Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   
Home
Surname List
Name Index
Sources
Email Us
Fred HOLLAND3,399 was born.3,399,400 He died Unknown.3,399,400 He is reference number 9541. [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]3,399,400 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]3,399,400 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]3,399,400 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]3,399,400 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]3,399,400 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]3,399,400 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]3,399,400 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]3,399,400 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]3,399,400 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]3,399,400 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]3,399,400 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Death]3,399,400

Spouse: Ada COOPER. Fred HOLLAND and Ada COOPER were married.3,399,400 Reference Number:210707 Children were: Fern HOLLAND.


George HOLLAND.19 Parents: Edward L. HOLLAND and Millie Ann Elizabeth HOOD.

Spouse: Frances MCDONALD. Children were: Lou Ann HOLLAND.


George HOLLAND3,401 died in 1802 in Grayson Co., VA.3,401 He was born Unknown.3,401 He is reference number 73418.

Spouse: MARY. George HOLLAND and MARY were married. Reference Number:1211860 Children were: William HOLLAND, Fanny HOLLAND, Judith HOLLAND, Sarah HOLLAND, Elizabeth HOLLAND, Agatha HOLLAND.


Geva HOLLAND7,103 was born about 879 in Of, Egmond Binnen, Noord Holland, Netherlands. She died on 11 Jan in Egmond-Binnen, Noord Holland, Netherlands. Parents: .

Spouse: Dirk HOLLAND I. Dirk HOLLAND I and Geva HOLLAND were married. Children were: Count Of Holland Dirk HOLLAND II, Wickmann I Or Wiemen Ghent GAND.


Harvey HOLLAND.19 Parents: Edward L. HOLLAND and Millie Ann Elizabeth HOOD.

Spouse: Cliffie WHITE. Children were: Harvey HOLLAND, Mary HOLLAND.


Harvey HOLLAND.19 Parents: Harvey HOLLAND and Cliffie WHITE.


Henderson HOLLAND4,5 was born about 1803.4,5 He is reference number SA151010s.

Spouse: Mary Mc Kee FAUSETT.


Henry HOLLAND2,3 died Unknown.3 He is reference number 32349.

Spouse: Lydia FELL. Henry HOLLAND and Lydia FELL were married. Reference Number:574887 Children were: Deborah HOLLAND, Lydia HOLLAND, Thomas HOLLAND.


Henry HOLLAND7,62 was born in 1430. He died in 1473. Parents: .

Spouse: Anne PLANTAGENET. Henry HOLLAND and Anne PLANTAGENET were married on 30 Jul 1447.


Henry Harrison HOLLAND3,401 was born on 19 May 1868 in Louisville, KY.3,401 He died on 17 Feb 1939.3,401 He is reference number 74447. Parents: Martin Hollon HOLLAND and Rozilla KING.

Spouse: Maggie Elizabeth WHEAT. Henry Harrison HOLLAND and Maggie Elizabeth WHEAT were married. Reference Number:1227937


Hildegarde De HOLLAND7,103 was born about 961 in Of, Zuid Holland, Netherland. Parents: Dirk HOLLAND I and Gerberge De VERMANDOIS.


Hubert HOLLAND.19 Parents: Edward L. HOLLAND and Millie Ann Elizabeth HOOD.

Spouse: Katie Lou BENTON.


Ingebiorg Finnsdottir Of HOLLAND7,27,261 was born before 1070. Parents: .

Spouse: King Of Scotland Malcom III CANMORE III. King Of Scotland Malcom III CANMORE III and Ingebiorg Finnsdottir Of HOLLAND were married. Children were: King Of Scotland Duncan II CANMORE II.


Isabella HOLLAND377 was born about 1328 in Of, Brackley, Northamptonshire, Eng.377 Parents: Lord Of Holland Robert DE HOLLAND and Maud LA ZOUCHE.

Spouse: John De Warrene (Earl DE WARRENE.


James Edgar HOLLAND3,513 was born between 1843 and 1870.3,513 He died between 1893 and 1957.3,513 He is reference number 235.

Spouse: Sarah Vance BOYD. James Edgar HOLLAND and Sarah Vance BOYD were married on 11 Jan 1888 in Trigg County, Kentucky.3 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Marriage]3,513 Reference Number:13966


Count Of Holland Jan Count Of HOLLAND7,129,377 was born about 1313 in Of, Le Quesnoy, Nord, France.377 He died in 1316.377 Ancestral File Number:<AFN> 7W1X-NH Parents: Count Hainaut Willem III De Avesnes Count Of HOLLAND and Countess Hainault Jeanne DE VALOIS.


Jan I Count Of HOLLAND.377

Spouse: Princess Of England Elizabeth PLANTAGENET II.


John HOLLAND377 was born about 1318 in Of, Brackley, Northamptonshire, Eng.377 Parents: Lord Of Holland Robert DE HOLLAND and Maud LA ZOUCHE.

Spouse: Eleanor METFIELD.


John HOLLAND4,5 was born about 1847 in Sheffield, Yorks, England.4,5 [master ged.FTW]

[1840319.FTW]

!Source: family letters Parents: Charles HOLLAND and Ann NICHOLSON.


