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Flom


Early Settlers in Wild Rice Township


1-Søren Bergerson was born in Strøs parish, Odalen, Norway, on November 22nd 1823. He was married to Kirsti Berntsdatter the 25th April 1847. He emigrated from Norway with wife and two children in the spring of 1858 to find a new home in America. They arrived in Decorah, Iowa, in the month June the same year. Here he settled and started to work as blacksmith, which work he continued until the fall of 1862. By that time the war between the South and the North broke out, he finished his work as blacksmith, because he thought " Uncle Sam " had more need for him. He therefore enlisted in the army and participated in the war for 3 years; he served in the Company D, 6th Iowa Cavalry Volunteers under general Cullen; and was discharged in the fall 1865. Afterwards he went back to Decorah and continued his blacksmith business which he operated until the spring 1871, when he went to the west to find land. His decision was to go to Lake Park, Becker Co., Minnesota. But on his arrival there, almost all the land, which wood and prairie, was occupied, why he went further north. The 3rd of June 1871 he came to Wild Rice River, and then he decided to build and live there. He thought the same as expressed by Ivar Aasen, when he sings : " Here is the land, which I like best, and for this I have been longing a long time ". Because the land at that time was not measured , he settled on a piece of land but did not know in which section he was. In the fall the land was measured and it appeared that his farm was in section 35, Town 144, Range 44, which Town later was called Wild Rice. He left his family behind in Decorah, because he wanted to find land and erect house before he brought them to the new place. He went back to Decorah in the fall and stayed there during the winter. The next spring he bought a couple of oxes, wagon and other necessities for a settler, got wife and children on the wagon and off they went for Wild Rice. But the pioneers life had its naughty sides. Thus they had the grasshoppers in 4 years, and they partly took all and partly most all of their crop.. Still he did not lose the spirit, but faithfully kept on.
His wife died 17th January 1884, and his only son 24th April 1889. In their marriage they had 4 children, of which 3 were born in Norway and 1 in Decorah, Iowa. One child died in Norway. When he went to Wild Rice for the first time he was together with Martin Johnson, Guldbrand Haagenson, Andrew Johnson and Gunder Gunderson.

2-Martin Johnson was born in Røkens parish, Norway, in the fall 1832. He left Norway in the spring 1854 and arrived to Dane Co., Wisconsin, the same spring. He stayed there for two years. From here he went to Freeborn Co., Minnesota. Here he was married to the maid Caroline Bergerson. In the spring 1871 he left Freeborn Co. along with Søren Bergerson, Guldbrand Haagenson and others to find a new home in the west. They came to Becker Co., Minnesota, first, but because he did not like the land hare, they went further north to Wild Rice River. Unfamiliar with the district they went to far east and entered The White Earth Reservation. Here Martin liked the land and prepared for settling on a ground. But because they met an indian camp, they learned that they had to go far to the west to find free land. When they came that far west, that they were sure they were out of the Reservation, Martin exclaimed : " Well, boys, here I will take land either its indians or Uncle Sams, what he really did, and after the measuring of the land, it turned out that it was on section 36, now Town of Wild Rice. By now Martin was busy, first he had to erect a house and then cleared the ground. The house was ready in a hurry, but unfortunately he had no plow. But he knew what to do; he went all the way to Alexandria to get a plow. And then it
was on plowing; it was the first land ever plowed in this settlement; may be the first in Norman Co. He also brought the first farm tools as hand rake, Reaper, a mower and a hayrake to the settlement. He took his land on June 3rd but his family did not arrive before the fall.
In the years 1872 to 1875 he seeded Martin wheat, but the grasshoppers reaped. In the spring of 1873 he bought 10 bushels of potatoes and in the fall he got back about a pail, the rest of it the grasshoppers took. They have had 11 children, of which 5 were born in Freeeborn Co., and 6 in Norman Co. His oldest daughter died in October 1885, the next oldest is married and lives in Town of Flom, and the others are staying at home.

3-Guldbrand Haagenson was born in Hitterdalen, Norway in 1833. He left Norway in 1858 and arrived in Winneshiek Co, Iowa, the same year. He lived there to the fall 1862 when he enlisted in company D 6th Iowa Cavalry Volunteers. Here he served for 3 years under general Cullen. Then he was discharged and went back to Winneshiek Co. Iowa, where he in the fall 1866 married the maid Ragnhild Christianson. The same fall he went to Freeborn Co., Minn., where he lived until the spring 1891, when he with Søren Bergerson, Martin Johnson and some others went to the west to find land. They arrived in Wild Rice the 3rd of June, and he then took land on section 35. His family came to him the same fall, and all the time they have had their home on this land. He too was amongst them, who had to suffer the grasshoppers ravages and the hard times that followed. They have had 10 children together; 1 was born in Winneshiek Co., 2 in Freeborn Co., and 7 in Wild Rice, of which 5 are passed away. The first child that died here was buried on the farm, because at that time there was no cemetery. Guldbrand Haagenson died from cancer on 18th April 1893 and is buried on the Wild Rice Cemetery.

