaid and Ulidia were ancient names for the territory in the modern Irish province of Ulster, related in particular to the eastern portion of the province. The Dal nAriade and the Dal Fiatach were the ruling dynasties for much of Uladh's history. By the 4th and 5th centuries much of the western and central portions of Ulster began to be dominated by the tribes of the northern Uí Neill and the Oirghialla.

The Annals and the early genealogies cite many of the Kings of Ulaid back through the mists and myths of time, with some of the early Monarchs of Ireland in descent from Ir and from Heremon, sons of Milesius. Numerous events with connections to early Ulster are cited in the Annals of the Four Masters.


Dál Fiatach - also referred to as the Ulaid. Their territory appears to have been along the coast of modern County Down from about the 6th century. They contended for the kingship of Uladh (Ulidia) with the Dál n-Araidhe for many centuries. The Dál Fiatach are cited in descent from clainn Con Ruí, son of Dáire, son of Dedaed. Further citation gives the lineage from Fiatach Find, son of Dáre, son of Dluthaigh (Forgo?), a quo Dál Fiatach, an early king of Ireland.
Prior to the rise of the MacDonlevys at the end of the 12th century, the sept of O hEochaidh (Haughey or O'Hoey) were styled kings of Ulidia.

An early genealogy of some of the Dál Fiatach kings of Ulaid, from the line of Heremon, is cited as:
Donnchad m. Néill m. Eochada m. Arddgail m. Matudáin m. Áeda m. Eochucáin m. Áeda m. Echdach m. Fiachna m. Áeda Róin m. Béicce Bairche m. Blaithmeicc m. Máel Coba m. Fiachnae m. Duib Thuinne m. Demmáin m. Cairill m. Muredaich Mundeirg m. Forgo m. Dalláin m. Lugdach m. Rossa m. Imchada m. Óengusa Find m. Fergusa Dubdétaig m. Imchatha m. Findchada m. Ogamuin m. Fiachach Fir Umai m. Dáire m. Dlúthaich m. Deitsin m. Echdach m. Sin m. Roshin.

Some early chiefs of Dal Fiatach -- Fergus Dubdétach mac Imchada -- Fiachu Find -- Eochu Gunnat mac Féicc -- Daig -- Muiredach Muinderg mac Forgo -- Cairell -- Baítán.

The Annals cite:
  • For 37 AD, The first year of Fiatach Finn, son of Daire, son of Dluthach, in the sovereignty of Ireland.
  • For 39 AD, Fiatach Finn (from whom are the Dal Fiatach in Uladh), son of Daire, son of Dluthach, after having been three years in the sovereignty of Ireland, was slain by Fiacha Finnfolaidh.
  • For 622, The battle of Lethed Midinn, at Drung, was fought by Fiachna, son of Deman, Lord of Dal Fiatach, against Fiachna, son of Baedan, King of Ulidia. The battle was gained over Fiachna, son of Baedan, and he fell therein.
  • For 1100, Aisidh Ua h-Amhradhain, tigherna Dhal f-Fiatach, died.
  • For 1172, Mac Giolla Epscoip, chief of Clann-Aeilabhra, legislator of Cath Monaigh, was treacherously slain by Donslevy O'Haughy, king of Ulidia. The chiefs of Ulidia, who were as guarantees between them, put Donslevy to death for it i.e. for his crime .
  • For 1178, John De Courcy with his foreigners repaired to Machaire Conaille, and committed depredations there. They encamped for a night in Glenree, where Murrough O'Carroll, Lord of Oriel, and Cooley Mac Donslevy, King of Ulidia, made a hostile attack upon them, and drowned and otherwise killed four hundred and fifty of them. One hundred of the Irish, together with O'Hanvy, Lord of Hy-Meith-Macha, fell in the heat of the battle.

