Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

Annals of Laigen
Leinster Series


Laigin * Tribes of Laigen * Kings of Leinster * Annals

Index * Connacht * Leinster * Mide * Munster * Ulster

Home * Names * Clans * History



Laigen in the early Irish Annals

  • For 122, Cathaeir Mor, after having been three years king over Ireland, was slain by Conn (of the Hundred Battles), and the Luaighni of Teamhair, in the battle of Magh hAgha.
  • For 241, The massacre of the girls at Cleanfearta, at Teamhair, by Dunlang, son of Enna Niadh, King of Leinster. Thirty royal girls was the number, and a hundred maids with each of them. Twelve princes of the Leinstermen did Cormac put to death together, in revenge of that massacre, together with the exaction of the Borumha (cattle tribute) with an increase after Tuathal.
  • For 272, Four battles by Cairbre [Liffeachair, son of Cormac, son of Art] against the men of Munster, in defence of the rights of Leinster.
  • For 435, Breasal Bealach, son of Fiacha Aiceadh, son of Cathaeir Mor (King of Leinster), died.
  • For 453, A great defeat was given by Laeghaire (son of Niall, sovereign of Ireland) to the Leinstermen.
  • For 457, The battle of Ath Dara was fought against the Leinstermen by Laeghaire, son of Niall. Laeghaire was taken in that battle; and Laeghaire took oaths by the Sun and the Wind, and all the elements, to the Leinstermen, that he would never come against them, after setting him at liberty.
  • For 464, The battle of Dumha Aichir was fought by the Leinstermen, against Oilioll Molt (sovereign of Ireland).
  • For 465, Crimhthann, son of Enda Censelach, King of Leinster, was killed by the son of his own daughter, i.e. Eochaidh Guineach, one of the Ui Bairrche.
  • For 468, The boxing battle of Bri Ele against the Leinstermen, by Oilioll Molt (of Munster).
  • For 470, The battle of Dumha Aichir against Oilioll Molt, by the Leinstermen.
  • For 476, The battle of Granard by Eochaidh, son of Cairbre, son of Oilioll, son of Dunlaing, son of Enda Niadh, against the King of Leinster, Fraech, son of Finuchadh, son of Garchu, son of Fothadh, son of Eochaidh Lamhdoidh, son of Mesincorb; and Fraech fell therein.
  • For 478, After Oilioll Molt, son of Dathi, son of Fiachra, had been twenty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain in the battle of Ocha by Cremhthann, son of Enna Cennsealach, King of Leinster, among others.
  • For 480, The battle of Granard, in the land of Leinster, between the Leinstermen themselves, wherein Finnchadh, Lord of Ui Cennsealaigh, was slain by Cairbre.
  • For 489, Aenghus, son of Nadfraech, King of Munster, fell in the battle of Cell Osnadha fought against him by Muircheartach Mac Earca, by Illann, son of Dunlaing, by Ailill, son of Dunlaing; and by Eochaidh Guineach (of the Ui Bairrche).
  • For 489, The battle of Tailtin against the Leinstermen, by Cairbre, son of Niall.
  • For 492, The battle of Sleamhain, in Meath was fought by Cairbre, son of Niall, against the Leinstermen.
  • For 494, The battle of Ceann Ailbhe by Cairbre, son of Niall, against the Leinstermen.
  • For 496, The battle of Druim Lochmaighe was gained by the Leinstermen over the Ui Neill.
  • For 497, The battle of Inde Mor, in Crioch Ua nGabhla, was gained over the Leinstermen and Illann, son of Dunlaing, by Muircheartach mac Earca.
  • For 500, The battle of Lochmagh by the Leinstermen, against the Ui Neill.
  • For 506, Illann, son of Dunlaing, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 506, The battle of Luachair was fought by Cucorb against the Ui Neill.
  • For 524, The battle of Ath Sighe was gained by Muircheartach (of the Ui Neill) against the Leinstermen. where Sighe, the son of Dian, was slain, from who Ath Sighe is called.
  • For 526, Oilill, son of Dunlaing, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 535, Cormac, son of Ailill, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 546, Cairbre, son of Cormac, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 559, The battle of Gabhra Liffe, and the battle of Dumha Aichir, by Domhnall and Fearghus (two sons of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach and joint sovereigns of Ireland), against the Leinstermen.
  • For 576, Colman, son of Cairbre, King of Leinster, died at Sliabh Mairge.
