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The


Graham

Family
of
Greenock, Scotland


From the book John Macfie of Edinburgh and his family, it is indicated that John Graham was a Captain of a sailing vessel.

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Mary Macfie
1780-1853
Married
January 11,1808
Greenock Scotland
John Graham (i)
1774-1830

V
John Graham(ii)
1811-1892
Mary Graham
1813-1899
Robert Graham
1815-1836
Jessie Johnstone Graham
1817-1892
Duncan Graham
1819-1840
Eliza Ann Graham
1820-1899

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In 1828 Captain John Graham, was considering the future of his eldest son John, now in his 17th year and with this in view was contemplating taking a share in a proposed Paper Mill on Shaws Water..

At Greenock Captain John Graham died on the 11th Feb 1830. He had been in ill health for some time and in the previous August had visited Bridge of Allan to drink the waters.

His son John was at this time, employed in the offices of Messrs A Wilson Co, but soon afterwards went into partnership with John Orr in a business in Greenock.

Robert Graham, the young brother of John entered the Greenock sugar house about the middle of December (1831).

A dyewood mill was started this year (1833) as a subsidiary of -      Macfie , Lindsay Co.

John Graham was put in charge of this new venture, which traded under the name of - Lindsay , Graham.

About October 1835 Robert Graham, the younger brother of John became seriously ill. It was suspected that he had tuberculosis and therefore a month later he was sent to Jamaica to escape the Scots winter. On 4th of March Robert Graham died at Kingston. He had reached Jamaica safely the previous January, after a voyage lasting forty five days, but had not benefited in health and after landing, as letters from Colin Campbell ( James Macfie 's partner) show, had failed rapidly. He was only 20 years of age ' a very fine lad and deservedly a universal favourite

Duncan Graham died 29 Apr 1840



Andrew Lindsay retired from Macfie , Lindsay  & Co in April 1842, John Graham thus became manager and after the formal dissolution of partnership (28 Feb 1843), the name of the firm was altered to Macfie , Graham & Co.

John Graham had not long been in charge of Macfie,Graham & Co before he advocated a radical change of policy. Owing to developments in Glasgow the shipping business in Greenock was declining, so he urged the necessity of establishing a branch in Glasgow, for export goods and ship's stores, if thier trade were to be maintained. This was agreed upon in April (1843) and in May an office was taken in St Enoch Square. William Andrew Macfie truened to the business for a time and took cahrge of the Greenock office while John Graham was opening up the Glasgow branch. John Graham was much involved with ships,
Hannah Ker, being the first, and then two others the - Robert Benn - which traded with Bombay and the - Palmyra

John Graham and his wife visited London in April in search of bargains in tea. (1846) While he was there he saw Ellison and Ann at their school. He also heard of a good British built ship that was for sale and after his return to Greenock he arranged to purchase her. Macfie Graham Co taking one half share. The - Hannah Ker - had not yet ceased to trouble him, In 1847 she came into collision with another ship the -Ann- on the homeward voyage from Quebec, while she was still the property of her late owners. At the end of December the - Robert Benn- was lost in the Bay of Biscay. Her master Capt Ritchie and all the crew were saved, but her cargo a rich one valued at £ 80,000 was lost.

John Graham took charge of a cargo of railway sleepers sent to him by William Andrew Macfie of Sweden, but they proved difficult to dispose of and notwithstanding William 's permission to " make a Kirk or  a Mill" of it, the lot had to be sold at a loss. In 1847 the Macfie family was considering reopening the Edinburgh sugar house and offering the mangership to John Graham, who had now been working for Macfie, Graham Co for some time but who was not now richer than he was some 5 or 8 years earlier.

1849 at the end of February the entire business of Macfie Graham Co was handed over to John Graham on very favorable terms so 80 years after its founding by Robert Macfie . William Macfie , Robert's son wrote in his memos I hope and trust John Graham will make it a tolerable business for himself and he will deserve it

A presentation of plate was made to John Graham in April 1852, it was to commemorate either the alteration in the constitution of Macfie, Graham Co or the 25th year of his association with that firm. The presentation was made by Provost Martin at a party at which there was a large muster of the connection ( Macfie family members)

John Graham was appointed manager of the Liverpool refineries in January 1853., he was afterwards made a partner, he gave up his position in Macfie Graham & Co to James Macfie.which brought tea , silk and bullion from China.

