Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   



Macfie-Scriver
Browning , Montana





 
                                 Alison Westgarth Macfie       Emery ThaddeusScriver                                                                                   



Ellison Westgarth Macfie
1887-1977
Married
August 9,  1911
Clarenceville, Quebec
Thaddeus Emery Scriver
1879-1971


Harold Thaddeus Scriver
1912-1984
Robert Macfie Scriver
1914-1999

Thaddeus Scriver , son of James Scriver and Mary Griffin , was born in Clarenceville and lived on the farm located next to the Macfie on Beech North.

Thaddeus , a graduate of the Military Academy of Standstead, Qc, became  bugler of the 6th Hussars, under the command of Major George Macfie

Thaddeus moved west to Minneapolis in the late 1890's, he moved in with his two brothers, but did not work with them, he  had gotten himself a job at the Minneapolis Journal. On day a Mr J H  Sherburne proposed to Thaddeus that he come work for him at an Indian trading post he was to operate  on the Blackfoot Reservation in northwestern Montana.

Thaddeus worked for  J H Serburne until 1903, when he opened up his own competing store across the street from J H Sherburne in Browning Montana, under the name of  Willets and Scriver General Merchandise. One Thaddeus became a naturalized American citizen he was able to buy out his partner Horace Willets  and hence he changed the name of his general store to the Browning Mercantile Company ( 1907)( incorporated 1918)  The  venture was so successful Thaddeus returned to Clarenceville, Que, to  marry his childhold sweetheart Ellison Westgarth Macfie .

Returning to Browning in 1911, the newlyweds set up house and  lived thier entire life in this town established in the  center of  the Blackfoot  Indian Reservation . As times went along, Thaddeus Scriver was able to enlarge his holding and purchased a ranch of some 320 acres on the South Fork of the Milk River , another on the dry fork of the Milk River, some 640 acres, and a further 800 acres near Valier, Montana.  Along  with three partners  Thaddeus opened the Stockman's State Bank , unfortunately following a theft ( like many of those in the old west)
Thaddeus and his partners were placed in a different financial position and he had to sell his farm lands to cover the losses at the back. ( apparently the name of the cashier who escounded with the money was Bartholamew).

Thaddeus Scriver became a respected white man among the Blackfeet and was hornored with granting of  the Indain name  ' Stumick-ot-o-si'  ( Medicine Bull).

1st Marriage
Harold Thadeus Scriver
1912-1984
Married
February 22, 1943
Browning, Montana
Hazel Overdhal
1916-1980


                Laurel Ellen Scriver
                      1947-

Harold Thaddeus  Scriver took possession of the Browning Mercantile Company after the death of his father and ran it until his death in 1984. His daughter Laurel ran the store  until she found a buyer, unfortunately the building has since burned and nothing is now left of this once grand general store.

2nd marriage
Harold Thaddeus Scriver
1912-1984
Married
September 4 ,1981
Browning ,Montana
Betty Lee



Laurel Ellen Scriver
1947-
Married
Browning, Montana
George Platt



John Scriver Platt
1974-
Christopher Scriver Platt
1976-




1st  Mariage
Robert Macfie Scriver
1916-1999
Married
November 20,1937
Cardson, Montana
Alice Prestmo
1914-1990

Margaret  Alice Scriver
1938-1968
 James Robert Scrvier
1942-1993



2nd Marriage
Robert Macfie Scriver
1916-1999
Married
January 4, 1946
Edmonton, Alberta
Jeanette Cermine Caouette



3rd Marriage
Robert Macfie Scriver
1916-1999
Married
November 27,1966
Browning, Montana
Mary Helen Strachan




4th Marriage
Robert Macfie Scriver
1916-1999
Married
August 15, 1972
  New York City, NY
Dorothy Lorraine Holdren
-2002




Bob Scriver was born August 15, 1914 in the Blackfoot Indian reservation town of Browning, Montana, where he lived most of his life. Beginning as a sculptor at age 46, Scriver rose to greater heights than most sculptors achieve in a lifetime.