John Wesley HOLLAND3,401 was born on 21 Jun 1871 in Louisville, KY.3,401 He died in 1947 in Stockton, CA.3,401 He is reference number 74448. Parents: Martin Hollon HOLLAND and Rozilla KING.

Spouse: Minnie B. KIRKLAND. John Wesley HOLLAND and Minnie B. KIRKLAND were married. Reference Number:1227952


Judith HOLLAND3,401 was born in 1761 in Virginia.3,401 She died Unknown.3 She is reference number 73422. Parents: George HOLLAND and MARY.

Spouse: Unknown VAUGHN. Unknown VAUGHN and Judith HOLLAND were married. Reference Number:1211928


Julia Ann HOLLAND3,401 was born on 24 Jan 1891 in Mountain Home, Baxter, Arkansas.3,401 She died on 13 Feb 1977 in Osceala, Arkansas.3,401 She is reference number 74453. Parents: Martin Hollon HOLLAND and Rozilla KING.

Spouse: Charles William BELL. Charles William BELL and Julia Ann HOLLAND were married. Reference Number:1228045


Living HOLLAND.3

Spouse: Living LASTER. Children were: Living LASTER.


Living HOLLAND.3

Spouse: Living FLOWERS. Children were: Living FLOWERS, Living FLOWERS.


Living HOLLAND.3

Spouse: Living BELL. Children were: Living BELL.


Living HOLLAND.5,128

Spouse: Living HALSTEAD. Children were: Living HOLLAND.


Living HOLLAND.5,128 Parents: Living HOLLAND and Living HALSTEAD.


Living HOLLAND. Parents: Clarence BOOTH Jr. Holland.


Living HOLLAND.188 Parents: .


Lou Alice HOLLAND3,401 was born on 11 Oct 1873 in Louisville, KY.3,401 She died on 30 Mar 1963 in Athens, Texas.3,401 She is reference number 74449. [boyd-trees.ged]







[xx.FTW]

[Boydfile.ged]

Her brother Henry helped her to slip out the window to mary John when she was 15. John and Lou moved to Trinidad, Texas in 1920. Parents: Martin Hollon HOLLAND and Rozilla KING.

Spouse: John Riley TAYLOR. John Riley TAYLOR and Lou Alice HOLLAND were married. Reference Number:1227982


Lou Ann HOLLAND.19 Parents: George HOLLAND and Frances MCDONALD.


Luther HOLLAND.5,94,126,127

Spouse: Charissa ASHLEY.


Lydia HOLLAND2,3 died Unknown.3 She is reference number 31585. [boyd-trees.ged]











!(1) "100 Years at Warrington, York County, Pennsylvania Quakers," comp. by
Margaret B. Walmer (Heritage Books) p.61.

!Birth: (1) d/o Henry Holland of Warrington, York Co., PA.
Marriage to Joseph Green: (1) 16 12th mo. 1773, Warrington, York Co., PA.
Signing under the bridal couple were Henry and Lydia Holland; John McMillan;
Sarah Leach; Sarah COX. (See Davidson Genealogy - he s/o Joseph Green. This
Sarah Cox is Sarah (Leech) Cox, wife of Jacob Cox.) Also witnessing were
Rebecca COX; Mary, Thomas Thornbrugh; Rebekah, Thomas, Mary Holland; Ann,
William Withrow; Abigail, Thomas McMillan; Ruth Wilkinson; William, Ebenezer
Horsman; William Farry; Robert, Sarah Vale; John, Rebekah Machlan; Riccord
Hussey.[alice-boyd.FTW]

!(1) "100 Years at Warrington, York County, Pennsylvania Quakers," comp. by
Margaret B. Walmer (Heritage Books) p.61.

!Birth: (1) d/o Henry Holland of Warrington, York Co., PA.
Marriage to Joseph Green: (1) 16 12th mo. 1773, Warrington, York Co., PA.
Signing under the bridal couple were Henry and Lydia Holland; John McMillan;
Sarah Leach; Sarah COX. (See Davidson Genealogy - he s/o Joseph Green. This
Sarah Cox is Sarah (Leech) Cox, wife of Jacob Cox.) Also witnessing were
Rebecca COX; Mary, Thomas Thornbrugh; Rebekah, Thomas, Mary Holland; Ann,
William Withrow; Abigail, Thomas McMillan; Ruth Wilkinson; William, Ebenezer
Horsman; William Farry; Robert, Sarah Vale; John, Rebekah Machlan; Riccord
Hussey. Parents: Henry HOLLAND and Lydia FELL.

Spouse: Joseph GREEN. Joseph GREEN and Lydia HOLLAND were married on 16 Dec 1773 in Warrington, York Co., Pennsylvania.2,3 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE: Alt. Marriage]2,3 Reference Number:590156


Machteld HOLLAND7,213 was born about 1057 in . Parents: Count Of Holland FLORIS and Of Saxony Gertrude BILLUNG.


Margaret HOLLAND3,38 was born about 1784 in .3 She died Unknown.3 She is reference number 50985. She has Ancestral File Number BR9K-2J.

Spouse: William MARKEE. William MARKEE and Margaret HOLLAND were married. Reference Number:889614 Children were: William MARKEE.