4-Ole HansonAarstad is born in Ullensaker, Norway, the 16th of May 1823 and was married to the maid Agnethe Hermansdaughter Bjerkein the year 1855. They emigrated from Norway in the spring 1867 and arrived in Fillmore Co., Minn., the same spring. Here they stayed for 4 years, whereafter he moved west with his family to find Land under the Homestead Act. He arrived here in Wild Rice the 1st of July 1871 and took land on section 35. He too took land before it was measured, therefore he did not know on which section the farm was before it was surveyed in the fall. - Together they have had 8 children, of which 6 were born in Norway and 2 of them died there; and 2 are born after he came to Wild Rice, at the same time 3 of the children died here. By them was born the first child amongst the pioneers here, that is the girl Dorothea, born 28th September 1871. Also the first death in this settlement occured in this family, namely the son Anders who died during the night between 3rd and 4th January 1873. He left the home in the evening to visit one of the neighbors. In the morning he was brought back home as corpse, because he froze to death during the night. He too is buried on the farm, because there was no cemetery. Mr. Aarstad has suffered much sorrow and adversity after he came here. First he lost his oldest son, as mentioned, and some years later his wife turned mentally ill and to go to St. Peter. Again after some time one of his sons had to go to the same place, and after the inspectors statement, both are incurable. About 3 years ago, he had to bid farewell to another son who
died from consumption. And finally on January 11th, 1896, his oldest daughter was brought home as corpse from Fargo, N.D., where she served. This show that he has suffered much mourning. At present he lives alone on his farm, but is soon moving to Twin Valley to live with his son Charles Hanson, so it is to hope for, that he hereafter will see a better life in his old age.

5-Hans G. Urdahl was born in Aurlands Prestegjeld, Sogn, Norway on the 14th of February, 1848. He left Norway in the Spring of 1866 and came to Winneshiek County in Iowa that same year. He lived here a year and then moved to Houston County, Minnesota where he lived until the Spring of 1872, when he left to find new land. He came to Wild Rice and took land in Section 20, where he now lives. On the 20th of February, 1879, he was married to the maid Rangnilde Tvedstulen. They have 8 children, whereof 1 has died.

6-Eden Nilson was born in Langsrud, Sweden, July 5th, 1850. He left Sweden in the spring of '73 an came to Wild Rice the same spring, where he already had two brothers. He took land on section 18. In '84 he made a trip back to Sweden just to see the old homestead. Anyway he liked Wild Rice best, and in '85 he came back here. In 1892 he was married to Anna Erikson and still he lives on his farm in section 18.

7-Jakob O. Hereid is born in Ulvigs parish, Hardanger, Norway in the year 1848. He left Norway in the spring of '66 and arrived in St Croix Co., Wis., the same year. Here he lived until 1870 when he moved to Nicollet Co., Minn. He was married there to the maid Olina Knudson. From here he moved again in 1876, when he came here to Wild Rice and took land on section 10. They have had 12 children together, 3 born in Nicollet and 9 in Wild Rice, 2 are dead after they arrived here. His travelling comrades to here were Knut Torgerson, Børe Olson and Svend Quam.

8-Peter Olsen Skjæggerud is born in Grans parish, Hadeland, Norway, December 31th, 1885. He left his home to go to America in 1851. He arrived the same year in Town of Norway, Racine Co., Wis., where he again met his parents who had made the journey two years earlier. In 1854 the family came to Iowa and settled in Town of Frankville, Winneshiek Co., Iowa. Here he was married to the maid Thora Hendrikson and have 9 children. He lived here until the fall of '75 when he went to the Red River Valley, and arrived to Søren Bergersons House in Wild Rice November 12th. By that time no one had tried to use the power which Wild Rice River gives, and a Flour and Saw Mill was of great importance to the people around in this Settlement, it was on the purpose to supply for this need, Olson came here with a large family in the middle of the winter, with humble means and no houses for people and animals. But in the wilderness the brotherly love shows more up than may be other times and places. The people in the settlement came from far away and near by to help him by erecting houses, and as early as December 15th , he and his family could move in, in their own house. During the winter they logged, and in the spring the neighbors gathered again and helped with the erection of the mill house. A simple Flour and Saw Mill was started in 1876. That everything was very simple, shows the following exclamation from Johan Matson, a quite rational man, however. When he got the sight of the water wheel, he exclaimed : " When this wheel can run a saw, may we then see a glass cabinet even in the clouds". When they had to build the Mill on the northern beach of the river, they, who lived on the southern side, had to take their wheat and flour across the river on boat. Because not everybody was accustomed to handling a boat, there were many strange events. Once John Narum was headed for the mill, but losed the whole burden into the river. Ole Holum wanted to cross the river in a boat, but he did not know how to row, the stream in the river seized the boat, which made him scream and bemoan, as if he was near death. Before we got a bridge, Jakob Herreid crossed the river in the morning in the ice to get to his claim to do some work. The river ice had started to break up, but had fastened again, so one could walk on it in the morning, but during the day it broke up. Olson pulled together some poles and in the afternoon crossed the river to fetch Jakob, but he was long in coming, and Olson had to go back without Jakob because it darkened. It was Eastereve '76 and Jakob Herreid had to put up with staying overnight on the other side under the open sky the whole night. Then one started attempts to build a bridge. Olson arrange for materials and the neighbors came and helped by the erection. But the next spring when the the ice broke up, the bridge followed the ice down the river, as if it was made of straws. Later we erected a good wooden bridge. Now we have a gorgeous steel bridge, so we have no difficulties when crossing the river.After some years there came a young miller to this place, Jørgen Heiberg, son of merchant J. Heiberg in Bergen, Norge. Olson now sold the mill with all the accessories, and because Heiberg possessed more resources, he teared down the old mill, an erected a new one. which later over and over again has been improved, so it by now is one of the best mills of its kind in the West. Mr. Heiberg was at that time unmarried, but had a very cheerful maid to keep the house for him. One Sunday eve she should cross the river to fetch the post and so on for Mr. Heiberg. But because it was late and darkened, she stayed over night on the other side. Early Sunday morning Olson should carry her across the river. But unfortunately someone had been there and had taken the boat to the other side. Olson then wanted to go after it in a canoe he had, but the girl thought it too dreary to wait for him, and before Olson knew of it, she was in the canoe too, and the whole mess went into the river; Olson, the girl, the post, cream and eggs. The girl had fastened to the canoe, but all there was to see was the nose and the feathers on her hat, which came up of the water. Many such stories from those days could be told, but this must be enough to show how the conditions were at that time

