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Northern Uí Neill
Ulster Series


Uladh * Kings of Uladh * Annals of Uladh
Airghialla * Northern Ui Neill * Northern Ui Neill Kings

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Background on the Northern Uí Neill

The sons of Niall of the Nine Hostages, Eoghan, Conall [Gulban], and Enda, travelled north from the kingdom of Connacht into the western and northern regions of the kingdom of Ulster (county Donegal). It was here in the 5th century that the Cenél Eóghain and Cenél Conaill began to establish themselves as overlords in northwestern Ulster. The Cenél Eóghain established there power base at Inishowen and their capital at Aileach. The Cenél Conaill centered themselves around the rich area of Magh Ithe, in the valley of the river Finn. The two clans alternated as kings of the North, as well as kings of Ireland, up to the 8th century.

In the 8th century a series of victories were gained by the Cenél Eóghain over the Cenél Conaill in Magh Ithe (east Co. Donegal), splitting their power between the territories of Fanad, in the north, and Tir nAeda, in the south. By the beginning of the 9th century the Cenél Eóghain were the dominant Northern dynasty, as they spread their influence east into modern county Derry and south into modern county Tyrone. In the 11th century the Cenél Eóghain moved their power base from Aileach to that near Tullahogue in modern day county Tyrone (named from Tir Eóghain, or Tir Owen). By the 12th century much of the area of Magh Ithe and that of Inishowen was taken by the O'Dohertys of Cenél Conaill. By the mid 13th century a leading family of the Cenél Eóghain, the Mac Lochlainn (McLoughlin), began to lose prominence to their kinsmen, the Ó Neill.

There are many notable northern Uí Neill clans which included O'Neill, O'Donnell, MacLoughlin, O'Donnelly, O'Doherty, O'Cannon, O'Muldory, O'Kane, O'Gallagher, O'Gormley, O’Flaherty or O’Laverty, O'Hamill, O'Lunney, O'Carolan of Clan Diarmada, O'Quin, O'Hagan of Tullahogue, O'Devlin of Munterdevlin, among many others.


Cenél Eóghain
Eoghan was the son of Niall who established his kingdom in Innishowen, centered at Aileach. Eoghan's sons included Muiredach, Binech, Fergus, Óengus, Dallán, Cormac, Feideilmid, Ailill, Echen, Illann, and Eochaid. Some of the clans of the Cenél Eóghain included those of Clan Neill, Clan Domnaill, Clan Birn, Cenél Fergusa, Cairrge Brachaidhe, Cenél Binnigh, Cenél Moen, Cenél Fearadhaigh, Cenel Tigernaich, Clan Conchobhair, Clan Diarmatta.