Margaret HOLLAND4,5 was born about 1850 in Sheffield, Yorks, England.4,5 She died in Feb 1875.4,5 [master ged.FTW]

[1840319.FTW]

!Sealed to Joshua William Sylvester 8 Feb 1889

!Source: family letters Parents: Charles HOLLAND and Ann NICHOLSON.


Margery HOLLAND377 was born about 1308 in Of, Upholland, Lancashire, Eng.377 Parents: Lord Of Holland Robert DE HOLLAND and Maud LA ZOUCHE.

Spouse: John De LA WARRE.


Maria Henrietta HOLLAND19 was born in 1824.19 She died in 1850.19

Spouse: Alexander HAUSER. Alexander HAUSER and Maria Henrietta HOLLAND were married.


Martha Hollon HOLLAND3,401 was born in 1876 in Wolfe County, KY.3,401 She died Unknown.3 She is reference number 74441. Parents: Sanford Hollon HOLLAND and Nancy KING.


Martin Hollon HOLLAND3,401 was born on 17 May 1844 in Wolfe County, KY.3,401 He died on 27 Mar 1937 in Mountain Home, Baxter County, Arkansas.3,401 He is reference number 74442. [boyd-trees.ged]







[xx.FTW]

[Boydfile.ged]

Martin was known as "Uncle Mart" commonly among family and friends alike. He fought for the Confederacy in the 5th Kentucky Regiment. A copy of his Company Muster Roll is dated May and June 1863, and also July and August 1863. There is a known "discrepancy" between Martin's stated age and census records.

The following is a newspaper article about Martin Holland (Research Source: Cora Burton):

"Uncle Mart Holland, 94, and said to be the oldest citizen in the county, enjoyed a ride in an airplane last week. The first airship to visit Mountain Home, the machine belongs to the Lightning Aviation Company of Kansas City, Mo. It spent several days here enroute home from Calico Rock where B.M. Tuxhorn, president, and B.P. Vlast, an associate of the company, had given an excellent program at the fair. Arrangements were made over the phone to have the machine visit here and 14 minutes after leaving Calico Rock the men landed in one of the large fields on the Baker farm just south of town. A good crowd soon collected on the field but the largest number of spectators were present Sunday to witness the flights. A series of thrilling stunts such as wing walking and looping the loop was scheulded for Sunday afternoon but did not take place due to an accident to the machine. Messrs. Tuxhorn and Vlast were on the upward flight preparatory to the exhibition when a drop of water from the gasoline entered the motor, causing it to stop at once. They were forced to land a short distance from the starting point in a very rough field. One of the wings was practically demolished making it necessary to have many of the parts rebuilt and to wire for other pieces. About 15 passengers were carried in the machine while it was here and they all enjoyed the trip. Uncle Mart takes considerable pride in relating his experience and says he felt perfectly safe while making his flight. The two youngest passengers were Paul and Curtis Love, little sons of R.C. Love. A number of ladies were also passengers on the flight. The Kansas City men started their trip over the Ozarks last Thursday morning, flying from Kansas City to Calico Rock in 4 1/2 hours. At one time near Bergman, where they had to make a forced landing, it looked like slow music and flowers for them. A pin in the rocking arm of the engine broke and put the engine out of commission. Vlast climbed from the cockpit and put a small punch in the hole to replace the pin, and rose the engine holding it there until Texhorn made a landing."

The following is a newspaper article about Martin Holland (Research Source: Cora Burton):

"Uncle Mart Holland was 100 years old Monday. On the day he reached the century mark, he was ready to scuffle. He has been a resident of this county 56 years, is a staunch Democrat, believes in the orthodox religion, and hold dear to his heart the traditions of the Old South. Although 100 years old, he is in a way a modernist, for he sees nothing alarming in the flapper, bobbed hair or short skirts, and accepts the radio, airplane and other modern inventions as a matter of progress."The following is a newspaper article about Martin Holland (Research Source: Cora Burton):

"In a recent interview with Uncle Mart Holland, now 106 and the oldest livng person in north Arkansas, he protested against modern conditions, stating that he would rather liver under conditions as they were when he came to Baxter County 60 years ago, than to live as we are living now. 'In those days, everyone had plenty and no one was out of employment,' Mr. Holland said, 'We all had our homesteads and clearings, with plenty of stock in the wooods, and got along all right. If we wanted meat, we would take down the old muzzle loading rifle and step out of the house, and kill a deer or turkey. If we wanted fish we would take a gig and go to the nearest river, and get all we wanted. Everyone seemed satisfied. The head of the household was responsible alone to keep the cupboard full, and the smokehouse full of meat. The womenfolk spun the cotton and wool, and wove it into cloth, from which clothes for the whole family were made. We didn't see much money, and didn't need it. Things are different today...It seems like everyone is in debt. There seems to be plenty of everything but everyone is wanting more than they have, and haven't the money to buy with. In the old days people were satisfied with a good life and they were happy.' Mr. Holland was born in Kentucky in 1826. He is of slight build, weighing about 135 pounds, with sparse white hair and small white moustache. Time has left its mark on him, but his mind is active and memory is good. He is an old Confederate soldier, having served with a Kentucky regiment. He was active up to the century mark, when a slight stroke cause him to become an invalid. Since then he has been supported by his Confederate pension. He was the first man in Baxter County to ride in an airplane. This was in his 94th year. It was the first plane ever seen in this county, and attracted hundrends of people. Everyone wanted to go up but Mr. Holland set the ball rolling. Notwithstanding his aversion to modern ways, he said that it was the best method of transportation he had ever tried."