    Also see Kings of Ulster


    Dal Riada - in descent from Cairbre Rioghfhoda, in the line of Heremon. Dal Riata was the tribal and territorial name of the early tribes of County Antrim, particularly the northeast portion. The Dal Riada extended their kingdom into Scotland probably during the 3rd to the 7th centuries. The early term that the Romans referred to these and other tribes in Ireland was the "Scoti", thus the legend of where Scotland received its name.
    An early genealogy of Dal Riata cites their common ancestor, Glass, a quo sunt Síl Cuind & Dál Riata & Ulaid & Laigin & Ossairgi. His lineage is stated as:
    Glass mac Nuadait Argatlám of clan Úgaine Mor.


    The Book of Ballymote provides this ancient list of Irish kings of Dal Riata: Aengus Turmech (of Tara), Fiachu Fer-mara, Ailill Erand, Feradach, Forgo, Maine, Arnail, Ro-Thrir, Trir, Ro-Sin, Sin, Dedad, Iar, Ailill, Eogan, Eterscel, Conaire Mor, Daire Dornmor, Coirpre Crom-chend, Mug-lama, Conaire Coem, Coirpre Riata (Cairbre Rioghfhoda), Cindtai, Guaire, Cince, Fedlimid Lamdoit, Fiachu Tathmael, Eochaid Antoit, Aithir, Laithluaithi, Sen-chormac, Fedlimid, Angus Buaidnech, Fedlimid Aislingthe, Angus, Eochaid Muin-remor, Erc, Fergus [Mor mac Earca of 501 AD].

    An ancient lineage of the Dal Riata is cited as:
    Áengus Teamrach (81st Monarch), father of Fiachu Fer-mara, father of Ailill Érann, father of Feradach, father of Forgo, father of Maine Mór, father of Arndail, father of Rothrer, father of Trer, father of Ro-Sin, father of Sin, father of Dedad, father of Iar, father of Ailill Anglonnach, father of Éogan, father of Eterscél (95th Monarch), father of Conaire Mór (97th Monarch), father of Cairpre Finn Mór, father of Dáire Dornmór, father of Cairpre Crommchenn , father of Lugaid Allathach, father of Mogh Lamha, father of Conaire, father of Eochaid (Cairpre Riata), father of Fiachra Cathmáil, father of Eochaid Antóit, father of Achir Cirre, father of Finn Fiacc, father of Cruithluithe, father of Senchormac, father of Fedelmid Ruamnach, father of Áengus Buaidnech, father of Fedlimid Aislingthe, father of Áengus Fert, father of Eochaid Muinremar, father of Erc, father of Fergus Mór mac Earca.

    It has been stated that the kingship of Dal Riata was moved to Scotland with Fergus mac Eirc and his descendants, and that later in the 6th century the lords of the Dal Riata in Ireland were also allied with their southern neighbors, the Dal Fiatach.
    One line of ancestors of Fergus (above) is cited as:
    Ferchar, son of Connad Cerr, son of Conall, son of Comgall, son of Domangart, son of Fergus.
    Another line is cited as:
    Cinead (Kenneth), son of Alpin, son of Eochaid, son of Aed Find, son of Eocgaid, son of Eochaid, son of Domangart, son of Domnall Brecc, son of Eochaid Buidhe, son of Aedan, son of Gabran, son of Domnagart, son of Fergus.
    Still another line is cited as:
    Fianamhail, son of Dunchad, son of Duban, son of Duncath, son of Eoganan, son of Gabran, son of Domnagart, son of Fergus.

