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from Worthington Globe
 January, 1911

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Thursday, January 5, 1911

County Attorney E.J. Jones was transacting business at Rushmore the first of the week.

Mrs. Elof Swanson, and daughter, Ruth, of St. Paul, visited with the Sterling and Wickman families the past week.

F.R. Duxbury, of St. Paul, was the guest of his brother, L.R. Duxbury, and family the latter part of last week.

John Flynn arrived in the city the latter part of last week from Vail, Ore., for a visit with friends and relatives.

Rev. G.A. Cahoon went to Beaver Creek, Saturday, where he occupied the pulpit in the Methodist church on Sunday.

E.E. Beckley arrived in the city from Blue Earth Friday afternoon for a visit with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.L. Beckley.

Attorney Manly P. Thornton returned Saturday afternoon from Mankato and Heron Lake, where he had been on business.

Miss Helen Schaeffer, of Adrian, visited in the city Monday while on her way to St. Paul, where she is taking special violin instruction.

Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Gardner, of Brewster, visited in the city Saturday last while on their way to Paullina, Iowa, where they spent New Years with relatives.

J.S. Frink went to Luverne Saturday afternoon to join his wife, who was visiting with relatives there, and incidentally to eat turkey with his brother-in-law, Sam Foight, and family.

Charles Stanton, who recently returned from Portland, Oregon, and who has been visiting with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. Stanton, departed on Monday r the twin cities, where he will remain for some time. While in Portland Charles was working at the tinner's trade, and was assisting in doing the copper work on the upper stories of the large skyscrapers.

Peter Langseth left Tuesday afternoon for Mankato, where he will enter the Mankato Commercial College.

Mrs. Charles Larson arrived in the city Tuesday from Luverne for a visit with Mr. and Mrs. A.O. Wensberg.

J.W. Boyington, of Nunda, S.D., arrived in the city the first of the week for a visit at the home of Wm. Lemm.

Mrs. Harry Shad, of Heron Lake, was visiting in the city Tuesday on her way home from Wilmont, where she had been visiting with relatives.

Mrs. M.O. Lemm, of Little Rock, Iowa, returned to her home Tuesday afternoon, after having spent a few days with her son and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Lemm.

Rev. and Mrs. Alvord went to Lake Wilson, Tuesday or, to assist in a series of meetings at the Baptist church. Mrs. Alvord will have charge of the music.

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Swensen, who have been the guests of L.A. Wannamaker and family, near town, returned to their home in Lake Crystal, Tuesday morning.

Miss Ethel Bloom returned to Mankato Monday, where she is attending the Normal school, after having spent the holidays with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Bloom. Miss Bloom was in the dining car at the time No. 4 was wrecked at Butterfield and it was the only car that did not leave the track.

Stanley Moore, proprietor of the Hotel Worthington, was arrested on a warrant sworn out by G.J. Robel, State Food Inspector, the latter part of last week, charging him with serving butterine without having the proper signs posted in the dining room. He was taken before Judge Dow, where he pleaded guilty and was fined $60 and costs, amounting in all to $67.22.

Mrs. August Swanson, spent the holidays in the cities with the Sterling families.

Attorney John A. Cashel was in Spirit Lake, Iowa, the first of the week on legal business.

J.J. Kies, the real estate agent, went to Grundy Center, Iowa, the first of the week on business.

Ernest Sterling spent several days between the holidays visiting with relatives in the twin cities.

During the year of 1910 there were issued in Nobles county 132 marriage licenses and 6 divorces.

Miss Alice Eggleston visited her sister, Mrs. Ralph Long, in Adrian the latter part of last week and the first of this.

Miss Emma Ferguson went to Brewster the first of the week for a few days' visit with her sister, Mrs. P.J. Silver.

Matt Fish went to Rushmore, Tuesday morning, to look after the barber shop, while the proprietor is away on a vacation.

T. Jacobson, of Jewell Junction, Ia., arrived in the city again the latter part of last week to look after his farming interests.

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Cashel returned Monday morning from Winona, where they had been spending a few days with relatives.