  • For 591, Aedh Cerr, son of Colman, son of Cairbre, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 601, The battle of Slaibhre was gained by the Ui Neill over Bran Dubh, son Eochaidh, King of Leinster; and Bran Dubh, i.e. son of Eochaidh, was killed by the Airchinneach of Senboithe Sine, and his own tribe.
  • For 610, Ronan, son of Colman, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 628, Crimhthann, son of Aedh, son of Seanach, King of Leinster, was slain by the King of Munster and the chief of Meath, at the battle of Ath Goan, in Iarthar Liffe.
  • For 638, Aedh Dubh, Abbot and Bishop of Cill Dara Kildare, died. He had been at first King of Leinster. Dalaise Mac hU Imdae, Abbot of Leithglinn, died.
  • For 642, Uaisle, daughter of Suibhne, son of Colman, wife of Faelan, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 650, Crunnmael Erbuilg, son of Ronan, chief of South Leinster, died.
  • For 658, Faelan, chief of Osraighe, was slain by the Leinstermen.
  • For 665, Faelan, son of Colman, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 675, A battle was fought between Finnsneachta (sovereign of Ireland) and the Leinstermen, by the side of Loch Gabhair; and the battle was gained over the Leinstermen.
  • For 677, The battle of Tailltin was gained by Finshneachta Fleadhach over Becc Boirche.
  • For 678, Fianamhail, son of Maeltuile, King of Leinster, was mortally wounded by Foicseachan, one of his own people, at the instigation of Finshneachta Fleadhach.
  • For 687, Bran, son of Conall, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 690, Bran Ua Faelain, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 690, A battle between the Osraighi and the Leinstermen, wherein Faelchar Ua Maelodhra was slain.
  • For 710, A battle by the south Leinstermen, wherein Bran Ua Maelduin and his son were slain.
  • For 713, Ceallach Cualann, son of Gerrtide, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 717, Leinster was five times devastated in one year by the Ui Neill. Leinster was plundered and the Borumha again enjoined, and the hostages, by Fearghal (son of Maelduin, son of Maelfithrigh and sovereign of Ireland).
  • For 718, After Fearghal, son of Maelduin, son of Maelfithrigh, had been ten years in sovereignty over Ireland, he was slain in the battle of Almhain, by Dunchadh, son of Murchadh, and Aedh, son of Colgan, an heir presumptive to the sovereignty. The number which the race of Conn brought to this battle was twenty one thousand, and the number brought by the Leinstermen was nine thousand.
  • For 721, Murchadh, son of Bran, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 721, A battle was fought by Cinaeth, son of Irgalach, against the Leinstermen; and he obtained his demand. The battle of Inis Breagain, wherein were slain Edersgeoil, son of Ceallach Cualann, and Congal, son of Bran.
  • For 722, The battle of Aillinn was fought between the two sons of Murchadh, son of Bran, in which Dunchadh, the senior, was slain.
  • For 726, A battle was fought between the South Leinstermen and the Munstermen; and the victory was gained by Aedh, son of Colgan.
  • For 730, The battle of Bealach Ele was fought between Cathal, son of Finguine, King of Munster, and the Leinstermen, where many of the Leinstermen were slain. There fell of the Munstermen here Ceallach, son of Faelchair, chief of Osraighe, and the two sons of Cormac, son of Rossa, chief of the Deisi, with three thousand along with them.
  • For 733, Aedh Allan, Ui Neill king of Ireland, and Aedh, son of Colgan, King of Leinster, met each other in single combat; and Aedh, son of Colgan, was slain by Aedh Allan. The Leinstermen were killed, slaughtered, cut off, and dreadfully exterminated, in this battle, so that there escaped of them but a small remnant, and a few fugitives. The following were the leaders and chieftains of the Leinstermen who fell, namely: Aedh, son of Colgan, King of Ui Ceinnsealaigh; Bran Beg, son of Murchadh, the second king who was over the Leinstermen; Fearghus, son of Maenach, and Dubhdacrich, two lords of Fotharta; the son of Ua Ceallaigh; the son of Trian; Fiangalach Ua Maeleaithgin; Conall Ua Aithechdai; the four sons of Flann Ua Conghaile; Eladhach Ua Maeluidhir; and many others, whom it would be tedious to enumerate. The people of Leath Chuinn were joyous after this victory, for they had wreaked.
  • For 733, Faelan, son of Bran, King of Leinster, died, after a well spent life.
