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Descendants of Fredrich Rasche

Fourth Generation


4. Johann Heinrich Frederich Rasche 1 (Johann Ernst , Johann Georg Christoph Fredrich , Fredrich ) was born 22 Oct 1807. He died 14 Aug 1884.

Friederike Rasche Luettge's Notes
The oldest son of Johann Ernst Rasche was Johann Heinrich Friedrich Rasche born on the Rasche Farm October 22, 1807. He was called the "de Innehmer", Tax Collector. When twenty years old he married the 21 year old Marie Friederike Bieling on August 31, 1828. She was born May 2, 1807 in Stapelburg the daughter of the shoemaker Heinrich Bieling and his wife Hanna, whose maiden name was Mueller. Johann Heinrich Friedrich Rasche's brothers were Heinrich and Ernst.

Did they go to school? Yes, for they could write and therefore read. The life of the farmers was not simple. When at the gate of the mill, at the entrance of the village, a horn was sounded, they had to let their own work lie, even though at harvest time a thunder storm threatened, and had to do forced service. In addition to that they had to give one tenth of the harvest and of everything else. No there was not much time for school work. Even so, naturally, there were teachers it happened in the country, that a shoemaker or tailor taught school. If the scholar then while reading came upon a difficult word, which gave trouble to the teacher, he would simply say; "huck et oebber, dat mag de Duebel lesen", or pass it by, the devil may read that. And the girls were not to learn to write on account of love letters.

Friedrich was very much attached to his brother Ernst and when he emigrated, he accompanied him as far as Harzburg. They walked for two hours and when the train with the entire family departed, he could never forget that experience. He never again was willing to take anyone to the place of departure to start into the unknown. He remained in communication with his brother until his death. He was six weeks in writing one letter, he always thought of something else to add.

On the Rasche Farm life went on. Early in life the Tax Collector with his farm wife moved to the "Altenteil", the house reserved to the oldest generation, because they wanted to make room for their son. It was so comfortable in their little room. They always had their grandchildren about them. Grandfather told stories and all the children retained a good remembrance of him. Grandmother sat at the spinning wheel. No one in the house was permitted to spin on Sundays, otherwise a misfortune would befall them. Instead of that they knitted. Grandmother once had a sore hand, and it did not get well. A gypsy woman came into the house. Under an apple tree, which was covered with blossoms, the gypsy spoke a charm over the hand. The hand got well, but in the fall the tree bore no fruit and in the spring not a single leaf; the tree was dried up. Johann Heinrich Friedrich Rasche died August 14, 1884 and his wife May 6, 1892.

Their survivors were one son and one daughter.
The daughter of Johann Heinrich Friedrich Rasche married someone from the neighboring farm - Bindseil.

Johann married 1 Marie Frederike Bieling 1, daughter of Heinrich Bieling and Hannah Mueller, on 31 Aug 1828. Marie was born 2 May 1807 in Staplesburg, Germany.

The oldest son of Johann Ernst Rasche was Johann Heinrich Friedrich Rasche born on the Rasche Farm October 22, 1807. He was called the "de Innehmer", Tax Collector. When twenty years old he married the 21 year old Marie Friederike Bieling on August 31, 1828. She was born May 2, 1807 in Stapelburg the daughter of the shoemaker Heinrich Bieling and his wife Hanna, whose maiden name was Mueller. Johann Heinrich Friedrich Rasche's brothers were Heinrich and Ernst.

Did they go to school? Yes, for they could write and therefore read. The life of the farmers was not simple. When at the gate of the mill, at the entrance of the village, a horn was sounded, they had to let their own work lie, even though at harvest time a thunder storm threatened, and had to do forced service. In addition to that they had to give one tenth of the harvest and of everything else. No there was not much time for school work. Even so, naturally, there were teachers it happened in the country, that a shoemaker or tailor taught school. If the scholar then while reading came upon a difficult word, which gave trouble to the teacher, he would simply say; "huck et oebber, dat mag de Duebel lesen", or pass it by, the devil may read that. And the girls were not to learn to write on account of love letters.

Friedrich was very much attached to his brother Ernst and when he emigrated, he accompanied him as far as Harzburg. They walked for two hours and when the train with the entire family departed, he could never forget that experience. He never again was willing to take anyone to the place of departure to start into the unknown. He remained in communication with his brother until his death. He was six weeks in writing one letter, he always thought of something else to add.

On the Rasche Farm life went on. Early in life the Tax Collector with his farm wife moved to the "Altenteil", the house reserved to the oldest generation, because they wanted to make room for their son. It was so comfortable in their little room. They always had their grandchildren about them. Grandfather told stories and all the children retained a good remembrance of him. Grandmother sat at the spinning wheel. No one in the house was permitted to spin on Sundays, otherwise a misfortune would befall them. Instead of that they knitted. Grandmother once had a sore hand, and it did not get well. A gypsy woman came into the house. Under an apple tree, which was covered with blossoms, the gypsy spoke a charm over the hand. The hand got well, but in the fall the tree bore no fruit and in the spring not a single leaf; the tree was dried up. Johann Heinrich Friedrich Rasche died August 14, 1884 and his wife May 6, 1892.