    The Annals cite:
  • For 165, Cairpre Riadal, desendant of King Conaire Mor, son of Mogh Lamha, from whom are the Dal Riada.
  • For 501/03, Feargus Mor mac Earca, king of Dal Riada (Alba), died.
  • for 565, Conall, son of Comhgall, chief of Dal Riada.
  • For 572, Conall, son of Comhgall, King of Dal Riada, died. It was he that granted Hy Iona to Colum Cille.
  • For 575, Conaill maic Comgaill, ríg Dal Ríada.
  • For 616, Aedhain m. Mongain regis Dal Riatai [& Araide?]
  • For 624, Connadh Cerr, Lord of Dal Riada.
  • For 629, Condadh Cerr rí Dal Riada.
  • For 698, Fianamhail Ua Dunchadha, chief of Dal Riada.
  • For 719, Sealbhach, Lord of Dal Riada, went into holy orders.
  • For 727, Eochaidh, son of Eochaidh, chief of Dal Riada, died.
  • For 771, Aedh Finn, lord of Dal Riada, died.
  • For 776, Fearghus, son of Eochaidh, lord of Dal Riada, died.
  • For 787/92, Donncoirche (Donn Corci), lord of Dal Riatai.
  • For 910, Diarmaid, mac Sealbhaich, tighearna Dail Riatta.


    Dál n-Araidhe - sometimes referred anciently with the Cruithne of southern Co. Antrim and northern Co. Down. Dalaradia, considered a part of ancient Ulidia, was the name of the territory in southern County Antrim (and part of Down) where St. Patrick was held as a slave during his young manhood.
    An early geneaolgy of the Dal Araide is cited as:
    Domnall m. Conchobuir m. Echrí m. Flathroí m. Áeda m. Loingsich m. Meicc Étich m. Lethlabair m. Loingsich m. Tomaltaich m. Indrechtaich m. Lethlabair m. Echach Iarlathi m. Fiachnae m. Báetáin m. Echdach m. Condlae m. Cóelbad m. Cruind Ba Druí m. Echach m. Lugdach m. Rossa m. Imchada m. Feidelmid m. Caiss m. Fiachach Araidi [m. Áengus Goibnenn m. Fergus Gallen m. Tipraiti Tírech m. Bressal Brecc m. Ferb m. Mál m. Rochride m. Cathbad m. Giallchad m. Condchad m. Findchad m. Muiredach Finn m. Fiachu Findamnas m. Iarél Glúnmár m. Conall Cernach]

    As noted in the name Loingsich (above) and the citings in the Annals for the 11th and 12th century, the Lynch sept were medieval chiefs of Dal Araidhe, although cited by Edward McLysaght with connections to the Dal Riada, their close neighbors and later allies. The O'Lynn (O'Floinn) sept is also noted in 1176.

    Legendary chiefs of Dal nAraide: Cermna -- Sobuirche -- Sétna Artt -- Fiachu Findscothach -- Ollam Fótla -- Fínnachta -- Slánoll -- Géde Ollgothach -- Berngal m. Géide -- Ailill -- Find m. Blátha -- Sírlám -- Argatmár -- Áed Ruad -- Díthorba -- Cimbáeth -- Macha (queen) -- Rudraige -- Bressal Bódíbad -- Congal Cláringnech -- Fachtna Fáthach -- Éllim m. Conrach -- Mál m. Rochride -- Cóelbad m. Cruind.

