Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   
Home
Surname List
Name Index
Sources
Email Us
Homer BROOKS3,206 was born on 27 Jan 1868.3,206 He died on 29 Oct 1943 in Perry Township, Ohio.3,206 He is reference number 66289. Parents: Francis BROOKS and Mary MCQUEEN.

Spouse: Adah J. SEMPLE. Homer BROOKS and Adah J. SEMPLE were married on 10 Jan 1891.3,206 Reference Number:732804 Children were: Edward BROOKS.


Howard C. BROOKS5,128 was born in Aug 1876.5,128 He is reference number 3199. Parents: Thomas Jefferson BROOKS and Mary Ann Elizabeth HALSTEAD.


Husband BROOKS.3

Spouse: Living BINKLEY.


James BROOKS3,610 was born WFT Est 1874-1894.3,610 He died WFT Est 1908-1980.3,610 He is reference number 64247.

Spouse: Charlotte LAWSON. James BROOKS and Charlotte LAWSON were married WFT Est 1905-1938.3,610 Reference Number:1080179


James C. BROOKS3,401 was born in 1827 in VA.3,401 He died between 1880 and 1900 in KY.3,401,1844 He is reference number 74168. [boyd-trees.ged]







[xx.FTW]

[Boydfile.ged]

1880 Menifee County, KY census, Sheet 40, Line 6, Precinct 1:
Brooks, James C., 53, Head, VA
Sallie, 47, Wife, KY
John L., 20, Son, KY
James H., 15, Son, KY
Peggie J., 12, Daughter, KY
Derrie N, 10, Son, KY
Rhuben A., 8, Son, KY
William A., 6, Son, KY
Rebeckah A., 4, Daughter, KY

1900 Menifee County Census: Sheet 155B
BROOKS, Reubin, Head, W, M, April, 1872, 28
Rachel, Wife, W, F, November, 1869
Harold W., Son, W, M, February 1899
BROOKS, William, Brother, W, M, February 1875
BROOKS, Sarah, MOTHER, W, F, December 1835

Spouse: Sarah Jane DENNIS. James C. BROOKS and Sarah Jane DENNIS were married on 12 Mar 1857 in Morgan County, KY.3,401 Reference Number:1222890 Children were: Matilda BROOKS, John L. BROOKS, James David BROOKS, Peggie J. BROOKS, Deary V. BROOKS, Reubin A. BROOKS, William A. BROOKS, Rebecca A. BROOKS.


James David BROOKS3,401 was born in 1865.3,401,1845 He died on 16 Apr 1916 in Middletown, Butler County, Ohio.3,401,1846 He was buried on 18 Apr 1916 in Woodside Cemetery, Middletown, Butler County, Ohio, Section 6, Lot 963.3,401,1846 He is reference number 74170. [boyd-trees.ged]







[xx.FTW]

[Boydfile.ged]

-----------------------------
The Middletown News-Signal, Tuesday, April 17, 1916:

"BOY KILLS TWO MEN LATE SATURDAY NIGHT -- James Nichols and David Brooks the Victims of Vicious Attack of Earl Jennings, Age 20, Who Has Cherished Grudge Against Nichols For Over Six Weeks -- Latter's Neck Broken as Result of Blow on the Jaw, Jennings' Only Weapon Being His Fist --

Board From Picket Fence Weapon Which Caused the Death of Brooks --

Alleged Murderer and Companion Said To Have Been Drinking and at Time Of the Murder Were Searching For Man Named Dennis With Whom They Had a Fight Earlier in the Evening -- Alvin Gravenstein, Jennings' Companion, Carried Club and is Held By Authorities As An Accomplice to the Crime --

As a result of trouble of six weeks' standing, and following a brawl on East Third Street about 11:30 Saturday night, James Nichols, aged 35, single, and David Brooks, aged 45, married, were killed by Earl Jennings, aged 20. A broken neck caused by a blow on the jaw, was responsible for the instant death of Nichols, while Brooks died about 10 o'clock Sunday morning as the result of a fractured skull.