Miss Ada Dosen, of St. Paul, arrived in the city, the latter part of last week for a visit with her friend, Miss Florence McIntosh.

Fred L. Humiston, the former Clerk of Court, left Tuesday evening, for San Beninto, Texas, where he will look after his plantation.

Gus Swanberg, of the Hub Mercantile Co., was again elected chairman of the Board of County Commissioners at their session on Tuesday.

Mrs. J.E. Norris and family departed Tuesday afternoon for San Benito, Tex., to join her husband who has charge of the Humiston-Brown plantation.

Carl Smith, who has been the guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E.K. Smith, returned to his home in Mission Hill, S.D., the latter part of last week.

Mrs. L.R. Gholz, who has been ill at the Humiston Hospital with typhoid fever, has so far recovered that she was able to be removed to her home the past week.

Miss Effie Stillwell, of Spirit Lake, Iowa, visited with her uncle, Matt Fish and family, Monday, while on her way to Mankato, where she is attending the Normal school.

Father Sherman was visiting with relatives and friends at his old home in Winona this week.

Mr. and Mrs. E.C. Pannell went to Lake Park, Ia., for a visit with relatives and friends Wednesday.

Mr. and Mrs. J.H. James entertained a number of friends at a seven o'clock dinner last Saturday.

Rueben Oakes will leave tomorrow for Welcome, where he is superintendent of the public schools.

Mr. and Mrs. Guy E. Smith, of Browns Valley, Minn., are visiting at the home of J.A. Smith. They came to attend his sister's wedding.

Miss Margaret Tilton, who has been employed in the Steffen's restaurant, has resigned her position and gone to Wilmont.

Mrs. Henry Fistman, residing near Wilmont, was taken to Rochester, Minn., Wednesday for an operation. She was accompanied by Dr. Sullivan, of Adrian.

George Lutz, who was formerly employed by the Western Implement Co., has gone to Wisconsin for a visit, after which he will go on the road for the Sharples Cream Separator Company.

Captain S.S. Smith, Corporal A.R. Schmid and Private Joe Hildyard, of Company F., received the medals they won at Camp Perry, the past week. They are made of bronze and are beauties.

Geo. Allen, of Aberdeen, S.D., was visiting in the city, the guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E.G. Allen, the latter part of last week. He went from here to Fort Dodge, Ia., for a visit with relatives.

Miss Ella Hawkinson, an employee at the depot lunch counter, was taken suddenly ill Monday and had to be taken to the Humiston hospital, where she is now recovering from a slight attack of pneumonia.

Mrs. Sarah Murray, of Duluth, Minn., is visiting with her brother, J.A. Smith. She came to be present at the King-Smith wedding. Those from Rushmore the wedding were Mary Ames, Mr. and Mrs. W.C. Renshaw and son, Solon.

L.E. Giles, of the Globe's force, spent Sunday at his home in Sibley.

R.A. Grout, of Luverne, was calling on old friends in the city Tuesday.

The condition of Joe Lowe, who has been ill for the past three weeks with erysipelas, remains about the same.

Clerk of Court Martin issued a marriage license this week to Geo. B. Hall and Nellie B. Westrip, both of Nobles county.

Rev. McMartin, of Round Lake, was visiting in the city the latter part of last week. We acknowledge a pleasant call.

Messrs. Clem Hanson and Leo Kittler, of Lismore, were calling on old friends in the city the first of the week.

Ben Hildyard came home Saturday, from Des Moines, where he has just completed a course in the Highland Park College.

The Misses Emma Grelson, Florence McIntosh and Berniece Weidman visited in Sibley between trains last Saturday.

Earl Barklew is taking a vacation from his duties as brakeman on the Omaha. He will leave in a short time for a visit with relatives and friends in Illinois.

John Larson, who has been visiting with relatives in the city, will go to Storden tomorrow for a visit, after which he will return to college at St. Peter.

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Grelson, of Minneapolis, who have been visiting with relatives and friends in the city, returned to their home in Minneapolis Monday.