    The Annals cite:
  • For 10 AD, Tibraide Tireach, from whom are the Dal Araidhe.
  • For 356, Caolbhadh, mac Cruinn Ba Dhrai, ri n-Uladh.
  • For 483, Fiachra Lon, son of the king of Dhal Araidhe.
  • For 558, Aedh Dubh, son of Suibhne, King of Dal Araidhe.
  • For 626, Fiachna mac Baedaín, ri Dal Araidhe.
  • For 665, Maelcaeich, son of Scannal, chief of the Cruithne of Dal Araidhe of the race of Ir, died.
  • For 696/698, Aedh Aired, chief of Dal Araidhe.
  • For 787/92, Breasal, son of Flathrai (Bresal m. Flaithri), lord of Dal Araidhe.
  • For 790, Tomaltach m. Innrechtaigh ri Dal n-Araide, died.
  • For 824, Eochaid m. Bressail, ri Dal Araide in Tuaisceirt.
  • For 823/25, Maelbreasail, son of Ailell Cobha (Mael Bresail m. Ailello Cobo), lord of Dal Araidhe, died.
  • For 892, Muireadhach, son of Maeleitigh, lord of Dal Araidhe.
  • For 904, Bec ua Lethlobhair, tighearna Dál n-Araidhe, died.
  • For 912, Loingsech ua Lethlobhair, tighearna Dal n-Araidhe.
  • For 978, Cath edir Ultoibh & Dal n-Araidhe, a t-torchoir rí an Chóiccidh .i. Aodh, mac Loingsich, go sochaidhibh ele lá h-Eochaidh mac Ardgair.
  • For 1003, Donnchadh ua Loingsich, tigherna Dail Araidhe.
  • For 1015, Domhnall mac Loingsigh, tigherna Dail n-Araidhe.
  • For 1113, Findchaise H. Loingsigh ri Dail Araide.
  • For 1141, Domhnall Ua Loingsigh, tigherna Dal Araidhe, was slain.
  • For 1176, Cu Maighe h-Ua Flainn, rí h-Ua Turtri & Fer Lí & Dal Araide.
  • For 1177, An army was led by John De Courcy and the knights into Dalaradia and to Dun da leathghlas; they slew Donnell, the grandson of Cathasach, Lord of Dalaradia.


    Cruithne - The Cruithne of Dalriada and Dál n-Araidhe (and/or Dál Fiatach?) were said to occupy south Antrim and north Down.

    The Annals cite:
  • For 552, The killing of Colman Mor, son of Diarmaid, in his chariot, by Dubhshlat Ua Treana, one of the Cruithni.
  • For 557, The battle of Moin Doire Lothair was gained over the Cruithnigh, by the Uí Neill of the North, i. e. by the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, wherein fell seven chieftains of the Cruithnigh.
  • For 584, Bruidhe maic Maelchon, rig Cruithneach.
  • For 629, Mael Caith mac Scandail, rex Cruithniu.
  • For 629, Dicull mac Eachach rí ceneoil Cruithne.
  • For 645, Lochene mac Fingen, rí Cruithne, died.
  • For 646, Scandlaín maic Bécce, maic Fiachrach, ríg Cruithne.
  • For 654, Tolartach mac Anfrait, ríg Cruithne,
  • For 657, Tolorcain maic Ainfrith, ríg Cruithne.
  • For 663, Gartnait maic Domnaill, rig Cruithneach, dies.
  • For 665, The battle of Fearsat, between the Ulidians and the Cruithni, where Cathasach, son of Laircine, was slain.
  • For 665, Maelcaeich, son of Scannal, chief of the Cruithne of Dal Araidhe of the race of Ir, died.
  • For 665, Eochaidh Iarlaidh, King of the Cruithne, also died!
  • For 666, Mael Cáich mac Scandlain, ri Cruithne, died.
  • For 666, Eochaidh Iarlaithe, rí Cruithne Midhi (Meath).
  • Fro 679/81, Dungal, mac Scandail, toisech Cruithne.
  • For 680/82, Cathasach, mac Maoile Dúin, ri Cruithne
  • For 706/08, Cucuaran (Cu Cuaráin), King of the Cruithni and of Ulidia, was killed by Finnchu hUa Ronain.
  • For 727, Dub Da Inber mac Congalaig, rex Cruithne.
  • For 749, Cathasaig maic Ailello ríg Cruithne, h-i Raith Betheach.
  • For 774, Flathrue mac Fiachrach, rex Cruithne, died.


