Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

back to BMD

Death Certificate of
Edward Richard DeCoursey

(1914 - 1914)

Edward was the first born of Edwin J. and Mary (Pfaff) DeCoursey's six children. Sadly, he was born with a condition called pyloric stenosis (see below) and only lived 7 days. Edward was born in San Antonio, Texas, and is buried there.

Related Items
Death records for his brothers Baby Boy and Charles.
Birth records for his younger siblings William J., Mary Ann J., and Robert O.
Accounts of family life in The DeCoursey Family written by Charles' cousin Frank and his sister Mary Ann.



  PLACE OF DEATH
County  Bexar  
City  San Antonio  
(No.  Santa Rosa Infirmary  St.; ____________Ward)
  (If death occurred in a hospital or institution, give its NAME instead of street and number.)
Texas State Board of Health
STANDARD CERTIFICATE OF DEATH

               Registered No.  11567  
FULL NAME   Edward Richard De Coursey  
PERSONAL AND STATISTICAL PARTICULARS

SEX   Male  
COLOR OR RACE   White  
SINGLE MARRIED WIDOWED OR DIVORCED   Single  
DATE OF BIRTH (Month, Day, Year)   June 13  , 19  14  
AGE ____yrs ____mos   7  days
OCCUPATION
    (a) Trade, profession, or particular kind of work   None  
    (b) General nature of industry, business, or establishment in which employed (or employer)__________
BIRTHPLACE (State or country)   San Antonio  
PARENTS
    NAME OF FATHER   E. J. De Coursey  
    BIRTHPLACE OF FATHER (State or country)   Colorado  
    MAIDEN NAME OF MOTHER   Mary Pfaff  
    BIRTHPLACE OF MOTHER (State or country)   Kansas  
THE ABOVE IS TRUE TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE
      (Informant)   E J De Coursey  
      (Address)   651 Main Ave  
Filed   19 , 191  4   ___________ Registrar
MEDICAL PARTICULARS

DATE OF DEATH (month, day, and year) ___________, 191___  ,
I HEREBY CERTIFY, that I attended deceased from   June 13  , 191  4  , to   June 19  , 191  4  ; that I last saw h  im   alive on   June 19 , 191  4  , and that death occurred on the date stated above at   10.30 AM.
The CAUSE OF DEATH* was as follows:
     Congenital pyloric stenosis  1    (Duration) ___yrs. ___mos.   7  ds.
Contributory (Secondary) ___________   (Duration) ___yrs. ___mos. ___ds.
(Signed)   Conrad Frey , M.D.
  June 19  , 191  4   (Address)   Santa Rosa Inf.  
LENGTH OF RESIDENCE (For Hospitals, Institutions, Transients or Recent Residents.)
   At place of death ___yrs. ___mos.   7  ds.     In the State ___yrs. ___mos.   7  ds.
Where was disease contracted if not at place of death?   San Antonio  
Former or usual residence ____________
PLACE OF BURIAL OR REMOVAL   St Marys Cemetery  2
DATE OF BURIAL   June 19 , 191  4  
UNDERTAKER  ZIZIK UNDERTAKING CO.     ADDRESS _____________


1 Pyloric stenosis is a narrowing of the pylorus, the lower part of the stomach through which stomach contents pass to enter the small intestine. When an infant has pyloric stenosis, the muscles in the pylorus have become enlarged to the point where food is prevented from emptying out of the stomach. The condition in itself is not fatal, but if untreated death occurs due to dehydration and eletrolyte imbalance caused by severe vomiting, the main symptom of this disorder. Today pyloric stenosis is typically managed with surgery.

Pyloric stenosis is fairly common, affecting about three out of 1,000 babies in the United States. It is about four times more likely to occur in firstborn male infants. It has also been shown to run in families - if a parent had pyloric stenosis, then an infant has up to a 20% risk of developing the condition. Pyloric stenosis occurs more commonly in Caucasian infants than in babies of other ethnic backgrounds, and affected infants are more likely to have blood type B or O.

Most infants who develop pyloric stenosis are usually between 2 weeks and 2 months of age - symptoms usually appear during or after the third week of life. The general consensus today is that it is not a real congenital condition but that the progressive thickening of the pylorus occurs after birth, probably due to both genetic and environmental factors. An affected infant begins showing symptoms when the pylorus is so thickened that the stomach can no longer empty properly.

Edward's case does seem atypical in that he developed the condition so early. The surgery used to cure pyloric stenosis, Ramstedt's pyloromyotomy, was first preformed in June 1911. This technique had apparently not reached San Antonio in 1914. There is also the possibility that he was misdiagnosed.

2 This is probably St. Mary's Cemetery in San Antonio.

Transcribed by Erica DeCoursey
© 2004