C. Lindstrom, who has been visiting with relatives and friends in Worthington and vicinity during the holiday vacation, left today for Chicago, where he is attending a medical college.

Joe Hildyard returned to Mankato Tuesday, where he is attending the Mankato Commercial College, after having visited with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. G.B. Hildyard.

Miss Lottie Bedient went to Bigelow last Friday for a short visit with friends.

Ole C. Olson was transacting business at Spirit Lake, Iowa, the latter part of last week.

E.A. Tripp, of Round Lake, came up Wednesday night for a visit with his brother, Harry.

John Flynn, who has been visiting in the city, went to Adrian, Wednesday afternoon on business.

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Curtis are the happy parents of a baby girl, which came to their home on December 15.

Ray Wolven, who recently underwent an operation at the Humiston hospital for appendicitis, is improving nicely.

Mrs. S.L. Terry, of Salt Lake, Utah, is visiting over the holidays with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. P.G. Anderson.

Mr. and Mrs. Harm Rust, of Reading, are rejoicing over the arrival of a baby girl at their home on New Years day.

L.M. Thompson, the real estate man, was transacting business and visiting with old friends in Round Lake Wednesday.

The Misses Ellen Olson and Alma Larson left Wednesday for Fergus Falls, Minn., where they will visit with relatives.

G.W. Anderson and Mrs. Lillian B. Dunning, of Spencer, Iowa, were in the city today, transacting business before the Probate court.

Chris. Hanson, the artist who presides over the first chair in Anthony's tonsorial parlors, visited in Sioux Falls New Years, the guest of his brother, C.J.

Messrs. Will DeVaney and John Frink went to Luverne Tuesday afternoon and in the evening took the Black Cross Degree in the Commandry.

Mrs. Mary Madden, who has been visiting with relatives and friends in the city and vicinity for the past two weeks, returned to her home in Tracy, Minn, Wednesday.

Miss Mildred Lewis, of Wilmont, visited in the city with friends the first of the week while on her way from her home in Wilmont to Albert Lea, where she is attending school.

Mr. and Mrs. George Dodge, of Melvin, Iowa, and Mr. and Mrs. J.N. Dodge, of Round Lake,and Dr. Dodge, of St. Paul, were guests at the Harry S. Hobson home the first of the week.

M.A. Berkhimer, of Dakota City, Iowa, was visiting in the city Wednesday on his way home from Wilmont, where he had been visiting with relatives. We acknowledge a pleasant call.

Mrs. Cecelia Pearson, residing two miles west of Org, died very suddenly on Tuesday night, Jan. 3. Deputy Coroner Dolan was called to view the remains and decided that pneumonia was the cause of death. The deceased was born in Sweden Aug. 8, 1833.

Mrs. Nancy Croxsen died at her home in Clary addition in the city, on Saturday, December 31st, 1910, of pneumonia, aged 83 years, 9 months and 16 days. The deceased was born in Ireland. She leaves two children, John and Hanuah [Hannah?], of this city to mourn her loss.

J.B. Green died suddenly at his home in this city this morning before a physician was able to reach his bedside. As he had had no doctor form some time, Coroner Williams was notified to come and view the remains. A further obituary will be found in next week's Globe.

NEWS OF YESTERDAY

Items of Interest Clipped from the Files of the Advance Over Thirty Years Ago

January 1, 1874.

We regret to learn that J.J. Hansberger, brother to J. Hansberger, of this place, is lying at the point of death at his home in Ohio. Mr. Hansberger expected to become a member of the colony in the spring, and to make his future home among us.

December 28, 1876.

R.L. Erskine, of Indian Lake, butchered some hogs a few days ago, one of them weighed over 480 and another 300.

O.D. Bryan, of Grand Prairie, dropped in on Tuesday evening and left us some script. Mr. Bryan says that nearly all the settlers in that part of the country have steadily improved in circumstances since settling in that beautiful township, and this notwithstanding the grasshoppers.

We acknowledge a very pleasant call from M. Birkett and M.J. Bryan, of Grand Prairie, both of whom left us some specimens of greenbacks raised in that fertile township. We have a list there of about 20 good subscribers as ever took a newspaper and they all seem to like the Advance.