The following is a newspaper article from 1937, "Mart Holland, Aged 111, Oldest Citizen, Died Last Thursday" (Research Source: Cora Burton):

"Mart Holland, aged 111, and Baxter county's oldest citizen, died at the home of his son, Frank, in Jackson County, last Thursday, and was laid to rest at the Douglas Cemetery, Friday afternoon. Up until the time of his death, Mr. Holland was probably the oldest man in the state. He was one of Baxter County's pioneer citizens, coming to the county from Kentucky, where he was born and raised, shortly after the Civil War, he fought under the flag of the Confederacy, in a Kentucky regiment, and made a splendid record. After Mr. Holland came here late in the sixties, he bought a farm a few miles east of this place and engaged in farming until he became too old to do the work. Later he moved to town and was a resident here for years. He was the first peron in the county to ride in an airplane. The first place came to Mountain Home 17 years ago and no one would go up in it. Mr. Holland stated that he was 84 years old and wouldn't lose many years if he crashed and took the first ride. The place had plenty to do after he came down all right."

The following newspaper article, "County's Most Durable Citizen, written by J.D. Alley (Research Source: Cora Burton):

"Uncle Mart Holland came to Arkansas from Kentucky when he was a young man and spent the remainder of this life in this vicinity. My first knowledge of htim was in 1885. They had built the Baptist CHruch House on the Mountain Home and Henderson Road, (now Highway 62 East). J.T. Hand, a Baptist minister, who lived near Whiteville, north of Gassville, was closing a week's meeting. At the last service, as the sang the old [unreadable] song, "On Jordan's Stormy Banks I Stand," the congregration began shouting and clapping their hands. I became so frightened that I wished something would happen to Uncle Mart. He was decidedly the oldest one - I thought he was the cause of the performance. That caused me to remember Uncle Mart. [Unreadable] I saw him after his [unreadable] turned his wagon over, hitting his head against a tree and tossing the wagon over his body. No one thought he would get well, but he did - and without a doctor. In 1920 I went to see him, after he was reported to be near death with the measles. Mrs. Holland told me that he had given up to die, had not eaten anything for three days and would not take any medicine. I went to his bed and he told me that he was going to die and he did not care if he did. I told Uncle Mart: "You are not going to die. We are awful anxious for you to live to be a hundred, and then we won't care if you do die." He kind of laughed at the joke. I prevailed on him" "Let's get something to eat and some medicine to break out the measles," and he consented to try and get well, and he did. Uncle Mart was 94 at that time. Mrs. Holland took the measles and died two weeks from that day. In 1937 I snapped this picture [sitting in a rocking chair] of Uncle Mart. He died a few months later, at the age of 111, and was buried in the Douglas Cemetery east of Moutain Home."

A newspaper article, "Planes Are No Novelty Now - But Back in 1920 They Were Indeed", by Mary Ann Messick (Research Source: Cora Burton):