Their survivors were one son and one daughter.
The daughter of Johann Heinrich Friedrich Rasche married someone from the neighboring farm - Bindseil.

They had the following children:

+ 7 M i Heinrich Ernst Fredrich Rasche was born 11 Apr 1834.

6. Johann Ernst Peter Rasch 1 (Johann Ernst , Johann Georg Christoph Fredrich , Fredrich ) was born 8/9 Oct 1810 in Rasche Farm, Stapleburg, Wernigerode County, Saschen, Prussia,Germany. He died 14 May 1894 in Carlyle, Clinton, Illinois and was buried in Old Baptist Cemetery Near Carlyle, Illinois.

1860 Census, Carlyle Post Office, Clinton County, Illinois, page 155 (have copy) - Ernst Rash (spelling on census), age 55, farmer, value of personal estate $100, born in Germany.
1870 Census, Trenton Post Office, Township 2 N R 3 W, Clinton County, Illinois, page 396a (have copy) - Ernst Rasch, age 60, farmer, born in Prussia, father and mother of foreign birth.
1880 Census, Sugar Creek Township, Clinton County, Illinois, page 460b (have copy) - Ernst Rasch, age 70, father in law, widower, farmer (retired), born in Prussia.  (Living with daughter Luisa Rasch Sohn family)

Friederike Rasche Luettge's Notes
Johann Ernst Rasche's third son was Johann Ernst Peter Rasche. He was born October 9. 1810. By vocation he was a baker and a turner. On August 14, 1836 he married Johanne Dorethea Charlotte Christine Kuehne, who was born April 25, 1813. They had one child, Luise born in 1837. Christine died January 7, 1842. On August 7, 1842 he married Christine's three-year-younger sister, Luise Friederike Henriette Kuehne, who was born April 3, 1816.
Johann Ernst Peter was a baker and had a business. He was a turner, and on the side was village magistrate. Why did they emigrate? The German people were discontented. Among the middle class, the laborers, and the farmers a great discontent reigned which mounted steadily. An excitement lay in the air, which in 1848 led to an explosion. The people streamed through the streets. Johann Ernst Peter gave the command, for the roll of drums to be given, which was the signal for the revolt. His cousin Sperling had broken, by throwing, the windows of the ranger's house. For this they each received a prison sentence. Tradition speaks of two years. In order to escape this punishment, they went to America. There was then no railroad in Stapelburg. They traveled from Bad Harzburg to Hamburg and boarded a ship there. If they rode in a sail boat? Most likely there was no other way.

Notes from Internet
He came to America on ship 'Falcon' Nov 1852 from Bremmehaven landing in New Orleans, taking a flat bottom boat up the Mississippi to St. Louis eventually making his way to Trenton, Clinton County, Illinois.

