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Hewlett PETERS5,128 was born about 1843.5,128 He is reference number 6096.

Spouse: Hannah GILDERSLEEVE. Hewlett PETERS and Hannah GILDERSLEEVE were married. Reference Number:3736


Imogene PETERS5,128 was born on 27 May 1836.5,128 Parents: James Sutton PETERS and Susan SQUIRES.


Isaac PETERS3,405 was born WFT Est 1836-1864.3,405 He died WFT Est 1842-1944.3,405 He is reference number 98635. Parents: Daniel Noffsinger PETERS and Charlotte GOODALL.


James PETERS5,128 was born on 7 Oct 1838.5,128 Parents: James Sutton PETERS and Susan SQUIRES.


James Sutton PETERS5,128 was born on 28 May 1802 in Stamford, NY..5,128 Parents: Richard PETERS and Susanna HALSTEAD.

Spouse: SARAH. James Sutton PETERS and SARAH were married. Children were: Maria E. PETERS.

Spouse: Susan SQUIRES. James Sutton PETERS and Susan SQUIRES were married on 1 Dec 1824 in Stamford, NY.5,128 Children were: Susan PETERS, William S. PETERS, Esther J. PETERS, Richard Gould PETERS, Imogene PETERS, James PETERS.


Jerusha PETERS5,128 was born on 6 Dec 1815 in Stamford, NY..5,128 Parents: Richard PETERS and Susanna HALSTEAD.


John PETERS5,128 was born about 1720.5,128 He is reference number 6076.

Spouse: Elizabeth GILDERSLEEVE. John PETERS and Elizabeth GILDERSLEEVE were married on 4 Dec 1748 in Hempstead, Li, NY St. George's Episcopal Church.5 Reference Number:3730


John PETERS5,128 was born on 22 May 1803 in Stamford, NY..5,128 [master ged.FTW]

JOHN PETERS 1804 - 1896
BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW - DELAWARE CO., NY (b1895)
The Leading Citizens of Delaware County, NY
Contributed by Jim Peters.

John Peters was born in the town of Stamford, Delaware County, NY, March22, 1804, the son of Richard Peters and Susannah Halsted, who came tothis county from Saratoga, and settled in the town of Stamford about theyear 1795, on the farm recentl y occupied by Mr. James A. Rich, bringingall their earthly possessions in a wooden chest of primitive mould andrather heroic dimensions, which served them for years in their new home,in turn as table, tool-chest, wardrobe, and cupboard, and whic h wascarefully preserved in the family for many years, bearing the marks ofteeth and claws of many wolves, bears, and other wild animals, receivedduring their almost nightly visits while doing duty as a barricade totheir doorless cabin. It is no t too much to say that the presence ofsome of these animals around or near their cabin during these years wasalmost of nightly occurrence: and the death rate of the item of wolvesfor a single season killed by Mr. Richard Peters and a neighbor,Mr .Timothy Canfield, as an occasional pastime, numbered as high asfifteen. The writer remembers a solitary cove in the woods near theBovina line, on the old farm, pointed out by the old gentleman (JohnPeters) many years ago as a spot where he wa s at one time attacked inopen day by three of these half-starved creatures, he having only an axeand an old knife with which to defend himself, the conflict ending onlywhen he had dispatched the most determined one and injured another, andbeing pr etty well scratched up and done for himself.

The family of Richard Peters (whose father and grandfather both bore thesame name) consisted of nine children, five sons and four daughters. Ofthese John was the sixth child and the youngest son. One of the socialfeatures of our country durin g these early years, worthy of note, was theexistence of slavery throughout the Northern as well as the SouthernStates. That previous to the passage of a law about the year 1820 fixingat latitude thirty-six degrees and thirty minutes a divisio n know as theCompromise Line, dividing States that should henceforth be recognizedas slave and free, slavery existed to a limited extent in DelawareCounty, is a fact which doubtless many of the present generation have butimperfectly comprehe nded. A considerable number of the prominentfarmers, however, owned one or more slave. One such was among thechattels of the Peters household - a colored girl whose name is nowforgotten. Her acknowledged value appeared to have been estimated at from two hundred and fifty to three hundred dollars: and she wasswapped around among the families of the neighborhood at about one ofthese prices, with nearly the same frequency and as little ceremony asthe good woman of the house in our day cha nges her servant girl. Thesequel of the particular Topsys history was that during her forcedmigrations she chanced to fall into hands that were reported as not beingany too gentle toward her: and some of her former owners, having learnedof thi s fact, straightway consulted with the good minister, the Rev.Robert Forrest, in reference to the matter. A purse was raised, a largeproportion of the amount having been furnished by the preacher: and theslave girl soon became the property of th e venerable Scotch divine. Therebeing a worthy colored man in the neighborhood who had lately obtainedhis own freedom, and was matrimonially inclined, the good man sought outthe sable Romeo, and in course of time, with the fullest consent of allpa rties interested, sold to him the faithful Juliet for the sum of onedollar, marrying them in the bargain, the couple living happily togetherfor many years, the firm friends of their generous and saintly benefactor.

