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33rd Generation


14720. Hamon Viscomte De Dinan was born about 1000. ORIGIN OF STUARTS AND FITZALAN

SUMMARY OF INFORMATION BY GEORGE WASHINGTON, MA, FSA, OF CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND,
FROM NEHGR VOL 116(1962),21-25 AND VOL117(1963),235-237, IN ENGLISH ORIGINS
OF NEW ENGLAND FAMILIES, VOL III, SECOND SERIES.

I. HAMON, VICOMTE DE DINAN, ABT 1000 M RAENTLINA
HAMAN IS FROM CADET OF RULING HOUSE OF BRITTANY
A. SALOMON A BASTARD(NOT BY RAENTLINA) FROM WHOM HOUSE OF DU GUESCLIN
B. HAMON ELDEST SON V DE DINAN OSP 1030
C. JOSCELINE 2ND SON V DE DINAN ABT 1040-1070
i. OLIVER V DE DINAN
D. JUNKENEUS, ARCHBISHOIP OF DOL AND LORD OF COMBOURG
E. RHIWALLON LIVING 1064 M AREMBURGE; LORD OF DOL AND COMBOURG
i. WILLIAM, LORD OF DOL ABT 1065-70, AFTERWARDF ABBOT OF ST FLORENT 1070
ii. JOHN, AFTERWARDS ARCHBISHOP OF DOL
a. RHIWALLON, LORD OF DOL 1095
F. FLAAD, SENESCHAL(DAPIFER) OF DOL ABT 1032-1064
i. ALAN FITZ FLAAD DAPIFER OF DOL ABT 1080
a. ALAN, DAPIFER OF DOL 1097, OSP
b. FLAAD FITZ ALAN 2ND SON AND HEIR 1101
(i.) ALAN FITZ FLAAD SHERIFF OF SHROPSHIRE, TIME OF HENRY I
M AVELINE DAU OF ARNULF DE HESDIN DOMESDAY BARON. SHE
MARRIES 2NDLY ROBERT FITZWALTER

(a.) FROM HIM DESCEND THE STUARTS AND FITZALANS
c. RHIWALLON A MONK
G. HATON, BROTHER OF FLAAD ABT 1065-70
Mr Cheape decided that the island must be the Hebridean land of
Scalpay, known, as Eilean Glas in Gaelic, and discovered that the Prince had
sought shelter there with a tacksman called Campbell. [Tacksmen were gentlemen
of a clan, the descendants of collateral of ell. [Tacksmen were gentlemen of a
clan, the descendants of collateral of the chiefs. They acted as lieutenants
in the days of clan warfare and thus obtained leases (tacks) of land from their
chief.]
There was also documentary evidence that the Prince had been given a
'sute of cloaths' at the first house at which he arrived, dishevelled and
bedraggled, after fleeing the battlefield of Culloden Moor where 2,000
Jacobite followers were slain on April 16 1746. This was the home of the
MacDonalds of Borrodale. Catriona MacDonald, who came from the clan
MacGregor, welcomed the Prince into her home on the same day she learned
her eldest son had been killed in the battle.
She was aware of the consequences of harbouring Prince Charles Edward
Stuart, the Young Pretender, but the rules of Highland hospitality ensured
him a bed at her house. Several days after he left, government forces razed
her house.
The Prince fled with his new clothes to the Hebrides. Mr Cheape said
that although Campbell of Scalpay was a tacksman and probably a supporter of
the Government [unlikely], again the rules of Highland hospitality prevailed.
He was reported to the authorities by the minister on the island for
harbouring the Prince, but when the King's men arrived to arrest him they
were unable to get off the boat. Campbell, threatening to "split them in
twain", told the soldiers he was bound by the unwritten rules of hospitality
to look after any man who came to his door in need.
The scrap of tartan is believed to be from the kilt given to the Prince
by Catriona MacDonald and left at the house of Campbell. It was analysed by
Dr Anita Quye of the museums conservation unit who identified the dyes in
the tartan using liquid chromatography and spectroscopy. All the dyes are
natural ones used in the 18th century. A reconstruction of the tartan has
been made from Dr. Quye's work. "Its not completely out of the ordinary
but it does not match any of the other clan tartans we know, which is what
you would expect if it were genuine," Mr Cheape said.
As he was finishing his research, Mr Cheape was sent a second scrap of
the same tartan from a family in Southampton. It was from the same cloth as the
original piece and with it was the identical note. It also proved to be
authentic. "It came completely out of the blue and it was electrifying,"
Mr Cheape said.
Today's clan tartans became fashionable in late Georgian and early
Victorian times. But there is ample evidence that tartan or plaid has played an
important part in Scottish dress since Roman times. "The turning point in
its history was its prohibition from Culloden until 1782 when, largely due
to the efforts of the Highland Society of London, the ban was lifted. In
1815, the Society wrote to clan chiefs and invited them to send a signed and
sealed sample of their tartans to the society, and so a collection was
formed.
The Prince's tartan, with the original fragments and other relics, goes
on display in Edinburgh this week.
---------------------------------

Sources:
Other : From NEHGR VOL 116(1962),21-25 & VOL 117(1963),235-237

14721. Raentlina Cadet of Ruling House of Brittany (private).

Children were:

i.

Hamon Eldest Son Vicomte De Dinan was born in 1030. He was an OSP 1030. Sources:
Other : From NEHGR VOL 116(1962),21-25 & VOL 117(1963),235-237

ii.

Joceline 2nd Son Vicomte De Dinan was born in 1040. He died in 1070 at the age of 30. Sources:
Other : From NEHGR VOL 116(1962),21-25 & VOL 117(1963),235-237

iii.

Junkeneus Archbishop of Dol and Lord of Combourg (private).

iv.

Rhiwallon Lord of Dol and Combourg (private).

-2147476288

v.

Flaad Seneschal (Dapifer) of Dol.

vi.

Haton Brother of Flaad was born between 1065 and 70. Sources:
Other : From NEHGR VOL 116(1962),21-25 & VOL 117(1963),235-237