  • For 733, A hosting was made by Cathal, son of Finguine, into Leinster; and he obtained hostages from Bran Breac, son of Murchadh, and carried off much property.
  • For 751, The army of Leinster was led by King Domhnall, son of Murchadh (of the southern Ui Neill), against Niall, i.e. the northern Ui Neill, until they arrived in Magh Muirtheimhne.
  • For 754, The battle of Gabhran was gained by Anmchaidh, over the Leinstermen.
  • For 755, Muireadhach, son of Murchadh, or grandson of Bran, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 763, A battle was fought between the Leinstermen themselves, namely, between Cinaech, son of Flann, and Aedh, at Foirtrinn, where Aedh was slain.
  • For 765, A battle between the Leinstermen themselves, wherein Ceallach, son of Dunchadh, had the victory, and in which Cinaedh, son of Flann, and his brother, Ceallach, and Caithnia, son of Becc, and many others besides them, were slain.
  • For 766, There arose a dissention between Ceallach, son of Donnchadh, King of Leinster, and the monarch Donnchadh, son of Domhnall. Donnchadh made a full muster of the Ui Neill and marched into Leinster. The Leinstermen moved before the monarch and his forces until they arrived at Sciath Neachtain. Donnchadh, with his forces, remained at Aillinn; his people continued to fire, burn, plunder, and devastate the province for the space of a week, when the Leinstermen at length submitted to his will.
  • For 769/71, Ceallach, son of Dunchadh, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 772, The army of Leinster was brought by Donnchadh (sovereign of Ireland) over Breagh.
  • For 777, The battle of Cuirreach, by the side of Cill Dara was fought on the sixth of the Calends of September, on Tuesday, between Ruadhriach, son of Faelan, and Bran, son of Mureadhach, wherein Mughron, son of Flann, Lord of Ui Failghe, and Dubhdachrich, son of Laidhgnen, were slain in a combat. The victory was gained by Ruaidhri.
  • For 780, Ruaidhri, son of Faelan, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 790, Bran Airdcheann, King of Leinster, and his wife Eithne, daughter of Domhnall Midheach, were killed by Finsneachta Ceathairdherc, son of Ceallach, at Cill Cuile Dumha, on the sixth night of summer precisely.
  • For 799, Aedh Oirdnidhe (of the Ui Neill) assembled a very great army to proceed into Leinster and devastated Leinster twice in one month. Aedh Oirdnidhe afterwards went to the King of Leinster, and obtained his full demand from the Leinstermen; and Finsneachta, King of Leinster, gave him hostages and pledges.
  • For 800, Finnshneachta, son of Ceallach, King of Leinster, entered into religion.
  • For 800, Aedh Oirdnidhe went to Dun Cuair, and divided Leinster between the two Muireadhachs, namely, Muireadhach, son of Ruadhrach, and Muireadhach, son of Bran.
  • For 801, Finnachta, son of Ceallach, King of Leinster, took the government again.
  • For 803, Finshneachta, son of Ceallach, King of Leinster, died at Cill Dara.
  • For 813, Muireadhach, son of Bran, half king of Leinster, died.
  • For 815, Aedh Oirdnidhe went a second time with a very great army to Dun Cuar, and divided Leinster between the two grandsons of Bran.
  • For 817, The devastation of the territory of Cualann, and of Leinster as far as Gleann Da Locha, by Aedh Oirdnidhe.
  • For 818, An army was led by Murchadh, son of Maelduin, to Druim Indech, having the Ui Neill of the North along with him. Conchobhar, King of Ireland, with the Ui Neill of the South and the Leinstermen, came from the South, on the other hand; and when they came to one place, it happened, through the miracles of God, that they separated from each other for that time without slaughter, or one of them spilling a drop of the other's blood.
  • For 826, Muireadhach, son of Ruadhrach, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 829, Feidhlimidh, son of Crimhthann (king of Cashel), with the forces of Munster and Leinster, came to Finnabhair Breagh, to plunder the men of Breagh; and the Liffe was plundered by Conchobhar, son of Donnchadh, King of Ireland.
  • For 833, Ceallach, son of Bran, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 834, A hosting was made by Niall Caille, [Ui Neill] King of Ireland, into Leinster; and he appointed a king over them, namely, Bran, son of Faelan, and obtained his demand.
  • For 836, Riagan, son of Finnachta, half king of Leinster, died.