At the age of twenty-six years, July 1, 1830, John Peters married Jane,daughter of William Blakely, Esq., of Kortright, N.Y., and shortlythereafter purchased of his father the Stamford homestead, the fatherremoving shortly afterward, with the unma rried portion of his family, toTully, Onondaga County, N.Y. There was born to John and Jane Peters fourdaughters and two sons; Nancy C., who became the wife of Samuel McCune;Sarah A., who died unmarried at the age of eighteen years; William B.,no w residing at Bloomville; Elizabeth J., wife of the late Judge D.T.Arbuckle; Susan F., wife of the Hon. Henry Davie; and John R. Peters-allof whom are living except the two first named. Although succeeding wellas a farmer, the rather restless spir it of John was not to be confined tothe limits of the homestead domain: and forming a partnership with afriend and neighbor, Mr. John Loughren (who later became the seniormember of the butter firm of Loughren & Edbert, of New York City),carrie d on with him for many years a quite extensive and profitablebusiness as dealers in butter, wool, etc. Later he added to this quite anextensive business in the manufacture of horse-rakes, being one of thepioneers in this industry, beginning wit h that marvel of labor-savingappliances, the wheelless scratch rake, which in these progressive dayswould be regarded as a marvel of the man-killing art. The favorite branchof his business, however, during his early life, and that to which hedevot ed most of his attention, was dealing in wool. In the earlier yearsnearly every farmer living in the towns of Andes, Bovina, Middletown, andStamford kept more or less sheep, many of them from two hundred to fivehundred, and some as many as a thous and; and the sheep and wool industrywas the most important in the county. Fulling and carding mills were ascommon as grist-mills at the present day. Every house has itsspinning-wheels, and very many contained looms for weaving their yarninto clot h for family use. Buyers of wool were abundant in the countyabout sheep-shearing time, the latter part of May or early June; andactivity meant success. Sleep on the part of local speculation duringthis rather brief portion of the season was a matt er that was left almostout of the question; and many were the "lots" of wool that were purchasedfor future delivery during the midnight and early morning hours, the goodman of the house being "rattled" out of the bed, and the negotiationscarrie d on and completed through the keyhole or open window, thepurchaser having no time to wait to appear in his "proper person."

During these years he was seldom without two or three farms on his hands,it being as much in the line of his speculative disposition to buy adrove of cows as a dairy of butter, and a farm as either, providingalways there was promise of quick retur ns and a fair commission; and itmight, we think, be safely said of him, as many of his earlyacquaintances would testify, that he possessed in a large degree a spiritof determination which usually "made thing go." In the year 1850, havingpurchase d a farm in the village of Bloomville, he removed to thatvillage, where he shortly after engaged in that mercantile business. Thiswas the period when the gold excitement of California was at white heat;and as an experiment, he made at different ti mes large shipments ofbutter to that market. One of the methods adopted with fair success forpreserving it sweet during the journey of two or more months necessaryfor its transit was that of packing the butter in small wooden kegs,holding abou t one gallon, identical in style with the old-fashionedoyster-kegs. These kegs were in turn packed in large casks of sixty ormore gallon capacity, and the vacant spaces carefully filled with Turk'sIsland salt. These weighty packages were then cart ed by team to Catskill,thence by water to New York, and thence around Cape Horn, crossing theequator twice on their journey to the "forty-niners" in that then far-offland of gold-a venture which proved a financial success. The advent ofthe hop-gro wing industry into Delaware County gave scope for speculation;and Mr. Peters, although well advanced in years, took his chances withthe others, and, like most others who dealt in this rather treacherouscommodity, met with varied experience s as to the results. Many of themembers of the One Hundred and Forty-fourth Regiment will recall acharacteristic incident which occurred during a visit made by Mr. Petersto their camp at Upton Hill, Va., during the war.

It is needless to say that to many of the boys he was a welcome visitor;and, when night came on, they succeeded in arranging for him acomfortable sleeping place in one of the tents. This, however, the oldgentleman, being a good sleeper, entirel y ignored; and wrapping himselfin a blanket, he took his place with "the rest of the boys." stretched atfull length around the camp-fire, where he was soon sleeping soundly. Thenight was cool, the disposition was to unconsciously snuggle up a litt lecloser to the embers; and toward morning the "mess" were awakened by himwith the caution; "Take care there, boys! some of you are burning! It'ssomebody's boots!" Then, suddenly getting out of his, he said: "Well,well! I guess it's my boots, afte r all!" They were burned to a crisp - ajoke which furnished sufficient fun for the rest of the night, and whichno one seemed to enjoy better that himself. A pair of army "schooners"about as wide as they were long were substituted which "did him pr oud"until he returned to Washington.

Mrs. Jane Peters, his wife, died at Bloomsville, March 7, 1879, at theage of sixty-eight years, after having spent a busy and in many respectsan exemplary life. Of slight frame and never physically strong, sheshared the spirit of activity and ambi tion which has characterized thelife of her husband. Her kind disposition and gentle manners deserved andwere rewarded with the respect of all with whom she mingled. Her remainsare resting beside those of her husband's parents, Richard and Susann ahPeters, who, after living about twenty years in Cortland County, returnedto Delaware that they might spend their last days near the scenes oftheir early married life, and in the year 1853 were, within a few weeksof each other laid to rest in th e cemetery at Bloomville. Mr. JohnPeters is living with his son, William B. Peters, at Bloomville, hale andhearty, and still full of business projects at the age of ninety -oneyears. His long and active life, crowing hard upon a century, has bee nto a greater extent than that of any other man now living identified withthe history of the village in which he dwells.

