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Jeremiah M. Carvell, Obituaries

My great-great-grandfather, Jeremiah Mark Carvell, was a pastor in the Church of God. Elder Carvell, it appears, was very respected in the Church of God, as well as the clergy circle in Pennsylvania. Following are 5 very detailed reports of his death. His death rated a front page column in Harrisburg, unusual, and in every instance at least a column was dedicated to his life. The following is from Newport News, Newport, Pennsylvania:
Death of Rev. J.M. Carvell,

He Passed Away at Shippensburg on Saturday Evening Last

By the death of Rev. Jeremiah Mark Carvell, Ph.D., which occurred at Shippensburg, Pa., at 5 p.m., Saturday, another distinguished citizen and minister of the gospel has been removed from our midst. He was a native of this state, having been born in Snyder County, March 3, 1843, later lived with his parents near Thompsontown, Juniata County, across the line between Juniata and Perry. He spent his boyhood days in the manual labor, attending the common schools of Snyder and Perry counties in the winter and acquiring the rudiments of an English education. In 1861 the civil war broke out. He enlisted at Harrisburg as a private on August 6, 1862, in Captain a.B. Demaree's company I, one hundred and thirty-third regiment, Pennsylvania infantry. The company was recruited in Perry county. He was mustered out by reason of expiration of term of service August 20, 186, as a private in company A, under Captain John Boal, afterwards commanded by Captain William M. Potter, Ninth Pennsylvania veteran cavalry, which after its many battles and hardships was assigned to the right wing of General Sherman's army and marched across Georgia to the sea. At the battle of Bear Creek and Griswoldville, Ga., November 22, 1864, while acting as secret scout for General Kirkpatrick and leading a charge, Mr. Carvell was severely wounded, and was sent y way of Savannah to the hospital at Hilton Head, S.C. He recovered sufficiently to join his company at Durham Station, to continue in active service to the close of the war. He was finally discharged from service under general order No. 83, of the war department, Washington, at Lexington, N.C., May 29, 1865
In addition to his common school education, hehad attended, in 1861-2, the Millerstown academy, and after his second term of enlistment had expired completed his studies in the academy at Markelville. During this time, while attending religious services at a point not far from Millerstown, Perry county, then under the pastoral care of Rev. T.M. Still, deceased, of the Church of God, he made a public profesion of religion. In 1866, without any further colllegiate or theological training, he entered the ministry of the Church of God, beginning his labors in Perry county. He was ordained in the fall of 1866, and the following spring took charge of his first appointment, the Plainfield circuit, west of carlisle. After his first charge he successively served circuits and stations as follows: Bainbridge and Maytown, Lebanon circuit, East York, Altoona, Chambersburg and Orrstown, Germantown Avenue in Philadelphia, Shippensburg, Harrisburg (Fourth Street) and Middletown. He took an active part in the organization of the Pennsylvania Chautauqua, at Mt. Gretna, and was a member of the executive committee. He was also a member of the Dauphin County Bible Society and held prominent positions in different orders, being chaplain of the grand lodge Royal Arch Masons of Pennsylvania, a member of Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Valley encampment and Grand Army post of Shippensburg; and past master of Big Spring Lodge of Masons at Newville, P.H.P. of No. 71, Royal arch chapter at Carlisle, P.E.C. of St. John's commandery at Carlisle.
A daughter, Mrs. Niess of Washington D.C., and stepdaughter, Mrs. Hamilton of Shippensburg, Paa., survive him. Funeral at Shippensburg Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock. The deceased was a brother-in-law of Mrs. A.F. Keim and was well known here.

The following notification of Rev. Carvell's death appeared in The Church Advocate on September 5, 1894. The Church Advocate is a publication of The Church of God.

Death of Elder J.M. Carvell, Ph.D.

At Shippensburg, Pa., last Saturday, Sep. 1st, Elder Jeremiah Mark Carvell, Ph.D., departed this life into the spirit world. He had a long and bitter conflict with disease, having been incapacitated for work for nearly eighteen months. Neither medicine nor surgery could avail, and by painful degrees his vital powers were undermined and the work of death effected. He was in the prime of life, having reached the age of fifty-one years and six months. He was a native of Snyder county, Pa., and secured his early common school education in Snyder and Perry counties, and later attended the academies at Millerstown and Markleysville. During the war he had twice enlisted; serving the last year under Sherman in his celebrated march through Georgia and the Carolinas. In this campaign he was severely wounder. He returned home and about a year later entered the ministry, beginning his labors in Perry county, where under the labors of Elder T.M. Still, deceased, he had been converted.