    Uí Eathach Cobha - A very early genealogy of the Uí Eathach, an offshoot of the Dál n-Araidhe is cited as:
    Flaithbertach m. Echmílid m. Áeda m. Echmílid m. Áeda m. Echmílid m. Óengusa m. Aitíd m. Laigne m. Blaithmeic m. Domnaill m. Conchobuir m. Bresail m. Fergusa m. Áedáin m. Mongáin m. Sáráin m. Maine m. Fothaid m. Conaill m. Cóelbad m. Cruind Ba Druí m. Fráechair m. Fergusa m. Lugdach m. Rossa m. Imchatha m. Feideilmid m. Caiss m. Fiachach Araidi m. Óengusa Goibnenn m. Fergusa m. Tipraite m. Bressail Bricc m. Briúin m. Feirbb m. Máil m. Rochride m. Cathbath m. Ailchada m. Cuindchatha m. Findchatha m. Muiredaich m. Fiachach Findamnais m. Iaréol Glúnmáir m. Conaill Cernaig m. Amargin m. Caiss m. Fachtnai m. Capai m. Ingai m. Rudraige m. Sittride m. Duib m. Fomuir m. Argatmáir m. Sírláim m. Find m. Blátha m. Labrada m. Ollaman Fótla m. Fiachach Fínscothaig m. Sétnai Airt m. Ébricc Bricc m. Ébir m. h- Ír m. Míled Espáine.

    Another early genealogy of the Uí Echach Coba is cited as: Congal m. Áeda m. Garbíth m. Écertaich m. Lorccáin m. Cernaich m. Máel Bresail m. Ailella m. Feideilmid m. Máel Cothaid m. Fergusa m. Áedáin m. Mongáin m. Sáráin m. Maine m. Fothaid m. Conaill m. Echach Coba (a quo Úi Echach Coba) m. Cruind Ba Druí.

    The Annals cite:
  • For 702, Maccnia, rex Nepotum Echdach Ulath.
  • For 732, Conchadh, son of Cuanach, chief of Cobha, was slain.
  • For 739, Eochaidh, son of Breasal, chief of Uí Eathach (Iveagh).
  • For 756, Ailill, son of Feidhlimidh, lord of Uí Eathach, was slain.
  • For 779, Coisenmhech Ua Predene, lord of Uí Eathach Uladh (Iveagh).
  • For 790, Cathasach, son of Toirpthea, lord of Uí Eathach (Iveagh), died.
  • For 796, Eochaidh, son of Ailell, lord of Cobha (Iveagh), was slain.
  • For 801, Echu mac Ailella, rex Cobho.
  • For 808, Dunlaing, son of Flannchaidh, lord of Uí Eathach, died.
  • For 825, Muireadhach, son of Eochadh, lord of Uí Eathach Uladh.
  • For 851, Cearnach, son of Maelbreasail, lord of Cobha, died.
  • For 879, Conallan, son of Maelduin, lord of Cobha, fell.
  • for 882, Conallan son of Maele Duin, king of Cobho.
  • For 1046, Aiteidh Ua h-Aiteidh, tighernaUa n-Eathach Uladh.
  • For 1094, Flaithbhertach Ua h-Addith, tigherna Ua n-Eatach Uladh.
  • For 1172, Mulmurry Mac Murrough, Lord of Muintir Birn, was slain by Mugh Magennis and the Clann-Aodha of Ui Eathach Uladh.
  • For 1208, Duvinnsi Magennis, Lord of Clann-Aodha, in Iveagh, was slain by the son of Donslevy O'Haughy.


    Conaille Muirtheimhne - of the barony of Dundalk in County Louth.
    The early genealogy of the Conaille Murthemni is cited as:
    Cináed m. Muiredaich m. Ingeirrce m. Congalaich m. Meicc Étich m. Cuilennáin m. Máel Brigti m. Speláin m. Sluagadaich m. h-Uargalaich m. Uchtbrain m. Uarcride m. Dícolla m. Coluimb m. Oissíne m. Crónáin m. Dúngaile m. Colmáin m. Cairill m. Conaill m. Echdach m. Cruind Ba Druí.