Alvin Gravenstein, aged 19, alleged to have been with Jennings, and to have carried the club with which Brooks was struck. Police allege that Jennings and Gravenstein were the aggressors, in that they followed their victims for several squares before the tragedy occurred.

R. Dennis, a principal in the first brawl, and the one for whom Jennings and Gravenstein were first searching, was not present at the time of the killing.

Jennings has signed a written confession to the police. Gravenstein is to be held as accomplice to the deed.

HAD BEEN DRINKING

The story as investigated by the police is as follows: Gravenstein, Jennings and a man named William Ellis were on third street near Clark, when they met Dennis, an argument followed, several blows were struck and Dennis displayed a knife and succeeded, it is alleged, in cutting Gravenstein's coat in several places. While the fight was in progress Jennings ran to a fence on Clark Street, tore a rail from ___ and returned to the fight, only to find that Dennis had succeeded in getting away. The police say both young men had been drinking at this time.

JENNINGS SAW NICHOLS

While following Dennis east on Third Street, Jennings and Gravenstein discovered James Nichols standing in front of the Seegar Saloon, where he was met by Dennis. As the two latter started out ____ on the north side of the street, Jennings and Gravenstein followed on the south side. At Grimes Street, Nichols turned north, his companion continuing on the way out Third. When a few feet off Third, Nichols was overtaken by Jennings who called to him to wait a minute. Gravenstein still carried the club. Hearing the call Nichols stopped, a few words were exchanged and Jennings delivered a terrific blow to the jaw, which an examination later showed, broke the neck. David Brooks, standing across the street at the time, saw the blow struck, called to Jennings to "cut it out," threw a stone at him and then departed west on Third.

FOLLOWED BROOKS

Jennings then joined Gravenstein and the two started after Brooks, who had been joined by Dennis. Reaching the railroad tracks, Brooks responded to a call from Jennings to wait a minute, while Dennis started for his home, he told police, to get a gun, as he ___ for trouble.

In the meantime Brooks and Jennings met on the platform, thirty feet north of the depot, a few words were exchanged and Jennings who had taken the club from Gravenstein, suddenly struck the heavy board striking Brooks directly across the face, breaking his nose. In falling, the back of his head struck the cement platform causing a fractured skull.

COULD NOT MOVE BODY

As Brooks fell, Jennings and Gravenstein started to run toward Second Street, decided that they had better investigate Brooks' condition and returned and tried to pick him up, intending, they claim, to roll him over on the grass and then send for a doctor. Unable to arouse him, the two boys then ran north on Charles Street to Second. Arriving at Second, they saw the police patrol and a crowd of men at the corner where Nichols had been killed, and then becoming considerably frightened, started for their homes. At the time both claim they had no idea whatever that Nichols had been killed.

POLICE AWAITED HIM

In the meantime, the police had been informed who struck Nichols and officers were at the home of Jennings, 407 Moore Street, when he arrived. He was taken to headquarters immediately, Gravenstein being found at his home on Iglehart Avenue about fifteen minutes later. The boys say that just after they discovered the patrol on Grimes Street, they met several fellows who told them that Nichols was dead.

Both Jennings and Gravenstein were terribly agitated when informed of the results of their fight and were so frightened when taken to headquarters that it was some time before they could give accurate account of just what part they had played in the terrible tragedy.

BOTH MAKE CONFESSION

Yesterday Detective Byrd secured a written statement from each of the boys, both corresponding to the above account. Jennings acknowledged that he secured the club, gave it to Gravenstein, saw Nichols in front of Seegar's Saloon and with the remark, "There's a Kentuckian I've been after for some time. Let's get him," crossed the street, and a few seconds later struck the blow which caused the death. That he and Gravenstein then met Brooks at the depot, that he took the club from Gravenstein's hands and struck at Brooks' head, the blow knocking the latter to the cement flooring of the depot platform, was all acknowledged.