Esther Krost Thomas's Notes
Johann Ernst Peter Rasche was the third son of Reihemann Johann Ernst Rasch and his wife Dorethea Christina Frederica Bartels and was born on the Rasche farm in Stapelburg in the County of Wernigerode, Germany. The Rasche farm had already been in the Rasch family  for several generations.
Johann Ernst Rasche was born July 18, 1781 and died October 2, 1831. On October 30, 1803 he was united in marriage with Dorothea Christina Frederica Bartels who was born March 28, 1780 and died December 28, 1837.
Johann Ernst Peter Rasche, my Grandfather, will henceforth be spoken of as Ernst Rasch, as he was known to his many descendants. Ernst Rasche was born October 8(from his tombstone) (9th from the record from Germany ) 1810, and died May 14, 1894. On  August 14, 1836 he was united in marriage with Johanne Dorothea Charlotte Christine Kuehne, who was born April.25, 1813, They had one child, Luise Friederike Henriette Rasche. His wife, Christine died January 7, 1842.
On August 8, 1842 he married his first wife's three year younger sister, Luise Friederike Henriette Kuehne who was born April 3, l8l6.
At this time it appears as if the family emigrated in 1852, based on statements that my Mother, Dorothea Rasch Krost and Uncle Henry Rasch made many times. Mother always said that she was about two years old when they sailed and Uncle Henry used to say he was about nine months old when carried onto American soil. Mother was born June 26, 1850 and Uncle Henry Jan. 12,1852. Accordingly they would have arrived around or about 0ctober 1852. This date will then be accepted until, or unless, we can conclusively prove differently. (Possibly by finding naturalization papers).
Again from memory, we were told they were on the ocean 72 days. Being on a sail-ship, the direction in which they went depended on the wind. If the wind came from one direction they were sailing towards America; if from the opposite direction they sailed back towards Europe; but if no wind they did not sail, but more or less stood still. Although by the time the Rasches came to America, laws had been passed which, in a measure prevented the ship company from imposing some of the hardships on the passengers that many of the emigrants had suffered previously.(Reread "Mittelberger" and "THE GERMANS IN THE UNITED STATES" BY RUDOLF CRONAU.) the trip was extremely hard. The passengers gave each other such help as possible. There was much sickness and many deaths occurred during the crossing. Some of the older Rasch children never forgot how the bodies of acquaintances other passengers were tossed over board and how many days they could see the sharks following the ship, waiting for just such food. Tales, or stories had come back to the Rasches, before sailing, that the ship company did not supply enough food nor enough drinking water for the passengers while enroute. The Rasches carried quite a large amount of "schwarz brot" to supplement the scanty diet supplied on board, and it is entirely possible that such forethought was the reason why they all survived the passage. Water and food was rationed in smaller and smaller quantities, and when the ship finally came into port in New Orleans, many of the passengers who survived, were so weak they had to be carried off the ship.
It is remembered that the Rasch Family came up the Mississippi River from New Orleans to St. Louis on a flat boat, again being exposed to the weather. Friends who had emigrated earlier helped the family become established and very soon Grandfather was busy at his trade - a baker. Just how long the family remained in St. Louis is not known. Their next home was on a farm in Illinois near Caseyville, St. Clair county. We recall some of the Rasch Children telling how they would go out to the railroad cut, about the time a train was to pass by, and throw stones down on the train. There seems to be no way to determine just where this farm was located, for over a hundred years later, a granddaughter and a great great grandson drove to Caseyville and saw what possibly was the railroad cut, but no more. It was while living there that friendly Indians would come to the door of the log cabin in which the family lived. It also was during that time that they saw car loads of wild pigeons shipped to St. Louis for food. Wild pigeons, now extinct, were so plentiful that they would blot out the sun like a heavy thunder cloud. Turkey and grouse or prairie-hens were plentiful. Bear had not disappeared, and deer could be seen in herds. Wolves and coyotes were still numerous. While living near Caseyville, Grandfather and his older sons walked a distance of  about twenty miles, to St. Louis carrying the produce from their farm to exchange it for staple groceries and clothing. It is remembered that in the winter on one or more occasions they walked across the Mississippi River on the ice. Also while living here Grandfather had a team of oxen -  Buck and Brandy. When there was grain to sell at the nearest market - St. Louis - they would start with a load driving this team of oxen. If the day was hot everything might go well until the oxen would see a pool of water, when they would start for the water. That would naturally mean that they left the poor, unimproved road often through a growth of trees, and if the wagon or sled became caught between trees, they would continue to pull until the traces would break. After they had all the water they wanted Grandfather would need to repair the traces before they could continue on their way.
The common school system in Germany had been established as early as 1600 and although it had been interrupted by the 30 years war  (1618 - 1648) it flourished again during the succeeding century. (Sunday schools also provided for a continual education even after the youths had quitted the public schools.) Grandfather was quite well educated for his day, and it was his wish that his children too, acquire schooling in the land of adoption. Schools were scarce, but there was one located about three miles from their home. The children needed to go through the trackless forest and since there were no bridges over the streams , he felled the trees across them to use as foot logs. Many of the children attending this school were well along in their teens, and, the teacher was not a good disciplinarian, so that the older children not only abused the younger ones while at the school building but much more so on the way home. When he heard how shamefully his little children had been treated, none of them older than 12 or 13, he knew he could no longer risk sending them. He taught his children at home, in his native language, and sang with them, with the accompaniment of an accordion, the beloved German folk songs and bits of German opera. Thus the simple cabin was not only a home but a school house and temple of worship.
When his older sons had reached the age that they under their Mother's supervision could do some work on the farm Grandfather worked on what was spoken of as "the rock road.", in order to supplement the income from the farm. This road was being built from Belleville to St. Louis a distance of about 14 miles and it was the first macadamized road in the state.
It is not known if the family lived elsewhere in St. Clair county, nor is it known when they removed to Clinton county. It is definitely known that they lived in the Trenton area, which may have been south or south west of Trenton. Here again he farmed, and whenever possible he supplemented the income derived from farming.
He was the Father of seven children before he left Germany and three more children were born to the couple following their coming to America. Feeding and clothing the children kept the parents busy. Both parents were hardworking, frugal and industrious. Their health was good and Grandfather not only kept the children's shoes in repair, but also tanned the leather out of which he made new shoes for the entire family. Their furniture was home made.
They lived in a cabin, which compared favorably with the homes of their neighbors. While the majority of early residents were without means, poverty carried with it no crushing sense of degradation, like that felt by the very poor of our day. Clinton county was sparsely settled at that time, and their nearest neighbor's may have been two or three miles away. But neighbors were indeed neighbors. They were friendly and sociable and gave help cheerfully. There was free hearted hospitality and if a weary traveler came by he was given food and lodging without money and without price. So also when any special work was to be done the neighbors would gather together and enjoy doing it. In sickness they needed to depend upon each others for even in the mid 19th century there were few doctors and those that there were often could not be reached, nor could they travel the unimproved roads.