    The Annals cite for the term Conaille:
  • For 686, Uaircridhe Ua Oisene, chief of Conaille Muirtheimhne, was slain.
  • For 747, Foidmeann, son of Fallach, chief of Conaille Muirtheimhne.
  • For 822, Spealan, son of Sloigheadhach, lord of Conaille Muirtheimhne.
  • For 829, Maelbrighde, king of Conaille, was captured by the Vikings.
  • Obit. 867, Maelbrighde, son of Spealan, lord of Conaille.
  • Obit. 875, Gairbhith, son of Maeilbrighde, lord of Conaille, beheaded by the Ui Eathach.
  • For 879, Gibhleachan, lord of Conaille Muirtheimhne, gained victory over Ulidia and Cobha.
  • For 886, Githleachan, son of Maelbrighde, lord of Conaille Muirtheimhne, died.
  • Obit. 887, Maelmordha, son of Gairbhith, lord of Conaille Muirtheimhne.
  • For 894, A slaughter was made of the Conailli by the Ui Eachach, in which fell the two sons of Gairbhith, i.e. the son of Eitigh, and Maelmoghna.
  • For 910, Domhnall, mac Gairbhith, tighearna Conaille.
  • For 937, Crongilla son of Cuilennain, ri Conaille Muirtheimhne.
  • For 949, Mac Eitigh, mac Cuilendáin, tighearna Conaille Muirthemne, was slain by the Mughdorn Maighen.
  • For 976, Cionaodh, mac Croinghille, tigherna Conaille.
  • For 995, Matudhan ua Croinghille, tigherna Conaille.
  • For 998, Giolla Criost ua Cuilennáin, tigherna Conaille.
  • For 1004, Muiredhach, tigherna Conaille, was slain by the Mughdhorn.
  • For 1010, Críonán, mac Gormladha, tigherna Conaille, was slain by Coin Cuailgne.
  • For 1078, mac Uí Treodáin, tigherna Conaille.
  • For 1081, Mac Angeircce, tigherna Conaille, was slain by the men of Fernmag.
  • For 1093, Aodh Ua Baigheallán (O'Boylan), tigherna Airghiall, was slain by the Conaillibh Muirthemhne.


    Leth Cathail - The early genealogy of the Leth Cathail, an offshoot of the Dal Fiatach, is cited as:
    Cú Ulad m. Gillai Domongairt m. Óengusa m. Flathróe m. Cummascaich m. Máel Mochéirgi m. Indrechtaich m. Comaltaich m. Cummascaich m. Cathaláin m. Indrechtaich m. Tommaltaich m. Cathail (a quo Leth Cathail) m. Óengusa m. Máel Choba m. Fiachnae m. Demmáin m. Cairill m. Muiredaich Muindeirg.

    The Annals cite:
  • For 1006, Cú Uladh mac Aenghasa, tigherna Leithe Cathail.
  • For 1147, Archoin Ua Flathraoi, tigherna Lethe Cathail.


    Laígsi Laigen - The early genealogy of the Laígsi Laigen cite Lugaid Loígsech son of Conaill Cernaich. From the Laígsi are said to descend the O'More chiefs of County Leix (Laios) in Leinster. Also see the Tribes of Laigen (Leinster).


    Sogaine - Co. Mayo/Galway. Ó Mannáin (Mannion), McWards, O'Scurrys (Scarrys), O'Lennans, O'Casins, O'Gillas, O'Maigins and O'Dugevans (Duggans). Among the Ui Máine dwelt the Sogain, a Cruithin (Pict) tribe, and the Dal naDruithne believed to be Tuatha De Danann Celts. Also see the Kingdom of Connacht.


    Monarchs of Ireland
    with Ulster Connections


    - Legendary monarchs of Ireland descended from the line of Ir, son of Milesius, were of clan Ollaman of Ulster, i.e. the Dal Araide of Fir Ulaid, and included:

    brothers Cearmna and Sobhrach (Sobuirche), 15th monarchs of Ireland (Deaths: circa 1492 BC).
    lineage: Cearmna and Sobhrach m. Ebric m. Ébir m. h-Ír mc Míled Espáine.