PREVIOUS TROUBLE

Both boys claim that at the time the club was secured there was no thought of trouble with either of the men who were killed, but that they simply wanted to get Dennis who, they claim, attempted to cut them with a knife. It was mere chance that led Jennings to Nichols. Trouble which, it is alleged, occurred over some woman, had caused an argument and bitter feelings between Nichols and Jennings about six weeks ago, and while under the influence of liquor, Jennings' bitterness burst forth as soon as he recognized his rival. There was practically no grievance against Brooks, other than that he had attempted to interfere while Jennings was attacking Nichols and had thrown a stone at the former.

GRAVENSTEIN'S CONFESSION

In an interview with Alvin Gravenstein, he gives his version of the affairs as follows:

"The first trouble started at the high school. Just I and 'Shug' Jennings and a man by himself (Dennis), who cut at me. We got out to Seegar's Saloon, saw Jim Nichols and 'Shug' called him and told him he wanted to see him. I saw 'Shug' hit Jim Nichols, saw Nichols fall and he did not move. Then we ran across the street to Binkley's Saloon, then we saw the man cross the street that had cut at me at the school building. "Shug' says, 'Let's go get him,' and we followed him out the street until he got with Dave Brooks. We got to the depot, a little past the north end and "Shug' called for the fellow to come back, but when we got to the depot end, Brooks came back and he and 'Shug' were in an argument. All at once 'Shug' hit him with the club. Brooks fell and we then ran on Charles to alley near Caspar. Then we came back to the depot, tried to get Brooks up; could not, and then we went down second street. We saw the patrol where Nichols laid, retraced our steps to the depot and some fellow told us Nichols was dead. We then went back to Grimes Street, but the body was gone. We separated, and I went home and went to bed.

"I had had no trouble with Brooks or Nichols, knew Brooks, but did not know Nichols. 'Shug' and Nichols must have had trouble before, because 'Shug' said he was going to get him when we crossed in front of Seegar's Saloon and we followed up the street he said, "Let's go get him," and told me to hold the club. I had the club in my hand when Nichols was struck by 'Shug.' 'Shug' went back and got it; that is, one of us did. I am not positive which one."

Jennings' confession was in response to questions put to him by Detective Byrd, a copy of same being taken and signed by the boy. His statement is practically the same as that of Gravenstein and he makes no attempt to deny that it was he who struck both men.

THE PRINCIPLES IN THIS TRAGEDY

Earl Jennings, aged 20, resides with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Jennings, on Moore Street, and is familiarly known among his friends as "Shug." He has two brothers, William and Harold, and one sister, Sarah.

According to a report from the authorities, Jennings is known to have an unruly temper and has been known to be somewhat of an agitator in several affairs in the past.

Alvin Gravenstein, aged 19 years, is the son of Mrs. Martin Gravenstein of Iglehart Avenue, and he lives there with her and one brother, William. The police have no records as to his reputation.

James Nichols, who was instantly killed, is a laborer and has been known by a number of persons in town for several months past, while David Brooks has plied his trade as a carpenter in this city for some time. Nichols was a single man, and although Brooks has been married, he has not been living with his wife, but boarded at 115 North Sutphin Avenue.

Immediately following the fight, Brooks was taken to police headquarters where throughout the night, Dr. Dell did all that was possible to save him. At nine o'clock he was taken to the home of his sister, Mrs. Davis on Sutphin Avenue, and died shortly after ten o'clock.

CAUSE OF DEATHS

Nichols' death was caused by a broken neck. Brooks' from cerebral hemorrhages, resulting from a blow across the face and over the right ear, also a fractured skull, suffered when his head struck the cement pavement.

POLICE TO INVESTIGATE

The fact that the police possess information which leads to the theory that both Jennings and Gravenstein had been drinking, and that both are under age, will result in an investigation as to how and where they secured the whiskey or whatever intoxicants they may have obtained and warrants may result from their investigation.

Both boys are terribly depressed over the affair today and both realize the awful tragedy which has resulted from their quarreling. The jail was filled throughout the morning with relatives who called to see them.