9-Elling Tharaldson was born in Drangedals parish, Norway, June 15th, 1843. He left Norway in the spring of 1865 and came to Goodhue Co., Minn., the same year. Here he was married to the maid Anne Johnson, and then he went to Norman co., Minn., the same year, and settled in Town of Lake Ida. There he stayed for 10 years and then he moved to Town of Wild Rice, and lives now on section 17. Together they have 7 children, all born in Norman Co.

10-John Olson was born in Sweden in 1844. He left Sweden in '68 and arrived to the state of Maine the same year and lived there in 2 1/2 year. Then he went back to Sweden again, and here he was married to Kaisa Anderson in '72. Thereafter he went to America once more in '73 and then went all the way to Becker Co., Minn. There he stayed for 3 years and then moved here to Wild Rice and took land on section 18. They have had 6 children, one born in Sweden, one in Becker and 4 here in Wild Rice. John Olson died June 11th, '85. The widow and the children have operated the farm afterwards.

11-Ole Knudson Tofte was born in Hol Prestegjeld, Hallingdal, Norway, in March of 1822. He left Norway in the Spring of 1865 and came to Goodhue County, Minnesota in the same year. He was married in the Spring of 1876 to the maid Anne Johnson, they moved to Norman County, Minnesota that same year and settled in the Town of Lake Ida. They lived there for 10 years, whereafter they moved to
the Twon of Wild Rice and bought land in Section 17. In their family were 7 children, all born in Norman County.

12-Andreas Peterson was born in Vermland, Sweden in 1837 and was married to Johanna Johnson in the Spring of 1866. They left Sweden in the Spring of 1868 and came to Kandiyohi County, Minnesota the same year. They then moved to Becker County, Minnesota in 1871 and were there until the Spring of 1878, when they moved to Wild Rice and settled in Section 19. In there family were 7 children, 1 was born in Sweden, 3 in Kandiyohi County and 3 in Becker County. 2 of the children died in Becker County.

13-Edon Peterson was born in Vermland, Sweden in 1867. He left Sweden in the Spring of 1868 with his parents and came to Kandiyohi County, Minnesota. He came with his parents to Becker County in 1871 and then to Wild Rice in 1878 and took Land in Section 30 in 1888. He was married to the maid Lottie Johnson and had 3 children.

14-Cornelius Peterson was born in Kandiyohi County of Minnesota on the 19th of July, 1868 and came with his parents in 1871 to Becker County, Minnesota where he lived till the Spring of 1878 when he moved to Wild Rice. He was married in the Fall of 1894 to Minnie Rustad. They lived in Section 19, where they farm.
15-Sivert O. Brække was born in Voss Prestegjeld, Bergens Stift, Norway, on the 2nd of July, 1888. He was married in the Sprin of 1866 to the maid Anne Olson Rørgo. That same year they emigrated from Norway and came to Spring Prairie, Wisconsin, where they were till the Fall of the same year. Then they moved to Winneshiek County, Iowa, where they were for 2 years. Then they moved to Ottertail County, Minnesota, where they were till the Spring of 1878, when they moved to Twild Rice and settled in Section 19. They
have a family of 7 children, 4 were born in Ottertail County and 3 in Wild Rice. Mr. Brække died on the 15th of Februray, 1887. The widow still runs the farm.

16-Martin Gilbertson
was born in Næs Prestegjeld, Romerike, Norway on the 11th of May, 1840. He was married to Anne Olson in 1866 and left Norway in the Sprin of 1869 and came to Fillmore County, Minnesota the same year. Here they lived for 6 years, whereafter they moved to Freeborn County, Minnesota, where they lived until the Spring of 1878. They then moved to Wild Rice, where
they took Land in Section 32. On the 14th of April, 1882, his wife died. In there family were 6 children, whereof 1 was born in Norway, 2 in Fillmore County, 1 in Freeborn County and 2 in Wild Rice. 1 child died in Fillmore County and 1 in Wild Rice. Mr. Gilbertson died in the Spring of 1893. His oldest son, Ole, runs the Farm.