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Photo kindly provided by John Irvine Robertson showing John Graham and Penelope at the beach with their grandchildren


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1881 Census  Dwelling place  77 Edge Lane  West Derby, Lancashire, England

Household
 Name       
Relation
Marital
 Status  

Gender
Age
Birthplace              
Occupation  
John GRAHAM Head  
M
 Male
69
Scotland  
Managing Dir Of
 Sugar Refinery
  (Employ 200 Men)    

Penelope GRAHAM
Penelope C GRAHAM
Mary M GRAHAM
Jessie E GRAHAM
Williamina M GRAHAM
Wife
Dau
Dau
Dau
Dau
M
U
U
U
U
Female
Female
Female
Female
Female
68
41
39
35
25
Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
Liverpool

Eliza Ann MARTIN    
John G MARTIN     
James D. MARTIN  
Penelope MARTIN  
Jessie J GRAHAM

 Dau  
Gr Son
Gr Son
Gr Dau
Sister
M



U
Female
Male
Male
Female

Female
31
6
6
5

64
Scotland
West Derby
West Derby
West Derby

Scotland
.
Scholar


Margaret MCKELLAN
Serv
W  
 Female
70  
 Scotland  
 Housekeeper
Elizabeth  CALDER
Serv
U
Female
41
Scotland
Domestic Serv
Mary JONES
Serv
U
Female
36
Liverpool
Domestic Serv
Mary CRAWFORD
Serv
U
Female
23
Scotland
Domestic Serv
Catherine MEEK
Serv
U
Female
22
Scotland
Domestic Serv


JOHN GRAHAM   - died 12 October 1890, aged 79.
The Woodlands, 317 Edge Lane, Liverpool.

Member of Fairfield Presbyterian Church. Arrived in Liverpool in 1840 from Greenock as partner in Macfie & Co sugar refiners; retired after 24 years and his son took over his position; frequently called in at Macfie's when in town; noted for the kindly interest he took in the welfare of the workmen, by whom he was regarded as a sincere friend.
The new church in Fairfield opened in 1864 thanks to huge collection of funds by John Graham and other Scottish gentlemen in the area.


Member of the Athenaeum and the Reform Club.
Left 2 sons and 3 daughters.
(Liverpool Echo Tues Oct 14, 1890)

Interred at Smithdown Rd Cemetery.
Partner in Macfie's and later Fairrie's.
(Liverpool Echo 1890)








John Graham (iii)
1843-1921

Married
January 15 1873
Greenock , Scotland

Mary Glikison Allan
1851-1918

V
Eleanora Allan Graham
1873-xxxx
John Graham (iv)
1877-1914
Mary Allan Graham
1880-xxxxx
Allan James Graham
1883-1941


Click thumb nail to enlarge
John Graham 1843-1921
The Croft, Hoylake.
Of Liverpool sugar refiners Macfie Co; hon treasurer and ex-officio director of Sugar Association of Lancashire.
Left gross estate of £89,500, net £87,378.
(Liverpool Echo Sept 1, 1921)


Notes in Lady McLure's register states that John the son, was a Captain in the Liverpool Scottish, and was killed at Hill 60, in the German War of 1914

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JOHN GRAHAM III - born 1877, died 1915.
Bachelor, residing in Hoylake.
Captain in the 10th Liverpool Scottish regiment; famous golfer.
Captain John Graham was killed in action during a gallant charge against German positions at Ypres. He had concluded his service in the regiment, but rejoined at outbreak of war.
Member of the firm of sugar refiners Macfie & Co in Moorfields; president of Sugar Association of Lancashire.
A great golfer; played for Scotland against England.
(Liverpool Echo Jun 21, 1915)

Funeral at West Kirby Presbyterian Church.
(Liverpool Echo Jun 28, 1915)

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Allan James Graham
1883- 1941
Married
1913

Norah Delafield
xxxx-xxxx

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Donald Shaw Graham
1847-1891
Married 
October 4, 1871
Liverpool, England
Elizabeth Anderson Clint
1851-xxxx
V
Francis Graham
1872-xxxx
John G Graham
1874-xxxxx
Elizabeth Graham
1876-xxxx
Penelope Graham
1878-xxxx
Donald Claude Graham
1882-1882 


Notes in Lady McLure's register states that Francis Graham was Engineer Commander,R N ,  HMS Undaunted ,  German War 1914

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Elizabeth Graham
1876-xxxx
Married
October 31, 1907
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Charles Sandon Powell
1877-xxxx
V
Geoffrey Graham Powell
1908-xxxx
  Guinevere  Page Powell
1910-xxxx

British Settlers in Argentina and Uruguay - St John's Church records

31/10/1907 Powell, Charles Sandon 31 England Buenos Aires Graham, Elizabeth 31 England Buenos Aires James J. Clarke, Jessie E. Graham, Ralph H. S. Woodgate J. H. de Turri Croft certificate St John's Church

Charles was born in Leeds Yorkshire in 1877 ,  Geoffrey was born in Buenos Aires Argentia.  Guinevere was born in  Hoylake, West Kirby, Cheshire