He received license in the Fall of 1866, and thereafter was continuously in the acitive work until the Spring of 1893, having successively served Plainfield, Bainbridge and Maytown, Lebanon Circuit, East York, Altoona, Chambersburg and Orrstown, Germantown Avenue in Philadelphia, Shippensburg, Fourth Street, Harrisburg and Middletown. During all these years he was a diligent student, as well as minister and pastor, completing his post-graduate course at Wooster University in 1887. He was a faithful and earnest preacher of the gospel, a persistent worker in all Church interests and an exemplary Christian in all life's varied relations. He was a man of finely developed aesthetic tastes, and a great lover of the beautiful in art, architecture, paintings, poetry and literature. He was reserved to a degree bordering on diffidence, winning his way slowly and by sheer force of merit to positions of influence and power. He always held the ground he gained. He manifested a deep interest in educational work, and was one of the incorporators of Findlay College and for nearly two terms a member of the Board of Trustees. We have lost a good and strong man, whose absence will be keenly felt. A beloved brother and minister has fallen. But, thank God, it is well with him, and the time is hastening when we shall meet again.

This next obituary is probably one of the most detailed obituaries I have ever read. It was taken from the Telegraph, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Monday, September 3, 1894

Death of Rev. J.M. Carvell; He passed Away at Shippensburg
He was a Soldier and Preacher - A Sketch of his life.

By the death of rev. Jeremiah Mark Carvell, Ph.D., which occurred at Shippensburg, at 5 o'clock Saturday evening, another distinguished citizen and minister of the gospel has been removed from our midst. He was a native of the State having been born in Snyder county, March 3, 1843, later lived with his parents near Thompsontown, Juniata county, across the line between Juniata and Perry. He spent his boyhood days in manual labor, attending the common schools of Snyder and Perry counties in the winder and acquiring the rudiments of an English education. He developed that robust physical constitution which later enabled him successfully to endure the hardships of military life and the severe and exhausting labors of a minister and pastor for nearly thirty years and to withstand the enervating inroads of a chronic and fatal disease, which for eighteen months has been undermining the citadel of life. He had not yet reached his majority when in 1861 the Civil War broke out. He enlisted in Harrisburg as a private, August 6, 1862, in Capt. A.B. Demaree's Company I, 133rd Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry. The company was recruited in Perry county. the Regiment to which it belonged was engaged in the second battle of Bull Run, Antietam, Fredricksburg and Chancellorsville, and was finally mustered out of service at the expiration of the term of enlistment at Harrisburg, August 20, 1863. After a lapse of a year he entered the army again enlisting at Carlisle, August 31, 1864, as a private in Company A, under Capt. John Boal, afterwards commanded by Capt. Wm. M. Potter, 9th Penna. Veteran cavalry, which after many battles and hardships was assigned to the right wing of General Sherman's Army, and marched steadily on their way with the great chieftan on his memorable campaign across Georgia to the sea. At the battle of Bear Creek and Griswoldville, Georgia, November 22, 1864, while acting as secret scout for General Kirkpatrick and leading a charge, Mr. Carvell was severely wounded, and was sent by way of Savannah to the hospital at Hilton Head, South Carolina. Here, under skillful nursing, he recovered sufficiently to join his company at Durham Station, to continue in active service to the close of the war. He was finally discharged from service under general order No. 83 of the War Department, Washington, at Lexington, N.C., May 29, 1865.

The great struggle for the preservation of the Union was over, and the war worn and battle scarred veterans returned to their homes to pursue the more peaceful vocation of life. A brave soldier, modest and retiring, he was the last to speak of his patriotic service to his country, so that very few of his friends ever learned from his lips how bravely and faithfully he served his country in the hours of greatest danger.