The annals cite for the northern Uí Neill:
  • For 465, Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages (from whom are descended the Cinel Eoghain), died of grief for Conall Gulban, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, and was buried at Uisce Chain, in Inis Eoghain.
  • For 527, After Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, had been twenty four years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was burned in the house of Cleiteach, over the Boyne, on the night of Samhain the first of November, after being drowned in wine.
  • For 557, The battle of Moin Doire Lothair was gained over the Cruithnigh, by the Uí Neill of the North, i. e. by the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, wherein fell seven chieftains of the Cruithnigh, together with Aedh Breac; and it was on this occasion that the Lee and Carn Eolairg were forfeited to the Clanna Neill of the North.
  • For 561, After Domhnall and Fearghus, the two sons of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall, had been three years in the sovereignty of Ireland, they both died.
  • For 562, Eochaidh, son of Domhnall, son of Muircheartach, and of Baedan, son of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, had been two years in the sovereignty of Ireland, they were slain by Cronan, chief of Cianachta Glinne Gemhin.
  • For 601, The first year of Aedh Uairidhnach, son of Domhnall Ilchealgach, son of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, in the sovereignty of Ireland.
  • For 634, The battle of Saeltire was gained by Conall Cael, son of Maelcobha, over the Cinel Eoghain.
  • For 650, The battle of Fleascach, by Crunnmael, son of Suibhne, chief of Cinel Eoghain, in which was slain Cumascach, son of Oilioll, chief of Uí Cremhthainn.
  • For 679, Dunghal, son of Scannal, chief of the Cruithni, and Ceannfaeladh, son of Suibhne, chief of Cianachta Glinne Geimhin, were burned by Maelduin, son of Maelfithrigh, at Dun Ceithirn.
  • For 698, Flann, son of Ceannfaeladh, son of Suibhne, chief of Cinel Eoghain, was slain.
  • For 698, Aurthuile Ua Crunnmaeil, chief of Cinel Eoghain was driven from his chieftainry into Britain.
  • For 698, Flann Finn, son of Maeltuile Ua Crunnmaeil, chief of Cinel Eoghain, died.
  • For 705, The battle of Leathairbhe was gained by Congal, son of Fearghus Fanad (sovereign of Ireland), over the Cinel Eoghain, where Maelduin, son of Maelfithrigh, Lord of the Cinel Eoghain, was slain.
  • For 718, After Fearghal, son of Maelduin, son of Maelfithrigh, had been ten years in sovereignty over Ireland, he was slain in the battle of Almhain. Also fell Forbasach, chief of Cinel Boghaine; Conall Menn, chief of Cinel Cairbre.
  • For 721, The battle of Druim Fornocht was fought by Flaithbheartach, son of Loingseach, and the Cinel Conaill, against Aedh Allan, son of Fearghal, and the Cinel Eoghain. Aedh Allan was defeated. These chieftains were slain on the side of Aedh, namely Flann, son of Erthaile, and Snedgus Dearg Ua Brachaidhe.
  • For 727, A battle was fought between Aedh, son of Fearghal, and the Cinel Conaill, at Magh Itha, where Conaing, son of Congal, son of Fearghus, and many others of the Cinel Eoghain, were slain.
  • For 728, A battle was fought in Magh Itha, between the sons of Loingseach, son of Aenghus, and the sons of Fearghal, son of Maelduin, where numbers of the Cinel Eoghain were slain, and Conchadh, son of Cuanach, chief of Cobha, was also slain.
  • For 730, The first year of Aedh Allan, son of Fearghal, son of Maelduin, over Ireland.
  • For 732, The battle of Fochart, in Magh Muirtheimhne was fought by Aedh Allan and the Clanna Neill of the North, against the Ulidians, where Aedh Roin, King of Ulidia, was slain.
  • For 733, Aedh Allan, King of Ireland, assembled the forces of Leath Chuinn, to proceed into Leinster; and he arrived at Ath Seanaith. The Leinstermen collected the greatest number they were able, to defend his right against him. A fierce battle was fought between them. The king, Aedh Allan himself; went into the battle, and the chieftains of the North along with him. The chieftains of Leinster came with their kings into the battle; and bloodily and heroically was the battle fought between them both. Heroes were slaughtered, and bodies were mutilated. Aedh Allan, and Aedh, son of Colgan, King of Leinster, met each other in single combat; and Aedh, son of Colgan, was slain by Aedh Allan. The Leinstermen were killed, slaughtered, cut off, and dreadfully exterminated, in this battle, so that there escaped of them but a small remnant, and a few fugitives.
  • For 738, Aedh Allan, son of Maelduin, fell in the battle of Magh Seirigh (i.e. Ceanannus), between the two Teabhthas, by Domhnall, son of Murchadh, after having been nine years in the sovereignty of Ireland. There were also slain in the same battle Cumascach, son of Conchubhar, Lord of the Airtheara (the Oriors); Maenach, son of Connalach, Lord of Uí Creamhthainn; and Muireadhach, son of Fearghus Forcraidh, Lord of Uí Tuirtre.
  • For 751, The army of Leinster was led by Domhnall, son of Murchadh, of Clan Cholmain, against Niall i.e. the Uí Neill, until they arrived in Magh Muirtheimhne.
  • For 754, The battle of Eamhain Macha was gained by Fiachna, son of Aedh Roin (king of Uladh), over the Uí Neill, wherein were slain Dunghal Ua Conaing and Donnbo.
  • For 765, Niall Frosach, son of Fearghal, was seven years king over Ireland when he resigned; and he died at I Coluim Cille, on his pilgrimage eight years afterwards.
  • For 766, There arose a dissention between Ceallach, son of Donnchadh, King of Leinster, and the monarch Donnchadh, son of Domhnall. Donnchadh made a full muster of the Uí Neill and marched into Leinster. The Leinstermen moved before the monarch and his forces until they arrived at Sciath Neachtain. Donnchadh, with his forces, remained at Aillinn; his people continued to fire, burn, plunder, and devastate the province for the space of a week, when the Leinstermen at length submitted to his will.
  • For 774, A hosting was made by Donnchadh, son of Domhnall (southern Uí Neill sovereign of Ireland), into the North, so that he brought hostages from Domhnall, son of Aedh Muindearg, lord of the North.
  • For 782, A battle (i.e. the battle of Ircoir) between the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, in which Domhnall, son of Aedh Muindearg, was routed.
  • For 783, Maelduin, son of Aedh Allan, King of the North, died.
  • For 784, The battle of Claideach, between the Cinel Eoghain and Cinel Conaill, in which Domhnall was routed.
  • For 793, The first year of Aedh Oirdnidhe, son of Niall Frosach, in sovereignty over Ireland.
  • For 797, Aedh Oirdnidhe went to Meath, and divided Meath between the two sons of Donnchadh, namely, Conchubhar and Ailill.
  • For 799, Aedh Oirdnidhe assembled a very great army to proceed into Leinster and devastated Leinster twice in one month. Aedh Oirdnidhe afterwards went to the King of Leinster, and obtained his full demand from the Leinstermen; and Finsneachta, King of Leinster, gave him hostages and pledges.
  • For 800, Aedh Oirdnidhe went to Dun Cuair, and divided Leinster between the two Muireadhachs, namely, Muireadhach, son of Ruadhrach, and Muireadhach, son of Bran.
  • For 815, Aedh Oirdnidhe went a second time with a very great army to Dun Cuar, and divided Leinster between the two grandsons of Bran.
  • For 817, A battle between the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, in which Maelbreasail, son of Murchadh, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain by Murchadh, son of Maelduin. Niall Caille mustered his forces, namely, the races of Conall and Eoghan; and Cumusgach, lord of Airghialla, and Muireadhach, son of Eochadh, lord of Uí Eathach Uladh, mustered the Airghialla and the Ulidians; and a spirited battle was fought between them, i. e. the battle of Leithi Cam, in Magh Enir. Victory was gained over the troops of Aileach, by the Airghialla, on the two first days; but on the third day, when Niall himself came into the battle at Leithi Luin, in the vicinity of Leithi Cam, the Airghialla were defeated, cut down, and pursued to Craebh Caille, over the Callainn, to the west of Ard Macha; and the battle was gained over the Ulidians and Airghialla, and a slaughter made of them.
  • For 821, The deposing of Murchadh, son of Maelduin, by Niall Caille, son of Aedh Oirdnidhe, and by the Cinel Eoghain.
  • For 825, The violation of Eoghan Mainistreach, as to the primacy of Ard Macha; for Cumasgach, son of Cathal, lord of Airghialla, forcibly drove him from it, and set up Airtri, son of Conchobhar (half brother of Cumasgach by the mother), in his place.
  • For 847, Flannagan, son of Eochaidh, lord of North Dal Araidhe, was slain by the Cinel Eoghain.
  • For 864, A complete muster of the North was made by Aedh Finnliath, so that he plundered the fortresses of the foreigners, wherever they were in the North, both in Cinel Eoghain and Dal Araidhe.
  • For 879, A hosting was made by the king, Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, with the Irishand foreigners, into the North; and they halted at Magh Eitir Di Glais, so that Ard Macha was plundered by some of the troops; and he took the hostages of the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain on that expedition.
  • For 896, Maelbreasail, son of Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain in the battle of Sailtin, by Murchadh, son of Maelduin, lord of Cinel Eoghain.
  • For 1003, Aodh, mac Domhnaill uí Néill, tighearna Oiligh.
  • For 1148, Domhnall Ua Gairmledhaigh, tigherna Chenel Eoghain.
  • For 1164, Muirchertach, mac Néill, rí Ailigh & maithe Cenel Eoghain.
  • For 1170, Conchobhar, mac Muirchertaigh Ui Lochlainn, tigherna Cenél Eóghain
  • For 1177, Aedh h-Ua Neill .i., In Macamh Toinlesc, ri Ceneoil Eogain.
  • For 1197, Flaithbertach O Mael Doraidh .i., ri Conaill & Eogain & Aigiall.

    Clan Neill genealogy (O'Neill, et al) -- Domnall m. Ardgair m. Lochlaind m. Muiredaich m. Domnaill m. Muirchertaich m.Néill Glúnduib m. Áeda Findléith m. Néill Caille m. Áeda Oirdnide m. Néill Frossaich m. Fergaile m. Máele Dúin m. Máel Fithrich m. Áeda Uaridnaich m. Domnaill m. Muircherdaich m. Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill.
    Note: The name O'Neill originated with Niall Glúndub, a 10th century ancestor of the Uí Neill line. The reference here to Clan Neill refers to Neill Caille, his grandfather.