O. Langseth, of Indian Lake, bought a new cutter the other day, ___ our friend, A. Schultz, all the work being done at the shop of Mr. Schultz. The painting was done __ Mr. Grundstein. Mr. Schultz is now prepared to turn out cutters in good style and we adivse our friends to give him a trial.

Thursday, January 12, 1911

Obituary

The deceased, J.B. Green, was born near Scranton, Parents. Dec. 2, 1828, and died in Worthington, Minn., Jan. 5, 1911, aged 82 years, 1 month and 3 days. He was one of a family of eight children, five of whom are still living.

In 1850 Mr. Green was united in marriage to Miss Julia Anne LaFeer, who died Jan. 8, 1891, thus preceding her husband 20 years lacking three days. In 1857 they moved to Buffalo county, Wisconsin, and in 1879 to Worthington where for the past 32 years he has lived as one of our most respected citizens.

In 1864 he enlisted in Co. G, 25th Wis. Vol. He was in the march with Sherman to the Sea, and for 54 days was cut off with all communication from the North. He was mustered out of service at the close of the war after the grand review at Washington, D.C.

Mr. Green was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, join ---missing text--- of Worthington Lodge No. 219, which organization at his request had charge of the funeral service.

Before coming to Minnesota he united with the M.E. church, but after settling in this city, he united with what is now the Reading Presbyterian church and lived a life consistant with that belief.

Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Green, seven of whom are still living. Two, Charlie and Mamie, died in childhood, and Mrs. Minerva Porter Aug. 8, 1902. The surviving children are as follows: Mrs. Violia Schranger of Minnong, Wis.; Frank and John, Mrs. Emma Leslie and Mrs. Nettie Fellows, of this city; Garic of Seattle, Wash.; John Green of Reading. These with many friends among the Odd Fellows and G.A.R. and old neighbors sincerely mourn the death of a good father, a loyal brother, a brave comrade and an upright citizen.

The funeral was held Monday afternoon in the Presbyterian church conducted by Dr. L.L. Sowles and the interment was made in the Worthington cemetery.

--------------------------

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Bud Thompson, on Friday, January 6, 1911, a baby girl.

Miss Edith Schanek left Saturday for Westbrook, where she is teaching school.

County Attorney E.J. Jones went to Adrian Saturday afternoon for a visit with his parents.

F.W. Johnson, the automobile man of Fulda, was in the city the latter part of last week.

Julius Palm was transacting business at Brewster a couple of days the latter part of last week.

Mrs. Anna Davis returned Tuesday afternoon from Adrian, where she had been visiting with relatives.

Mrs. E.L. Cary and son, of Wilmont, were visiting in the city with friends the latter part of last week.

Messrs Roy Sowles and Ed Rosauer, of Lismore, were visiting in Worthington the latter part of last week.

Henry Hennings went to Mankato Tuesday morning and took his little baby there for medical treatment.

J.L. Mangelson and E.A. Tripp, of Round Lake, were in the city Monday attending the funeral of J.B. Green.

Mrs. Roy Newman came down from St. James the latter part of last week for a visit with relatives and friends.

M.L. Holbrook, proprietor of the Ideal Cleaning Parlors, made a trip to Sioux City the latter part of last week on business.

Ole Landberg left the latter part of last week for Minneapolis, where he will spend a week visiting and [taking] in the sights.

The Misses Bessie Loveless, Iona Barklew and Bessie Anderson went to Sibley last Friday evening to take in a dance.

William Stoutemeyer went to St. James Tuesday morning on business connected with filling the railroad company's ice houses.

Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Poole and Mrs. Ida Milton left Monday for Pipestone, on business connected with the Yeomen lodge.

Garrick Green arrived in the city Monday afternoon to attend the funeral of his father, J.B. Green, who died here last Thursday.

Dave Fauskee went to Bigelow Monday to do some steam fitting in the school house. Dave belongs to Frink's force of plumbers.