"Since the establishment of several Federal Aviation Agency marked in the central Ozarks, air travel is almost as heavy as that on the highways, and planes over Northern Arkansas are as common as the proverbial cornbread. Even the recent rumor that a jetport was about to locate in the area didn't stir up much excitement, but 44 years ago when the first airplane landed there, Baxter County had not yet developed this sophisticated attitude. The first airplace to visit the county was scheduled to land at the Cotter picnic on September 2, 1920. The following week the Baxter Bulletin reported the picnic a huge success despite the keen disappointment caused by the failure of the plane to show up. Then the last week in September a plane landed at the Calico Rock picnic in neighboring Izard County. October 1, 1920 arrangements wer made by telephone and 14 minutes later the plane landed in a flat field on the Baker farm just south of the Mountain Home square about where the sales barn is today. Within an hour a bid crowd had gathered to examine the plane - a Curtis biplane with two open cockpits. A former Army aircraft, it was still painted olive-drab. The main metal parts about it were the overhead valve engine and its moorings. The fuselage and wings were special "doped" canvas stretched over a wooden fram and the propeller was wood. The plane was piloted by B.M. Tuxhorn, president of Lightning Aviation of Kansas City, and the trip from Kansas City to Calico Rock had taken four and a half hours. Tuxhorn cut a dashing figure in his jodhpur pants, tan flight jacket, brown leather helmet and goggles. He was accompanied by B.P. Vlast. Vlast was a little man and the two fliers became affectionately known as "Frenchy" and "Shorty" during their stay at Mountain Home. Both men were stunt fliers. They advertised that their daredevil tricks were performed without any safety precautions. However, they did use a device while wing-walking, but waited until the place was in the air to hook it up. That afternoon Vlast accidently dropped the device, jamming the plane's controls and forcing Tuxhorn to crash land in a rocky field about where the National Guard Armory is today. Although the plane was heavily damaged, local craftsman had it back in flying condition in a couple of days. Dick Halburt, a building contractor, made a new propeller and wing spars of black walnut. My father, Herbert Messick, had just been discharged from the Army Air Corps and he had brought home the altimeter from his plane as a souvenir. It was too big for the plane so Tuxhorn and Messick rewired the broken altimeter with parts from the other one, and the plane was ready to fly on short runs. However, the couldn't leave for Kansas City until the received the special banana oil dope to coat the new parts. (Incidently, my father made a safe for most valuable papers out of the empty altimeter case.) To pass the time away "Frency" and "Shorty" offered airplane rides - five minutes for five dollars - but they had no takers until the offered a free ride to 94-year-old Martin Holland. "Uncle Mart" Holland was born May 17, 1825 near Lousivlle - one of a family of nine boys. During the Civil War he served in a Kentucky Regiment of the Confederate Army. In 1876 the Holland family came to Arkansas in a ox wagon and settled on a farm four miles east of Moutain Home. By 1920 Uncle Mart had already cheated death at least twice - in 1891 when an ox wagon turned over on him and in the spring of 1920 when he was seriously ill. Mrs. Holland died and Uncle Mart moved to Mountain Home. His little house stood between the square and the Baxter Theater and visitors to town inevitably made a point to drop by Uncle Mart's - usually with baked goods, fresh meat or game to exchange for stories. His most interesting and popular stories were tales of the Revolutionary War he had heard from former soldiers. After his plane ride Uncle Mart was bombarded with questions and he described his ride to his admiring listeners. "You step in the cockpit with your heart in your mouth. Then this windmill in front starts to turn and the power whirls along the plane. Then all of a sudden you've taken an easy leap - right up into the air. Shuckings, it's a heap easier than riding in an oxen wagon. If these fellas will come back when I'm a hundred, I'll be glad to take another ride." Despite Uncle Mart's glowing testimony, still nobody wanted to risk a ride. Then Tuxhorn took up two young boys, Curtis and Paul Love, together. When they landed he told the crowd, "See, we're all just home folks. I'm Baxter Tuxhorn flying in Baxter County and I've just took up Curtis Love in a Curtis Plane." Uncle Mart celebrated his 100th birthday May 17, 1926, but "Frenchy" wasn't there to take him for a plane ride. Tuxhorn was killed while participating in a cross-country airplane derby about two years after he visited Mountain Home. Martin Holland died March 7, 1937 at the age of 110 years, 10 months, and 10 days - setting a record for longevity that has yet to be equaled in Baxter County. Two of his eight children are still living and many of his descendants live in Baxter County, including County Judge Jimmie Baker."

The following is a story about Martin Holland by James Baker (Research Source: Cora Burton):

"Along about 1960 Uncle Joe Nimo told me this story about Uncle Mart Holland. He said that he moved over to a place called Hand, Arkansas, over the ridge in the northeast part of Baxter County pretty close to the Fulton/Izard county line. He took a mail route over there. It was a star route as they called it in those days. A start route was where they carried the mail from one post office to the other. This was somewhere around 1920 and he had this contract to carry the mail from Hand Post Office to Mountain Home every day and back. He had two good oldtime saddle horses, fox trotting horses, and he said one morning he was coming out across the cedar break there from Hand going toward Mountain Home and he got about a mile and a half from the house and the sun was just up shining good, big frost on the ground. He said he hadn't gotten much rest the night before and he had just halfway nodded off riding the horse. He really wasn't asleep, just kind of relaxed. He said he had heard of Uncle Mart Holland, but he hand't met him. Uncle Mart was pretty stooped in his old age and he had a long flowing white beard and this beard, as I recall seeing him in 1935, came down to about his belt buckle. He was real withered up by then and he looked kind of pitiful. Uncle Joe said his horse was just kind of nodding his head down going down the road and all of a sudden this little gray donkey shot right out of the cedar break out in front of him and on it was an old man, stooped, small, with a flowing white beard. Uncle Joe told me, he said, 'I guess I wasn't living a very good life at the time. The first thing that happened was my horse reared straight up and my mail pouches fell off. I just through of the devil. That's the first thing I thought of."

The following is a story about Martin Holland, author unknown (Research Source: James Baker):

"It was said that Uncle Mart had a way with hunting dogs. He could just take a dog and train it and just about make it do anything. I do know this that his son, Harrison Holland, was the same way. Uncle Mart was known to hunt at night a lot and went a lot by himself if he couldn't get someone to go with him. This one particular night he and his old longtom single barrel shotgun and his dogs kept treeing and before he could get to the tree, whatever it was would jump out and leave and the dogs would go on and he would have to catch up with them again. Well, we all know pretty well what that was, that was a cat of some kind. Uncle Mart knew that. About the third time that happened, the dogs ran him in the cave, whatever it was, and Uncle Mart lit his pine torch and he went in there. After he went back in there and got close enough, he could see them yellow eyes. He lined up that old shotgun and help up that torch the best he could and he shot this cat. There were two cats and when he shot one the other one ran over him, and jumped into him and knocked his pine torch out, the only light he had, and went out the hole. He scrounged around and got his pine torch lit again and so he had killed one cat and the other had gotten away. I doubt if any of us would have the nerve of fortitude to do that sort of thing today."