But now that his two older sons had reached the age where they could help with the farm work Grandfather hopefully looked forward to better days. Crops had been good for several years, and he felt the time was near when they could buy a good farm and by industry and frugality soon find that it is theirs and debt free.
Again it was October, about eight years after their arrival from Germany. Word had come to their cabin home that a neighbor lady, the Mother of a number of small children was ill, bedfast. Could Grandmother come and help the family. Among those sympathetic, kind and obliging people there could be but one answer. Grandmother walked through the forest and fields a distance of over three miles to help care for the sick neighbor and her large family. This continued for possibly a week; she went to the neighbors home in the early morning and came home at dark or just before, following which she would do as much of her own house work as possible. One evening as she was returning home a cold, hard rain was falling. She was overly tired and also became thoroughly drenched and chilled. Her family did all possible for her, but that night she became ill with chills and fever. What was thought to be pneumonia followed and within about thirty six hours she was gone, dying Oct. 7, 1860.
This was the blow which caused Grandfather to stagger for many years, in fact he never fully recovered. He was a stranger in a strange country, and a strange language. He was away from all of his relatives, a widower for the second time, left with nine children ranging in age from one year two months and 18 days to seventeen years one month and twenty eight days. Has oldest child, a daughter Luise, by his first marriage was already married, but living close by and the mother of three children, two living, one dead.
Word spread among the neighbors that Grandmother had passed away. There were no morticians or funeral directors in those days and the Rasch family lived too far from an established cemetery to use it, because of distance and no roads. Since this large family was living in a one room cabin with a loft, something needed to be done, and done immediately. Neighbors came with saws and axes and under Grandfather's supervision they went to the near by woods, selected a large walnut? (or was it Oak? think it was walnut) tree and after cutting it down , they cut off the proper length. They sawed a slab off the top, then with the help of an adze and perhaps other tools with Grandfather's help they hollowed out the inside of the log, following which they laid Grandmother's body into the cavity, nailed the slab on and buried her near a large oak tree not far from the cabin. Such burials were not rare in those days.
No man left a widower, with a large family of little children, ever felt his responsibility more keenly, nor shouldered it more courageously. From that day on he dedicated his life to the care of his motherless children. He not only filled the place of father and Mother, but was Teacher.
Many times the writer was told that it was not unusual to see Grandfather sitting, with one of his little children on each knee, while a third stood close beside him, his protective and comforting arms around all three.
As nearly as can be determined at this time the Ernst Rasch family emigrated from Germany in July 1852, when Grandfather was 42 years old. His parents had passed away a number of years previously, leaving three children, all sons, who were all born on the Rasch Farm, which it is thought had already been in the Rasch family for several generations.
Here, it may be well to mention that the Rasches in Germany have always spelled their name "Rasche". While nowhere has the writer found that our branch of the family in the United States spells the Rasch name with the final "e". However, she has found many Rasches in the United States spelling their name with the final "e".
When Grandfather Ernst Rasch emigrated his two brothers still living remained in Germany. The older, to whom he was very much attached, was Johann Heinrich Friedrich Rasche, who was born October, 22, 1807. The second brother was Heinrich Rasche who was born about,1809. Although the ocean separated the oldest and youngest brother they remained in rather close contact with each other by letter during their long life. After the death of his favorite brother on August 14, 1884 Grandfather wrote to this brother's son, which was his nephew Heinrich Ernst Friedrich Rasche, who was born April 11, I834, and died November 14, 1888. Before the nephew's death, he gave the address of the American Rasches to his son, Friedrich Rasch, who was born July 28, 1866 and died January 25, 1953. A few letters were exchanged between my Grandfather Ernst Rasch and this great nephew.
Following Grandfather Ernst Rasches death on May 14, 1894,.his son, Heinrich Friedrich Rasch (January 12, 1852 ? January 8, 1933) began to correspond with Friedrich Rasch (July 28,1866 - Jan 25, 1953) the grandson of his Father's favorite brother. About eleven months before Henry passed away the writer sent her first letter to Germany dated February 22, 1932, which was addressed to Friedrich Rasch., Punier Str. 10, Ilsenburg, Harz Germany. Through the wisdom that comes with years, instead of replying to my letter, he passed it on to his daughter, Friederike (Rasche) Luettge, lovingly called "Friedel," who was born February 25, 1897, and whose address is: Frau Ernst Luettge, Ilsenburg Harz, Ilsetal 23, Germany.
Thus another acquaintanceship, through correspondence, was begun, which continued without interruption , except during the years of World War 11, to the present time. So the great-granddaughter of the oldest brother, Johann Heinrich Friedrich Rasch, and the granddaughter of the youngest brother, the immigrant Johann Ernst Peter Rasch, between whom such strong family ties existed throughout their long life, found they had many interests in common among which was their love of family history.
Not only were there many letters exchanged during this 30 year period between Friedel and the writer but also photographs of the families. How much pleasure it gave the writer when she received a picture of the ancient church in which her Grandfather and other ancestors had been christened, confirmed and married and in which they worshipped; also a picture of the home he had built in which her Mother and other children of the Ernst Rasch family were born.
On April 22, 1957 she received a packet from Friedel containing data on the Rasches in Germany much of which will be incorporated into this record. Believing that there are, some of the Ernst Rasch descendants who will enjoy reading the original, written in German, it will be included, and her translation of it. Only through Friedel's and some of her ancestors help was it possible to trace the ancestors back to 1725. Without this help the writer's records would have begun in 1810, the year her Grandfather was born.
On April 22, 1957 the writer received a packet from Friedel containing data on the Rasches in Germany.  Her translation of a part of it will be included here. Only a poet can capture the beauty of a poem when translating it from one language to another. So in the following  translation, although correctly translated, some of the descriptive beauty of the German language  has been lost.
Only through Friedel's and some of her ancestor's help was it possible to trace the ancestors back to 1725. Without this help the Writer's record would have begun in 1810, the year her Grandfather was born.
Let us now turn from the record of the Rasches who remained in Germany and continue with the history of the descendants of Ernst Rasch the immigrant. As previously stated he was born on the Rasch Farm, Stapelburg, Germany, where he grew to maturity. He was christened, confirmed and married (both the first and second time), in the church.
He married for his first wife Johanne Dorethea Charlotte Christine Kuehne, who was born April 25, 1813. By this marriage he became the father of one child, Luise Friederike Henriette Rasch, born March 17, 1937. His wife Christine died January 7, 1842.
He  married for his second wife Luise Friederike Henriette Kuehne, born April 3, 1816, who was his first wife's younger sister. To this union nine children were born. The first six were born in Germany and the last three in the United States.