Miss Irma Theile, of Emmettsburg, Iowa, attended the dance in this city last Thursday evening and visited with friends on Saturday.

John Egleston is taking a few days vacation from his duties as fireman on the Omaha and on Tuesday went to Tracy, Minn., for a few days visit.

Jack Arkell, one of Carrier's force of tonsorial artists, left Monday for Iona, where he will visit with his parents and other relatives and friends.

Miss Gertrude Hughes, who has been visiting with her mother in this city, returned to Le Sueur Monday afternoon to resume her studies in the high school.

Herman Moeller, of Lake Park, Iowa, was transacting business in Worthington Tuesday.

Mr. and Mrs. John Duel mourn the loss of an infant child on Monday morning, January 9.

M.L. Holbrook went to Brewster Tuesday morning on business connected with his Ideal Cleaning Parlors.

Mr. and Mrs. E.A. Tripp and daughter, Grace, of Round Lake, were the guests of Harry R. Tripp and family Tuesday.

Miss Mary Maxon, of Faribault, Minn., returned to her home Wednesday morning after having visited with friends and relatives in Worthington and vicinity.

Ralph Anderson arrived in the city Friday last from Drinkwater, Canada, where he has been visiting for the past two months with his sister, Mrs. Charles Pannell.

A.J. Hansberger, of Ramage, Minn., returned to his home the latter part of last week, after having visited with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Hansberger, in this city.

F.C. Hand, of Hatfield, Minn., arrived in the city Saturday for a visit with his wife's parents, Mr. and Mrs. I.N. Wilson. Mrs. Hand has been visiting here for a couple of weeks.

Miss Emma Ferguson, who has been spending the holiday vacation with her mother, Mrs. William Ferguson, departed on Saturday for Tracy, Minn., to resume her duties in the public schools.

Mr. and Mrs. O.J. Seeley mourn the loss of a little daughter, who died on January 6th. The little one came to their home on December 4. The remains were taken to Illinois for burial.

Judge Cory performed the ceremony that made Charles Willhauser and Bertha Theide, of Round Lake, man and wife and on the ninth performed a like service for John Johnson and Jennie Stryker, of the same place.

Clerk of Court Martin has issued marriage licenses to the following persons during the past week: Charles Willhauser and Bertha Theide, John Johnson and Jennie Stryker, and Frank W. Loosbrock and Anna Merfele.

William Doolittle, the veteran engineer who has handled the throttle so long on the Sioux Falls branch, has taken a vacation from his duties until the first of May. He left Monday, accompanied by his wife for California, where they will spend the winter. "Billy" is the oldest engineer in service on the Omaha.

John H. Staubus went to Round Lake Tuesday to look after business.

Miss Susie Dingwald left Tuesday afternoon for Walt Hill, Neb., where she will remain for some time.

W.L. Pigman, of Brewster, was transacting business in the city Wednesday and made the Globe office a call.

Misses Clara Hack, of Bigelow, and Ella Barnum, of Haywarden, Iowa, are now employed in the Steffens restaurant.

Miss Maude Kibbey, of Windom, is now operating the linotype in the Globe office. Leo Giles, the former operator has returned to his home in Sibley.

Mrs. Morris and son, Chester, who have been the guests of E.C. Pannell and family returned to their home in Revere, Minn., Tuesday morning.

Frank Sanford, formerly of this city, but now of Seattle, Wash., is the proud father of a baby boy, which was born on Nov. 28, 1910, is the news that is conveyed to us by his father, O. Sanford. Mr. Sanford says that all the family are well and that it is an impossibility to get along without the Globe.

Fred Sanderson went to Butterfield the first of the week, where he will visit with relatives.

Sam Stewart, who has been visiting with old friends in the city for several days, returned to his home in Boise, Idaho, Wednesday, afternoon. He was accompanied by John Humiston, who will spend a few weeks in the west.

Mrs. Archie Armstrong and daughter, Mildred, who have been making their home in Washington, D.C., arrived in the city the latter part of last week for a visit with her parents, Judge and Mrs. George W. Wilson. Mrs. Armstrong was on her way to the western coast to visit with a sister and expects to make her home in that country.