    Clan Domnaill (O'Donnelly, et al) - The name of O'Donnelly is said to derive from a great-great grandson of Domnaill, that is Donghaile. They were cited as chiefs Feardroma. The early genealogy of the "Fir Droma Lighen" is cited as Gilla Meic Liac m. Echthigirn m. Donngaile m. Cellacháin m. Domailén m. Donngaile m. Sechnassaich m. Cellaich m. Echdach m. Domnaill m. Áeda Findléith m. Néill Caille m. Áeda Oirdnide

    an early Clan Domnaill genealogy
    Áed m. Néill m. Máel Sechnaill m. Máel Ruanaid m. Flaind m. Domnaill m. Áeda Findléith m. Néill Caille m. Áeda Oirdnide m. Néill Frossaich m. Fergaile m. Máele Dúin m. Máel Fithrich m. Áeda Uaridnaich m. Domnaill m. Muircherdaich m. Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig.

    Clan Birn genealogy -- Cú Lacha m. Con Chaille m. Muredaich m. Fergail m. Muiredaich m. Birnn m. Ruadrach m. Murchada m. Máel Dúin m. Áeda Alláin m. Fergaile m. Máel Dúin m. Máel Fithrich m. Áeda Uaridnaich m. Domnaill m. Muircherdaich m. Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig.


    Cenél Conaill
    Conall Gulban was the son of Niall who established his kingdom, among other places, in Mag Ithe in the valley of the Finn. His territory was co-extensive, more or less with the present baronies of Tir Hugh, Bannagh, Boylagh and Kilmacrenan. Conall's sons included Óengus Gunnat, Nath Í, Tigernach Duí, Énna Bóguine, Fergus Cennfota (or Taulán), and Eochu. Some of the clans or territories of the Cenél Conaill included those of Sil Lugdach (O'Donnell, O'Boyle, O'Doherty, ...) Cenel Bóguine, Tir Ainmireach & Tir Aedha (O'Cannon, O'Muldorey, O'Gallaghers, ...), and Cenel Duach, among others.

    An early Cenél Conaill genealogy -- Máel Ruanaid m. Muirchertaich m. Óengusa m. Máel Bresail m. Máel Doraid m. Óengusa m. h-Irchada m. Máel Bresail m. Flaithbertaich m. Loingsich m. Óengusa m. Domnaill m. Áeda m. Ainmerech m. Sétnai m. Fergusa Ceannfhoda m. Conaill Gulban m. Néill Noígiallaig.

    The annals cite for Cenél Conaill:
  • For 464, Conall Gulban, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages (from whom are descended the Cinel Conaill), was slain by the old tribes of Magh Slecht, he having been found unprotected, and was buried at Fidhnach Maighe Rein, by Saint Caillin, as the Life of the aforesaid saint relates.
  • For 564, The first year of Ainmire, son of Sedna, son of Fearghus Ceannfhoda, in the sovereignty of Ireland.
  • For 566, After Ainmire, son of Sedna, son of Fearghus Ceannfhoda, was three years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain by Fearghus, son of Nellin.
  • For 567, After Baedan, son of Ninnidh, son of Fearghus Ceannfhoda, had been one year in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain at Leim An Eich.
  • For 568, The first year of Aedh, son of Ainmire, over Ireland. Fearghus, son of Nellin, was slain by Aedh, son of Ainmire, in revenge of his father. Aedh was ancestor of the families O'Gallachubair (O'Gallagher), O'Canannan (O'Cannon) and O'Maeldoraidh (O'Muldory of Loch Erne)
  • For 579, The battle of Druim Mic Earca, was gained by Aedh, son of Ainmire, over the Cinel Eogain, where was slain Colga, son of Domhnall, son of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach.
  • For 586, Baedan, son of Níndedha, son? of Conall Gulban, king of Tara.
  • For 594, After Aedh, son of Ainmire, son of Sedna, had been twenty seven years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain by Bran Dubh, son of Eochaidh, in the battle of Dun Bolg, in Leinster, after Aedh had gone to exact the Borumha, and to avenge his son Comusgach upon them. Some nobles fell in this battle of Bealach Duin Bolg, together with Beg, son of Cuanach, Lord of Oirghialla.
  • For 605, Seachnasach, son of Garbhan, chief of Cinel Boghaine, was slain by Domhnall, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire.
  • For 608, The first year of Maelcobha, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, in the sovereignty of Ireland.
  • For 610, After Maelcobha, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, had been three years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain by Suibhne Meann, in the battle of Sliabh Toadh.
  • For 624, The first year of Domhnall, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, in the sovereignty of Ireland.
  • For 634, The battle of Magh Rath was gained by Domhnall, son of Aedh, and the sons of Aedh Slaine, over Congal Claen, son of Scannlan, King of Ulidia, where fell Congal, and the Ulidians and foreigners along with him.
  • For 639, After Domhnall, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, had been sixteen years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he died at Ard Fothadh, in Tir Aedha, after the victory of penance, for he was a year in his mortal sickness; and he used to receive the body of Christ every Sunday.
  • For 640, The first year of Conall Cael and Ceallach, two sons of Maelcobha, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, over Ireland, in joint sovereignty.
  • For 641, Maelbreasail and Maelanfaidh died; and Flann Enaigh was mortally wounded. These were of the Cinel Conaill Gulban.
  • For 646, The battle of Dun Crimhthainn was gained by Conall and Ceallach, the two sons of Maelcobha, over Aenghus, son of Domhnall; and Aenghus was slain in this battle; and there was also slain in this same battle Cathasach, son of Domhnall Breac.
  • For 656, After Conall and Ceallach, the two sons of Maelcobha, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, had been seventeen years over Ireland, Conall was slain by Diarmaid, son of Aedh Slaine; and Ceallach died at Brugh Mic An Og.
  • For 622, Conall and Colgu, two sons of Domhnall, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, were slain by Ceirrceann.
  • For 670, Dungal, son of Maeltuile, chief of Cinel Boghaine, was slain by Loingseach, son of Aenghus, chief of Cinel Conaill.
  • For 694, The first year of Loingseach, son of Aenghus, in the sovereignty of Ireland.
  • For 701, After Loingseach, son of Aenghus, son of Domhnall, had been eight years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain in the battle of Corann, by Ceallach of Loch Cime, the son of Raghallach. There were slain also his three sons along with him, Artghal, Connachtach, and Flann Gearg.
  • For 721, The battle of Druim Fornocht was fought by Flaithbheartach, son of Loingseach, and the Cinel Conaill, against Aedh Allan, son of Fearghal, and the Cinel Eoghain. Aedh Allan was defeated. These chieftains were slain on the side of Aedh, namely Flann, son of Erthaile, and Snedgus Dearg Ua Brachaidhe.
  • For 723, The first year of Flaithbheartach, son of Loingseach, son of Aenghus, in sovereignty over Ireland.
  • For 727, A battle was fought between Aedh, son of Fearghal, and the Cinel Conaill, at Magh Itha, where Conaing, son of Congal, son of Fearghus, and many others of the Cinel Eoghain, were slain.
  • For 728, Flaithbheartach sent for a marine fleet of Dal Riada to Ireland, and on their arrival they made no delay till they arrived in Inis hOinae; and there was a battle fought between Flaithbheartach with his guards and the Cianachta, and others of the Ulidians and the Cinel Eoghain; and a countless number of the Ulidians, Cinel Eoghain, and Cianachta, were cut off, together with Conchubhar, son of Loichene, and Branchu, son of Bran; and a countless number of them was drowned in the Banna, after their having been defeated.
  • For 749, Loingseach, son of Flaithbheartach, lord of Cinel Conaill, died.
  • For 762, Murchadh, son of Flaithbheartach, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain.
  • For 782, A battle (i.e. the battle of Ircoir) between the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, in which Domhnall, son of Aedh Muindearg, was routed.
  • For 799, Domhnall, son of Aedh Muindearg, son of Flaithbheartach, son of Loingseach, son of Aenghus, son of Domhnall, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, lord of the North, died.
  • For 810, Colman, son of Niall, was slain by the Cinel Conaill. A hosting was made by Aedh Oirdnidhe against the Cinel Conaill, by which Roghallach, son of Flaithghius, was slain.
  • For 817, A battle between the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, in which Maelbreasail, son of Murchadh, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain by Murchadh, son of Maelduin.
  • For 868, Dalach, son of Muircheartach, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain.
  • For 874, The battle of Claideach, between the Cinel Eoghain and Cinel Conaill, in which Domhnall was routed.
  • For 879, A hosting was made by the king, Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, with the Irishand foreigners, into the North; and they halted at Magh Eitir Di Glais, so that Ard Macha was plundered by some of the troops; and he took the hostages of the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain on that expedition.
  • For 896, Maelbreasail, son of Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel Conaill, was slain in the battle of Sailtin, by Murchadh, son of Maelduin, lord of Cinel Eoghain.
  • For 899, Fogartach, son of Maeldoraidh, lord of Cinel Conaill, fell upon his own javelin, and died of it the wound.
  • For 901, Eigneachan, son of Dalach, son of Muircheartach, lord of Cinel Conaill, died.
  • For 967, Mael Isu H. Canannan, ri Cenil Conaill.
  • for 976, Giolla Colaim Ua Canandáin, tigherna Ceneóil Conaill, was slain by the king, Domhnall ua Néill.
  • For 978, Tighernán ua Maol Doraidh, tighearna Cenél Conaill, was slain.
  • For 1011, Mael Ruanaidh H. Mael Doraidh, ri Ceniuil Conaill.
  • For 1153, Flaithbhertach Ua Canannáin, tigherna Cenél c-Conaill.
  • For 1156, Aedh, mac Ruaidhri Uí Chanannáin, tigherna Cenel c-Conaill.
  • For 1160, Aithchléreach Ua c-Canannáin, lá tigherna Cenél Conaill.
  • For 1188, Ruaidhri h-Ua Canannan, rí Ceneoil Conaill, was slain by Fhlaithbertach h-Ua Mael Doraidh.
  • For 1197, Echmarcach h-Ua Dochartaich righi Ceneoil Conaill.
  • For 1197, Flaithbertach O Mael Doraidh .i., ri Conaill & Eogain & Aigiall.