By 1911 the family was back in Hoylake, Cheshire


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Penelope Graham
1878-xxxx
Married
December 29,1908
West Kirby, Cheshire, England
Bertram Wood-Jones
1872-1954
V
Penelope Irene Wood-Jones
1909-xxxx

Bertram  is  listed in 1911 as a Cotton broker


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Eliza Ann Graham
1849-1931
Married
October 9, 1873
Liverpool, England
William Rose Martin
xxxx-1883
V
John Graham Martin
1874-xxxx
James Douglas Martin
1875-xxxx
Penelope Clarkson Martin
1877-1968

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Click on photo to enlarge

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John Graham Martin
1874-xxxx
Married
September 20,1904
Liverpool, England
Gertrude Montgomery
xxxx-xxxx

Notes in Lady McLure's register state that John received his M B Bac Surgery, Victory University, Liverpool, and that he served as a Major in the German War of 1914

Martin, John Graham {Univ.). Born August 6, 1874, at Liverpool.

M.B., Ch.B., 1896.

Liverpool University : M.B., Ch.B., 1904.

Formerly House Surgeon, Royal Infirmary, Liverpool; Honorary Anaesthetist, Royal Southern Hospital, Liverpool. Civil Surgeon with the Army in South Africa, 1900-1901.

Honorary Medical Referee in Liverpool for the Royal National Hospital for Consumption and Diseases of the Chest, Ventnor, Isle of Wight.

I, Princess Gate East, Liverpool.


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Penelope Clarkson Martin
1877-1968
Married
 March 8, 1907
Liverpool, England
Cecil Raikes Stavert
1883-1974
V
Phyllis Raikes Stavert
1908-xxxx
Joyce Graham Stavert
1910-1991
Cecil Raikes Stavert (jr)
1912-1912
Audrey Raikes Stavert
1914-2001
Cecily Mary Stavert
1918-xxxx


Notes in Lady McLure's register states that Cecil Stavert, served in the German War of 1914

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Williamina Graham 
1855-1932
Married
November 17,1881
Liverpool, England 
James William Drummond
1850-1934
V
Henry Claude Drummond
1883-1916
John Graham Drummond
1884-xxxx
Norah Blackwood Drummond
1886-xxxx
Winifred Penelope Clarkson Drummond
1888-xxxx
Dorothy Mary Drummond
1893-1893






Click on thumb nails to enlarge<

William Drummond & Sons Ltd.

Seed Merchants


William Drummond (1760-1824) set up in business in the late 18th century as a nurseryman and seedsman in the Bannockburn area. He leased ground at Coneypark, Stirling, from about 1800 which continued in use as a nursery until the late 20th century. The business flourished and Drummond was joined by the eldest son of his first marriage, William, the founder of Drummonds Agricultural Museum, who eventually became a partner.


In 1814 they opened a shop at the corner of Baxter's Wynd (Baker Street) and Bow Street, Stirling and offered an advisory service to the leading agriculturalists from all over Scotland. The business expanded into new premises in Corn Exchange Road, where that they held a successful agricultural exhibition and sale. The Drummonds were pioneers in turnip development with the  'Drummond's Improved Swede' and 'Drummond's Extra Improved Swede'. The firm took premises in King Street, 1820-1898, and when they were destroyed by fire they moved to Murray Place. This property was again destroyed by fire and was replaced by shops, offices and a store in Colquhoun Street.

In 1831 William Drummond held his first exhibition of agricultural produce in Stirling. The exhibition attracted thousands of visitors and was repeated the following year with such success that in 1833 it was made permanent and became known as Drummonds' Agricultural Museum, Stirling. The museum displayed, as well as seeds and bulbs, the latest inventions in tools and implements.

In 1840 it moved to its own building and it was also awarded a gold medal by the Agricultural Society of Scotland. The museum ceased to operate later in the century, partly because the increasing popularity of agricultural societies and shows made it less of an attraction.

In 1843 a grandson of the founder, David Drummond, opened premises at 16 (now 58) Dawson Street, Dublin and in 1931 at Carlow. In 1941 and 1959 these premises were expanded to comprise a large grain-drying store with shops, offices stores and nursery gardens. W Drummond & Sons Ltd was incorporated in Dublin as a limited company on 10 October 1895.

The objects of the company included the acquisition and  take over as a going concern [of] the business of seed merchants, nurserymen, potato, manure, feeding stuff and implement merchants,and all other business now carried on under the style of William Drummond & Sons' in Stirling and Dublin The company retained its family connections with family members maintaining control until the premises closed in 1981.