In addition to his common school education, he had attended in 1861-62, the Millerstown Academy, and after his second term of enlistment had expired, he completed his studies in the academy at Markleysville. During this time, while attending religious service at a point not far from Millerstown, Perry County, then under the pastoral care of Rev. T.M. Still, deceased, of the Church of God, he made a public profession of religion. In 1866, without any further collegiate or theological training, he entered the ministry of the Church of God, beginning his labor in Perry County. He was ordained in the fall of 1866, and the following spring took charge of his first appointment, the Plainfield circuit west of Carlisle. After his first charge he successively served circuits and stations as follows: Bainbridge and Maytown, Lebanon circuit, East York, Altoona, Chambersburg and Orrstown, Germantown Avenue in Philadelphia, Shippensburg, Harrisburg (Fourth Street) and Middletown.

He was an efficient, zealous and earnest minister of the gospel, of irreproachable character and unblemished reputation. Upon entering the ministry, Mr. Carvell discovered that his most serious deficiency was his partial training for his work. He at once became a student. Under private tutors he made commendable progress in scientific, philosophical and classical studies, taking up to some extent Latin, Greek and Hebrew. Later he began a post graduate course at Wooster University, Ohio, which he successfully completed in 1887, receiving his degree of Philosphy, having previously been honored with the degree of A.M. from Bates college, Lewiston, Maine. Of scholarly taste and habits, he gradually accumulated a library of valuable literary, theological, scientific, philosophical and classical works of a standard character second to few, if any, in the Church. He was a man of ideals in education, morals, aesthetics, and religion, which he was often too conscious of failing to realize. His abilities and singleness of purpose, his purity of character and power of intellect were fully recognized by his associates in the ministry, so that the Church repeatedly honored itself by promoting him to places of greater usefulness. He was for years a member of various boards and standing Committees of the East Pennsylvania Eldership. He had also been a delegate to the General Eldership of the Church a number of times and served on its Board of Publication and Board of Education. As a member of the last named Board he became one of the incorporators of Findlay College, Findlay, Ohio, on whose board of trustees he also later served for nearly two terms. He took an active part in organization of the Pennsylvania Chautauqua at Mt. Gretna, and was a member of the executive committee. He was also a member of the Dauphin County Bible Society and held prominent positions in different orders, being chaplain of the Grand Lodge Royal Arch Masons of Pennsylvania; a member of the I.O.O.F. and the Valley Encampment and the Grand Army Post of Shippensburg; past master of Big Spring Lodge of Masons, Newville; P.H.P. of No. 71 Royal Arch Chapter at Carlisle; P.E.C. of St. John's Commandery at Carlisle; all of which orders ministered to his wants during his past illness. Beginning life as a poor boy and largely dependent on his own energy and resources, there is much in the career of Dr. Carvell which is interesting, instructive and hopeful to every American youth who starts life with earnest and lofty intentions to win fame and character. But he was only an instrument and the Maker of the instrument in his providence played upon it, and with loving care and skill brought the jarring strings in to tune so that they delighted us with bursts of exquisite music. We recall the poet's vision:

"Behind the dim unknown
Standeth God within the shadow keeping watch above his own"

Three years ago, after a pastorate of six years with the Fourth Street Church of God, Dr. Carvell moved to Middletown, full of enthusiasm and buoyant not only with hope, but with confidence. No one anticipated that today his obituary would be published. But the symptons of disease soon betrayed by their persistent presence that he had been marked for death. Slowly his strong frame wasted away, and after eighteen months of indescribable suffering of body and greater anguish of mind, he has entered into the heavenly rest. He died in the full orbed hope of immortality. Of his character, as ready by those who knew him best, words of praise alone can be spoken. He was well rounded and symmetrical in mental and moral development. His training, education and environment made him rather more of a philospher than a theologian. Yet he happily united the concrete with the abstract, so that while he was noted for breadth of thought, he also developed strong powers for practical things. His preaching was always fresh, vigorous and thoughtful, adapted more to awaken the intellect than to enkindle the emotion. He was reserved and diffident, yet as occasion required, he manifested a high order of Christian fortitude. There were no contradictions in his moral or aesthetical character. He gave to others what he expected of them. If he inculcated liberality, he practiced it as well. If amibitious of success, he rejoiced also with those who achieved it. If sensitive to praise or blame, he was characterized ith magnanimous consideration for others. Actuated by a high ideal of life, he expected the same of his co-laborers. Free from the baser forms of sympathetic affections, he could not tolerate them in his associates. There was purity without ascetism, piety without mysticism, courage without rashness, churchliness without bigotry, and conscious progress without vanity. He gave many tokens of a noble modesty akin to that of the Baptist when he drew back into the shade befor the perfect light of Christ. He was wide in his sympaties and charitable in his dealings with others, and thos qualities which he loved and cultivated he was most ready to recognize in others. He always had the air of one who had a solemn work to do, and all his activities were characterized with wide-awake religious earnestness. His life suggested that the effect of grace received in the heart is love to other fellow men and a desire to promote their highest welfare. He was ever ready to yield a cheerful submission to the supremacy of an enlightened conscience. Those and many other qualities made fragrant with his friends and the hundreds who loved him as a pastor the name of Dr. J.M. Carvell. They enable them through their tears to say:
"Over the grave's low door a rose is blooming,
Over the vale of shadows shines a star."