A. Sullwold, the Chiropractor, who was on trial at Spirit Lake, Iowa, last week easily won the case, it being taken from the jury on the grounds that there was no evidence to prove that he had practiced medicine without a license. Thomas Morris, Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin, and H. Nary, of Spirit Lake, were attorneys for the defense.

Drink water and get typhoid fever. Drink milk and get tuberculosis. Drink whiskey and get the jim-jams. Drink soup and get fat. Eat meat and encourage cancer, apoplexy and appendicitis. Eat oysters and absorb typhoid gastric poison germs. Eat vegetables and give the system Asiatic thin-blooded weakness. Eat dessert and die with paresis or some thing else. Smoke cigarets and die too soon. Drink coffee and fall into insomnia and nervous prostration. Drink tea and get weak heart. Drink wine and so get gout. Blame it all, if you want to keep well, quit eating and drinking, smoking and loving, and before breathing or touching anything see that the air and everything is perfectly sterilized. Some scientific cranks or madmen think every man should so live, while all modern science is nonsense. There is a scientific moderation in living that almost surely insures long life, no matter what the different kinds of cranks say. --New York Press.

John Carlson, of Heron Lake, was in the city this week looking after some fancy hogs.

W.O. Collins, of LeMars, Iowa, was transacting business in Worthington the first of the week.

Ole C. Olson is again in charge of the depot lunch counter nights, having taken charge Monday.

Miss Gaumnitz, of St. Paul, arrived in the city this week and will take up her duties in the Worthington public schools. Miss Gaumnitz is the teacher for the domestic science and agricultural botany class, which has recently been established in our schools.

Ned Jones, cashier of the Worthington State Bank, was transacting business in Wilmont today.

Charles Rielly, of Reading, was in town today shaking hands with old friends and transacting business.

Messrs. Peckerin and Herman Sol, of Leota township, were transacting business and calling on old friends in Worthington today.

Thursday, January 19, 1911

ISSUE MISSING

Thursday, January 26, 1911

Obituary.

Samuel Allen, one of the best known and most highly respected pioneers of Nobles county, died at his home in this city on Thursday morning, January 19, 1911, after an illness of a few months.

Mr. Allen was born in Worcester, New York, Oct. 30, 1832, the son of Justin and Margaret (Russ) Allen, natives of New York, and one of the old families of the state. In the place of his nativity mr Allen learned the carpenter trade. In 1856 he moved to Ripon, Wis., where he worked at his trade for twenty years.

In the spring of 1866 he came to Worthington where he has since resided and has been identified with the building of the principal residences and business blocks of the city. Among others he built the first brick block, Masonic Temple, the city hall, Carnegie Library, Worthington National Bank building, Peterson & Stitser block, the Morland and Lewis block, German Evangelical church, Wilson store building and the Chaney & McKay store building. Mr. Allen was one of those men who could never be idle and up until a short time before his illness worked at his trade.

He built the Carnegie library in his seventy-fourth year and the city hall in his seventy-sixth, and completed the remodeling of the Catholic church about two months before his death.

He was a man of temperate habits and was always a strong advocate of the temperance cause.

Mr. Allen was married at Ripon, Wisconsin, to Mary E. Clifford. To this union was born eight children, seven of whom are now living, and were in attendance at the funeral -- Romaett, now Mrs. C.H. Saulpaugh of Mankato; Ina Belle, Mrs. W.W. Loveless of this city; Josephine, mrs Stanley Moore of this city; Myron Reed, an electrician at Watertown, S. Dak.; Harry E. of Minneapolis and Carrie Ivanette of this city.

The funeral services were held in this city on Saturday afternoon conducted by Rev. G.A. Cahoon, and the remains laid to rest in the Worthington cemetery.

Thus it goes, the Globe has been called upon to chronicle the deaths of several of the early history makers of Nobles county, the past year, those who suffered all the early privations and tribulations of the frontier days, and we wonder will the rising generation do as much toward the upbuilding of the county as those sturdy pioneers who fought almost against hope to make the country what it is today.