    For Cenél Eóghain and Cenél Conaill, also see northern Uí Neill kings


    Cenél Endai, of southern Co. Donegal and northern Fermanagh. In the 5th century Enda, the youngest son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, received territory which extended from the river Errity to Barnesmore, barony of Tir Hugh, to Sruell in the barony of Banagh, county of Donegal. The north-western limit was Farnagh in the parish of Aughnis, barony of Kilmacrenan. The eastern limit of his lands was the river Finn. From Eanna (Enda), son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, descended the Cinel Eanna, Kings of Magh Ith, Tir Eanna and Fanad in present day Co. Donegal until dispossessed of their territories by the expansion of the Cinel Chonaill septs in the 12th century. 11th century chiefs of Cenél n-Enda mentioned in the annals below include ua Lapáin (O'Lappin) and ua h-Eicnechan (roughly O'Heneghan).
    According to O'Dugan, the following were chiefs of Magh Ith: O'Boyle, O'Mulbraisil, O'Quinn, and O'Kenny. Mag Ith was partly in the barony of Raphoe in Donegal, and partly in the barony of Tirkeran in Derry. O'Breslin, cited as chiefs in Fanad and noted as brehons there, are cited by MacLysaght as a branch of the Cenel Enda, and by others as a branch of Cenel Conaill (descent from Fergus Fanad).

    The annals cite:
  • For 1011, Oenghus ua Lapáin, tigherna Cenél n-Enda
  • For 1036, Cú Ciche, mac Eccnecháin, tigherna Ceneoil Enda, died.
  • For 1057, Niall H. h-Eicnechan ri Ceniuil Endai
  • For 1078, Cathal, mac Domhnaill, tigherna Cenel Enda
  • For 1175, The Kinel-Enda were defeated, and a great slaughter made of them by Eachmarcach O'Kane, and Niall O'Gormly.
  • For 1177, Niall O'Gormly, Lord of the men of Magh-Ithe and Kinel-Enda, was slain by Donough O'Carellan and the Clandermot in the middle of Derry Columbkille.
  • For 1177, O'Muldory and the Kinel-Connell were defeated by Conor O'Carellan in a battle, in which O'Sherry and many other distinguished men of the Kinel-Enda were slain.
  • For 1199, Donnell O'Doherty, Lord of Kinel-Enda and Ard-Mire, died.
  • For 1201, On the same day the Kinel-Owen made another predatory incursion into Tirconnell; and a conflict took place between them and O'Donnell, in which the Kinel-Owen were defeated, and Gearrmaidi O'Boylan and many others of the Kinel-Owen were slain alone with him.


    Cenél Cairpri [Mor], of northern Co. Sligo and northeast Co. Leitrim. The territory of Cairbre, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, around the 6th century extended from the Drowes west to the Owenmore river in Ballysadare. Duncarbry (Dun Chairbre- Cairbre's Fort) - later a McClancy fort - marks the border of Cairbre's territory on the Drowes, while the Barony of Carbury in North Sligo today reminds us also of where he ruled. Noted chiefs of Cenél Cairpre included O'Mulclohy (Ó Maolchloiche).