    Seidnae, 23rd monarch of Ireland (Death: circa 1352 BC).
    lineage: Sétna Artt [m. Artraich m. Airtt m. Ebric] m. Ébir m. h-Ír mc Míled Espáine.

    Fiacha Fionn-Scothach, 24th monarch of Ireland (Death: circa 1332 BC).
    lineage: Fiacha Fínscothach m. Sétnai Airtt [m. Artraich m. Airtt m. Ebric] m. Ébir m. h-Ír mc Míled Espáine.

    Eochaidh Ollamh Fodhla, 27th monarch of Ireland (Death: circa 1277 BC).
    lineage: Ollamh Fodhla m. Fiachach Fínscothaich m. Sétnai Airtt [m. Artraich m. Airtt m. Ebric] m. Ébir m. h-Ír mc Míled Espáine.

    Fínnachta Fionn-sneachta, 28th monarch of Ireland (Death: circa 1257 BC).
    lineage: Fínnachta m. Ollamh Fodhla m. Fiachach Fínscothaich m. Sétnai Airtt [m. Artraich m. Airtt m. Ebric] m. Ébir m. h-Ír mc Míled Espáine.

    Slánoll, 29th, monarch of Ireland (Death: circa 1240 BC).
    lineage: Slánoll m. Ollamh Fodhla m. Fiachach Fínscothaich m. Sétnai Airtt [m. Artraich m. Airtt m. Ebric] m. Ébir m. h-Ír mc Míled Espáine.

    Gedhe Ollghothach, 30th monarch of Ireland (Death: circa 1228 BC).
    lineage: Gedhe m. Ollamh Fodhla m. Fiachach Fínscothaich m. Sétnai Airtt [m. Artraich m. Airtt m. Ebric] m. Ébir m. h-Ír mc Míled Espáine.

    Fiacha Finnailches, 31st monarch of Ireland (Death: circa 1208 BC).
    lineage: Fiacha m. Fínnachta m. Ollamh Fodhla m. Fiachach Fínscothaich m. Sétnai Airtt [m. Artraich m. Airtt m. Ebric] m. Ébir m. h-Ír mc Míled Espáine.

    Bearnghal, 32nd monarch of Ireland.
    lineage: Bearnghal m. Géide Ollghothaich m. Ollamh Fodhla m. Fiachach Fínscothaich m. Sétnai Airtt [m. Artraich m. Airtt m. Ebric] m. Ébir m. h-Ír mc Míled Espáine.

    Olioll (Ailill), 33rd monarch of Ireland.
    lineage: Ailill m. Slánoll m. Ollamh Fodhla m. Fiachach Fínscothaich m. Sétnai Airtt.

    Fionn, 42nd monarch of Ireland (Death: circa 929 BC).
    lineage: Find m. Blátha m. Labrada m. Cairpri m. Olloman Fótla.

    Sírlám, of Ráith Cochláin, 49th King of Ireland (Death: circa 855 BC).
    lineage: Sírlám m. Find. m. Blátha m. Labrada m. Cairpri m. Olloman Fótla m. Fiachach Fínscothaich m. Sétnai Airtt.

    Argethamar, 58th King of Ireland (Death: circa 747 BC).
    lineage: Argatmáir m. Sírláim mc Find m. Blátha m. Labrada m. Cairpri Olloman m. Olloman Fótla m. Fiachach Fínscothaich m. Sétnai Airtt.

    Áed Ruad, a quo Ulaid of Ehmain Macha, 61st King of Ireland (Death: circa 730 BC).
    lineage: Áed Ruad m. Baduirn m. Argatmáir m. Sírláim mc Find m. Blátha m. Labrada m. Cairpri Olloman m. Olloman Fótla m. Fiachach Fínscothaich m. Sétnai Airtt.

    Díthorba, a quo Ulaid of Ehmain Macha, 62nd King of Ireland (Death: circa 730 BC).
    lineage: Díthorba m. Dímaín m. Argatmáir m. Sírláim mc Find m. Blátha m. Labrada m. Cairpri Olloman m. Olloman Fótla m. Fiachach Fínscothaich m. Sétnai Airtt.