HEARING TODAY

Upon the return of Solicitor Palmer from Hamilton, a charge of murder will be filed against Jennings, in the meantime Gravenstein is being held as an accomplice and the authorities are considering whether or not a charge of second degree murder should be placed against him, upon the grounds that in carrying the weapon, he assisted in the crime. Their hearing will be held late this afternoon.



-----------------------

The Middletown News-Signal, Tuesday, April 17, 1916:

"LATE REPORTS OF MURDER:

Attorney A.S. Fenzel will be counsel for the defense in the double murder which occurred late Saturday night. At a hearing this afternoon Earl Jennings, alleged murderer and his accomplice waived preliminary examination and were bound over the grand jury without bond on the charge of first degree murder."


-----------------------

The Middletown News-Signal, Tuesday, April 17, 1916:

"SERIOUS CHARGE IS FILED -- Against Local Man Arrested Late Saturday Night.
While the police were searching through box cars early Sunday morning for the two men implicated in the murder of Nichols and Brooks, they arrested Alfred Tapp and M.P. Minnigan, later filing a serious charge against the former.
As the result of their actions in the car, Tapp, who is a married man of this city, residing on Lefferson street, was arraigned before Squire Neiderlander late this afternoon, fined $25 and costs and sentenced to 60 days in the workhouse. He is 35 years of age, while Minnigan, who is an old soldier living at the home in Dayton, is about 50 years of age and was given the same fine."

-----------------------


The Middletown News-Signal, Tuesday, April 18, 1916:

"TO AWAIT THE TRIAL -- Jennings and Gravenstein Were Taken to Hamilton Yesterday.
Immediately following the preliminary hearing before Squire Neiderlander late yesterday afternoon, at which they were bound over to the grand jury without bond, Earl Jennings and Alvin Gravenstein were taken to Hamilton by Constable Langdon and Officer Clemens from Hamilton.

Although showing that they were deeply agitated, the boys, while on the trip, still did not appear to realize the gravity of the charge against them and it was not until they were at the threshold of the jail that Jennings showed even the slightest signs of breaking down, and then only for an instant."

---------------



The Middletown News-Signal, Tuesday, April 18, 1916:

"BROOKS FUNERAL -- The funeral of James D. Brooks, one of the victims of the Saturday night murder was held at 9:30 a.m. today from the home of his sister Mrs. G. W. Davis, 115 Sutphin Avenue. Interment in charge of J.D. Riggs was made in Woodside Cemetery."

---------------------- Parents: James C. BROOKS and Sarah Jane DENNIS.


James Madison BROOKS3,401 died Unknown.3 He is reference number 73839.

Spouse: Sally A. HOWELL. James Madison BROOKS and Sally A. HOWELL were married. Reference Number:1218656


Jan BROOKS.5

Spouse: Jannetje BECKER. Children were: Harmanus BROOKS.


Jillian F. BROOKS5,128 was born in Feb 1867 in Alabama.5,128 He is reference number 3195. Parents: Thomas Jefferson BROOKS and Mary Ann Elizabeth HALSTEAD.


John BROOKS3,399 died Unknown.3 He is reference number 13463.

Spouse: Martha BOYD. John BROOKS and Martha BOYD were married. Reference Number:324136


John BROOKS3,629 died Unknown.3 He is reference number 22715. He served in the military in Fought At King's Mountion, Revolutionary War.3,629

Spouse: Annie IRVIN. John BROOKS and Annie IRVIN were married. Reference Number:453467 Children were: Moses BROOKS.


Rev. John BROOKS3,405 was born WFT Est 1644-1673.3,405 He died WFT Est 1698-1758.3,405 He is reference number 94988.

Children were: Martha BROOKS.


John L. BROOKS3,401 was born in 1860.3,401,1847 He died Unknown.3 He is reference number 74169. Parents: James C. BROOKS and Sarah Jane DENNIS.


June BROOKS3,401 died Unknown in 1988.3,401,1848 She is reference number 74777. Parents: Buren BROOKS and Jennie N..