Johann married 1 (1) Johanne Dorothea Charlotte Christine Kuehne 1 on 14 Aug 1836. Johanne was born 25 Apr 1813 in Stapelburg, Sachsen, Prussia, Germany. She died 7 Jan 1842 in Stapelburg, Sachsen, Prussia, Germany and was buried in Germany.

Friederike Rasche Luettge's Notes
On August 14, 1836 he married Johanne Dorethea Charlotte Christine Kuehne, who was born April 25, 1813. They had one child, Luise born in 1837. Christine died January 7, 1842. On August 7, 1842 he married Christine's three-year-younger sister, Luise Friederike Henriette Kuehne, who was born April 3, 1816.

They had the following children:

+ 8 F i Luise Friederike Henriette Rasch was born 17 Mar 1837 and died 13 Dec 1898.

Johann also married 1 (2) Luise Frederike Henriette Kuehne 1 on 7 Aug 1842. Luise was born 3 Apr 1816 in Germany. She died 7 Oct 1860 and was buried in Near New Trenton, Illiinois.

1860 Census, Carlyle Post Office, Clinton County, Illinois, page 155 (have copy) - Mrs. Rash (spelling on census), age 50, born in Germany.

Friederike Rasche Luettge's Notes
Johann Ernst Rasche's third son was Johann Ernst Peter Rasche. He was born October 9. 1810. By vocation he was a baker and a turner. On August 14, 1836 he married Johanne Dorethea Charlotte Christine Kuehne, who was born April 25, 1813. They had one child, Luise born in 1837. Christine died January 7, 1842. On August 7, 1842 he married Christine's three-year-younger sister, Luise Friederike Henriette Kuehne, who was born April 3, 1816.
Johann Ernst Peter was a baker and had a business. He was a turner, and on the side was village magistrate. Why did they emigrate? The German people were discontented. Among the middle class, the laborers, and the farmers a great discontent reigned which mounted steadily. An excitement lay in the air, which in 1848 led to an explosion. The people streamed through the streets. Johann Ernst Peter gave the command, for the roll of drums to be given, which was the signal for the revolt. His cousin Sperling had broken, by throwing, the windows of the ranger's house. For this they each received a prison sentence. Tradition speaks of two years. In order to escape this punishment, they went to America. There was then no railroad in Stapelburg. They traveled from Bad Harzburg to Hamburg and boarded a ship there. If they rode in a sail boat? Most likely there was no other way.

They had the following children:

  9 M ii Ernst Rasch [scrapbook] 1 was born 9 Aug 1843 in Stapelburg, Germany. He died 26 Jan 1864 in Cumberland Hospital, Nashville, Tennesse.