Henry Claude Drummond
1883-1916
Married
1911

Kathleen Drummond
xxxx-xxxx

Notes in Lady McLure's register, state that Henry was a Lt in the Argyle Sutherland Highlanders, served in German War 1914, was killed in  action 1916 at Picardie

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John Graham Drummond
1884-xxxx
Married
 1912

Clarina Hogarth
xxxx-xxxx

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Norah Blackwood Drummond
1886-xxxx
Married
1913

Stirling, Scotland
Douglas Walker
xxxx-xxxx

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Winifred Penelope Clarkson Drummond
 1888-xxxx
Married
 1912

Duncan Irvine Robertson
xxxx-xxxx

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Mary Graham
1813-1899
Married
Feb 07, 1837
 Greenock, Scotland
James  Macfie
1801-1856
V
Dugald Macfie
1837-1894
Mary Graham Macfie
1839-1874
John Graham Macfie
1841-1916
James Macfie
1843-1860
Margaret Ann Macfie
1845-1854
Jessie Barbara Macfie
1847-1930

Mary Macfie, mother of Mary Graham  is the sister of  Margaret Macfie  who is  mother of James    making James and Mary his wife , 1st cousins 


James was in Nassau  , Jamaica about 1820     apparently a business partner with Colin Campbell






Early in the year 1836 James Macfie decided not to go back to Jamaica, and arranged with his partners to take up a post at Glasgow.

1835-1836 Glasgow Street Guide

The Dugald Macfie, listed on the 1836 Glasgow Street guide  we have to assume is Jame's Uncle on his father's side, as his son had not yet been born and Dugald as a proper name does not  figure into the Sugar Macfie side of the family anywhere that we have been able to discover as of 2015 - There is a Dugald Macfie who married a Jane Andrew  who had been mentioned in William Macfie's notes as not of his immediate family   which has led us to the assumption  Dugald  comes from the other male  Macfie  line.  

1820 Glasgow Street  guide                                                                      1828 Glasgow Street  Guide                                                                                                                            1834- 1835 Glasgow Street Guide




The  Greenock sugar operations had it appears an office in Glasgow at this time at the same location as James Macfie's store  or at least sales office. or vice versa.

The Robert A is  Robert Andrew Macfie of Edinburgh who had not yet taken a position in his father's sugar operation but who  as stated was an agent  for the National Back of which his father was a director .He was also operations from the  group building address.

Neil on the other had who may  well be a  member of the larger McFie Clan was not related  at the Sugar Macfie generation  level.




1841 Census
Residence  Rose St, Barony

1851 Census
Residence , 7 Somerset Place, Barony



In November he became engaged to his cousin May Graham and they were married on the 7th of February 1837..

The 1901 census shows John G Macfie , born Scotland , living in Lancashire, Moss side Parish, and holding a commission with the East India Company 


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Dugald Macfie
1837-1894
Married
Sept 20 1866
Manchester, England
Agnes Fleming
1844-xxxx
V
Elizabeth Macfie
1867-xxxx
James Macfie
1869-xxxx
David Fleming Macfie
1870-1945
Agnes Violet Mary Macfie
1872-xxxx
Douglas Graeme Macfie
1874-xxxx
Morna Graham Macfie
1876-xxxx
Agnes Margaret Gladys Macfie
1879- xxxx






Click on photo to enlarge




James Macfie
1869-1945
Married
April  1901
Manchester, England
Nina Campbell  Drew 
1876-xxxx
V
Sylvia Elizabeth Macfie
1902-1988
Dugald Macfie
1908-1982

JAMES MACFIE, major, Deputy Judge Advocate General, of the Northern Command

Headquarters, Murree, Punjab, India, (53), eldest son of Dugald M., late of Manchester,

Lancs., merchant

Sylvia  attained the rank of Colonel  in the WRAC


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1 st marraige
Dugald Macfie
1908-1982
Married

Manchester, England
Rosemary V (Campbell) Rush
xxxx-xxxx
V
Clare Macfie
xxxx-xxxx

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Duglad was Lt Col in the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders


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2nd marriage
Dugald Macfie
1908-1982
Married

Manchester, England
Jane Wilson
xxxx-xxxx
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Clare Macfie
xxxx-xxxx

Married
1965
  England 
Michael Hicks
xxxx-2012
V
Andrew Hicks
xxxx-xxxx
Zoe Hicks
xxxx-xxxx
Thomas Hicks
-xxxx
Nicolas Hicks
xxxx-xxxx



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David Fleming Macfie
1870-1945
Married
1913
Chiang Mai ,Siam
Nang Kammao
1882-1968
V
Violet Macfie
1905-1992
Mollie Macfie 
1908-1993
Norah  Macfie 
1909-1991
Angus Fleming Macfie
1910-1989




David moved to Siam ( Thailand )  having a position with the Borneo Company Ltd , a company  which  had as director Robert Henderson , of the  R & J Henderson  co of Glasgow, merchants ( John of R & J Henderson Glasgow , was married to Mary Macfie, daughter of John Macfie of Leith,  John was the brother of David Fleming's Great grand mother, making David and John of R & J Henderson , his boss  1st cousins  2 times removed (by marriage)