17-Henry Peterson
was born in Gjøvig, Norway, on the 15th of September 1852. He left Norway in the Spring of 1869 and came the same year to Stephenson County, Illinois, where he was for 2 years. He then moved to Decorah, Iowa. Here his served as a store clerk until the spring of 1879. He was married in Decorah to the maid Bertha Haug in the Fall of 1877. In the Spring of 1879 they moved to Wild Rice and took Land in Section 20. The first 2 years he was the Postmaster and had the Post Office in his house. He has also held Town positions such as Town Clerk and Assesor. They have 3 children, whereof 1 was born in Decorah and 2 in Wild Rice.

18-C.J. Skaurud
was born in Winneshiek County in Iowa on the 14th of June in 1857. He was married to Helmine Vig in the Spring of 1879. They moved that same year from Iowa to Minnesota, where he was looking for a home. They came the same Summer to Wild Rice, where they settled in Section 3. In 1893 they rented the farm and moved to Ada, where he built a flour mill which he now operates. They have 5 children, all born in Wild Rice.

19-John Ryding
was born in Sweden in 1854. He went to Norway, where in the Spring of 1880 he emigrated to America. He came to Wild Rice in the same year. In 1881 he took land in Section 20 in the Town of Fossum

20-Nils Wold
was born in Quams Prestegjeld, Gudbrandsdalen, Norway in 1828. He was married on the 26 of December, 1854 to the maid Cicilia Heiraas. They left Norway in the Spring of 1861 and come to Canada that same year, where they were for 2 years. Thereafter, they moved to Chicago, Illinois, and lived there for 2 years. From Chicago they moved to Sibley County, Minnesota where they lived until the Sprin of 1880: they moved to Norman County, Minnesota and settled in Section 21 in the Town of Wild Rice. In 1889 he began in Twin Valley a Hotel, this he did until 1895 and then his son took over. They have 12 children in the family, whereof 3 have died. 1 died in Trondheim, Norway, 1 died on the boat to America, and was buried at sea, and one died in Chicago, Illinois. None of the children were born in Wild Rice.

21-Peder O. Herreid
was born in Ulvigs Prestegjeld, Hardanger, Norway on the 4th of September 1831. He attended a course at Søndre Bergenhus Agricultural School from where he graduated in '56.He emigrated from Norway in the Spring of 1857 to go to America. He came however stopped first in Canada for a time from he went to the State of Maine. He was there until 1860, when he went to St. Croix County, Wisconsin, where he was married in 1861 to the maid Julia Levorson and they lived there until 1869, when they moved to Nicollet County, Minnesota. They lived there till the Spring of 1880 when they moved to Norman County, Minnesota and settled in Section 27 in the Town of Wild Rice. The have had 8 children born in their family, of them, 6 have died: 2 in Wisconsin, 3 died in Nicollet County and 1 died while moving to Wild Rice.

22-P.B. Olson
was born in Ekers Prestegjeld, Norway, the 6th of January, 1830. He emigrated from Norway in 1858 in the Spring to America, where he landed first in Eid in Canada, where he came to on the 14th of March. He left from Canada and went to Chicago, Illinois, where he was for 2 years. He then went to Scott County, Minnesota and was ther for 2 years. Thereafter he moved to Sibley County, Minnesota. Here he married in 1868 to Tilda Jensine Heiraas. They stayed in Sibley County until the Spring of 1880 when
they moved up to Norman County and settled in Section 27 of the Town of Wild Rice. They have 9 children in the family, whereof 6 were born in Sibley County and 3 in Wild Rice. One child died in Sibley, County.

23-Hans Nilson Kragerø
was born at Kragerø, Norway in April of 1849. He left Norway in the Spring of 1866 and went to Chicago, Illinois the same year. Here he lived one year, whereafter he moved to Ossian, Winneshiek County, Iowa. Here he was married to the maid Annie Larson in the Winter of 1873. In the Spring of 1880 they moved up to Norman County and brought Land in Section 36 in the Town of Wild Rice, where they live now. They have 5 children, whereof 3 were born in Winneshiek County, Iowa and 2 in Wild Rice. One child has died, namely the youngest son, Almer died on the 28th day of August, 1895.

24-Albert J. Skaurud
was born in Winneshiek County, Iowa, in 1863. He left from Iowa in 1880 to find a home in Norman County, Minnesota. He came the same year to Wild Rice and settled in Section 9. He was married in the Fall of 1884 to the maid Maria Haug. They had 2 children. Skaurud died the 1st of December, 1891. The widow continues to operate the farm.

25-Leonard Glaus
was born in Vermland, Sweden in 1859. He left Sweden in the Spring of 1880 and came to Wild Rice, Norman County, Minnesota the same year and settled in Section 31. He was married to Thea L. Hove in the Fall of 1892. They have 2 children born, but one has died.

26-Ludvig Heiraas
was born in Trondhjem, Norway on the 19th of April, 1849. He left Norway in the Spring of 1880 and came to Wild Rice where he took land in Section 24. He is not married.

27-John Heiraas
was born in Trondhjem, Norway on the 19th of April, 1849. He left Norway with some Sailors in the Spring of 1878 and sailed around until 1881, when he left Sjøen and came to Norman County, Minnesota, and took land in Section 32 in the Town of Wild Rice, where he now lives. He is not married.