Often called America's foremost sculptor of the West, Scriver was accorded gold and silver medals for excellence in sculpture by both the Cowboy Artists of America and the National Academy of Western Art. He was also an elected member of the National Sculpture Society, the International Art Guild, the Salamagundi Club and the Society of Animal Artists.



Seeing Bob Scriver's Artwork: An Intermountain Tour

by Kirby Lambert

From Montana The Magazine of Western History, 51 (Summer 2001), 70-73; this article is presented courtesy of the Montana Historical Society. All rights reserved, © 2001

From the late 1950s through the close of the twentieth century, a visit to Bob Scriver's museum was one of the highlights of a trip to the Glacier National Park area for many Montana travelers. Located along Highway 89 on a busy corner in the Blackfeet Indian Reservation community of Browning, the building's unassuming exterior belied the treasures held within. Since the artist did not advertise, the experience was reserved for those who had learned of the museum by word of mouth and for adventurous sightseers whose curiosity was piqued by bold lettering announcing the "Museum of Montana Wildlife" and "Hall of Bronze."

Once inside, visitors were greeted by a maze of exhibits packed, literally, floor to rafter. To the left lay the Museum of Montana Wildlife--an assemblage of taxidermy mounts and dioramas depicting the big game, fish, and fowl of the Treasure State. To the right lay the Hall of Bronze--an accumulation of a lifetime of work by one of the West's premier sculptors. Arranged by category, Scriver's exhibits paid homage to a wide array of figures from the past. Most notable among these were two series of bronzes depicting traditional Blackfeet culture and professional rodeo cowboys. Unseen by most visitors were basement work areas--Scriver's sculpting studio and bronze foundry--and attic storage areas brimming with early artwork, saddles, and cowboy gear of all kinds.

Following Scriver's death in January 1999, it became impossible for his widow, Lorraine, to continue the museum's operation, and after one final season, the Browning institution closed. Fortunately for art lovers, wildlife enthusiasts, and future generations, however, the world that Scriver created lives on. In March 2000 Lorraine Scriver presented her late husband's massive collection to the Montana Historical Society. Included in this gift were more than four hundred bronzes, five hundred casts in other media (primarily fiberglass, plaster, and the plasterlike material, Hydrocal), one hundred twenty paintings and sketches by Scriver, one hundred fifty works of art by other artists, two hundred taxidermy mounts, thirteen dioramas, an eleven-hundred-volume library, one hundred fifty linear feet of archival material, two thousand photographic images, and a broad assortment of historic artifacts ranging from foundry and sculpting tools to miniature wagons and presentation belt buckles.

To ensure the long-term preservation of this remarkable collection, the Montana Historical Society entered into a cooperative agreement that offers western museum goers expanded opportunities to enjoy Scriver's work. While the Society retains ownership of the materials, the Provincial Museum in Edmonton, Alberta, (with which Scriver had a long-standing relationship) and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation in Missoula, Montana, will care for and exhibit portions of the collection that most closely fit their institutional missions. This unique consortium provides travelers the opportunity not only to enjoy more of the artist's work but also to experience firsthand the West that Scriver loved as they travel through the landscape that inspired his art.

The creator of this extraordinary collection was born on August 15, 1914, on Montana's Blackfeet Indian Reservation where his family operated the Browning Mercantile Company. Growing up amid the region's vast plains and shining mountains--and surrounded by frontier characters and Blackfeet elders--Robert MacFie Scriver was inßinfluenced equally by the geography, people, and animals of the Glacier Park area, as well as by the romantic tales of the Wild West he heard in his father's store. As an adult, he devoted his considerable talents to music and taxidermy before becoming one of the nation's most celebrated sculptors of western life.

Bob Scriver had two lifelong passions--music and art. In the beginning, it was music that most captivated him. After graduating from Browning High School, where he played the cornet, Scriver studied music education at Dickinson State College in North Dakota, the prestigious VanderCook College of Music in Chicago, Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and the University of Washington in Seattle. For many years Scriver served as music supervisor and band director at his high school alma mater and for three years in the Malta, Montana, public schools. During World War II Scriver played in the 550th Army Air Force's band where, as first-chair cornet in the Alaskan Division, he was stationed in Edmonton, Alberta. In addition, he played trumpet in dance bands across the region throughout the 1930s and 1940s.