A daughter, Mrs. Niess, of Washington, D.C., and a step-daughter, Mrs. Hamilton of Shippensburg, Penna., survive him.

The following obituary appeared in The News, Shippensburg, Pennsylvania on Friday morning, September 7, 1894. This obituary is over one column long!

Death of Rev. J.M. Carvell, Ph.D.

After many weary months of extreme suffering from disease of a cancerous nature, Rev. Jeremiah Mark Carvell breathed his last at the home of Mr. John M. Hamilton, of this place Saturday, Aug. 31, at 5:00 p.m. He was born in Snyder County, March 3d, 1843, and had not yet reached his majority when in 1861 the civil war broke out. He enlisted at Harrisburg as a private, August 6, 1862, in Capt. A.B. Demaree's Company I, 133d Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry. The company was recruited in Perry County. The regiment to which it belonged was engaged at the second battle of Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, and was finally mustered out of service, at the expiration of the term of enlistment, at Harrisburg, August 20th, 1863. After the lapse of a year he entered the army again, enlisting at Carlisle, August 31st, 1864, as a private in Company A, under Capt. John Boal, afterwards commanded by Capt. Wm. M. Potter, 9th Pennsylvania Veteran Cavalry, which after its many battles and hardships was assigned to the right wing of General Sherman's army, and marched steadily on their way with that great military chieftain on his memorable campaign across Georgia to the sea. At the battle of Bear Creek and Griswoldville, Ga., November 22, 1864, while acting as a secret scout for General Kirkpatrick and leading a charge, Mr. Carvell was severely wounded, and was sent by way of Savannah to the hospital at Hilton Head, S.C. Here under skillful nursing, he recovered sufficiently to join his company at Durham Station, to continue in active service to the close of the war. He was finally discharged from service under general order No. 83, of the War Department, Washington, at Lexington, N.C., May 29, 1865.

In addition to his common school education, he attended, in 1861-62, the Millerstown Academy, and after his second term of enlistment had expired completed his studies in the academy at Markleysville. During this time, while attending religious services at a point not far from Millerstown, Perry County, then under the pastoral care of Rev. T.M. Still, deceased, of the Church of God, he made a public profession of religion. In 1866, without any further collegiate or theological training, he entered the ministry of the Church of God, beginning his labors in Perry County. Upon entering the ministry Mr. Carvell discovered that his most serious deficiency was his partial training for the work. He at once became a student. Under private tutors he made commendable progress in scientific, philosophical and classical studies, taking up to some extent Latin, Greek and Hebrew. Later he began a post-graduate course at Wooster University, Ohio, which he successfully completed in 1887, receiving his degree of Doctor of Philosophy having previously been honored with the degree of A.M. from Bates College, Lewiston, Maine. Of scholarly tastes and habits, he gradually accumulated a library of valuable literary, theological, scientific, philosophical and classical works of a standard character second to few, if any, in the Church. He was a man of high ideas in education, morals, aesthetics and religion, which he was often but too conscious of failing to realize. His abilities and singleness of purpose, his purity of character and power of intellect were fully recognized by his associates in the ministry, so that the Church repeatedly honored itself by promoting him to places of greater usefulness. He was for years a member of the various boards and standing committees of the East Pennsylvania Eldership. He had also been a delegate to the General Eldership of the Church a number of times and served on its Board of Publication and Board of Education. As a member of the last-named board he became one of the incorporators of Findlay College, Findlay, Ohio, on whose board of trustees he also later served for nearly two terms. He took an active part in the organization of the Pennsylvania Chautauqua, at Mt. Gretna, and was a member of the Executive Committee. He was also a member of the Dauphin County Bible Society and held prominent positions in different orders, being Chaplain of the Grand Lodge Royal Arch Masons of Pennsylvania, a member of I.O.O.F. and the Valley Encampment and Grand Army Post of Shippensburg; past master of Big Spring Lodge of Masons at Newville, P.H.P. of No. 71 Royal Arch Chapter at Carlisle, P.E.C. of St. John's Commandery at Carlisle, all of which orders ministered to his wants during his long illness. Beginning life as a poor boy and largely dependent on his own energy and resources, there is much in the career of Dr. Carvell which is interesting, instructive and hopeful to every American youth who starts life with earnestness an lofty intentions.