Spouse: Living YABORAK.


Lawrence BROOKS5,94,126,127 was born on 3 Aug 1827.5,94,126,127 He is reference number 16175.

Spouse: Susan Altana TRUESDELL. Lawrence BROOKS and Susan Altana TRUESDELL were married on 14 Jan 1852.5,94,127 Reference Number:107812 Children were: Florence Augusta BROOKS, Emogene BROOKS, Delanse E BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.395

Spouse: Living BRICKEY.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Thomas Sheridan BROOKS and Living LUNDGREN.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Ralph E. BROOKS and Carrie Emojean STANLEY.

Spouse: Living NICHOLS.


Living BROOKS.3

Spouse: Margaret WARD. Children were: Living BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Living BROOKS and Margaret WARD.


Living BROOKS.3

Spouse: Living RAKES. Children were: Living RAKES, Living RAKES, Living RAKES, David Daniel RAKES Sr., William Eugene RAKES.


Living BROOKS.3

Spouse: Living BOYD. Children were: Living BOYD, Charles Brooks BOYD.


Living BROOKS.3

Spouse: Living FAULKENBERRY. Children were: Living BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Living BROOKS and Living FAULKENBERRY.

Spouse: Living PASCHALL. Children were: Living PASCHALL, Living PASCHALL, Living PASCHALL.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Buren BROOKS and Jennie N..


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Buren BROOKS and Jennie N..


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Buren BROOKS and Jennie N..

Spouse: Living TUTT.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Buren BROOKS and Jennie N..

Spouse: Living BALES.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Buren BROOKS and Jennie N..

Spouse: Living HOLIDAY.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Buren BROOKS and Jennie N..

Spouse: Living GUSTIN.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Cecil Daimwood BROOKS and Jane Lee BOYD.

Spouse: Living CARRICO. Children were: Living BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Cecil Daimwood BROOKS and Jane Lee BOYD.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Living BROOKS and Living CARRICO.


Living BROOKS.3

Spouse: Kenneth Lavon HELDENBRAND. Children were: Living HELDENBRAND, Living HELDENBRAND, Living HELDENBRAND.


Living BROOKS.3

Spouse: Living PERRY. Children were: Living BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Living BROOKS and Living PERRY.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Ola A. BROOKS and Johnnie Lou Gennie SUTTON.

Spouse: Living HENSON. Children were: Earl Dean BROOKS.

Spouse: Living LORRAINE. Children were: Living BROOKS, Living BROOKS, Living BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Ola A. BROOKS and Johnnie Lou Gennie SUTTON.

Spouse: Dayton Hughes ALLEN. Children were: Living ALLEN, Living ALLEN, Living ALLEN.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Ola A. BROOKS and Johnnie Lou Gennie SUTTON.

Spouse: Living DEDMON. Children were: Living JR..

Spouse: Living NATION.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Ola A. BROOKS and Johnnie Lou Gennie SUTTON.

Spouse: Living REESE. Children were: Living BROOKS, Dennis BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Ola A. BROOKS and Johnnie Lou Gennie SUTTON.

Spouse: Living COPPLER. Children were: Living COPPLER, Living COPPLER.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Ola A. BROOKS and Johnnie Lou Gennie SUTTON.

Spouse: Living HICKS. Children were: Living HICKS, Living HICKS, Living HICKS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: William BROOKS and Living PARRIS.

Spouse: Living MERRILL. Children were: Living BROOKS, Living BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: William BROOKS and Living PARRIS.

Spouse: Living LEWIS. Children were: Living LEWIS, Living LEWIS, Living LEWIS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Living BROOKS and Living MERRILL.

Spouse: Living BROOKS. Children were: Living BROOKS, Living BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Living BROOKS and Living MERRILL.

Children were: Living BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.3

Spouse: Living BROOKS. Children were: Living BROOKS, Living BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Living BROOKS and Living BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Living BROOKS and Living BROOKS.


Living BROOKS.3 Parents: Living BROOKS.

Back       Next