28-Olai O. Lene
was born in Herrø Prestegjeld, Norway in 1861. He left Norway in the Spring of 1881 and came directly to Norman County and bought land in Section 5 of Wild Rice Township. On the 6th of February, 1889 he married Regine Hanson. They have 6 children.

29-Hans Hanson Kulsrud
was born in Gjerdrums Prestegjeld, Norway, on February 12, 1825. He was married in 1850 to Martha Wilhelmsdatter, who was born July 10, 1826, and in 1871 in the Spring left from Norway and came to Allamakee County, Iowa in the same year. He lived there 5 year, then he moved to Fillmore County, Minnesota, where he lived til the Spring of 1881 then he moved to Norman County and bought land in Section 9, Town of Wild Rice. They have 4 children, of which 2 live with their old grandparents on the Farm.

30-Enok Tobiasien Birkeland
was born in Lyngdals Prestegjeld, near Mandal, Norway in 1848. He left Norway in the Spring of 1868 and in the same year came to Ossian, Winneshiek County, Iowa. He he was married on the 13th of November, 1871 to the maid Karen Larson. That same Fall they went to Lyon County, Iowa, where they went to get some Homestad Land, and lived there until the Spring of 1881, when they sold the farm and moved up to Norman County, Minnesota, where he bought Land in Section 36, Town of Wild Rice. The have 10 children, whereof 5 were born in Lyon County, Iowa and 5 in Wild Rice. Three children died in Lyon County, Iowa.

31-Aron B. Johnson
was born in Vermland, Sweden on the 10th day of October, 1833. He married the maid Agnethe Johnson in 1858. He left Sweden in the Spring of 1882 and in the same year came to Wild Rice, Norman County, Minnesota and bought land in Section 19. They have had 12 children born, all born in Sweden. Five of the children died in Sweden and 1 died after they came to Wild Rice.

32-Ole H. Sensland
was born in Hjertdals Prestegjeld, Norway, on the 20th of August, 1844. He was married in 1870 to the maid Kari Halvorsdatter. They left Norway to make a home in America. They came to Dunn County, Wisconsin where they lived for 3 years. Then they moved to Otter Tail County in Minnesota, where they lived until the spring of 1882, then they came to Norman County,           Minnesota where they took land in Section 4 of the Town of Wild Rice. They had 6 children born, 5 were in Wisconsin and 1 in Otter Tail County, Minnesota. One child has died.

33-Oscar Trandum
was born in Ullensaker, Norway on the 5th of April, 1860. He emigrated from Norway in 1881 and came the same year to Goodhue County, Minnesota. He was there for a year and then in 1882 moved to Norman County, Minnesota and took land in Section 8 of the Town of Wild Rice. He was married in January of 1887 to the maid Amanda Olson, datter of Peter O. Skæggrud. Mr. Trandum died the 12th of July in 1887, leaving a widow with an unborn child. Since she has lived for most of the time on the farm. Mrs. Trandum was again married the 5th of March, 1896 to Mr. Nils E. Natvig.

34-P.O. Hanson
was born in Ringebo Prestegjeld, Norway in 1858. He left Norway with his parents in the Spring of 1864 and the same year went to Waupacca County, Wisconsin. He he lived until 1879 and then moved to Clay County, Minnesota where he where he found work in Moorhead and in Glyndon. In 1882 he moved to Ada, Norman County, Minnesota where he worked for the firm Andrews and Hampton until the fall of 1887, when he moved to Twin Valley, Minn. where he built a store and began an ironmonger business on his own account. He was among the first to begin a business in Twin Valley.He sold the store and business in '90 to his brothers, S. O. and N.O. Hanson who now run the business. At the same time he bought land in Section 28 in the Town of Wild Rice, right by the city of Twin Valley, where he still lives. In '84 he married to Miss Amalia Grovende. They have had 6 children of whom 2 are dead, one in '88 and one in '91

35-Hermand V. Natvig
was born in Hitternæs Prestegjeld, in Trondheim, Norway in 1852. He emigrated with his parents from Norway in 1869 and came to Dane County, Wisconsin the same year. Here they lived for 4 years and then went to Shelby County, Iowa. In the Spring of 1875, he married Sønneva Johnson. They left in the Spring of 1882 for Norman County, Minnesota and bought land in Section 7 in the Town of Wild Rice. They have 7 children born, 4 were born in Shelby County, Iowa and 3 in Wild Rice. 2 children
have died here.

36-E. J. Natvig
was born in Varsdals Prestegjeld, Sogn, Norway, in 1823. He was married in 1847 to Kirsti Nelson. They left Norway in the spring of 1878 and came to America, and the same year to Shelby County, Iowa. They stayed there until the spring of 1882 and then came to Norman County, Minnesota and bought land in Section 7, Town of Wild Rice. His wife died on the 6th of February, 1891. They had 13 children born, 3 were born in Norway, 2 died in Norway, 2 were born in Shelby, Iowa and died there, 8 were born in Wild Rice whereof 6 have died. He married again in February of 1892 to the maid Anne Olson. With his last wife, he had one child.

37-Carl Haagenson
was born in Hitterdals Prestegjeld, Norway in 1831. He was married to the maid Maria Olson in the fall of 1856. They have 4 children born, and 1 has died. His wife died in 1867. In the fall of 1869 he married Anne Karine Anderson. They left Norway in the spring of 1880 and went to Norway, Michigan the same year. Here they lived for 2 years and then in 1882 they came to Norman County, Minnesota and bought land in Section 27 , Town of Wild Rice, where they now live.