 Notes written by  R W W

Macfie , David Fleming ( B C L)  ( British)

D F Macfie was another of Chiang Mai's eminent men. Though Scottish, his family had established themselves in Macnhester in the cotton business. Macfie was educated at Charterhouse, where he represented the school in the public schools racquets championship at Queens and also at football, which he later played for the Corinthians . He was not attracted to the family business and in January 1893 arrived in Chiang Mai as a forest assistant under Louis Leonowens who was then employed by BCL to acquire  teak leases for them from the Chao Luang. Leonowen's ploy was to lose money gambling with the Chao and Macfie was expected to attend these sessions, but as he lived on the opposite side of the river and had no boat he was sometimes compelled to swim across, with dry clothes waiting for him on the other bank. He also had the junior's privilege of gambling with his own money. 

Leonwens however was before long found wanting by BCL and resigned and after a probationary period Mafie was appointed Forest Manager, which he remained until his retirement in 1927. During this time he controlled the BCL forest leases, which in the main comprised the whole of the wet bank of he Mae Ping from Chaing Mai to Tak, with one or two other to the North and in Lampang.  One area he obtained was a gift from King Prajadhipok, Rama VII, who visited Chiang Mai ( the first King ever to do so) in 1927 to open the railway station, which marked the final completion of the Bangkok-Chiang Mai line. A calf born shortly before in the BCL herd was found to be a scared white elephant, which was presented to to  His Majesty ceremoniously and the Mae Yuak forest was subsequently Royally gifted in appreciation. Macfie himself was appointed to the Order of the  White Elephant.

Macfie was a founder member of the Chiengmai Gymkhana Club in 1898 where he wasactive in sport for many  years, notably polo and tennis, while his home leaves were occupied with sailing. His hobbies included cartography in which he skilled, though unfortunately much of this is lost. One work of his which does survive in the " Chiang Mai Record " in which he lists year by year the names and movements of all European residents and visitors: this extends from 1884  to 1919 hen he discontinued it and is a virtual source of information .

In 1927 he retired to a house he had built for himself and his family at the foot of the Chiang mai  hill, and lived there until he was interned in Bankok from 1941-45. The internment camp was controlled by the Thais and the Japanese and therefore less severe that some but severe  enough for a man of 70  and he died in Chiang Mai  four months after his release.

Macfie  Mrs Kammao

born 1882 , died 13 November 1968  aged 86

Though born  Thai, she acquired British nationality automatically on her marriage to D F Macfie according to the British marriage laws of that time. As a girl , she had been handmaiden to one of the princesses of Chiang Mai and accompanied her to Bankok when the princess joined the court of King Chulalongkorn, returning to Chiang Mai to marry. She became a Christian and was active in church work in her neighbourhood, where she built several churches.


Macfie  Angus Fleming     born 14 August 1910, died 13 July 1989  aged 79  of cancer

He was born in Chiang Mai, the fourth and youngest child of D F Macfie and Nag Kammao and spent his infancy in Chiang Mai. About 1916 he was sent to Hong Kong, along with two of his three sister, as boarders at darsen School on Kowloon, and in 1919 the same group were sent under command of two governesses to Jeanne d'Arc School in San Remo, Italy to prepare for school in  England He then spent 1920-1924 at ' Hillcrest' Preparatory School at  Swanage, Dorset, passing into the Scottish School Glenalmond where he remained until 1930.  it is said by his school master there that his main interest appeared to be sport and he was the school's rugby full back for two years besides  winning a number of athletic prizes.

From 1930-1934 he studied at Camborne School of Mines, in Cornwall where he qualified as a mining surveyor. While at Camborne he excelled as a rugby footballer, playing regularly for the school, Camborne Club and once for Cornwall County.

From 1934-29 he was employed in Nigeria by the Yalwah Obosse Gold Mining Co. but on the outbreak of war returned to England and joined up. He spent the next six years in the army, finishing up in europe 9 where he had landed two days after the 1944 invasion) as a sergeant in the 9th Survey Regiment Royal Artillery. After  demobilisation  he returned to  Chiang Mai ( where his father had recently died) in 1946 to rejoin his mother, whom he had not seen for thirty years. Her first reaction was to give him a bath, aged 36. He had, by this time  become in effect an Englishman visitor and never really acquired enough Thai to communicate with her.  He found no suitable employment in Thailand and in 1949 went off to Malaya to join a British firm, Sir Bruce White and Partners as a mine's surveyor. About 1960 , he decided to go on his own and settled at Ipoh as a partner of a survey firm called Macfie & Wilkins, until his final retirement in 1980 when he returned to live in Chiang Mai, close to his sister Violet.