William B. Peters, third child and eldest son of John Peters and JaneBlakely, was born in the town of Stamford, Delaware County, N.Y.,December 23, 1837, in the same house in which his father first saw thelight, and took his name from his materna l grandfather, William Blakely.

Since the age of twelve years he has been a resident of Bloomville,having removed with his parents to that village in 1850, on the same dayin which Simon B. Champion, the now venerable editor of the StamfordMirror, took up his abode therein. Bein g a boy of an inquistive turn onmind, his time for the following four years was about equally dividedbetween the district schoolhouse, his father's store, and theprinting-office, with odds probably in favor of the latter. At the age ofsixtee n he was placed in Harpersfield Union Academy, at that time underthe supervision of the Rev. Robert Rogers, and remained for two years, atthe end of which time he entered Delaware Academy at Delhi, in the oldbuilding which is now standing, opposit e the County Clerk's office, itbeing the first term in which Professor John L. Sawyer was in control ofthat institution. He remained a student there for about three years,during which time the present buildings were erected and the school wasremov ed into its more commodious quarters; and during the same time hetaught two winter terms of school. At twenty-one years of age he enteredinto mercantile business at Bloomville with Samuel McCune, under the firmname of McCune & Peters, and the foll owing winter was elected Justice ofthe Peace, his opponent being the honorable Stephen H. Keeler, nowdeceased.

July 17, 1861, four days previous to the battle of Bull Run, he marriedHannah Rich, of South Kortright, daughter of James Rich and JaneSouthard, and a grand-daughter of the Rev. Robert Forrest. Mrs. Peters isa sister of Captain John Rich, lat e of Jacksonville, Fla. Like herhusband, Mrs. Peters was for a time student at Delaware Academy under thetutorage of Professor Sawyer. During the war Mr. Peters was a member ofthe town board, and was for some time engaged in the recruiting service ,being later appointed at assist Colonel Robert Parker and the Hon. JamesH. Graham in looking after the just apportionment of State militarycredits in Delaware County, at Albany, and elsewhere. After the war,having closed out his mercantile busine ss, he engaged in agriculturalpursuits on what was then known as the John Bathrick farm in Bloomville,and continued to make this his business, in part, for about four years.In this short period he entitled himself, as he declares, to be regardeda s one of the most unsuccessful farmers in the community; and, feeling aparticular respect for men who succeed in employments where he cannot, heto this day feels like raising his hat when he meets a prosperous farmer.Mathematics was his favorit e study, and he had a special fondness formechanical pursuits. The astonishing development of the watch-makingindustry about 1870 led him to engage in the watch and jewelry business;and this occupation, together with that of surveying, to whic h he hasfrom boyhood given more or less attention, have for the past twenty-fiveyears furnished him with sufficient and fairly remunerative employment.As a surveyor and draughtsman, Mr. Peters is said to have no superior inDelaware County.

Mr. and Mrs. Peters have had a family of four children, three daughtersand one son, named respectively, Jennie, who died at the age of elevenyears; Lizziebell, who pursued a course of study at Delaware Academy, andafterward graduated from the Oneo nta Normal School; James R., who was fora time a student at Delaware Academy, and also at D.L. Moody's school atMount Hermon, Mass.; and Sarah, who finished a course of study atDelaware Academy.



-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------[2098755.FTW]

JOHN PETERS 1804 - 1896
BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW - DELAWARE CO., NY (©1895)
The Leading Citizens of Delaware County, NY
Contributed by Jim Peters.

John Peters was born in the town of Stamford, Delaware County, NY, March 22, 1804, the son of Richard Peters and Susannah Halsted, who came to this county from Saratoga, and settled in the town of Stamford about the year 1795, on the farm recently occupied by Mr. James A. Rich, bringing all their earthly possessions in a wooden chest of primitive mould and rather heroic dimensions, which served them for years in their new home, in turn as table, tool-chest, wardrobe, and cupboard, and which was carefully preserved in the family for many years, bearing the marks of teeth and claws of many wolves, bears, and other wild animals, received during their almost nightly visits while doing duty as a barricade to their doorless cabin. It is not too much to say that the presence of some of these animals around or near their cabin during these years was almost of nightly occurrence: and the “death rate” of the item of wolves for a single season killed by Mr. Richard Peters and a neighbor, Mr.Timothy Canfield, as an occasional pastime, numbered as high as fifteen. The writer remembers a solitary cove in the woods near the Bovina line, on the old farm, pointed out by the old gentleman (John Peters) many years ago as a spot where he was at one time attacked in open day by three of these half-starved creatures, he having only an axe and an old knife with which to defend himself, the conflict ending only when he had dispatched the most determined one and injured another, and being pretty well scratched up and done for himself.