The remains of this good man were taken to the Church of God where his funeral sermon was preached by one of the fathers of the Eldership, the Rev. Mr. Carlton Price, of Harrisburg, from the text "Be thou faithful unto deth and I will give thee a crown of life" - Rev. 2nd: 10th. Rev. D.S. Shoop, of Mechanicsburg, read a selection from 2 Cor. 5th chapter; Rev. Baum of the Lutheran Church of Middletown, made a touching prayer. Mr. George Sigler, followed Mr. Price in a short address dwelling upon the individuality and nobleness of purpose of the deceased brother this characteristic moulding him into the perfect man. Dr. Forney, editor of "The Church Advocate," took the foundation of his words from Job. All these distinguished men of the Church of God, like the "Three wise men of the East" met for a single purpose, to pay homage to one who had been a chosen vessel. Mr. Getz the present pastor of the church, rose to endorse all that had been said. He visited the good brother frequently and while he was shut off from the world, he was shut in with his God. The choir rendered choice selections. As the funeral procession entered, Miss Edith Getz, daughter of the pastor, played softly that beautiful air, "Nearer my God to Thee." the floral tributes were of the most exquisite workmanship, and all were fitting emblems of a beautiful life.

Dr. Carvell was one of those Christians who enjoyed an enlarged faith, courage, devotion, and whose spiritual strength came as daily manna. His trust was in God through the agency of the Holy Spirit to accomplish God's great work, and his face would become radiant with holy enthusiasm when endeavoring to lay before his hearers the wonderful love of God. It was our privilege on one occasion while he was pastor of this church to hear him urge upon the christian people to hold frequent communion with those out of the kingdom for the salvation of souls. He said the work was electric when ones self was charged with the fullness of Christ; our spirits were in touch and sent a thrill through the frame of those with whom we hold righteous intercourse. How beautifully this truth blends with the records of the Holy writ: "Phillip saith unto Nathaniel come and see." Dr. Carvell preached the truth as he understood it in all of its purity with a soul that was afire with God. His expressions were clothed in a chaste diction and his thoughts gave vent through a studied vocabulary that was delightful for its purity and simplicity.

Dr. was a student of a superior order. He realized in this generation the demand for excellence in every department of work, and he aimed to that end, and when his disease was such that he had no hope, he gave up with reluctance just in the prime of a mentally rich manhood. He felt he was but in the horizon of his work, and that coveted zenith could never be his, but we are assured the unfinished work of so good a man will be victorious in celestial glory, and with enlarged facilities the Saviour will add greater embellishments and finish the work begun in the flesh. The memory of this fragrant life will be one of unfading sweetness, bound not only to his own church but linked to this community at large. He was deservedly held in esteem as a Christian gentleman, and minister of the gospel of Christ. This beautiful example of a Godly man should awaken and develop new energy in the hearts of all who knew him. Individual obligation, although felt and lived quietly becomes eloquent at the end, and leaves imperishable impression. He believed true discipleship was gained by stepping into the foot prints of his Master as shepherd, friend and brother; with so holy a kinship he realized the source of his spiritual strength to keep him and ward off undue criticism from the path way of his ministerial life. Dr. Carvell's whole course of action was commendable in the highest degree, he being a gentleman possessing those qualities of mind and heart that go to make the perfect man, and the communities in which he ministered should return thanks to the Lord for his fathful services, having been the human istrument in God's hands of bringing into the kingdom many precious souls.