    An early Cairpri Mor genealogy -- h-Uallgarg m. Máel Ruanaid m. Máel Fábaill m. Ciardai m. Máel Bennachtai m. Écneicháin m. Dúnchada m. Arttgaile m. Donngaile m. Loingsich m. Lóegaire m. Con Gamna m. Moínaich m. Fiangusa m. Congaile m. Máel Dúin m. Scandláin m. Roitich m. Ainmerech m. Cormaicc m. Cairpri m. Néill Noígiallaig.

    The annals cite (possibly related to this Cairpri sept):
  • Ua Ciardai as king of Cairpri around 954 (referring to the Cairpri Moir).
  • For 993 Maol Ruanaidh ua Ciardha, lord of Cairpre, is slain by the men of Teftha;
  • For 1012, Ualgharg ua Ciarrdhai lá tigherna Coirpre.
  • For 1017, Aodh na Dearbha Ua Ciarrdha was tigherna (lord) of Cairpre;
  • For 1024 Maol Ruanaidh ua Ciarrdhai is cited as tigherna Cairpre;
  • For 1046, Ferghal Ua Ciardha, tigherna Cairpre;
  • For 1080 Giolla Muire Ua Ciarrdha, tigherna Cairpre;
  • For 1138 Domnall O Cíardha is cited as rí Cairpri;


    Cenél Fergusa, of the Cenél Eóghain, with territory later held south of the Sperrin Mountains in Derry. Fergus was a son of Eoghan, and ancestor of the O'Hagans, O'Quins, Mulfoyles and O'Mallons (O'Mellans) among others. O'Mellan's country was said to be originally in southernmost Co. Derry, and the sept is later noted in Co. Tyrone.

    An early Cenél Fergusa genealogy -- Ragnall mc Gillai Áeda m. Flaind m. Gillai Epscoip Éogain m. Ócáin m. Cináeda m. Máelgairb m. Ailella m. Cummascaich m. Donngaile m. Cuanach m. Conaill m. Brachaidi m. Diarmata m. Feideilmid m. Cairpre m. Cóelbad m. Fergusa m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig.


    Cairrge Brachaidhe. The Mulfaal (Mulfoyle, MacFael or MacFall) sept are cited in the Annals as chiefs of Carrichbrack (Carrickbraghy) in the barony of Inishowen West, County Donegal. The Mulfaal sept is descended from Fergus, grandson of Niall of the Nine Hostages, and are thus part of the Cenél Fergusa. O'Hogain (O'Hagan or Hogan) is cited as a chief here by O'Dugan.
    Other territories in Inishowen at the time included the kingdoms of Aileach, held by the powerful descendants of Niall Glundubh (Ua Neill and Mac Lochlainn), as well as the territory of an Breadach (na Brédcha or Brédaigh) comprising the parishes of Upper and Lower Moville, and held by the O Duibh Dhíorma sept (e.g. O'Duvdirma, O'Dierma, Dermond, or MacDermott of Bredagh Glen), a branch of Cinel Eoghain.

    The annals cite for Cairrge Brachaidhe:
  • For For 721, Snedgus Dearg Ua Brachaidhe, was slain in battle on the side of Aedh Allan, son of Fearghal, and the Cinel Eoghain.
  • For 834, Fearghus son of Badhbhchadh, lord of Carraig (Cairge or Cairrge) Brach Aidhe, was slain by the Munstermen.
  • For 857, Seghonnán, son of Conang, lord of Carraig Brachaidhe, died.
  • For 859, Sechonnan filius Conaing, rex Cairgi Brachaide, died.
  • Fir 878/81, Maelfabhaill, son of Loingseach, lord of Carraig Brachaighe (or Chairrge Brachaighe), died.
  • For 907, Ruarc, mac Maol Fabhaill, tighearna Cairrge Brachaidhe, died.
  • For 965/67, Tigernach mac Ruairc, ri Carce Brachaidhe, died.
  • For 1014, Cú Dubh, mac Maol Fabhaill, toiseach Cairrge Brachaighe was slain by the Síl Taidhg i m-Breghaibh.
  • For 1053, Flaithbhertach Ua Mael Fabhaill, tigherna Cairrcce Brachaidhe, died.
  • For 1065, Muircertach Ua Mael Fhabaill ri Cairce Brachaidhe was slain by the Ui Meithe Menna Tire.
  • For 1082, Gilla Crist Ua Mael Fhabaill ri Cairrce Brachaidhe, died.
  • For 1102, Sitricc Ua Maol Fabhaill tigherna Cairrge Brachaidhe.
  • For 1166, Aedh Ua Mael Fhabhaill, tigherna Cairrcce Brachaidhe, was slain by the son of Néll Uí Lochlainn.
  • For 1199, Cathalan h-Ua Mael Fhabaill, ri Cairrgi Brachaidhe, was slain by d'O Deran.

    The annals cite for Bredagh Glen and Dhuibh Dhíorma:
  • For 1043, Giolla Mo Chonna Ua Duibh Dhiorma d'écc.
  • For 1122, Aodh Ua Duibh Dhíorma, toiseach na Brédcha, ceann einigh Tuaisceirt Ereann, & Domhnall a bhráthair do écc.
  • For 1167, Muirchertach, mac Ladhmainn Uí Dhuibh Dhíorma, tigherna Fordroma, tuir airechais Tuaisceirt Ereann uile, do mharbhadh i meabhail lá Donnchadh Ua n-Duibh Dhíorma, & lasan m-Brédaigh for lár Maighe Bile, & a dhá mhac do mharbhadh arna bhárach, & mac oile do dhalládh.
  • For 1178, Conor, the son of Conallagh O'Loony, assumed the chieftainship of Kinel-Moen; and Donnell, the son of Donnell O'Gormly, was banished from Moy Ithe into Inishowen, to Donough O'Duibhdhiorma.
  • For 1198, Hugh O'Neill and the Kinel-Owen went to the plain of Magh Ithe, and plundered the Kinel-Connell. From this place they drove off a vast number of cows, after killing O'Duvdirma in a skirmish between the cavalry.
  • For 1215, Donough O'Duvdirma, Chief of Bredagh, died in the Duvregles of Derry.
  • For 1260, The battle of Druim-dearg, near Dun-da-leath-ghlas (Downpatrick) was fought by Brien O'Neill and Hugh O'Conor, against the English of the North of Ireland. In this battle many of the Irish chieftains were slain, including Conor O'Duvdirma, and his son Hugh.


    Cenél Binnigh, of the Cenél Eóghain, descendants of Eochu Binnigh, son of Eoghan, included the O'Hamills, who advanced into Airghialla territory, northwest of Lough Neagh, as early as the 6th century.