1860 Census, Carlyle Post Office, Clinton County, Illinois, page 155 (have copy) - Ernst Rash (spelling on census), age 17, born in Germany, attended school within the last year.

Database: Civil War Service Records
Name:    Ernest Rasch
Company:    C  
Unit:    15 Missouri Infantry.  
Rank - Induction:    Private  
Rank - Discharge:    Private  
Allegiance:    Union  

Esther Krost Thomas's Notes
Ernst, the eldest child of Ernst and Louise Rasch was born August 9. 1843 in Stapelburg, Germany. He died at the age of 20 years 5 months and 19 days. He had just passed his seventeenth birthday when his Mother died leaving him and eight younger sisters and brothers. He helped supplement the family income in every honorable way possible, giving all of his earnings to his Father.
A few days before his eighteenth birthday he volunteered to serve three years, or during the War of the Rebellion. From official records located  in Washington D. C. and in the office of the Adjutant General, State of Missouri, and from the Illinois State Archives we find:

                                                                ERNST RASCH
                                                                 CIVIL WAR
                                                                UNION FORCES
Enlisted: 2 August 1861 in Company C, 15th Regiment Infantry, Missouri Volunteers at St. Louis, Missouri, by Captain Zimmermann.
Mustered into Federal service 9 September 1861 at St. Louis,
Rank: Private; Age; 18; Native: Prussia. Unmarried. Occupation: Laborer.
Residence: Trenton, Clinton county, Illinois.
"The Fifteenth Missouri Infantry (also known as "Swiss Rifles") was Organized at St. Louis in August, 1861. After serving in Missouri and Arkansas during the rest of the year, it marched in the spring of 1862 on the campaign which culminated in the victory at Pea Ridge, Arkansas. The regiment was in reserve at that battle and sustained but slight loss.  In June,1862, it moved to Corinth, Mississippi, later moving into Kentucky and was engaged at the battle of Perryville, Kentucky. Three months later it fought at Stone's River or Murfreesboro, Tennessee. The regiment suffered its severest loss at  Chickamauga, its casualties on that field being unusually large in proportion to the very small number engaged. After its three years' of service was over, it re-enlisted in January, 1864, and joined Sherman's army as it was starting on its Atlantic campaign. After the fall of Atlanta, the regiment fought at Franklin and Nashville, Tennessee, proceeding thence to Texas, where the regiment was mustered out in December, 1865.
The Fifteenth has the distinction of having suffered a greater number of casualties in service than any other Missouri Regiment, save one."
It was at the battle of Chickamauga that Ernst Rash was wounded in his left breast, his lung being punctured, on September 20, 1863.  He was first sent to a hospital at Chattanooga, Tennessee and from there to a hospital called Cumberland Hospital at Nashville, Tennessee where he died January 28, 1864 of wounds and from chronic diarrhea incurred during the service in the army.
This devoted son was so concerned about the welfare of his Father and younger brothers and sisters that he sent all of his army pay ? $13.00 dollars per month home to his Father. It is definitely known that Grandfather made the trip to Nashville one time (perhaps more often) during his son's long illness, hoping to be able to bring him home.
Transportation was a serious problem making it necessary for him to walk much of the way, accepting rides whenever offered. When he arrived at the hospital and saw, his son, he knew Ernst could not be removed.
Private Ernst Rasch was buried on the day he died, in Nashville, Tennessee. His remains now rest in grave Number 1499 - Section E, in the Nashville National Cemetery, located six miles north of Nashville and one and one quarter miles south of Madison. The cemetery contains sixty?five acres and 16,988 interments, 4,121 of them unknown.
+ 10 F iii Maria Johanne Rasch was born 14 Dec 1844 and died 2 May 1880.
+ 11 M iv Friedrich Wilhelm Rasch was born 1 May 1847 and died 17 Nov 1915.
  12 M v Wilhelm Rasch 1 was born 5 Jan 1849 in Germany. He died 24 Jul 1929 in Summerfield, St. Clair County, Illinois and was buried in Summerfield Cemetery.

1860 Census, Carlyle Post Office, Clinton County, Illinois, page 155 (have copy) - William Rash (spelling on census), age 12, born in Germany, attended school within the last year.
1870 Census, Trenton Post Office, Township 2 N R 3 W, Clinton County, Illinois, page 396a (have copy) - William Rasch, age 21, farmer, born in Illinois, father of foreign birth.  (Living with the father.  Was born in Germany rather than it Illinois)
1880 Census, East Bend, Champaign County, Illinois, page 130b (have copy) - Wm. Rasch, age 36, servant, single, born in Prussia.
1900 Census, East Bend Township, Champaign County, Illinois, page 25a (have copy) - William Rasch, boarder, born February 1848, age 52, single, born in Germany, immmigrated in 1852, day laborer, can read and write.