  • For 836 The first taking of Ath Cliath (Dublin) by the foreigners (Vikings).
  • For 837, Bran, son of Faelan, from whom is named Ui Faelain, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 840, A fortress was erected by the foreigners at Linn Duachail (in co. Louth), out of which the territories and churches of Teathbha were plundered and preyed. Another fortress was erected by them at Duibhlinn (Dublin), out of which they plundered Leinster and the Ui Neill, both territories and churches, as far as Sliabh Bladhma.
  • For 844, Maelduin, son of Conall, lord of Calatruim, was slain by the Leinstermen.
  • For 845, A slaughter made of the foreigners of Ath Cliath, at Carn Brammit, by Cearbhall, son of Dunghal, lord of Osraighe, where twelve hundred of them were slain.
  • For 846, A battle was gained by Olchobhar, King of Munster, and by Lorcan, son of Ceallach, King of Leinster, having the Leinstermen and Munstermen along with them, over the foreigners, at Sciath Neachtain, wherein Tomhrair Earl, tanist of the King of Lochlann, and twelve hundred along with him, were slain.
  • For 846, A defeat was given by Echthighern and the Leinstermen to the Osraighe, at Uachtar Garadha.
  • For 849, The Dubhghoill arrived in Ath Cliath, and made a great slaughter of the Finnghoill, and plundered the fortress, both people and property.
  • For 852, Tuathal, son of Maelbrighde, King of Leinster, was martyred.
  • For 856, The plundering of Leinster by Cearbhall, son of Dunlang; and he took their hostages, together with Cairbre, son of Dunlang; and Suithenen, son of Arthur.
  • For 860, Ruarc, son of Bran, King of Leinster, were slain by the Ui Neill.
  • For 862, A prey by Cearbhall, lord of Osraighe, from Leinster; and another prey in a fortnight afterwards from the Osraighi, by the Leinstermen.
  • For 862, Domhnall, son of Dunlang, heir presumptive of Leinster, died.
  • For 867, Dunlang, son of Muireadhach, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 868, The plundering of Leinster by King Aedh Finnliath, from Ath Cliath to Gabhran. Cearbhall, son of Dunghal, plundered it on the other side, as far as Dun Bolg. The Leinstermen attacked the fort of Cearbhall, and of the son of Gaithin, and many men were slain by them. When the people of the fort had perceived this, they fought bravely against them, so that they compelled them, with their chief, Bran, son of Muireadhach, to return back, after numbers of their people had been slain.
  • For 869, Ailill, son of Dunlang, King of Leinster, was slain by the Norsemen.
  • For 872, An army was led by Aedh Finnliath into Leinster, so that he plundered the entire country.
  • For 876, A slaughter was made of the South Leinstermen at Fulachta, by the Osraighi, wherein Dunog, son of Anmchadh, and Dubhthoirthrigh, son of Maelduin, were slain, together with two hundred men, who were cut off by slaying and drowning.
  • For 875/77, Domhnall, son of Muirigen, King of Leinster, died.
  • For 877, Caindealbhan, son of Riogan, heir apparent of Leinster, died. King Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, came into the province of Leinster, and took their hostages.
  • For 882, Muireadhach, son of Bran, [of Magh Liphe], lord of Leinster, and Abbot of Cill Dara, died.
  • For 883, The mortal wounding of Tuathal, son of Domhnall, and of Cathal, son of Finnagan, two royal heirs of Leinster, by Finnachta, son of Muireadhach.
  • For 885, Cearbhal, son of Dunghal, lord of Osraighe, died.
  • For 891, A slaughter was made of the Eoghanachta at Grian Airbh, by the Osraighi, i.e. by the son of Cearbhall, and the Leinstermen.
  • For 892, Bran, son of Muireadhach, Tanist of Leinster, was slain.
  • For 895, A prey was taken by the Leinstermen from the Osraighi, on which occasion Buadhach, son of Ailell, was slain.
  • For 901, Muireadhach, son of Domhnall, heir apparent of Leinster, was wounded in the country of Munster, and died.
  • For 923, Faolan, mac Muiredhaigh, king of Laighen.
  • For 936, Lorcán, mac Faoláin, lord of Laighen.


    Further Leinster Reference: Laigin * Tribes of Laigen * Kings of Leinster

    Further Province Reference: Index * Connacht * Leinster * Mide * Munster * Ulster


    Further Reference at this site:
    Ireland History in Maps - Home Page
    Old Irish Surnames
    Kingdoms and Clans
    This site maintained by
    D Walsh
          Ireland History in Maps Home Page            


    FastCounter by bCentral