    An early Cenel Binnigh genealogy -- Garbíth m. Cináeda m. Gillai Cuimne m. Con Bethad m. Domnalláin m. Garbíth m. Uaréirge m. Máel Fábaill m. Daithgile m. Con Galann m. Elgonaich m. Cobraid m. Máel Dúin m. Faílbe m. Ultáin m. Domnaill m. Laisreáin m. Echach Binnich m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig.

    The annals cite:
  • For 1030, Mael Dúin, mac Ciarmhaic, tigherna Cheineoil m-Binnigh, was slain by Conchobhar ua Loingsigh.
  • For 1075, Cionaoth Ua Con Bethadh, toiseach Cenel m-Binnigh, died.
  • For 1078, Conchobhar Ua Briain, tigherna Ceneóil n-Eoghain & Tealcha Occ was slain by the Cenel m-Bindigh Glinne.
  • For 1081, Maol Mithidh Ua Maol Ruanaidh, tigherna Ua t-Tuirtre, do mharbhadh lá Cenél m-Binnigh Glinne.


    Cenél Moen, of the Cenél Eóghain, from Máién (Moen), son of Muiredach and grandson of Eoghan. Originally of the barony of Raphoe, county Donegal, the Cenél Moen were driven across the Foyle by the O'Donnells to the northeast of Strabane in the 14th century. Moen was the great-grandson of Niall [of the Nine Hostages] whose descendants included Domnall O'Gairmleadhaigh (O'Gormley), king of Cenél Eóghain in the 12th century. Other surnames included O'Patton (Peyton) and O'Lunney (or O'Loony).

    The annals cite:
  • For 1090, Giolla Criost Ua Lúinigh, tigherna Cenél Moen
  • For 1178, Conor, the son of Conallagh O'Loony, assumed the chieftainship of Kinel-Moen, but was afterwards deposed, and the Kinel-Moen gave back the chieftainship to Donnell, the son of Donnell O'Gormly. After the people of Donnell O'Gormly, namely, Gilla Caech O'Ederla, and the O'Flanagans, treacherously slew O'Loony in Donnell's own house, the Kinel-Moen drove Donnell O'Gormly from the chieftainship, and set up Rory O'Flaherty as their chieftain.
  • For 1179, A peace was concluded by Donough O'Carellan and all the Clandermot with the Kinel-Moen and O'Gormly, i.e. Auliffe, the son of Menman, brother-in-law of the aforesaid Donough.
  • For 1180, Raghnall h-Ua Cairellan was slain by the Cenel Moen.
  • For 1183, A battle was fought between O'Flaherty (Gillarevagh) and the son of O'Gormly, in which O'Flaherty and a great number of the Kinel-Moen were slain.


    Cenél Fearadhaigh, of the Cenél Eóghain, Feradach was the son of Muiredach, and great-grandson of Niall whose descendants included the MacCawells (MacCathmhaoil), as well as the Irish Campbells, of Cenél Fearadhaigh [Theas] in the Clogher area of Co. Tyrone. MacGilmartin were chiefs in the barony of Clogher, and one was chief of Cenel Fearadaigh in 1166. The Mac Fiachra sept of Cenél Fearadhaigh were known as MacKeaghery. MacFetridge was also cited as chief of Cineal Feradaigh in the north of Co. Tyrone where offshoots of the clan remained from earlier days.

    An early Clan Feradaich genealogy -- Máel Íssu m. Máel Brigti m. Duib Indsi m. Máel Pátric m. Doiligén m. Brolcháin m. Eilgíne m. Díchon m. Flaind m. Máel Tuile m. Crundmáel m. Suibne m. Fiachnai m. Feradaich m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig.

    The annals cite:
  • For 626, The battle of Leathairbhe between Maelfithrigh, chief of Cinel Mic Earca, and Ernaine, son of Fiachna, chief of Cinel Fearadhaigh, where Maelfithrigh, son of Aedh Uairidhnach, was slain.
  • For 631, Ernaine, son of Fiachna, chief of Cinel Fearadhaigh, was slain. It was by him Maelfithrigh, son of Aedh Uairidhnach, was slain in the battle of Letherbhe.
  • For 1082, Uidhrin Ua Maoil Muire, taoisech Cenél Fearadhaigh, died.
  • For 1120, Echmharcach mac Uidhrin taoiseac Chenél Fearadhaigh, do mharbhadh d'Feraibh Manach.
  • For 1129, Giolla Chriost h-Ua h-Uidhrín, toiseach Cenél Fearadhaigh, do losccadh i t-tigh a altrann i t-Tír Manach i meabhail.
  • For 1166, Mac Gille Martain, toiseach Cenél Fearadhaigh.
  • For 1185, Gilchreest Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry and of the Clans, viz. Clann-Aengus, Clann-Duibhinreacht, Clann-Fogarty, Hy-Kennoda, and Clann-Colla in Fermanagh, and who was the chief adviser of all the north of Ireland, was slain by O'Hegny and Muintir-Keevan, who carried away his head, which, however, was recovered from them in a month afterwards.
  • For 1215, Murrough Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, died.
  • For 1238, Flaherty Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, and Clann-Congail, and of Hy-Kennoda in Fermanagh, the most illustrious in Tyrone for feats of arms and hospitality, was treacherously slain by Donough Mac Cawell, his own kinsman.
  • For 1251, Donough Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, was slain by the men of Oriel.
  • For 1252, Conor Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry in Tyrone, and many other territories, and peace-maker of Tirconnell, Tyrone, and Oriel, was slain by the people of Brian O'Neill, while defending his protegees against them, he himself being under the protection of O'Gormly and O'Kane.
  • For 1262, Donslevy Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, was slain by Hugh Boy O'Neill.
  • For 1346, Cu-Uladh Mac Cawell, chief of Kinel-Farry, was slain by Donnell Mac Cawell.


    Cenel Tigernaich, of the Cenél Éoghain. Tigernach, son of Muiredach and grandson of Eoghan was the progenitor of this clan. O'Mulfoharty, and O'Heodhasa (O'Hosey), were styled chiefs of Cineal Tighearnaigh.

    An early Cenel Tigernaich genealogy -- Áed mc Muiredaich m. Donngusa m. Duib Uinsenn m. Ainbítha m. Máel Éoain m. Fogartaich m. Máel Roit m. Fir Móir m. Muirgiusa m. Cobthaich m. Tnúthgaile m. Dáire m. Sáráin m. Tigernaich m. Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig.


    Cenel Mic Earca, of the Cenél Éoghain. A grandson of Eoghan was Muircherdaich, sovereign of Ireland from about 504 to 527, who was also called mac Earca (after his mother). The Cenel Mic Earca produced a line of kings who were styled sovereigns of Ireland. Máel Fithrich, the son of Aedh Uairidhnach was styled as chief of the Cenel mac Earca.