Database: Civil War Service Records
Name:    William Rush
Company:    B  
Unit:    145 Illinois Infantry.  
Rank - Induction:    Private  
Rank - Discharge:    Private  
Allegiance:    Union

Database: American Civil War Soldiers
Name:    William Rush ,   
Residence:    Carlisle, Illinois  
Enlistment Date:    21 May 1864  
Distinguished Service:    DISTINGUISHED SERVICE  
Side Served:    Union  
State Served:    Illinois  
Unit Numbers:    325 325  
Service Record:    Enlisted as a Private on 21 May 1864
Enlisted in Company B, 145th Infantry Regiment Illinois on 09 June 1864.
Mustered out Company B, 145th Infantry Regiment Illinois on 23 September 1864 in Camp Butler, Springfield, IL
 
 
  
 
 
Esther Krost Thomas's Notes
Wilhelm Rasch, the fourth child, and the third son of Ernst and Luise Rasch, was born January 5, 1849,in Germany. He died July 24, 1929, at the age of 80 years, 6 months and 19 days. His death was caused by chronic myocarditis.
He was not yet 12 years old when his Mother died and there were five younger sisters and brothers. He was a good child, but different from the other children. He was obedient and willing to help with the work most of the time. However, on several occasions he did give the family much concern. One day he was missing from his cabin home, which was partly surrounded by forests in which bear and wolves were sometimes still found. The entire family called and searched for hours but could not find him. When time came to prepare the evening meal it was discovered that a skillet and a loaf of bread were also missing. Grandfather then suspected where his son was and what he was doing, and yet he could not go to bed and get rest for fear some harm would come to his child. The next day Uncle Will, the. skillet and part of the bread returned, and he also brought home enough fish for the entire family. When they were seated about the table eating the fish, he remarked: "If he had had some salt and lard the fish he had fried for himself would have tasted better.
Grandfather tried hard, but unsuccessfully, to get him to understand how much trouble he had caused by going away without telling anyone. Uncle Will commented that it was such a good day for fishing and since he had not yet finished hoeing all the rows of corn he had been told to hoe, he felt the surest way to get to go fishing was to quietly slip away. He finished hoeing the corn.
As time passed he would frequently disappear, as also would the skillet, salt, lard, bread, his fishing pole and a gun. As he grew older he would be gone for several days at a time, explaining upon his return that he was quite old enough to defend himself, and that it was so necessary for him to be alone sometimes.
Although he never acquired much book learning, he learned from observation. He knew where and when the different kinds of fish could be found and when they were most likely to "bite."; he knew the names and habits of insects and birds; he knew the trees which were found in the local forests; and by watching the clouds, stars and moon could pretty well determine the kind of weather to expect. Early in his teens he began to help the neighbors do their farm work and gradually went farther away from home, but always he could not permit such work to keep him from occasionally taking a few days off to go fishing and hunting.
Early during the war his oldest brother, Ernst, then 18 enlisted. From that time on he wanted to join the army, but he was not old enough. It has been told that on one occasion he went away and tried to enlist by misrepresenting his age, but had no luck. Later he heard that some men who had been drafted and did not wish to serve paid others to serve for them, using their names; also that some who had registered would permit others to use their names and records.
The opportunity came for William Rasch to do just that, when he was 15 years, 4 months and 21 days old. He was granted permission by a William Rush to enroll under his name and age. William Rush was born February 5. 1845, and therefore was almost 4 years older than William Rasch.
On May 21, 1864, at Carlisle(Carlyle), Illinois, William Rasch, under the assumed name of William Rush, was enrolled by E. C. Dew, as a private in Company B, 145th Infantry Regiment of Illinois Volunteers, for a term of 100 days. He was mustered into Service on June 9, 1864 at Camp Butler by Lt. Montgomery. At that time he gave his residence as Carlisle(Carlyle) Clinton County, Illinois.(His address really was Trenton, Clinton County, Illinois). He was Mustered Out, September 23, 1864, at Camp Butler by Lt. Montgomery. (Camp Butler, at which enrollees were mustered into Federal service, was a mustering camp and a prison for Confederate soldiers situated six miles East of Springfield. Today it is a National Cemetery.)
It has been told that when his Company was "on the march" rather far from Camp Butler some one recognized "William Rush" and identified him as William Rasch. Being called before the officer in charge he frankly admitted having misrepresented both his name and age, saying he wanted to join the army and that he had been turned away when he used his own name and true age. The commanding officer knew it was too dangerous to permit him to return home alone, because they were then more or less in enemy territory. Uncle Will was permitted to remain with the unit as a "Drummer Boy."