38-Nicolai Græsdahl
was born in Søndmøre, Bergens Stift, Norway, in 1858. He left Norway in the Spring of 1883 and came to Wild Rice, Norman County, Minnesota in the same year. He was married in 1893 to Clara Tharaldson and has two children born.

39-Ole O. Normand
was born at Vossestranden, Bergen, Norway in 1844. He left Norway with his parents in 1853 and came to Wisconsin the same year. He was here just one year when he moved to Nicollet Co., Minn. He lived there until 1884, with the exception of 3 years, when he served in the war. He served 1 year in Company B, 1st Minnesota Mounted Rangers under General Sibley, then 2 years in Company B, 2nd Cavalry Volunteers under General Sulley.In 1866 he was married. He came in 1884 to Norman Co., Minnesota and took land in Section 12 in Lake Ada. He moved in 1894 to the Town of Wild Rice and now lives on Section 8. He has had 6 children, 3 were born in Nicollet Co., 3 in Norman Co.; One is dead.

40-Ole E. Bakke
was born in Sogn, Norway, in 1861. He left Norway in the Spring of 1867 and came with his parents and siblings to Winneshiek County, Iowa, the same year, where he lived for 5 years. He left for Fillmore County, Minnesota, where he lived unti 1882. Then he went to Montana, where he lived until 1884. He moved to Norman County, Minnesota, where he took land in Section 34, Town
of Wild Rice. He was married in the fall of 1885 to the maid Cecilia Syverson and they have 5 children.

41-Kristian Lane
was born in Herrø Prestegjeld, Norway in 1854. He was married in 1883 to Karoline Johannesdatter Bøe. They left Norway in the spring of 1884 and came that same year to Wild Rice, Norman County, Minnesota, where they took land in Section 3. They have 10 children born, all in Wild Rice. 5 have died.

42-Bernt Quam
was born in Indvigens Prestegjeld, Norway in 1855. He left Norway in the spring of 1883 and came to Swift County, Minnesota the same year. He was married in the spring of 1884 to Sigrid Pederson Eide. That same year they came to Norman County, Minnesota and bought land in Section 5, Town of Wild Rice. They have 6 children born, all in Wild Rice.

43-Mickel Elmstad
was born in Vos Prestegjeld, Norway. He was married to Anna Stensdatter. They left Norway in the spring of 1871 and come to Winneshiek County, Iowa. She died in June of 1880. They had 4 children born, 1 in Norway and 3 in Winneshiek County, Iowa. In the summer of 1880 they moved to Norman County, Minnesota and lived until the fall of 1884 in Lake Ida, then he bought land in Section 7, Town of Wild Rice. He married in the fall of 1887 again to the widow Mrs. Ingeborg Tharaldson who had 5 children
born from her first husband.

44-Knut Hedahl
was born in Østre Slidre, Valders, Norway. He emigrated from Norway in the spring of 1882 and came to the Town of Flom the same year. In 1885 he bought land in Section 18, Town of Wild Rice. In the fall of 1890, he married Annie Olson. They have 4 children born, whereof 1 died in the fall of 1891.

45-John Benson
was born in Vermland, Sweden, in 1854. He was married to the maid Maria Johnson in 1881. They left Sweden in the spring of 1885 and came the same year to Wild Rice, where they bought land in Section 30. They have 7 children born, whereof 2 were born in Sweden and 5 in Wild Rice.

46-Nils P. Forseth
was born in Gausdal, Gudbrandsdalen, Norway, on the 22, September, 1862. He left Norway in 1878 and in the same year went to Rock County, Wisconsin. Here he married Helene Rostad in 1883. They left in the spring of 1885 from Wisconsin to Norman County, Minnesota and bought land in Section 36 and 25 in the Town of Wild Rice. Here they lived until the spring of '91, when he sold his land and became U.S. Mail Carrier between Faith and Fossum, Twin Valley, Folkedahl and Ada. Here he drove the mail for 3 years while he with his family lived in faith, as long as his wife lived. His wife died the 24th July '92. In their marriage they had 3 children, all born in Wild Rice. In the fall of '94 he moved to Ada, where he now lives and works as a butcher. His oldest child, a daughter, is with R. Grutle in Fossum, the middle one with C.D.Tvedstulen in home Lake, and the youngest with Hans Nelson in Wild Rice. The middle one is a boy and the youngest a girl.

47-Bernt P. Evenvold
was born in Gausdal, Gudbrandsdalen, Norway, July 26, 1863. He left Norway in 1883 and came the same year to Coon Prairie, Wisconsin where he lived one yearand then went to Waupacca County, Wisconsin, where he married in the spring of 1886 to Rhoda Forseth and in the same year came to Norman County, Minnesota and bought Land in Section 34 of Wild Rice. In '90 he sold this land, after which that same fall he left his family, wife and 3 children, which should have been his most precious possession on earth, and went out into the world. Where he is now, nobody knows. His wife has built a house and now lives on Section 35 in the Town of Wild Rice

48-Simon Haug
was born in Rollags Prestegjeld, Norway, in 1826. He was married at Aurdal, Valders to Gunnild Michelson in 1856. They left Norway in 1871 and came to Black Earth, Dane County, Wisconsin the same year. He lived there until the Spring of 1886, when he moved his family to Norman County, Minnesota, and took land in Section 6 of the Twon of Wild Rice. They have 2 children,
both born in Norway.