During the whole of his twenty years at Ipoh, he lived in one small room at the Ipoh Club and at no time showed any especial interest in domestic comfort. on various visits to Chiang Mai, he was usually presented by his relations with eligible girls( whom he thoroughly enjoyed) but always seemed to escape quite honourably from matrimony. He  was curiously indifferent to money though neither a spendthrift nor a lender and as generous as the next man. he had inherited 9 from his father) gift for  rhymes, which he composed as family bard (comic) for all special occasions and was also a remarkably good writer of  letters .

What impressed people the most was his imperturbability in crises, real or imaginary and his totally unmalicious attitude to the world he lived in, a man empty of guile but full of friendliness and good sense,



The Borneo Company  



David married a handmaiden of the Princess of Siam , his children were all born there , the three daughters are buried along with their parents in the Chiang Mai Foreign cemetery, Thailand

Extract from  book written by W s Bristowe 1976 " Louis and the King of Siam " )

"Macfie was 43 before he was officially married in 1913 and was very hurt that his friends did not call on his Lao wife or when Bristowe mentioned about Mr W.W. Wood in his sources and notes, Like other men of his time he was class-conscious where Europeans were concerned, but a thoroughly decent fellow, D.F. Macfie was a manager of Borneo co. ltd. in Chiang Mai since 1899. His wife name was Kam Mao. The couple had together three children, all born before they were officially married. He died in Chiang Mai in 1945;

David was a founding member of the Chiang Mai Gymkhana Club  1898

The Chiang Mai Record was kept by D.F. Macfie from 1884 to 1919 noting the names and movements of foreign residents and visitors in the north of Siam.


Just over a century ago a group of expatriates, mainly British and living in the North of Thailand, spent many of their leisure hours playing Squash. Most were in the then highly lucrative timber trade and thus it is not surprising that they built their courts from Teak.

One of these happy band of Squash players was a Mr. D.F. Macfie (Douglas Fleming) who worked for the Borneo Company and appears in Squash records from the middle 1890's to the middle 1920's. He played all his Squash during this period on Teak Courts whilst he was in Northern Thailand. He was one of the 14 founder members of the Chiengmai Gymkhana Club (Louis T Leonowens, whose wife Anna was the famous "The King and I" Anna was another) which started in 1898. The Club still exists and although Polo is no longer played they still play Squash. They have a thriving Squash section playing on two  modern courts which were built in 1979 and 1985.  When the second court was completed the Teak Court was dismantled and, we believe, put in storage.

There were a number of such courts but all but one have disappeared or have been converted to other uses.  One still remains in Chiengmai, in the compound of the old Borneo Company, but this is now a house.  Traces of the wall sidelines were still visible when last inspected.

Mr. Macfie left an outstanding legacy.  This was the "Chiengmai Cup"  for doubles squash which he presented to the Royal Bangkok Sports Club in 1910.  The competition for this cup has been played almost continuously since 1910 to this date.  The only times it was not played were the war years and a couple of "administrative slippages".  We believe the competition holds the record for the longest still played.


Just under a century ago a group of expatriates, mainly British and living in the North of Thailand, spent many of their leisure hours playing Squash. Most were in the then highly lucrative timber trade and thus it is not surprising that they built their courts from Teak.

One of these happy band of Squash players was a Mr D.F. MacFie (Douglas Fleming) who worked for the Borneo Company and appears in Squash records from the middle 1890's to the middle 1920's. He was one of the 14 founder members of the Chiengmai Gymkhana Club (Louis T Leonowens, whose wife Anna was the famous "The King and I" Anna was another) which started in 1898. The Club still exists and although Polo is no longer played they still play Squash. They have a thriving Squash section playing on two courts.

Mr MacFie was obviously a enthusiastic and durable player. Records show that he was the winner of a number of competitions, including the Chiengmai Cup in 1913. In 1921 and 1922 he was the winner, with a Mr Queripel, of the doubles in the North of Thailand. Mr Queripel obviously did not exert all his energy on the Squash courts as he is known to be the father of 23 children. Some of his descendants still live in Chiengmai.

Mr MacFie retired in Chiengmai in 1927, was interned in Bangkok by the Japanese during World War 2 and died in Chiengmai in December, 1945, four months after his release from the camp. His son Angus died in 1989 and his daughter Violet in 1992 whilst both were living in Chiengmai.

Perpetuating the name of Mr MacFie is the Chiengmai Cup that he presented to the Royal Bangkok Sports Club in 1909 and was first played for in 1910. 


In the early days of the Asylum the support was entirely local, coming from foreign and Siamese friends in Chiengmai and vicinity. From before the days of the Asylum, when we were giving unorganized aid to the wandering leper, until the present time, Mr. D. F. Macfie, has solicited funds for the lepers each year during a period of more than a quarter of a century.














