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LINCOLN COUNTY LANDMARKS


City Hall
Lincoln's City Hall, which is still in use today, was built in 1913-14. In 1981, it suffered a serious fire but was remodeled.

Hundertmark's Store
George Hundertmark ran a mercantile store in Lincoln for many years.

Chicago Lumber Company
One of Lincoln's longest-running businesses, this lumber yard was on the corner where Crispin's Drug Store is now located. It burned in a fire in 1949. In front is James D. Brockett, who was manager of the yard for many years, and his daughter, Haddie Brockett, my grandmother.

Windsor Hotel
The Windsor Hotel was the main hotel in Lincoln for many years. Traveling salesmen and bachelor businessmen called it home during its heyday at the turn of the century. The hotel, which closed in the 1930s, was at what is now the corner of Lincoln Avenue and Highway 14.

Windsor Hotel and Main Street
This card from around 1910 shows the Windsor Hotel and part of Main Street (Lincoln Avenue) looking west. The hotel was owned for many years by Harlan and Sarah E. Allen.

Bicyclists at the Windsor Hotel
This photo was taken in front of the old Windsor Hotel during the height of the bicycle craze of the 1890s.

Water Tower
The water tower used to be located east of the courthouse on Lincoln Avenue. This card is from 1910.

Herman's Greenhouse
The Herman greenhouse was located near the train depot and did quite a business at the turn of the century.

Rees Mill
The Lincoln mill was begun by Elias Rees in 1870 and operated for more than 70 years before it burned to the ground on New Year's Day 1942. Among the mill's products was Old Abe Flour.

Dam Across the Saline River
The postmark on this card is hard to read; I believe it is from the 1910-1920 era. The writer of the postcard wanted to point out to the recipient, Alta Noble Rees, that the boat in the background belonged to the father of Alta's husband, John Rees. The Rees family operated a mill at Lincoln for years and for a time they also had a flat-bottomed boat called "The Sunflower." That may well be the boat moored on the river above the dam.

Cole Sanitarium
The Cole Sanitarium was founded by Dr. Sarah Cole and her sister, Hannah Cole. In later years the house was fitted with apartments and is still standing in Lincoln, on the south side of the grade school.

Dam Across the Saline River
The postmark on this card is hard to read; I believe it is from the 1910-1920 era. The writer of the postcard wanted to point out to the recipient, Alta Noble Rees, that the boat in the background belonged to the father of Alta's husband, John Rees. The Rees family operated a mill at Lincoln for years and for a time they also had a flat-bottomed boat called "The Sunflower." That may well be the boat moored on the river above the dam.

Kansas Historical Marker
Located on Highway 18 about a mile east of Lincoln, the marker was originally erected in the 1930s to memorialize the Indian raids of 1864 and 1969. Recently, the marker was replaced to give the wording a more politically correct tone. This is the new marker.

Post Rock Motel and Restaurant
Not as historical as some of the other sites in Lincoln, perhaps, but as memorable for some of us. The motel is still there but the restaurant has been torn down and is now a car wash, and the filling station on the right has been long replaced by a conveniece store.

G.M. Weeks' Home?
This is a postcard featuring a house and a family on the porch. It does not say "Lincoln" on it, but on the back is written "Is this G.M. Weeks' at home at Lincoln, Kan." They later lived at Miami, Fla." According to Mr. Weeks' obituary, he had left Lincoln about 30 years before his death in 1933. He was city engineer and supervised the construction of the first water works system and power plant in Lincoln. Mrs. Weeks died in Lake Worth, Fla., in 1936.