49-Bernhard Jensen
was born in Hitterdalen, Norway the 25th day of August, 1867. He left Norway in the spring of 1882 and came the same year to Wild Rice. He was married the 21st of July 1894 to Boliva Tomtengen and they live in Section 27 of Wild Rice.

50-Nils G. Hedalle
was born in Østre Slidre Prestegjeld, Valders, Norway and was married to Marith Svensen in the spring of 1884. They left Norway right after to seek their fortune in America, and came to the town of Flom, Minnesota the same year. Here he lived for 2 years, after which he went to Clay County, Minnesota. Since he was not content there, he moved back in 1888 to Norman County and bought land in Section 18 in the Town of Wild Rice, where he now lives. He has had 5 children, one born in Flom, one in Clay County and 3 in Wild Rice.

51-Andrew Dahlbom
was born in Vermland, Sweden, in 1868. He left Sweden in 1884 and came the same year to Wild Rice, Norman County, Minnesota, where he in 1888 bought land in Section 18 in Wild Rice. He married in 1892 to Mary Nelson and has 2 children born.
52-Jens Brodsho was born in Drangedals Prestegjeld, Norway, on the 5th of November, 1860. He emigrated from Norway in the spring of 1882 and came to the Town of Fossum the same year. He was married in 1888 to Clara Jensveen and settled in 1889 in the Town of Wild Rice in Section 33, where he lives now. They had 7 children born, 1 in Fossum and 6 in Wild Rice.
53-Hans Carlson was born in Hitterdalen, Norway, on the 9th of January, 1860. He emigrated from Norway in 1879 and came to Michigan, where he worked at the Iron Mines until the Fall of 1881. Then he went to Colorado and worked in the Silvermines until the Fall of 1889.From there he moved to Norman County, Minnesota and boought land in Section 35 in Town of Wild Rice. He was married the 26th of November, 1890 to Annie Haagensen and has 4 children.

54-Sivert T. Hove
was born in Dane County, Wisconsin in 1861. He left Wisconsin in 1865 with his parents and came to Freeborn County, Minnesota. Here he lived until 1879, when he and his parents came to Norman County, Minnesota, where he bought land in the Town of Rockville, Norman County, Minnesota. He was married in March of 1885 to Karoline Haagenson. In the Fall of 1882 he bought his Father in law, Gudbrand Hagenson's Farm in the Town of Wild Rice, where he now lives. They have had no children.

55-Morten Johnson
was born in Ringebo, Gudbrandsdalen, Norway, on the 17th of June, 1852. He left Norway in 1869 and came that same year to Waupacca County, Wisconsin, where he lived for 7 or 8 years. Then he left Wisconsin and came to Norman County, Minnesota, and settled first in Lake Ada where he lived for a 5 year period. He then moved back to Wisconsin, but returned to Norman County, Minnesota in 1894, and bought land in Section 8 in the Town of Wild Rice, where he now lives. He is unmarried but his elderly
parents live with him.

56-Emil Johnson
was born in Vermland, Sweden, in 1870. He left Sweden in 1891 and came to Hickson, North Dakota that same year, where he lived until 1894, when he came to Norman County, Minnesota and bought land in Section 30. He was married the 15th of July, 1895 to Manda Olson.

57-John Hedin
was born in Vermeland, Sweden, in 1862.He left Sweden in the Spring of 1885 and cam to Becker County, Minnesota where he lived for 2 years, then he went to Hickson, North Dakota, where he married Manda Gunderson. Here he stayed until 1894, when he moved back to Minnesota, and took land in Wild Rice, Norman County, Minnesota, in Section 29. He had 4 children born, 3 in
North Dakota and 1 in Wild Rice.
 