By 1950, however, Scriver's growing fascination with taxidermy had replaced his interest in teaching music. Leaving his position at Browning High School, Scriver focused his attention on developing a career as a professional taxidermist. As a child, he had sculpted small animal figures from riverbank clay. Now he applied his talents to constructing anatomical forms for mounting hides. While enrolled at Vandercook, Scriver had spent hours at Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History studying the animal mounts and visiting with the taxidermists who prepared the displays. In the late 1950s, as an extension of his taxidermy business, Scriver opened his Museum of Montana Wildlife, which featured mounted specimens and dioramas inspired by his memories of exhibits at the Field Museum. Scriver also created a series of small animal figurines cast in plaster to sell as souvenirs to the museum's visitors.

Scriver's success in sculpting animal forms for his taxidermy work encouraged the artist to pursue more traditional forms of sculpture. In 1956 the Montana Historical Society sponsored a competition to select a heroic-size statue of Charles M. Russell for National Statuary Hall in the United States capitol. Scriver entered but lost the competition. (Years later Scriver said of his entry in that competition, "There was hardly anything right about it.") His initial disappointment at losing gave way to resolve, as the artist realized that he had found his true calling. From that point forward he devoted his efforts to becoming a master sculptor.

Although he received little formal schooling in art, Scriver was an extremely careful observer and was quick to learn from advice offered by the many artists he befriended. In 1961 Scriver opened the first major exhibition of his sculpture at his studio in Browning. The show received critical acclaim. National recognition soon followed, along with an ever-growing audience of admirers and collectors. In the mid-1960s Scriver opened his own bronze foundry to gain control over the complicated casting process. In 1967 he began his series of bronzes devoted to the daring men and women of the rodeo. In the early 1970s he added to his repertoire a series of sculptures depicting the culture and traditions of the Blackfeet people among whom the artist had spent his life.

Over the course of forty-plus years, Bob Scriver created, piece by piece, a unique artistic vision of the West. Upon his death, Lorraine Scriver inherited the daunting task of ensuring that her late husband's legacy would be properly preserved. By forming a consortium, the Society and its new partners were able to offer an innovative solution that kept the collection intact while making it available to the broadest possible audience. The Montana Historical Society Museum has recently opened A Legacy in Bronze: The Sculpture of Bob Scriver, an inaugural exhibit celebrating the acquisition of the collection; the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation has added Scriver mounts to its visitor center's displays; and the Provincial Museum of Alberta will soon be installing a major exhibit of Scriver's Blackfeet series and other bronzes. Most significantly, each institution is involved in planning expanded exhibit space for the Scriver Collection.

In addition to these works, the region is rich in other Scriver offerings as well. The area's leading western art museums--including the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyoming, the C. M. Russell Museum in Great Falls, Montana, and the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, Alberta--all collect and periodically exhibit Scriver's work.

Like the large-scale sculpture Symbol of the Pros that now stands east of the Montana Historical Society building in Helena, a number of monumental works are also permanently on view across the region. Visitors to Great Falls can see Scriver's heroic-size renderings of Charlie Russell at the C. M. Russell Museum and Lewis and Clark at Overlook Park on the Missouri River. Just downriver, Fort Benton is home to two monumental Scriver bronzes--the state's official memorial honoring Jefferson's intrepid Corps of Discovery as well as Shep, Faithful Friend, a tribute to Montana's most beloved canine. In Cody, Wyoming, Scriver's heroic-size statue of the great western showman William "Buffalo Bill" Cody welcomes visitors to the Buffalo Bill Historical Center. And, current plans call for two large-scale rodeo pieces on loan from the Scriver Collection to be installed on the grounds of the Plains Indian Museum in the artist's hometown of Browning.

With the death of one of the Treasure State's most celebrated sculptors and subsequent closure of his museum, visitors lost the opportunity for a chance encounter with the colorful artist amid the works he created. But Bob Scriver's matchless legacy has been preserved, and Scriver enthusiasts--present and future--have gained myriad opportunities to continue enjoying his artistic vision of a West that was.