-------------------------------------

Joe Nazarenus commenced his duties as fireman on the Omaha this week.

Henry Dibble went to Wilmont on business Monday, returning the same day.

Mrs. J.K. Baker and son were the guests of Brewster relatives and friends a couple of days the first of the week.

C.H. Kunze departed Tuesday afternoon for Preston, Iowa, where he will spend a couple of weeks with relatives.

Mrs. Frank R. Coughran returned from Sioux Falls Tuesday afternoon, where she had been visiting with relatives.

Arthur Meade, of Windom, was visiting in the city the latter part of last week, the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lewis.

The Misses Lulu and Agnes Lamb and Margaret Roll, of Adrian, friends Saturday last.

Mrs. Sutherland, a former resident of Worthington, died at her home in Heron Lake the latter part of last week.

B.T. Shunway, residing three miles west of town, left Tuesday morning for Woodstock, Minn., where he will be a couple of days on business.

Rev. D.D. Day, of Lake Benton, occupied the pulpit in the Baptist church on Sunday last. He is the father of Mrs. I.D. Alvord.

The Misses Anna Gerdes and Pauline Lidtke, of Brewster, returned to their home Monday after having visited at the home of G.H. Doeden.

Mrs. Maggie Thurston, a former resident of Worthington, but now of Estherville, has been spending a month with relatives in Beaver Creek.

W.M. Hoffman, of Pipestone, was in Worthington over Monday night, while on his way to Rushmore to attend the funeral of W.F. Breckon, who died on Monday morning.

Mr. and Mrs. A.C. Todd, of Beaver Creek, Minn., are the proud [some text missing here] to them the latter part of last week. Mr. and Mrs. Todd were former residents of this town.

Raymond Bahne, of Sibley, Iowa, was a pleasant caller at the Globe office a few hours Tuesday.

Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Littell are the proud parents of a baby boy, which was born to them on January 1st.

John Druckenbrood went to Brewster on business Wednesday morning, returning on the afternoon train.

Bruce Yale returned the first of the week from Iowa, where he has been visiting with relatives and old friends for several weeks.

George W. Patterson the past week purchased the land belonging to the Hawley estate in Lorain township, consisting of 1130 acres.

The many friends of Mrs. B.B. Morris will learn with regret that she was taken suddenly ill this week.

Everet and Clifton Christenson returned this week from a visit in Iowa and Nebraska. They were absent about five weeks.

George McChruchton, the new conductor of the Rock Island, has arrived in Worthington with his family, and are stopping at the B.B. Morris home.

Mr. Leabhart, residing in Ransom township, is building a new set of farm buildings. Mr. Leabhart moved into this county last fall from Mitchell, South Dakota.

Mr. Ladine went to Heron Lake Monday morning to accompany home a couple of his daughters, who recently underwent operations at the hospital there.

Mrs. Thomas Eide, of Grindstone, South Dakota, who has been visiting with her brother, Ole Sorem, and family, for the past ten weeks, departed last week or Jewell Junction, Ia., for a visit with her parents. She was accompanied by her brother, Louis Sorem and wife.

Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Davis went to Heron Lake last week to attend the funeral of her father, James Sutherland.

"Hiko" Edwards came up from Sioux City the latter part of last week for a couple of weeks' visit with old friends.

Messrs. John, Will and Duncan Sutherland, of North Battleford, Sask., were visiting in the city this week, the guests of their sister, Mrs. W.E. Davis.

James Sutherland, a former resident of this vicinity died at his home in Heron Lake the latter part of last week. He was the father of Mrs. W.E. Davis, of this city.

The many friends of Mrs. A.C. Thompson in this city will be pleased to learn that she is convalescing from a long illness and surgical operation at the Judge-Mercy hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah.