The family of Richard Peters (whose father and grandfather both bore the same name) consisted of nine children, five sons and four daughters. Of these John was the sixth child and the youngest son. One of the social features of our country during these early years, worthy of note, was the existence of slavery throughout the Northern as well as the Southern States. That previous to the passage of a law about the year 1820 fixing at latitude thirty-six degrees and thirty minutes a division know as the “Compromise Line,” dividing States that should henceforth be recognized as “slave” and “free,” slavery existed to a limited extent in Delaware County, is a fact which doubtless many of the present generation have but imperfectly comprehended. A considerable number of the prominent farmers, however, owned one or more slave. One such was among the chattels of the Peters household - a colored girl whose name is now forgotten. Her acknowledged value appeared to have been estimated at from two hundred and fifty to three hundred dollars: and she was “swapped” around among the families of the neighborhood at about one of these prices, with nearly the same frequency and as little ceremony as the good woman of the house in our day changes her servant girl. The sequel of the particular Topsy’s history was that during her forced migrations she chanced to fall into hands that were reported as not being any too gentle toward her: and some of her former owners, having learned of this fact, straightway consulted with the good minister, the Rev. Robert Forrest, in reference to the matter. A purse was raised, a large proportion of the amount having been furnished by the preacher: and the slave girl soon became the property of the venerable Scotch divine. There being a worthy colored man in the neighborhood who had lately obtained his own freedom, and was matrimonially inclined, the good man sought out the sable Romeo, and in course of time, with the fullest consent of all parties interested, sold to him the faithful Juliet for the sum of one dollar, marrying them in the bargain, the couple living happily together for many years, the firm friends of their generous and saintly benefactor.

At the age of twenty-six years, July 1, 1830, John Peters married Jane, daughter of William Blakely, Esq., of Kortright, N.Y., and shortly thereafter purchased of his father the Stamford homestead, the father removing shortly afterward, with the unmarried portion of his family, to Tully, Onondaga County, N.Y. There was born to John and Jane Peters four daughters and two sons; Nancy C., who became the wife of Samuel McCune; Sarah A., who died unmarried at the age of eighteen years; William B., now residing at Bloomville; Elizabeth J., wife of the late Judge D.T. Arbuckle; Susan F., wife of the Hon. Henry Davie; and John R. Peters-all of whom are living except the two first named. Although succeeding well as a farmer, the rather restless spirit of John was not to be confined to the limits of the homestead domain: and forming a partnership with a friend and neighbor, Mr. John Loughren (who later became the senior member of the butter firm of Loughren & Edbert, of New York City), carried on with him for many years a quite extensive and profitable business as dealers in butter, wool, etc. Later he added to this quite an extensive business in the manufacture of horse-rakes, being one of the pioneers in this industry, beginning with that marvel of labor-saving appliances, the wheelless scratch rake, which in these progressive days would be regarded as a marvel of the man-killing art. The favorite branch of his business, however, during his early life, and that to which he devoted most of his attention, was dealing in wool. In the earlier years nearly every farmer living in the towns of Andes, Bovina, Middletown, and Stamford kept more or less sheep, many of them from two hundred to five hundred, and some as many as a thousand; and the sheep and wool industry was the most important in the county. Fulling and carding mills were as common as grist-mills at the present day. Every house has its spinning-wheels, and very many contained looms for weaving their yarn into cloth for family use. Buyers of wool were abundant in the county about sheep-shearing time, the latter part of May or early June; and activity meant success. Sleep on the part of local speculation during this rather brief portion of the season was a matter that was left almost out of the question; and many were the "lots" of wool that were purchased for future delivery during the midnight and early morning hours, the good man of the house being "rattled" out of the bed, and the negotiations carried on and completed through the keyhole or open window, the purchaser having no time to wait to appear in his "proper person."

During these years he was seldom without two or three farms on his hands, it being as much in the line of his speculative disposition to buy a drove of cows as a dairy of butter, and a farm as either, providing always there was promise of quick returns and a fair commission; and it might, we think, be safely said of him, as many of his early acquaintances would testify, that he possessed in a large degree a spirit of determination which usually "made thing go." In the year 1850, having purchased a farm in the village of Bloomville, he removed to that village, where he shortly after engaged in that mercantile business. This was the period when the gold excitement of California was at white heat; and as an experiment, he made at different times large shipments of butter to that market. One of the methods adopted with fair success for preserving it sweet during the journey of two or more months necessary for its transit was that of packing the butter in small wooden kegs, holding about one gallon, identical in style with the old-fashioned oyster-kegs. These kegs were in turn packed in large casks of sixty or more gallon capacity, and the vacant spaces carefully filled with Turk's Island salt. These weighty packages were then carted by team to Catskill, thence by water to New York, and thence around Cape Horn, crossing the equator twice on their journey to the "forty-niners" in that then far-off land of gold-a venture which proved a financial success. The advent of the hop-growing industry into Delaware County gave scope for speculation; and Mr. Peters, although well advanced in years, took his chances with the others, and, like most others who dealt in this rather treacherous commodity, met with varied experiences as to the results. Many of the members of the One Hundred and Forty-fourth Regiment will recall a characteristic incident which occurred during a visit made by Mr. Peters to their camp at Upton Hill, Va., during the war.