    Cimbáeda, a quo Ulaid of Ehmain Macha, 63rd King of Ireland (Death: circa 730 BC).
    lineage: Cimbáed m. Fintain m. Argatmáir m. Sírláim mc Find m. Blátha m. Labrada m. Cairpri Olloman m. Olloman Fótla m. Fiachach Fínscothaich m. Sétnai Airtt.
    King Cimbáeda was claimed to have built Emhain Macha (Navan) near Armagh (around 300 B.C.?)

    Macha Mongrua, a quo Ulaid, 64th Monarch (Queen) of Ireland (Death: circa 653 BC).
    lineage: Macha Mongruadh ingen Áeda Ruaid m. Baduirn m. Argatmáir m. Sírláim.

    Rudhraighe Mor, a quo Dál n-Araide, 86th King of Ireland.
    lineage: Rudraige mc Sittride m. Duib m. Fhomuir [m. ...] m. Argatmáir m. Sírláim m. Find m. Blátha m. Labrada m. Carpri m. Ollaman Fótla.

    Breasal Boidhiobhadh, 88th King of Ireland.
    lineage: Breasal m. Rudhraighi m. Sittride m. Duib m. Fhomuir m. Argatmáir.

    Congal Claroineach, 90th King of Ireland.
    lineage: Congal m. Rudhraighi m. Sittride m. Duib m. Fhomuir m. Argatmáir.

    Fachtna Fathach, 92nd King of Ireland
    lineage: Fachtna m. Rossa m. Rudhraighi m. Sittride m. Duib m. Fhomuir m. Argatmáir.

    Fiatach Finn, a quo Dál Fiatach, 103rd King of Ireland (line of Éremón, son of Mílesius)
    lineage: Fiatach Find m. Dáire m. Dlúthach (Forgo) m. Deithsin m. Eochaid m. Sin m. Roshin m. Trer m. Rothrer m. Airndil m. Maine Mór m. Forga m. Feradach m. Ailill Érann m. Fiachu Fer Mara m. Áengus Tuirmech -- through Ugaine Mor onto -- hÉremón m. Míled Espáine.

    Éilim (Éllim) Mac Connrach (Condrach), 105th King of Ireland
    lineage: Éilim mac Connrach mac Fergusa i. m-Maig Bolg.

    Mál, of m-Maig Line, 107th King of Ireland.
    lineage: Mál mac Rochraidhe m. Cathbad m. Giallchad m. Condchad m. Findchad m. Muiredach Finn m. Fiachu Findamnas (Dál n-Araidhe).

    Colla Uais, a quo Airghialla, 121st King of Ireland (line of Eber, son of Milesius).
    lineage: Colla Uais m. Eochaidh Doimhlen m. Cairbre Liffechair.

    Cóelbad, of the Dál n-Araidhe, 123rd King of Ireland.
    lineage: Cóelbad mac Cruind Ba Druí m. Echach m. Lugdach m. Rossa m. Imchada m. Feidelmid m. Caiss m. Fiachach Araidi (a quo Dál n-Araidhe).


    The mythical king of Ulster, Conor mac Nessa (Conchubar), Son of Nessa and Cathbad (the druid), and grandson of Rory Mor, king of Ulster is stated as living at the time of Christ. He took the crown from Fergus mac Roich. Other legendary chiefs at that time included Conall Cearnach, Fergus Mac Roi, Laoghaire, Dubhtach, and Scet.


    Further Ulster Reference: Airghialla * Northern Ui Neill * Kings of Uladh * Annals of Uladh

    Further Province Reference: Index * Connacht * Leinster * Mide * Munster * Ulster


    Further Reference at this site:
    Ireland History in Maps - Home Page
    Old Irish Surnames
    Kingdoms and Clans


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