A very pretty wedding took place at Rev. Father Sherman's home on Wednesday morning, Jan. 25, 1911, when William Joseph Ullrich was united in marriage to Miss Iveloo Hazel Kinsman. The couple were attended by Edward and Miss Guta Ullrich, brother and sister of the groom. Immediately after the ceremony the invited guests repaired to the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Kinsman, residing two miles northwest of town, where a sumptuous wedding dinner was served. The happy couple left on the Rock Island for the twin cities and Faribault where they will spend about ten days visiting with relatives and friends. The contracting parties are well and favorably known to everyone in the community and were the recipients of many useful and beautiful presents. Upon their return they will make their home upon the farm of the groom's father, who recently built an elegant cottage for them. The groom will have charge of the farm and his father will devote his time to his automobile business. The Globe joins with their hosts of friends in wishing good luck and in the language of Rip Van Winkle "Here's to their good health, their families good health and may they live long and prosper."

The many friends of Mrs. John Lawson pleasantly surprised her on Tuesday afternoon and presented her with several fine presents, the occasion being her forty-first birthday.

Mrs. J.S. Frink left the latter part of last week for Luverne, where she will visit with her mother Mrs. Beers and other relatives and friends.

Clerk of Court Martin has issued the following marriage licenses during the past week: Frank Fritz, of North Dakota, to Selentin Klontz, of Nobles county; Eugene Steinman to Coroline Larson, both of Nobles county; William Ullrich to Iveloo Hazel Kinsman, both of Nobles county; F.E. Markwick, of Missouri, to Addie Rowe, of Nobles county.

Eugene Steinman and Miss Emily Caroline, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charley Larson, were married at the home of her parents near Worthington on Wednesday f this week, Rev. Shipp officiating. The young people are well and favorably known in Worthington and vicinity and their many friends join with the Globe in extending congratulations. The happy couple left on the afternoon train for the twin cities for a couple of weeks visit and upon their return will go to housekeeping upon the farm of the groom's uncle.

John A. Saxon Passes Away.

The people of Worthington were shocked on Sunday morning to learn of the sudden death of one of the earliest pioneers of Nobles county, John Saxon, who died after an illness of only a couple of days of peritonitis.

Mr. Saxon was taken suddenly ill last Friday night with what the physicians though was an obstruction of the bowels. It was found necessary to operate and Dr. Comstock, of St. Paul, one of the leading surgeons of the northwest was called and performed the operation. A curved piece of glass about an inch long was discovered in the intestines, which had cut them. Just where and when Mr. Saxon swallowed it will always remain a mystery. Up until a half hour before his death he seemed to be getting along nicely, but the ultimate end was feared by the physicians.

Mr. Saxon was born in Osterdotland, Sweden, Nov. 18, 1845, and when a mere lad came to America with his parents, one brother and two sisters. In the year of 1852 they settled near Rock Island, Illinois, but within a short time removed to Fulton, Illinois, where he resided until the opening of the Civil War when he entered the service of the government. At the close of the war he returned to Fulton and resided there until 1870, when he moved to Alamaee county, Iowa.

In 1872 he came to Nobles county and settled on a homestead in section 30, Lorain township, where he resided until a couple of years ago, when he came to Worthington. In 1881 he was united in marriage to Martha Johnson, who together with seven children survive to mourn his loss -- Mrs. Alma Christenson, Miss Lillian, Mrs. Una Christenson, George, Violet, Ethel and Earl, all residents of this vicinity. His only surviving sister, Mrs. Christene Harrison, with her husband, of Fulton, Illinois were in attendance at the funeral.

For several years Mr. Saxon served as school director in the district in which he lived in Indian Lake township and was road overseer for a number of years. For three years he was postmaster of the Saxon postoffice situated on his farm. It was discontinued upon the advent of the rural delivery.

Funeral services were held at the house in this city at twelve o'clock Wednesday and at the Baptist church in Indian Lake at 2:30, and the remains interred in the cemetery at that place. The sermons were preached by Rev. Dr. Peterson, of Minneapolis, who with Mr. Saxon as boys romped the deck of the same vessel for ten weeks during the trip across the Atlantic. They came from the same section in Sweden.

----End Transcription----


Source:
Microfilm, Worthington Globe; Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN; obtained May, 2009.


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