It is needless to say that to many of the boys he was a welcome visitor; and, when night came on, they succeeded in arranging for him a comfortable sleeping place in one of the tents. This, however, the old gentleman, being a good sleeper, entirely ignored; and wrapping himself in a blanket, he took his place with "the rest of the boys." stretched at full length around the camp-fire, where he was soon sleeping soundly. The night was cool, the disposition was to unconsciously snuggle up a little closer to the embers; and toward morning the "mess" were awakened by him with the caution; "Take care there, boys! some of you are burning! It's somebody's boots!" Then, suddenly getting out of his, he said: "Well, well! I guess it's my boots, after all!" They were burned to a crisp - a joke which furnished sufficient fun for the rest of the night, and which no one seemed to enjoy better that himself. A pair of army "schooners" about as wide as they were long were substituted which "did him proud" until he returned to Washington.

Mrs. Jane Peters, his wife, died at Bloomsville, March 7, 1879, at the age of sixty-eight years, after having spent a busy and in many respects an exemplary life. Of slight frame and never physically strong, she shared the spirit of activity and ambition which has characterized the life of her husband. Her kind disposition and gentle manners deserved and were rewarded with the respect of all with whom she mingled. Her remains are resting beside those of her husband's parents, Richard and Susannah Peters, who, after living about twenty years in Cortland County, returned to Delaware that they might spend their last days near the scenes of their early married life, and in the year 1853 were, within a few weeks of each other laid to rest in the cemetery at Bloomville. Mr. John Peters is living with his son, William B. Peters, at Bloomville, hale and hearty, and still full of business projects at the age of ninety -one years. His long and active life, crowing hard upon a century, has been to a greater extent than that of any other man now living identified with the history of the village in which he dwells.

William B. Peters, third child and eldest son of John Peters and Jane Blakely, was born in the town of Stamford, Delaware County, N.Y., December 23, 1837, in the same house in which his father first saw the light, and took his name from his maternal grandfather, William Blakely.

Since the age of twelve years he has been a resident of Bloomville, having removed with his parents to that village in 1850, on the same day in which Simon B. Champion, the now venerable editor of the Stamford Mirror, took up his abode therein. Being a boy of an inquistive turn on mind, his time for the following four years was about equally divided between the district schoolhouse, his father's store, and the printing-office, with odds probably in favor of the latter. At the age of sixteen he was placed in Harpersfield Union Academy, at that time under the supervision of the Rev. Robert Rogers, and remained for two years, at the end of which time he entered Delaware Academy at Delhi, in the old building which is now standing, opposite the County Clerk's office, it being the first term in which Professor John L. Sawyer was in control of that institution. He remained a student there for about three years, during which time the present buildings were erected and the school was removed into its more commodious quarters; and during the same time he taught two winter terms of school. At twenty-one years of age he entered into mercantile business at Bloomville with Samuel McCune, under the firm name of McCune & Peters, and the following winter was elected Justice of the Peace, his opponent being the honorable Stephen H. Keeler, now deceased.

July 17, 1861, four days previous to the battle of Bull Run, he married Hannah Rich, of South Kortright, daughter of James Rich and Jane Southard, and a grand-daughter of the Rev. Robert Forrest. Mrs. Peters is a sister of Captain John Rich, late of Jacksonville, Fla. Like her husband, Mrs. Peters was for a time student at Delaware Academy under the tutorage of Professor Sawyer. During the war Mr. Peters was a member of the town board, and was for some time engaged in the recruiting service, being later appointed at assist Colonel Robert Parker and the Hon. James H. Graham in looking after the just apportionment of State military credits in Delaware County, at Albany, and elsewhere. After the war, having closed out his mercantile business, he engaged in agricultural pursuits on what was then known as the John Bathrick farm in Bloomville, and continued to make this his business, in part, for about four years. In this short period he entitled himself, as he declares, to be regarded as one of the most unsuccessful farmers in the community; and, feeling a particular respect for men who succeed in employments where he cannot, he to this day feels like raising his hat when he meets a prosperous farmer. Mathematics was his favorite study, and he had a special fondness for mechanical pursuits. The astonishing development of the watch-making industry about 1870 led him to engage in the watch and jewelry business; and this occupation, together with that of surveying, to which he has from boyhood given more or less attention, have for the past twenty-five years furnished him with sufficient and fairly remunerative employment. As a surveyor and draughtsman, Mr. Peters is said to have no superior in Delaware County.

Mr. and Mrs. Peters have had a family of four children, three daughters and one son, named respectively, Jennie, who died at the age of eleven years; Lizziebell, who pursued a course of study at Delaware Academy, and afterward graduated from the Oneonta Normal School; James R., who was for a time a student at Delaware Academy, and also at D.L. Moody's school at Mount Hermon, Mass.; and Sarah, who finished a course of study at Delaware Academy.



-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------ Parents: Richard PETERS and Susanna HALSTEAD.

Spouse: Jane BLAKLEY. John PETERS and Jane BLAKLEY were married on 1 Jul 1830 in Kortwright, NY.5


John PETERS5,128 was born on 16 Dec 1823 in Harpers Ferry, NY.5,128 Parents: Richard PETERS and Polly WILCOX.

Spouse: Ellen BURNHAM. John PETERS and Ellen BURNHAM were married. Children were: Mary PETERS, Ellen Louise PETERS.