    An early Cenel Mic Earca genealogy -- Máel Fithrich m. Áeda Uaridnaich m. Domnaill m. Muircherdaich m. Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill.

    The annals cite:
  • For 478, After Oilioll Molt, son of Dathi, son of Fiachra, had been twenty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain in the battle of Ocha, by Lughaidh, son of Laeghaire, and Muircheartach Mac Earca, among other nobles.
  • For 486, Uel hoc anno primum bellum Graine in quo Muircheartach mc. Earca uichtor erat.
  • For 489, Aenghus, son of Nadfraech, King of Munster, fell in the battle of Cell Osnadha fought against him by Muircheartach Mac Earca, among others.
  • For 497, The battle of Inde Mor, in Crioch Ua nGabhla, was gained over the Leinstermen and Illann, son of Dunlaing, by Muircheartach mac Earca.
  • For 499/502, The battle of Seaghais was fought by Muircheartach mac Earca against Duach Teangumha, King of Connaught.
  • For 504, The first year of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall, as king over Ireland.
  • For 513, The battle of Dedna, in Droma Breagh, by Muircheartach mac Earca, and by Colga, son of Loite, son of Crunn, son of Feidhlimidh, son of Colla Dachrich, chief of Airghialla, where Ardghal, son of Conall Creamhthainne, son of Niall, was slain.
  • For 524, The battle of Ath Sighe was gained by Muircheartach against the Leinstermen. where Sighe, the son of Dian, was slain, from who Ath Sighe is called.
  • For 526, The battle of Eibhlinne by Muircheartach mac Earca.
  • For 527, After Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, had been twenty four years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was burned in the house of Cleiteach, over the Boyne, on the night of Samhain the first of November, after being drowned in wine. He was killed by Sin, daughter of Sighe, in revenge of her father.
  • For 537/47, The battle of Sligeach by Fearghus and Domhnall, the two sons of Muircheartach mac Earca; by Ainmire, son of Sedna; and Ainnidh, son of Duach, against Eoghan Bel, King of Connaught. They routed the forces before them, and Eoghan Bel was slain.
  • For 544, The battle of Cuil Conaire, in Ceara, was fought by Fearghus and Domhnall, two sons of Muircheartach mac Earca, against Ailill Inbhanda, King of Connaught, and Aedh Fortamhail; and Ailill and Aedh were slain.
  • For 555, The battle of Cul Dreimhne was gained against Diarmaid, son of Cearbhall (sovereign of Ireland), by Fearghus and Domhnall, the two sons of Muircheartach, son of Earca, among others.
  • For 557, The battle of Moin Doire Lothair was gained over the Cruithnigh, by the Ui Neill of the North, i. e. by the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain, wherein fell seven chieftains of the Cruithnigh, together with Aedh Breac; and it was on this occasion that the Lee and Carn Eolairg were forfeited to the Clanna Neill of the North. The two sons of Mac Earca were in this battle.
  • For 559, The first year of the two sons of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, in the kingdom of Ireland, i.e. Domhnall and Fearghus. The battle of Gabhra Liffe, and the battle of Dumha Aichir, by Domhnall and Fearghus, against the Leinstermen.
  • For 561, After Domhnall and Fearghus, the two sons of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall, had been three years in the sovereignty of Ireland, they both died.
  • For 562, The first year of Eochaidh, son of Domhnall, son of Muircheartach; and of Baedan, son of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, in the sovereignty of Ireland.
  • For 563, After Eochaidh and Baedan had been two years in the sovereignty of Ireland, they were slain by Cronan, chief of Cianachta Glinne Gemhin.
  • For 579, The battle of Druim Mic Earca, was gained by Aedh, son of Ainmire, over the Cinel Eogain, where was slain Colga, son of Domhnall, son of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach.
  • For 600/04, After Colman Rimidh, son of Baedan Brighi, son of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall, had been six years in the sovereignty of Ireland, along with Aedh Slaine, son of Diarmaid, of the Southern Ui Neill, they both were slain. Colman Rimidh was slain by Lochan Dilmana.
  • For 601, The first year of Aedh Uairidhnach, son of Domhnall Ilchealgach, son of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, in the sovereignty of Ireland.
  • For 607, After Aedh Uairidhnach had been seven years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he died at Ath Da Fearta.
  • For 626, The battle of Leathairbhe between Maelfithrigh, chief of Cinel Mic Earca, and Ernaine, son of Fiachra, chief of Cinel Fearadhaigh, where Maelfithrigh, son of Aedh Uairidhnach, was slain.
  • For 769, Badhbhchadh, son of Eachtghus, chief of Cinel Mic Earca, died.
  • For 792, Muireadhach, son of Flann Garadh, lord of Cinel Mic Earca, died.
  • For 828, Finneachta, son of Bodhbhchadh, lord of Cinel-Mic-Erca, died.


    Clan Conchobhair, of the Cenél Éoghain, originally of Magh Ithe and moving into county Derry about the 10th century. Conchobhar was the son of Fergal, and the great-great grandson of Aedh Uairidhnach, whose descendants included O'Cathain (O'Kanes and O'Canes), O'Mullans, MacCloskeys and the Clan Diarmatta. The O'Kanes were lords of Creeve (Coleraine area) and Keenaght beginning in the 12th century when they overshadowed the O'Connors of Glengiven (modern Dungiven).

    An early Clan Conchobuir genealogy -- Máel Ruanaid m. Áeda m. Ruaidrí m. Óengusa m. Cairelláin m. Baígill m. Diarmata m. Conchobuir m. Fergaile m. Máele Dúin m. Máel Fithrich m. Áeda Uaridnaich m. Domnaill m. Muircherdaich m. Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig.