Dr. Carvell was married early in life to Mary Zeigler, of Newport Perry County. She died about 10 years ago during his partorate in Philadelphia. One daughter survives him, Mrs. Neiss, (sic) of Washington D.C. His stepdaughter Mrs. John Hamilton received him into her home when his health failed him, and it is due Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton that no natural son and daughter could have bestowed more fillial affections and untireing ministrations than they, who have Christ's message "Even as ye have done it unto the least of one of these my brethren ye have done it unto me," a heritage that is better than patrimony. The Ministrerial Association of Shippensburg were present in a body. The funeral took place Tuesday morning at ten o'clock, and was largely attended by the citizens of the town as well as those from a distance. The remains were interrred in Spring Hill Cemetery.

I have found still another obituary for my great-great-grandfather. He seems to have been a well-respected man of God. This appears to have been in some sort of Church Publication, presumably for The Church of God. No name of the publication appears, nor does the date. It is merely a yellowed, column.

CARVELL.--At Shippensburg, Pa., Sept. 1, 1894, Elder Jeremiah Mark Carvell, Ph.D., aged 51 years and 6 months.
This faithful servant of God, after eighteen months of awful suffering, left the land of pain and death for the land of life and rest. As pastor of the church here it was my lot to witness this strong, manly and dearly beloved minister of the gospel gradually weaken, fade and die. No one knows what our dear brother suffered, for he did not murmur or complain; on the contrary, during all these months in which he was in the clutches of the destroyer he was always cheerful, calm and hopeful. God sustained him in his great trial. yea, we may say, these months of suffering were months spent with God. The Bible was his constant companion, and as long as he had the strength to hold the Scripture in his hands he read the word of God. Our departed brother was blessed with an army of friends who sympathized with him in his afflictions and sought in every way to relieve his sufferings. And his kindred! Oh! how good God was to his servant to give him such a plesant place to lay his head and breathe out his life so sweetly! How good God was to his anointed to give him such kind and tender hands to minister to him in the closing scenes of life! His death was calm and peaceful, one by one the cords that bonound him to the earth were loosened, and then at last God lifted him upward into the rest and glory of heaven. Wave the palm, oh, brother beloved, for the victory is yours. Strike your harp of gold, for you are with the Lord and in the enjoyment of everlasting peace and rest. Appropriate funeral services were held on Tuesday, Sept. 4th, in the Bethel of the Church of God at Shippensburg. The sermon was preched by Elder C. Price. Text - Rev. ii., 10. Elders Geo. Sigler, D.D., C.H. Forney, D.D., and the writer followed with remarks. All paid eloquent and fitting tributes to the high character, ability and zeal of our departed friend and brother. The ministers of the Eldership present, in addition to the speakers, were Elders J.W. Deshong, J. Haifleigh, A.H. Long, C.I. Brown, C.I. Behney, J.T. Fleegal, Wm. Rice, D.S. Shoop, C.D. Rishel, J.A. Staub, F.W. McGuire, O.J. Farling, W.J. Schaner and E.B. Price. The Ministerial Association of Middletown, Dauphin Co., Pa., of which brother Carvell was a member, and where he ended his labors, were present in a body. Its representative, Rev. Stephen H. Evans, of the M.E. Church, read the following resolutions:
WHEREAS, The Rev. J.M. Carvell, Ph D., a pastor in the Church of God, and a member of the Ministerial Association of Middletown, Pa., after a prolonged illness has been called by his Father to exchange the Cross of suffering for the Crown of glory,
RESOLVED, That we, his comrades in the pastoral office in the field of his last earthly service, deplore his departure as a personal sorrow and a loss, not only to his own denomination, but to the Church at large.
RESOLVEDThat we bear glad testimony to his catholicity of spirit, to his broad culture, to the high spiritual tone of his life, to the genial, fraternal manliness of the man, that made him larger than any pulpit he happened to stand in, and caused his personality, sanctified to his holy service, to overflow in helpfulness upon the communities in which he ministered.
RESOLVED, That while we extend our tenderest sympathy to those of his own house who now weep the tears of stricken love, we point with joy to the triumph of this loved saint of God, who has gone up from them through great tribulations, and having washed his robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb, has left behind him to to them forever the priceless legacy of such a life, of such an ending.
RESOLVED, That the Ministerial Association further attest our affection for our departed friend and brother by attending his funeral in a body.
John H. Groff,
Presbyterian Church
Stephen H. Evans,
M.E. Church.
F.W. Staley,
St. Peter's Lutheran Church
J.G. Smoker,
U.B. Church
C.I. Behney,
Church of God
"May his rest be all the sweeter now that he has laid his burden down."
G.W. Getz

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