John PETERS3,405 was born about 1861.3,405 He died WFT Est 1862-1951.3,405 He is reference number 98636. Parents: Daniel Noffsinger PETERS and Charlotte GOODALL.


John A. PETERS5,128 was born on 26 Dec 1858.5,128 Parents: Charles PETERS and Julia Ann BURNHAM.


Joseph PETERS.3

Spouse: Nellie Florence SHOCK.


Living PETERS.3

Spouse: Living VALDEZ.


Living PETERS.3

Spouse: Living DUFFY. Children were: Living DUFFY, Living DUFFY, Living DUFFY.


Living PETERS.3

Spouse: Alta Adel CLARK.


Living PETERS.3

Spouse: Living LANGFORD. Children were: Living SMITH.


Living PETERS.3

Spouse: Living KING. Children were: Living KING.


Living PETERS.3

Spouse: Jr. Living SUTTON. Children were: Living SUTTON.


Living PETERS.3

Spouse: Living BYRD. Children were: Living PETERS.


Living PETERS.3 Parents: Living PETERS and Living BYRD.


Living PETERS.3

Spouse: Living CHRISTENSEN. Children were: Living CHRISTENSEN.


Living PETERS.5,128 Parents: Richard Calvin PETERS and Frances Amelia TROMBLY.


Living PETERS. Parents: PETERS and Marjorie FINK.


Loretta B. PETERS3,399 was born on 13 Oct 1866 in Raligh Co., West Virginia.3,399,400 She died on 15 Aug 1898 in Princeton Mercer Co., West Virginia.3,399,400 She is reference number 11408. Parents: Elijah C. PETERS and Tamiar A. LESTER.

Spouse: George A. WINFREY. George A. WINFREY and Loretta B. PETERS were married on 1 Jan 1886 in Princeton Mercer Co., West Virginia.3,399,400 Reference Number:264156 Children were: Rebecca Faye WINFREY.


Louisa Jane PETERS7,188 was born in 1818 in OH. She died about 1891.

Spouse: John HOFFHINES. John HOFFHINES and Louisa Jane PETERS were married.


Louise PETERS5,128 was born on 16 Jan 1886 in Morris Co., MN.5,128 She died on 24 Jan 1968 in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., NY.5,128

Spouse: Frank Zell HEUSTON. Frank Zell HEUSTON and Louise PETERS were married on 5 Nov 1905 in South Bend, Pacific Co., WA.5 Children were: Living HEUSTON, Living HEUSTON, Harold Zell HEUSTON.


Lucinda Harriet PETERS3,405 was born in 1862.3,405 She died in 1927.3,405 She is reference number 98637. Parents: Daniel Noffsinger PETERS and Charlotte GOODALL.

Spouse: James WADE. James WADE and Lucinda Harriet PETERS were married WFT Est 1876-1908.3,405 Reference Number:1577962 Children were: Earl WADE, Mona WADE, Kate WADE, Robert WADE.


Lula Ethel PETERS.5,128 Parents: . Parents: .

Spouse: Daniel E. HALSTEAD. Children were: Living HALSTEAD.


Mahala J. PETERS7,188 was born on 21 Mar 1845 in Gallia Co, OH. She died on 7 Nov 1921 in Ross Co, OH.

Spouse: George Washington BURLILE. George Washington BURLILE and Mahala J. PETERS were married on 23 Jan 1873 in Franklin Co, OH. Children were: Alvin L. BURLILE, Jemima M. BURLILE.


Mannie Lee PETERS3,1395 was born on 13 Jan 1891 in Fleming County, Kentucky.3,1395 She died on 2 Apr 1970 in Bath County, Kentucky.3,1395 She is reference number 39036.

Spouse: Wilson BOYD. Wilson BOYD and Mannie Lee PETERS were married in 1910 in Fleming County, Kentucky.3,1395 Reference Number:711436 Children were: Charles Russell BOYD.


Maria E. PETERS5,128 was born on 13 Jul 1850.5,128 Parents: James Sutton PETERS and SARAH.


Marrie C. PETERS.5,128 Parents: . Parents: .


Mary PETERS3,405 was born in 1847.3,405 She died in 1922.3,405 She is reference number 98912. Parents: Daniel Noffsinger PETERS and Charlotte GOODALL.

Spouse: John Andrew BOWMAN. John Andrew BOWMAN and Mary PETERS were married WFT Est 1861-1893.3,405 Reference Number:1581677


Mary PETERS5,128 was born in May 1865.5,128 Parents: John PETERS and Ellen BURNHAM.


Nancy PETERS3,405 was born WFT Est 1836-1864.3,405 She died WFT Est 1853-1947.3,405 She is reference number 98908. Parents: Daniel Noffsinger PETERS and Charlotte GOODALL.

Spouse: William PIERCE. William PIERCE and Nancy PETERS were married WFT Est 1853-1897.3,405 Reference Number:1581632


Rachel PETERS5,128 was born about 1706 in Rye, Westchester Co., NY.5,128 She died in Rye, Westchester Co., NY.5,128

Spouse: Peter STRINGHAM. Peter STRINGHAM and Rachel PETERS were married. Children were: Owen STRINGHAM, Peter STRINGHAM, Hannah STRINGHAM, Jacobus STRINGHAM.