The following story about Martin Holland was written by T.J. McCabe (Research Source: James Baker):

"The first airplane that ever landed in Baxter County landed in Mountain Home. Uncle Mart at that time was a member of the Spit and Whittle Club. You know, they sat around the square with little cedar sticks and good pocket knives and whittled and told stories, lived in the past. They heard this airplane come over and I guess there probably had been rumors that it was going to come to Baxter County. The plane landed over west of Mountain Home which is now where the bowling alley is. Being the old rotary engine plane, it was noisy and everybody knew what had happened when it went over and when it lit. Uncle Mart, along with some of the other oldtimers, started over there. Uncle Mart was 90 at this time. The man that told me this was just a young boy at the time and the Mountain Home School which was grade 1-12 at that time was relatively close to there. They said the kids just ran out of the schoolroom. The teacher didn't have to dismiss them or anything. It just made so much noise and the were so curious, they just ran out of it never stopped until they got over there. Everybody gathered around and soon Uncle Mart and the other oldtimers got there and the aviator was prepared to take up passengers. He wanted to know who would be the first to ride the plane. Uncle Mart put up quite a tussle to be the first one to ride the plane, quite an argument ensued. He said, 'Now, gentlemen, I'll tell you, I'm the oldest man in the country, 90 years old, and I've got the least to lose of anybody, cause I'm the oldest, and I'm going to be the first one to ride the plane.' And so it was. The Baxter County History Book printed in 1973 shows a picture and tells the story about Uncle Mart riding the plane. I've seen several pictures of that event. In some of the pictures that I have seen, the wash from the prop in that open cockpit swept his flowing long whiskers back over this shoulder like a hard wind would blow back a necktie. It was comical to look at it. The bottom line of the story is that when the plane landed, Uncle Mart got out and holding the strut stood on one of the wings. It was a bi-plane, double wing plane. And he made a speech. Among the different things he said was he believed the airplane was a coming thing."

The following is a story about Martin Holland by James Baker (Research Source: Cora Burton):

"Uncle Joe Curlee ran the old Moone's Drugstore there on the northeast corner of the square. This was around the time that the railroad came to Baxter County, maybe a little bit before, and a lot of the oldtimers used to "freight" into Mountain Home from West Plains, Missouri off the Frisco Railroad up there and they would bring staple goods: salt, and a lot of different things like that. They would come into Mountain Home and unload, spend the night, put up in the old Commercial Hotel just off the square. There wasn't much to do at night and they would come down to Mooney's Drugstore. This happened around 1905, they were all sitting around the potbellied stove down there in the drugstore, telling yarns. Uncle Mart Holland came running in the door, had a pair of overalls on, one gallus unfastened. He had an old long tom, single barrel shotgun in his hand and it was open. He said, "Joe, Joe, I need some shotgun shells." Joe got up out of his cane-bottomed chair and he said, "What's the matter, Uncle Mart?" Uncle Mart said, "Joe them dadburn boys are down there rocking my house again, and I don't aim to put up with it, I need some shotgun shells." Joe kind of looked around and thought out the circumstances and kind of plundered around behind the case there on the shelf. He said, "Uncle Mart, I've not got any shotgun shells. I just don't keep them anymore." So Uncle Mart kind of stomped his foot and he said, "Well, what am I going to do?" Old Joe said, "Well, I don't know, Uncle Mart, maybe they'll be gone when you get back." Uncle Mart stormed out the door and down the street he went. Of course, there wasn't anything else open that time of the evening. I believe Uncle Mark Kerley was the one that told me about this when he was in the crowd and said, "Joe, why didn't you let the old man have some shotgun shells?" Joe said, "Well, Mark, you know that wouldn't do, that old man is liable to kill them kids. When he goes back down there, them kids will be gone. They knew where he was going. I wasn't about to give him any shells."

The following is a story about Martin Holland by James Baker (Research Source: Cora Burton):

"Uncle Mart was a member of the County Courthouse Square Spit and Whittle Club. The old gentlemen would sit around the courthouse square there and, I supposed, still do today. They do in many of the old Arkansas county courthouse squares. Little cedar sticks, good pocket knives, whittling, talking about times of yesteryard. Uncle Alf Hutch was one of Uncle Mart's friends and Alf was known to be the tightest man in Baxter County. He had a little money, never spent any of it, probably had the first nickel he ever made. He was pretty bad to bum tobacco off of grandpa. Grandpa kept his tobacco in a little leather pouch in his front pocket. He would get that little pouch out and get him a chew of tobacco. It was probably leaf tobacco, homegrown leaf tobacco. He would put that back in his pocket. Many times, even though he had tobacco, Alf would brag on Uncle Mart's tobacco and he would get a chew off of Uncle Mart. Time being hard as they were, Uncle Mart got a little tired of it. One morning before he went up to the square he just wet down his tobacco with a little water. Sure enough that morning when he got out his pouch after they got started into their coversation and their whittling good, Alf said, 'Uncle Mart, let me bum a chew of that good tobacco you have always got.' Uncle Mart got his little pouch back out of his pocket, handed it over to Alf Hutch, and Alf proceeded to get him a little bit of his tobacco. It may have been a plug or it may have been a twist, may have been leaf tobacco. Alf Hutch said, 'Uncle Mart, your tobacco's a little bit moist this morning, seem like it's kind of wet.' Uncle Mart said, 'Yeah, Alf, I'm getting to where I can't hold my water anymore like I used to could.' Just never said anymore, folded up his tobacco, put it in his pocket. They say that's the last time that Alf Hutch ever bummed tobacco from Uncle Mart Holland."