Chaing-Mai 1899

Chaing-Mai 1998





Typical British Family setting

1899 Chaing Mai
Police station

















Teak logging operation excursion
Teak loggin operation excursion
Teak logging operation
Chaing Mai Telegraph office
Chiang Mai street
Loeowens Company Ltd
Teak logging tourist excursion
Boreno  Company wharf
















Chiang Mai markert
Borneo  Co teak operations 1927
Typical British family residence

1901 Chiengmai Gymkhana Club
Chiang Mai market
a typical  Meao family
Teak Logging


































1 st marriage

Mollie Macfie
1908-1993
Married
July 27, 1933
Penang ,Siam
Hugh McKean
1893-1942

V
David James McKean
1939-xxxx
 Catherine  Mary  McKean
xxxx-xxxx


Reid Mollie Macfie Mckean

Born 18 February 1908 , died 18 October 1889 aged 85

Ollie was born in Chiang Mai, the second child of D F Macfie and Nang Kammao and sister to Violet, Norah , and Angus and spent her infancy in Chiang Mai. In 1916 at the age of 7 she was sent by her father together with Norah and Angus to be educated in Europe. But owing to the Great War , they were forced to sail to Hong Kong and remained a boarders at the Diocesan School on Kowloon. When the was ended the three youngsters were sent with two governesses to Jeanne d’Arc School in San Remo, Italy, to prepare for school in England,. There she attended Roedean in Sussex and later a finishing school in Switzerland. She then went to the school of Domestic Science in Edinburgh, Scotland.

When she was 25 years of age the returned to Chiang Mai and lived with her mother, father and sisters Violet and Norah at “ Hillside” ( adjacent to what is now Chiang Mai University). She taught English at Prince Royal College and was a nurses aide at McCormick Hospital.

On 27 June 1933 she married Hugh McKean in Penang Malaysia and honeymooned in Indonesia. Hugh was the son of Dr James and Laura McKean ( fouder of the McKean Leper Asylum). Around that time Hugh McKean became superintendent of the Chiang Mai Leper Asylum. They made their home outside Chiang Mai and raised their children David James and Catherine Mary until the Second World War. The family were among those who evacuated northern Thailand, escaping into Burma and then on to India as the Japanese came north.

Upon arriving in India her husband’s health quickly deteriorated and he was too ill to be evacuated, he died shortly after. With her two children she then travelled to northern India to help in a mission. They were later able to board the last ship out of India to the United States where they resided with Dr and Mrs. McKean.

Fro the remainder of the war, Mollie volunteered to serve as a hospital in Long Beach California as a nurses aide and also worked wit the USO ( service organization for soldiers on leave from the war) . When the second World War ended, the U S Immigration demanded that Mollie return to Thailand. She left her two children in the care of her sister –in-law Kate McKean Garvin, due to the uncertain condition in Thailand.

For some time she fought wit the U S Immigration though later returned to the United States and won her citizenship. During that time she had kept in contact with Thomas Reid who she had first met during her USO service and they were married in 1952. The raised David and Catherine in Los Angeles, California and made numerous trips to Thailand to visit the Macfie family. Thomas passed away during a family Christmas reunion at “ Riverside” Chiang Mai.

Mollie returned home to Los Angeles where she had maintained her home and lived independently until health concerns made it advisable to move in with her daughter. She died peacefully at home. She is survived by he son David McKean and his children Mary Catherine and Morgan James, and her daughter Catherine McKean Royer and her children Kat and Mollie.

She was a woman of great personal strength and courage, a fine model for her family, always looking to the future with a generosity of heart and good cheer. She was deeply loved and admired by all.

_________________________________________

McKean James Hugh

Born November 18 1893, died May 6 1942

Hugh McKean was born in Chiang Mai, the son of Dr. and Mrs. James W McKean, missionaries of the Board of Foreign Mission of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America and founder of the McKean Leper Asylum, now the McKean Rehabilitation Center . He and his sister Kate McKean were raised in Chiang Mai but then left Thailand to attend Wooster College and the university of Michigan from where he graduated in 1916. After a year post-graduate study at John Hopkins University, Hugh McKean applied to the Board for an appointment to the Thailand Mission wit the desire to assist his father in the leprosy work in Chiang Mai. Before he could be sent to Thailand he was called for military service in the First World War.

After the war he was appointed to the Thailand Mission on February 1922.he was also business manager of the McCormick Hospital and Chiang Mai Dispensaries, treasurer of the station and manager of the Chiang Mai Mission Press. When he father retired from active missionary work, Hugh became superintendant of the Chiang Mai Leper asylum. He had an unusual knowledge of leprosy and his missionary associates wrote that “ though he did not had an MD, he knew more about leprosy than the average physician” . He was also deeply interested in the spiritual welfare of his patients.