58-J. F. Heiberg *)
is born in Bergen, Norway, 4th of July 1861. He emigrated from Norway in the spring of 1881 and came to Minneapolis, Minn. Shortle afterwards he went to Dane Co., Wis., and stayed there for a year. After that he went to Minnesota, and came here to Norman Co., where he bought the mill from Peter O. Skjægrud in Town of Wild Rice. The 18th January 1884 he was married to the maid Augusta Slettebakken. He has 5 children. With regard to the new mill by Heiberg it can be added : It was erected in 1882 and was 30 x 40, 3 floors height. In 1890 it was completely changed to roller mill. In 1892 it was improved, enlarged and added 10 feet, so it now is 30x50. The addition is used for rinsing and storing wheat. The mill also has its own Feed Department with excellent rinsing apparatus. Before we got the bridge across the river, there was a ferry on which one transported the wheat across the river. The mosquitos were so many those days, that when one wiped the face with the hand, it was filled of mosquitos. More to conclusion about Heibergs Park. Note from Håkon: *) J. F. Heiberg = Jørgen Faye Heiberg, born 4th July, bapt. 4th Aug 1861 in Nykirken, Bergen, parents : merchant Andreas Heiberg and wife Else Catharine Reutsch born Faye, married in the Cathedral of Bergen on 18th Nov 1849, father was at that time 29 and mother 22 1/4 years old. Digitalarkivet Emigrants from Bergen 1874-1930 says that Jørgen Faye Heiberg,19 years old, emigrated from Bergen 7th May 1880 with State Line
59-Dr. John O. Froshoug was born in the vicinity of Kristiania, Norway, 8th August 1837. At age 18 he went to Copenhagen, Denmark, to be educated as a veterinarian there. After 5 years of studies he graduated as a such. After that he went back to Norway and started to practice as veterinarian. He was married in 1867 and in 1870 he decided to go to America to see if it was possible to get a home there. He left his family behind in Norway, to fetch them later, if he decided to stay in America. He came first to Stoughton, Wis., where he lived for a short time, because he soon understood, that it was not enough to provide for a family, only to practice as a veterinarian, he also had to be a medical doctor for the people. For that reason he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he after 1 1/2 years of studies by a medical college there, took diploma as doctor. In the fall of 1872 he went to Albert Lea, Minn., where he settled as doctor and started a drugstore business. Here he lived untill 1875 when he moved to Lake Park, Becker Co., Minn., where he started a drugstore once more. In 1877 he decided to use his rights for a homestead, whereafter he the same year took land on section 22 in Town of Wild Rice, Norman Co., Minn. Because he had his Homestead here and the drugstore in Lake Park, and he often had to be on both places, he became post carrier between Wild Rice Postoffice and Lake Park. Every time he carried the post to Wild Rice, he went down to his Homestead and stopped there. He constructed soon a house, and to manage the household he got hold of a swedish Count and a swedish tanner, and the whole lot was given the Noble Name " The Barony of Poor Livelihood ". When the whole staff on " The Barony of Poor Livelihood " was gathered, it consisted of a norwegian doctor, a norwegian veterinarian, a swedish count, a swedish tanner and - a dog. But they were not alone all the time, because often the neighbors often visited them, and if the walls of the Barony could quote the many stories which happened here, then the book about it would be larger than this one. In the beginning of the '80s Dr Froshoug let his business in Lake Park come to an end, and decided to make Wild Rice to his future home. He then send to Norway for his family, which was his wife and 2 sons. He also bought 160 acres of land on section 28. Of this he sold 40 acres to the railway company for city ground where Twin Valley now is located, and where he setlled. He he stayed until 9th June 1889 when he passed away caused by tuberculosis. After his family came here, the family was increased with a daughter. Froshoug's oldest son followed in his fathers steps and be- came a doctor. He took his degree by Reokuk Medical College, Reokuk, Iowa, in the spring of 1896, and then went to Norse, Tex., where he lives by now. His younger son, Arnt, still lives in Twin Valley, where he runs business of hardware and farming machinery. Mrs. Froshoug wnet back to Norway in 1894 to be with her mother's side in her last days.

60-A. Stenseth
is born in Skridje parish, Norway, 1857. In 1872 he was married to the maid Lovise Thorsen. This marriage did not last long, because she died after a year leaving him with their baby. In 1876 he was married again to Caroline Marcussen. He left Norway in the spring of 1882 to try his luck in America, and he came directly here to Norman Co., Minn., and obtained work by Heiberg's Mill. Here he worked for 4 or 5 years. In 1888 Heiberg postoffice started and A. Stenseth was hired as postmaster. In addition he has a small store. They have had 9 children, of whom 3 were born in Norway and 6 in Wild Rice. His wife is authorized midwife.

61-Andrew Johnson
was born in Sweden about the year 1825. He also got married in Sweden, but when can not be told. About the year 55 or '56 he left Sweden and his family, and went to Norway, where he from what is told, stayed for about 12 years near Holmestrand. His family had to go ahead as good as possibly on their own. His wife died about 3 years after he left her, and his 4 sons, so to speak, became orphans. In '67 he went to America, and settled in Freeborn Co., Minn., where he stayed to the spring '71. Then he went with Søren Bergerson, Martin Johnson and others, when they went to the West. He then came here and took land near the others, and after the surveying of the land, it turned out to be in section 35 and 36 in Town of Wild Rice. In the winter of '74 he married again to the widow Anna Maria Engen. This marriage turned out to be unsuccessful too, and they lived together only for a year. They were divorced again by the civil law by which they had been married. Johnson lived thereafter alone on his farm, while his former wife moved to her son Edvard Engen, who lived in the south part of Town of Flom. In the years '80 to '82 his sons came over from Norway. They stayed with him for some time, but went out on their own. He sold his farm in '85 to Nils B. Forseth and moved then to Nils Nilson in Town of Flom. After a while he went back to the old country to see the old homestead. About a year later he came back, and builded a house on his son Andrews farm in Home Lake, to live there for the rest of his life. But in the fall of '91 he got tired by the life, and one night he sat the house on fire, and shot himself a bullet in the forehead. That way died Andrew Johnson.

From the book "Nogle Optegnelser om Settling m.m. indenfor de fire Towns Fossum, Wild Rice, Home Lake og Flom i Norman County, Minn". Collected by R. Grutle, Lars Aamoth, John Narum, O.S. Bentley and John Hommelvig.
Translated by Håkon Skaugvoll and Olaf Kringhaug.

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