The following is a story about Martin Holland by James Baker (Research Source: Cora Burton):

"Uncle Mart lived there in Mountain Home about a half block off the square. I remember the place being a shack-like place, but it was home to him. His children were all scattered here and there. He had a big family. The youngest boy, Uncle Frank Holland, lived out there on the river at Bull Shoals. He farmed on the river there sharecropping for one of the Bryants. Now that little community is called Lakeview. Uncle Frank Holland told me that Uncle Mart would come out there nearly every weekend, or every other weekend. He had a real good little gray saddle mare. He would get on that little mare - and we're talking about a man that was between 90 and 100 then I guess - and he would ride 15 miles out there to his youngest boy's place. He would ride out there on Friday and come back Sunday, or maybe come out Friday and go back Monday, stay a day or two, spend the weekend. So, Frank said he knew that he was just getting so feeble that he afraid if he fell off that horse somewhere in between he knew he would never be able to get back on it by himself. He said, 'I just tried and tried to figure out some way or other to keep him from making that trip.' The only thing that he could come up with after a few months was to try to trade him out of that mare. He just kept trying to trade him out of it. Uncle Frank said, 'I finally told him, now Dad, it's coming crop time. You know I ain't got no decent team. The boys are getting big enough if I had another little scrap out of that little mare you've got.' The ulterior motive of course being keeping Uncle Mart from being on the road. So he traded him for that little gray mare and that kind of put a stop to that because he was just worried to death something was going to happen to him."

The following is a story about Martin Holland by James Baker (Research Source: Cora Burton):

"Uncle Mart Holland died at Fisher, Arkansas. He had lived with Uncle Frank Holland who was farming in the bottoms at Fisher. I remember the day that he was buried. It was a cold, dreary, rainy day. I was not scheduled to go to the funeral. My mother and dad left early and walked to the Douglas Cemetary. Uncle Frank Holland came to our house. He had forgotten just exactly how to get to the cemetary or didn't know just which road was the best. You could go two different ways. He had gotten a man to drive him up to Mountain Home. The man had a new 1936 Chevrolet pickup, practically new. That pine box was in the back. It had some kind of tarp over it. Uncle Frank Holland invited my older brother, Loy, and me to go with them to the cemetary and show them just how to get there by the best road. It was a bad road. It was red clay, with ruts sometimes axle deep. I remember as a small boy thinking about Uncle Mart back there in that box. A dead man back there in that box. It bothered me as a child to think about it. But we went to the funeral. It was well attended. Wish I could remember today the faces of many of those there. According to all family accounts, Uncle Mart lived to be 110 years, 10 months, and 10 days old."

The following is a story about Martin Holland by James Baker (Research Source: Cora Burton):

"In 1935 I went to Uncle Frank's birthday party. They lived on the Russell place at Hand, Arkansas. Uncle Mart lived there with Uncle Frank and his family. We went in a wagon and I remember quite a few of the particulars about it. They forded the river with the wagon. I know long before we got to the river how I dreaded the thought of us taking that wagon across the river. But Dad had a man in a skiff take mother and me and one or two of the other boys across while he took the wagon across. The Russell place where Uncle Frank lived was a big house for those days. It was an old-timey house that had a dog trot through it. That meant that the sleeping rooms were on one end of the house and the cooking facilities were on the other end. This was a bid airspace between the two. It had a big front porch running the length of the house. The first thing I remember when we got there was lots of people. People had come from far and near and lots of wagons and teams, several cars, and here was this old man, little man, with a long white beard, crawling around on the porch. That was Uncle Mart Holland. How strange I thought it was for a man to be crawling around on his hands and knees. He was so old that he couldn't walk. Uncle Frank would carry him on his back nearly everywhere they went, like you would carry a child on your back. Having been born in 1926, he would have been 109 years old that birthday." Parents: Andrew Jackson Sr. HOLLAND and Sarah WRIGHT.

Spouse: Rozilla KING. Martin Hollon HOLLAND and Rozilla KING were married on 25 Jan 1907 in Mountain Home, Baxter County, Arkansas.3,401 Reference Number:1219354 Children were: Arminnie HOLLAND, Armannie HOLLAND, Henry Harrison HOLLAND, John Wesley HOLLAND, Lou Alice HOLLAND, Tubal HOLLAND, William Franklin HOLLAND, Floyd Lonzo HOLLAND, Julia Ann HOLLAND.


Mary HOLLAND.19 Parents: Harvey HOLLAND and Cliffie WHITE.


Mary HOLLAND7,97,1901,2119 was born about 1329 in Of Denton Manor, Prestwich, Lancashire, England.2119 Ancestral File Number:<AFN> 15F4-FSG Parents: Thurstan HOLLAND and Mary COLLYER.