He married Mollie Macfie and had two children. As the Japanese moved north during the Second World War, Hugh and family left for Burma and then on to India. He had been in poor health for some time prior to the evacuation, however, his courage and patience were unfailing.

When he and his family arrived in India, he was too ill to travel on a troop ship so was taken to Miraj Hospital where he passed away.








King Ramma IV opening McKean Leper Asylum 1929








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David James McKean
1939-xxxx
Married

Los Angeles ,Ca.
Miss  Unknown
xxxx-xxxx

V
Mary Catherine McKean
xxxx-xxxx
 James Morgan  McKean
xxxx-xxxx

 --------------------------------------------------------------

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Catherine Mary McKean
xxxx-xxxx
Married

LosAngeles , Ca
Mr Royer
1xxxx-xxxx

V
Kate Royer
xxxx-xxxx
 Mollie  Royer
xxxx-xxxx



1 st  marriage

Mollie Macfie
1908-1993
Married
July 27, 1933
Penang ,Siam
Thomas Monroe Reid
1902-1987

V

No issue

Reid Thomas Monroe

Born 6 September 1902 in Athens Georgia, died 24 December 1987 aged 85 in Chiang Mai, of heart failure

His mother was a teacher who inbued his with a great love for learning and sent him to California where there were better schools , to live with his grandmother during his high school years. It was something of a handicap in the America of the 1920’s that he was part negro and it says volumes for his character and ability that he achieved the rare distinction of admission to the University of Southern California where he graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in History, working at night to pay for his education. He attended Graduate School at Columbia University of New York and achieved a Master’s Degree in education.

He then obtained a permanent position in the U S Postal Administration, ut continued in his spare time to pursue his bent for self-education. He studied pharmacology and owned his own pharmacy, became a Certified Real Estate Broker and Appraiser and a Licensed Insurance Broker. He is remembered for theses remarkable achievements, also for his quiet struggles against prejudice, a much respected civic and church leader.

During his second world War army service he met Mollie ( Macfie) McKean widow of Dr Hugh McKean of the Mckean Leper Asylum and second daughter of D F Macfie. She was at the time an army nurses aide, and had two young children. She returned to Thailand after the was but they kept in touch and in 1852 she married him and settled in the United States where they lived in Los Angeles. They were on one of several visits to Chiang Mai to see her relatives when he died.

He was a quiet and modest man despite his notable struggles and achievements, but a man of self-confidence , forward looking, hopeful and optimistic of the future of his fellow men.



1 st marraige
Norah  Macfie
1909-1991
Married

, England
Frederick Sanders
xxxx-xxxx
V
Miss Sanders
xxxx-xxxx

2nd   union
Norah Macfie
1909-1991
Common Union
195!
Kaula Lumpur
Morris Edgar
xxxx-1991
V
No issue

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Edgar , Norah Macfie

born 9 March 1909 in Chiang Mai, died 27 January  1991 , aged 81  Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

She was the third daughter of  D F Macfie and Nang  Kammao. At age 6 she was sent to school in Kowloon, Hong Kong with  her brother Angus and her sister Mollie, thence to  San Rerno Italy with governesses. from there she when to the prestigious

Roedean  School in Sussex and subsequently to a finishing school in Switzerland  after which she attended Studley Agricultural College in England in general an extremely comprehensive education. 

She returned to Chiang Mai about 1930 but only for a short time. From childhood she had suffered from what  were once known as "brainstorms" and at this time the diagnosis indicated a brain tumour, requiring a very serious operation; she returned therefore to Britian, where the operation was preformed with complete success and convalesced in Denmark, where she spent four years up to 1939.  On the outbreak of the  second World War, she returned to England and lived at Dunkeld, Perthshire with her father's three sisters . During  war service she met and married Frederick Sanders, a chemist, with whom she moved to Singapore after the war, where her daughter was born

In the early 1950's she moved to Kuala Lumpur, where she started divorce proceeding. there were handled by Morris Edgar, a well known Scottish Lawyer, and later  on Norah became Mrs Edgar, also  " Datin" when Edgar was raised to the Malaysian title of "Datuk". They lived in Kuala Lumpur until they both died, within six months of each other, Norah was cremated and her ashes brought to Chiang Mai for burial, close to her father and mother as she wished.

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Agnes Violet Mary Macfie
1872-xxxx
Married
July 26th ,1899
, England
James Edward Graham
xxxx-1929

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WHO'S  WHO  1926

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Jessie Barbara Macfie
1847-1930
Married
October 23 1872
Dunoon , Scotland
William Macfie Campbell
1848-1928
V
Mary Graham Campbell
1873- 1952
Margaret Macfie Campbell
1875-1890
Jessie Graham Campbell
1878-1880
Ethel May Campbell
1880-1904
Duncan Alexander Campbell
1886-1914


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Graham Campbell Campbell Macfie Macfie

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