    The annals cite for the O'Kanes:
  • For 1138, Raghnall, mac Iomhair I Cathain, tigherna na Craoibhe, Ciannachta, & Fer Lí.
  • For 1156, Aedh, mac Ruaidhri Uí Chanannáin, tigherna Cenel c-Conaill, do mharbhadh lá h-Ua gCatháin, & lá Fearaibh na Craoibhe tria meabhail.
  • For 1175, The Kinel-Enda were defeated, and a great slaughter made of them by Eachmarcach O'Kane, and Niall O'Gormly.
  • For 1181, The men of Moy-Ithe, together with O'Kane Eachmarcach, and the Kinel-Binny of the Valley, mustered an army, and crossed Toome. They plundered all the territories of Firlee and Hy-Tuirtre, and carried off many thousands of cows.
  • For 1183, Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Loughlin, marched with an army to Dunbo, in Dal Riada, and there gave battle to the English. The Kinel-Owen were defeated, and Randal O'Breslen, Gilchreest O'Kane, and many others, were killed.
  • For 1192, The doorway of the refectory of Duv-regles-Columbkille was made by O'Kane, of Creeve, and the daughter of O'Henery.
  • For 1195, Eachmarcach O'Kane died in St. Paul's church.
  • For 1196, Murtough, the son of Murtough O'Loughlin, Lord of Kinel-Owen, was killed by Donough, the son of Blosky O'Kane, at the instigation of the Kinel-Owen
  • For 1205, Manus O'Kane, son of the Lord of Kianaghta and Firnacreeva, tower of the valour and vigour of the North, was wounded by an arrow, and died of the wound.
  • For 1212, Farrell O'Kane, Lord of Kienaghta and Firnacreeva, was slain by the English.
  • For 1247, Eachmarcach O'Kane, Lord of Kienaghta and Firnacreeva, was slain by Manus O'Kane, after having gone on a predatory excursion into his country as far as Armoy in Dal-Riada.
  • For 1260, The battle of Druim-dearg, near Dun-da-leath-ghlas Downpatrick was fought by Brien O'Neill and Hugh O'Conor, against the English of the North of Ireland. In this battle many of the Irish chieftains were slain. In a word, fifteen of the chiefs of the family of O'Kane were slain on the field, including Hugh O'Kane and Murtough O'Kane.
  • For 1303 , Donn O'Kane, Lord of Firnacreeva and Kienaghta, was slain during the long war between two sons of Donnell Oge O'Donnell, Turlough and Hugh.
  • For 1349, Rory O'Kane, Lord of Creeve and Ard-Keanaghta, died.


    Clan Diarmatta (Clandermot), of the Cenél Éoghain, descent from Clan Conchobhair. The parish of Clondermot in County Derry is said to derive its name from this clan territory. An O'Carolan sept (O Cairealláin) as well as a Mac Ettigan (Mac Eitigen) were cited as chiefs of Clan Diarmada prior to the 13th century.

    An early Clan Diarmatta (Clan Conchobuir) genealogy -- Máel Ruanaid m. Áeda m. Ruaidrí m. Óengusa m. Cairelláin m. Baígill m. Diarmata m. Conchobuir m. Fergaile m. Máele Dúin m. Máel Fithrich m. Áeda Uaridnaich m. Domnaill m. Muircherdaich m. Muiredaich m. Éogain m. Néill Noígiallaig.

    The annals cite:
  • For 1090, Maol Ruanaidh Ua Cairellán (O'Carolan), tigherna Cloinde Diarmatta
  • For 1215, Aengus O'Carellan, Chief of the Clann-Dermot, was slain by his own kinsmen.
  • For 1215, Teige Mac Etigen, Chief of Clann-Dermot, died.


    Cenel Aenghusa, of the Cenél Éoghain. The MacCanns were lords of Clanbrassil, a district of County Armagh on the southern shore of Lough Neagh.

    The annals cite:
  • For 1155, Amhlaoibh Mac Cana, tigherna Ceneoil Aenghusa, tuir gaisccidh & beodhachta Cenéil Eoghain uile, d'écc, & a adhnacal i n-Ard Macha.


    Sil Lugdach, of the Cenél Conaill and Clann Dálaigh. Lugaid was the son of Setna, and great-grandson of Conall Gulban, whose descendants were the sept of O'Domhnaill (O'Donnell), Kings of Tir Conaill until the 17th century ("Flight of the Earls"). The O'Donnells, at first lived along the river Lennon but later established themselves in south Donegal. The O'Boyles and the O'Dohertys were also of Sil Lugdach.

    Am early Sil Lugdach genealogy -- Cathbarr m. Gillai Críst m. Cathbairr m. Domnaill m. Éicnich m. Dálaich m. Muirchertaich m. Cind Fáelad m. Airnelaich m. Máel Dúin m. Cind Fáelad m. Gairb m. Rónáin m. Lugdach m. Sétnai mic Fergus m. Conaill Gulban m. Néill Noígiallaig.

    The annals cite:
  • For 868, Maelmordha, son of Ailell, lord of Cinel Lughdhach, died.
  • For 1010/11, Mael Ruanaidh ua Domnaill, lord of Ceniuil Lughdach (Luighdheach), was slain by the men of Magh Ithe.
  • For 1100, Mac mic Giolla Coluim Uí Domhnaill, tigherna Cenel Luighdhech do mharbhadh la a mhuintir féissin.
  • For 1106, Cathbharr O Domhnaill, tuir cosnamha, & coinghleca, ordáin, & einigh Chenel Luighdeach, d'faghail bháis iar m-breith bhuadha ó dhomhan & ó dhemhan.


    Cenel Bóguine, of the Cenél Conaill, Énna Bóguine, son of Conall Gulban. St. Crona (Croine Bheag) who was living in the 7th century was the daughter of Diarmuid, son of Garbhan, son of Brandubh, son of Melge, son of Enna Boghuine, son of Conall Gulban, Son of Niall Naoighiallaigh (Niall of the Nine Hostages).

    A Cenel Bóguine genealogy -- Murchad m. Máel Ograi m. Echdach m. Forbassaich m. Sechnassaich m. Dúngalaich m. Máel Tuili m. Sechnassaich m. Garbáin m. Branduib m. Meilge m. Énnae Bóguine m. Conaill Gulban m. Néill Noígiallaig.

    The annals cite:
  • For 605, Seachnasach, son of Garbhan, chief of Cinel Boghaine, was slain by Domhnall, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire.
  • For 626, Fiacha Fínd, rí Cenéoil Boghuine, died.
  • For 670, Dungal, son of Maeltuile, chief of Cinel Boghaine, was slain by Loingseach, son of Aenghus, chief of Cinel Conaill.
  • For 781, Forbhasach, son of Seachnasach, chief of Cinel Boghaine, died.
  • For 1035, Flaithbhertach ua Murchadha, tigherna Ceniúil m-Boghaine, was slain.


    Cenel Duach, of the Cenél Conaill. Tigernach Duí (Duach), son of Conall Gulban. The Annals of the Four Masters cite Baedan, son of Níndedha, son? of Conall Gulban, as a king of Tara in AD 586.

    A Cenel Duach genealogy -- Nuadu m. Duinechda m. Cuircc m. Duach m. Sechnassaich m. Conaill m. Báetáin m. Ninnida m. Duach m. Conaill Gulban m. Néill Noígiallaig.


    Further Ulster Reference: N. Ui Neill Kings * Uladh * Airghialla * Uladh Kings * Uladh Annals

    Further Province Reference: Index * Connacht * Leinster * Mide * Munster * Ulster


    Further Reference at this site:
    Ireland History in Maps - Home Page
    Old Irish Surnames
    Kingdoms and Clans


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