Mary Ann HOLLAND3,206 died Unknown.3 She is reference number 5410.

Spouse: William R BOYD. William R BOYD and Mary Ann HOLLAND were married on 31 Dec 1890 in Christian Co. MO.3,206 Reference Number:106640


Mary Ellen HOLLAND4,5 was born about 1856 in Sheffield, Yorks, England.4,5 She was buried on 25 Dec 1872 in Burngreave Cem., Sheffield, Yorks, England.4,5 [master ged.FTW]

[1840319.FTW]

!Sealed to Joshua William Sylvester 8 Feb 1889 Parents: Charles HOLLAND and Ann NICHOLSON.


Mathew De HOLLAND7,251 was born about 1171. He died after 1202. He was also known as Matthew De Holland.177 GEDCOM line 36961 not recognizable or too long:
() 2 GIVN Mathew de

GEDCOM line 36962 not recognizable or too long:
() 2 SURN Holland

Turton's "Planta genet Ancestry"

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Valley/3829/holland.html : Matthew de
Holland first appears in a 'final concord' made at the Lancaster Assizes dated
Nov
GEDCOM line 36974 not recognizable or too long:
(NOTE) 2 C ONC ember 5, 1202. In this deed Uhetred de Chyrche releases his
right in fourt een oxgangs of lan

GEDCOM line 36975 not recognizable or too long:
(NOTE) 2 CONC d to Matthew de Holland. This would be about 120 acres of
arable land to gether with rights o

GEDCOM line 36976 not recognizable or too long:
(NOTE) 2 CONC f meadowing and pasturage, perhaps the manor as a whole. Two
years lat er deeds show that Matt

GEDCOM line 36977 not recognizable or too long:
(NO TE) 2 CONC hew de Holland died and was succeeded by his son Robert.
(Researche r - Jasper Land Holand II)

GEDCOM line 36978 not recognizable or too long:
(NOTE) 2 CONC .

Matthew de Holland b. est 1175, Upholland, Lancashire, Engla nd, died ABT
1224, Upholland, Lancashire, England. Matthew de Holande (Latin , Mattheum de
Holande) is known to be one of the earliest progenitors of the family in
Lancashire.
Holand or Holande was the spelling used prior to the 1 5th century. The family
settled in Upholland, a village about four miles west of Wigan. The manor of
Upholland is listed in the Domesday Book as "Holland" . The ancient township of
Upholland at one time was numbered among the market towns of Lancashire. A
castle and priory adorned this place when the de Holan des were its lords. The
castle
has disappeared. The church remains, along wi th diminutive ruins. All that
remains
now of the Monastery buildings are fra gments of some ivy clad ruins, but the
Chapel of the old Priory still exists, and is now a Parish Church of Upholland.
From "The Lancashire Hollands" by Be rnard Holland C.B., 1917. "There has
existed
no family in Lancashire, whose career has been so remarkable as that of the
Hollands. Playing an active part in the most picturesque and chivalrous period
of
English history, they figu re among the founders of the Order of the Garter,
allied
themselves with the royal family, and attained the highest rank in the peerage.
"

Matthew de H olland first appears in a 'final concord' made at the Lancaster
Assizes dated Nov
GEDCOM line 36999 not recognizable or too long:
(NOTE) 2 CONC ember 5, 12 02. In this deed Uhetred de Chyrche releases his
right in fourteen oxgangs of lan

GEDCOM line 37000 not recognizable or too long:
(NOTE) 2 CONC d to Matt hew de Holland. This would be about 120 acres of
arable land together with rig hts o

GEDCOM line 37001 not recognizable or too long:
(NOTE) 2 CONC f meado wing and pasturage, perhaps the manor as a whole. Two
years later deeds show t hat Matt

GEDCOM line 37002 not recognizable or too long:
(NOTE) 2 CONC hew de Holland died and was succeeded by his son Robert.
(Researcher - Jasper Land Holand II)

GEDCOM line 37003 not recognizable or too long:
(NOTE) 2 CONC .

GEDCOM line 37004 not recognizable or too long:
() 1 CHAN

GEDCOM line 3 7005 not recognizable or too long:
() 2 DATE 8 MAR 1999

GEDCOM line 37006 n ot recognizable or too long:
() 3 TIME 20:46:15 Parents: Siward De LONGWORTH. Parents: Siward De LONGWORTH and EVA.

Children were: Robert De HOLLAND.


Mrs Elizabeth HOLLAND.377

Spouse: Lord Holland Robert De HOLLAND.


Mrs Joan HOLLAND.377

Spouse: Otho DE HOLLAND.


Mrs Joan HOLLAND.377

Spouse: William HOLLAND.


Nancy HOLLAND3,333 died Unknown.3 She is reference number 104763.

Spouse: Jacksson ROBERTS. Jacksson ROBERTS and Nancy HOLLAND were married. Reference Number:1599525 Children were: Mary Roberts EUBANKS.


Nicholas HOLLAND7,97,1901,2119 was born about 1363 in Of Denton Manor, Prestwich, Lancashire, England.2119 Ancestral File Number:<AFN> 15F4-G39 Parents: Richard HOLLAND and Ameria KENYON.

Back       Next