KIRBY LAMBERT is the curator of collections for the Montana Historical Society Museum, Helena.
From Montana The Magazine of Western History, 51 (Summer 2001), 70-73; this article is presented courtesy of the Montana Historical Society.  All rights reserved,




Robert Scriver (1914-1999)

Robert was born on August 15, 1914 in the Blackfeet Indian Reservation town of Browning, where he lived for most of his life. 
Over his long career, he created more than 1,000 sculptures at his foundry - studio - museum complex.The body of his work includes heroic statues of "Buffalo" Bill Cody and Charlie Russell, as well as a 53-piece series about the Blackfeet people entitled "No More Buffalo" and an additional 33-piece series depicting the American rodeo cowboy. Notable works by Scriver are on display at the C.M. Russell Museum, the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center (both in Great Falls), and the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City. Four Scriver works are on display at the Hockaday in memory of the artist. Three of the bronze sculptures "Watching the Herd," "War Sign," and "Paul's Bull," are part of the museum's permanent collection of work by Montana artists. The fourth, "No More Buffalo," is on loan to the Hockaday from Marshall and Jackie Noice. Like much of Scriver's work, these four pieces depict traditional themes of Western sculpture. Scriver also wrote and published several books, including surveys of his own work and an art history of Blackfeet materials he collected. Two of these books, "The Blackfeet: Artists of the Northern Plains," and "No More Buffalo," were illustrated by Kalispell photographer and artist Marshall Noice. In 1969, in recognition of the high regard the Blackfeet held for him, Scriver was chosen to become the owner of the Little Dog Thunder Medicine Pipe. In 1990, Scriver was presented the Governor's Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Arts in Montana.

Pictured on the left is "Watching the Herd"



Sacagawea and Jean-Baptiste, by Scriver




Sacagawea and Jean-Baptiste
Detail of sculpture by Robert Scriver
Riverfront Park, Fort Benton, Montana.
1976
J. Agee photo



Bob Scriver Bronze

Sage Brush Bronc

Price:  $12,500 or best offer

   

Above; details of name on bronze - Sage Brush Bronc, Bob Scriver 1983, bronze arrowhead and the number 35/60 edition

 




THE CENTER FOR THE ROBERT M. SCRIVER COLLECTION

CHALLENGE

In March 2000, the Montana Historical Society acquired one of its largest and most significant collections ever: the personal collection of renowned Western artist and sculptor Robert M. Scriver. The $15 million collection was temporarily housed in a 20,000 square foot warehouse that was only available only on a short-term basis and offered no access to the public. The current Society building in Helena did not have the space to store the collection.

RESPONSE

The Foundation built a 20,000 square foot repository
to house the Scriver Collection to give the public greater
access to the breadth of the Collection. The Foundation
and the Montana Historical Society are working together
to complete the lobby and viewing area for the Scriver
Center. A no-frills exhibit area will allow the public to
view significant portions of the collection while still
protecting the pieces.

RESULT

The Robert M. Scriver Collection is now on permanent
exhibit in Helena. The Scriver Collection will be
preserved for future enjoyment for generations to come.







Margaret Alice Scriver
1938-1968
Married
Albert De Smet
1935-


Charmine Marie De Smet
1957-1980
Michelle Rene De Smet
1959-
Lane Anthony De Smet
1960-
Rory Neil De Smet
1962-





2nd Marriage
Margaret  Alice Scriver
1938-1968
Married
Kenneth Paul





Michelle Rene De Smet
1959-
Married
Matthew Warrington
1958-


Colt James Warrington
1985-
Whitney Cherié Warrington
1987-




Lane Anthony De Smet
1960-
Married
Christine Renée Jones
1965-

          Ariel Anthony De Smet
                       1990-




Rory Neil De Smet
1962-
Married
Denene Gail Kesterson
1952-

                 Evan Neil De Smet
                        1987-





 James Robert Scriver
1942-1993
Married
July 7, 1967
El Monte Ca
Jacqueline Lea Snodgrass
1945-

Jann Louise Scriver
1969-
Jenifer Robin Scriver
1975-





E-mail
Index
  Guestbook 






Thursday, 05-Mar-2009 19:14:27 MST