Rapsey PETERS3,405 was born WFT Est 1836-1864.3,405 He died WFT Est 1842-1944.3,405 He is reference number 98910. Parents: Daniel Noffsinger PETERS and Charlotte GOODALL.


Richard PETERS5,128 was born in 1740 in Clifton Park, Saratoga, NY.5,128 He died in 1811 in Mohawk Valley, Of NY.5,128

Spouse: Jerusha SUTTON. Richard PETERS and Jerusha SUTTON were married. Children were: Richard PETERS.


Richard PETERS5,128 was born on 27 Jun 1773 in Clifton Park, Saratoga, NY.5,128 He died on 6 Mar 1853 in Bloomville, Del..5,128 He is reference number 3672. [master ged.FTW]

Richard Peters, son of Richard (1740-1811) and Jerusha (Sutton), who hadspent most of their lives in the Mohawk Valley of New York State, wasborn at Clifton Park, Saratoga County on 27 June 1773.

On 04 September he married Suzanna, the daughter of James Halstead andElizabeth (Tead/Teed) and moved to Delaware County, New York where hepurchased a farm located near Bloomville in about 1795, removingthereafter to Tully, Onodaga County, New Yor k where they remained until1852 when they returned to Bloomville.

Richard, son of Richard and Suzanna, was born at Stamford, NY on 13 March1797 and married Polly Wilcox on 26 January 1820 and were the parents ofsix children. In 1824, they removed to Michigan from Harpers Ferry, NewYork with their three eldest ch ildren (Frances, George & John) andpurchased from the United State government about 600 acres of land inSummerfield Township, Monroe County, Michigan. In 1834, he deeded some ofhis property to railroad investors who platted a village of 41 block s andnamed it Petersburg after him.


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Richard Peters, son of Richard (1740-1811) and Jerusha (Sutton), who had spent most of their lives in the Mohawk Valley of New York State, was born at Clifton Park, Saratoga County on 27 June 1773.

On 04 September he married Suzanna, the daughter of James Halstead and Elizabeth (Tead/Teed) and moved to Delaware County, New York where he purchased a farm located near Bloomville in about 1795, removing thereafter to Tully, Onodaga County, New York where they remained until 1852 when they returned to Bloomville.

Richard, son of Richard and Suzanna, was born at Stamford, NY on 13 March 1797 and married Polly Wilcox on 26 January 1820 and were the parents of six children. In 1824, they removed to Michigan from Harpers Ferry, New York with their three eldest children (Frances, George & John) and purchased from the United State government about 600 acres of land in Summerfield Township, Monroe County, Michigan. In 1834, he deeded some of his property to railroad investors who platted a village of 41 blocks and named it Petersburg after him.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------ Parents: Richard PETERS and Jerusha SUTTON.

Spouse: Susanna HALSTEAD. Richard PETERS and Susanna HALSTEAD were married on 4 Sep 1791 in Newe York.5,128 Reference Number:14743 Children were: Elizabeth PETERS, Daniel PETERS, William PETERS, Richard PETERS, James Sutton PETERS, John PETERS, Susan PETERS, Sarah PETERS, Jerusha PETERS.


Richard PETERS5,128 was born on 13 Mar 1797 in Stamford, NY..5,128 [master ged.FTW]

RICHARD PETERS 1797 - 1862
History of Monroe County, Michigan (b1890)
Talcott E. Wing, Editor

Of Petersburg, was one of the early pioneers of Monroe county, and hisservices has been invaluable in aiding to clear up and redeeming anunbroken wilderness from the savages and wild beasts which inhabited it.He purchased from the United States Go vernment some six hundred acres ofland, about five hundred of which he cleared and brought into anexcellent state of cultivation.

He emigrated from Harpersfield, Delaware county, New York, in 1824, atwhich place he received a common school education, and at which place hewas married to Polly Wilcox, and proceeding directly to the spot wherethe village of Petersburg now stand s, where he built a hut and commencedimprovements, with Morris and Lewis Wells and their families the nearestneighbors, two miles distant. The last two or three miles of road he cutthrough the wilderness. The family then consisted of a wife an d threechildren, the former died in 1834, and the latter are all still living.Mr. Richard Peters held himself aloof from all kinds of offices; washighly esteemed as a citizen and first-class farmer, and though averse toholding office, was, notwith standing this, frequently forced to accepttownship offices, and was supervisor of the town of Raisinville eight orten years, which town then embraced Summerfield, Dundee, Whiteford,Bedford, Ida, London and Milan. He died at the old homestead ofin flammation of the lungs after a short illness of six weeks, at theadvanced age of sixty-four years. His eldest son George was bornSeptember 21, 1822, at Harpersfield, now residing on a part of the oldhomestead far; has been repeatedly honored wit h offices, indicating theesteem in which he is held; has serve the town as school inspector; wasnineteen years supervisor; member of the House of Representative in 1861and 1862, and a member of the State Senate in 1867 and 1868. He marriedMiss Mar y J. Holmes; has one son Richard G., who resides on the homefarm, and one daughter, who was married to Mr. Rea, and resides inBuffalo, New York.

John resides on a portion of the old homestead farm; married EllenBurnham; has two daughters receiving their education in Oberlin College,Ohio. he is esteemed as a very substantial enterprising farmer, and hasalways resided on the farm, with th e exception of a few years that hespent in California.[2098755.FTW]

RICHARD PETERS 1797 - 1862
History of Monroe County, Michigan (©1890)
Talcott E. Wing, Editor

Of Petersburg, was one of the early pioneers of Monroe county, and his services has been invaluable in aiding to clear up and redeeming an unbroken wilderness from the savages and wild beasts which inhabited it. He purchased from the United States Government some six hundred acres of land, about five hundred of which he cleared and brought into an excellent state of cultivation.

He emigrated from Harpersfield, Delaware county, New York, in 1824, at which place he received a common school education, and at which place he was married to Polly Wilcox, and proceeding directly to the spot where the village of Petersburg now stands, where he built a hut and commenced improvements, with Morris and Lewis Wells and their families the nearest neighbors, two miles distant. The last two or three miles of road he cut through the wilderness. The family then consisted of a wife and three children, the former died in 1834, and the latter are all still living. Mr. Richard Peters held himself aloof from all kinds of offices; was highly esteemed as a citizen and first-class farmer, and though averse to holding office, was, notwithstanding this, frequently forced to accept township offices, and was supervisor of the town of Raisinville eight or ten years, which town then embraced Summerfield, Dundee, Whiteford, Bedford, Ida, London and Milan. He died at the old homestead of inflammation of the lungs after a short illness of six weeks, at the advanced age of sixty-four years. His eldest son George was born September 21, 1822, at Harpersfield, now residing on a part of the old homestead far; has been repeatedly honored with offices, indicating the esteem in which he is held; has serve the town as school inspector; was nineteen years supervisor; member of the House of Representative in 1861 and 1862, and a member of the State Senate in 1867 and 1868. He married Miss Mary J. Holmes; has one son Richard G., who resides on the home farm, and one daughter, who was married to Mr. Rea, and resides in Buffalo, New York.

John resides on a portion of the old homestead farm; married Ellen Burnham; has two daughters receiving their education in Oberlin College, Ohio. he is esteemed as a very substantial enterprising farmer, and has always resided on the farm, with the exception of a few years that he spent in California. Parents: Richard PETERS and Susanna HALSTEAD.

Spouse: Polly WILCOX. Richard PETERS and Polly WILCOX were married on 10 Feb 1820 in Stamford, NY.5 Children were: Frances A. PETERS, George PETERS, John PETERS, Charles PETERS.


Richard PETERS3,405 was born in 1853.3,405 He died in 1942.3,405 He is reference number 98916. Parents: Daniel Noffsinger PETERS and Charlotte GOODALL.

Spouse: Hattie Elizabeth SWEET. Richard PETERS and Hattie Elizabeth SWEET were married WFT Est 1872-1902.3,405 Reference Number:1581742


Richard Calvin PETERS5,128 was born on 29 Apr 1862.5,128 Parents: Charles PETERS and Julia Ann BURNHAM.

Spouse: Frances Amelia TROMBLY. Richard Calvin PETERS and Frances Amelia TROMBLY were married on 27 Sep 1885 in Petersburg, Mich.5 Children were: Living PETERS, William Fullerton PETERS, George Richard PETERS, Frances Evelyn PETERS.


Richard Gould PETERS5,128 was born on 2 Jul 1832.5,128 Parents: James Sutton PETERS and Susan SQUIRES.


Ruth PETERS5,128 was born about 1709.5,128 She is reference number 1471. Parents: Samuel PETERS and Sarah CARLE.


Samuel PETERS5,128 was born about 1687.5,128 He is reference number 1469.

Spouse: Sarah CARLE. Samuel PETERS and Sarah CARLE were married about 1707.5,128 Reference Number:1982 Children were: Sarah PETERS, Ruth PETERS.


Sarah PETERS5,128 was born about 1708.5,128 She is reference number 1470. Parents: Samuel PETERS and Sarah CARLE.


Sarah PETERS5,128 was born on 28 Sep 1809 in Stamford, NY..5,128 Parents: Richard PETERS and Susanna HALSTEAD.

Spouse: Elisha E. SHELDON. Elisha E. SHELDON and Sarah PETERS were married in 1833 in Hampersfield, NY.5


Sophia PETERS5,128 was born about 1782.5,128 She is reference number 5562. She was baptized in Quaker.5,128

Spouse: Benjamin Jr. HALSTEAD. Benjamin Jr. HALSTEAD and Sophia PETERS were married on 2 Dec 1807.5 Reference Number:3537 Children were: Amanda HALSTEAD, Stephen HALSTEAD.


Susan PETERS3,405 died in 1923.3,405 She was born WFT Est 1836-1864.3,405 She is reference number 98911. Parents: Daniel Noffsinger PETERS and Charlotte GOODALL.


Susan PETERS5,128 was born on 6 Jul 1806 in Stamford, NY..5,128 Parents: Richard PETERS and Susanna HALSTEAD.

Spouse: Isaac SQUIRES. Isaac SQUIRES and Susan PETERS were married on 2 Dec 1824 in Stamford, NY.5

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