Since his enrollment on May 21, 1864, until quite recently, all of William Rasches war service records have been in the assumed name of "William Rush" and also have given his date of birth as February 5, 1845. It required the help of a Town Clerk, County Clerk, Funeral Director, cemetery association official, and affidavits from relatives who attended his funeral and other relatives; the patient cooperation of the Adjutant General's office of the State of Missouri and State of Illinois, in addition to help from several departments of the General Services Administration in Washington, D. C., to establish the proof of his services. About 18 months of effort, many letters and persistence finally paid off.
Following his return home his life was much the same. He would works, and work well, but always at intervals, would take time off to hunt and fish, and through those means help supply food for his father's growing family.
Then as now, mature men of questionable character, delighted in teaching young boys, especially boys without parents, or without parental supervision, bad habits. When he returned from army service he had acquired a habit which plagued him the rest of his life. He had learned to like liquor.
Many years of his life were spent in Champaign, Sangamon and Adams County, Illinois. Perhaps more years in Champaign County than elsewhere. There he worked as a laborer usually for farm families, among them Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mattinson and Mr. and Mrs. William Covert. His need for being alone continued throughout his life. He was never happier than when he lived in a shack surrounded by trees, near a river or lake. When he ran out of money and food he would return to work.
One severe winter night he almost froze to death. The circumstances which brought this about are not clear, but as a result he lost most of his fingers, and all of his toes and most of both of his feet. After a long period of hospitalization he was brought to our parents home where he was cared for and lived for many months. Later he lived in the home of another sister, Aunt Emma, in O'Fallon, Illinois. While in her home he learned to walk again. Just as soon as he could partly care for himself he returned, with a companion to his old life; hunting, fishing, living in a cabin and being somewhat alone. The arrangement did not work. His male companion would leave him alone for periods of time and Uncle Will could no longer take entire care of himself. Although two sisters and a brother had offered him a home in their homes he chose to live with strangers.
William Rasch was gentle, kind, obliging, contented, and happy. He was soft spoken and used exceptionally good, clean English for a person who had had little schooling. The writer never heard him say an unkind word about anyone, nor did she ever know him to do an unkind act. He was much kinder to others than to himself, for after taking a drink or two he became just plain silly and foolish.
Although he was Christened in the Church in Germany he attended no church. He never cared to acquire property. He chose to be free, unencumbered.
He had two great loves. The first was the out of doors. The second was music. A "Drummer Boy" in service and later a harmonica was his constant companion. Hr could play most any tune he had ever heard and played for hours at a time. While in the hospital he played for the other patients and nurses. I never knew one tune could be played and hummed so often as he played and hummed, "Wait 'Till the Sunshines Nellie".
One summer while he lived in our home he devised a way to fasten a garden tool to his near fingerless hand with a strap, in order to cut the weeds out of our large yard. He had a feeling of accomplishment when he proudly announced: "I have them all out." It was a lot of work for an old man, who scooted along on his well padded bottom propelled by the padded palms of his hands.
He died in Summerfield, St. Clair County, Illinois and is buried in the Summerfield Cemetery.
Uncle Will was admitted to the Illinois Soldiers and Sailors Home at Quincy, Illinois on May 1, 1908 and records there indicate he was discharged on furlough from the institution on October 25, 1910 and in all probability he left the Home sometime in October, 1909. The records maintained back in those years were quite scant but it has always been custom, to carry a veteran on furlough status for one year prior to discharging him.
+ 13 F vi Dorothea Rasch was born 26 Jun 1850 and died 3 May 1939.
  14 M vii Heinrich Friederich Rasch 1 was born 12 Jan 1852 in Germany. He died 8 Jan 1933 in Trenton, Illinois and was buried in Trenton City Cemetery, Trenton, Illinois.

1860 Census, Carlyle Post Office, Clinton County, Illinois, page 155 (have copy) - Henry Rash (spelling on census), age 8, born in Germany.
1870 Census, Trenton Post Office, Township 2 N R 3 W, Clinton County, Illinois, page 396a (have copy) - Henry Rasch, age 18, at home, born in Illinois, father of foreign birth, attended school within the last year.  (Living with the father.  Was born in Germany rather than it Illinois)
1880 Census, East Bend, Champaign County, Illinois, page 130b (have copy) - Henry  Rasch, age 28, boarder, single, farmer, Prussian. (Living with the Wm. Meyer family)
1930 Census, Trenton, Sugar Creek Township, Clinton County, Illinois, page 218b (have copy) - Henry Rasch, head, owns a home valued at $3000, age 78, married at age 65, can read and write, born in Germany.

Esther Krost Thomas's Notes
Heinrich Friedrich Rasch, the sixth child and fourth son of Ernst and Luise Rasch was born January 12, 1852 in Germany and died, January 8, 1933, of heart condition and complications, in his home in Trenton, Illinois at the age of eighty one years.
He was a child, not yet nine years old ,when his Mother died and there were three younger children in the family. There were no schools near by so he did not receive much formal education, however, his Father instructed him in religion and taught him to read and write in his native language. He helped with the work on his Father's farm until he was old enough to work on neighboring farms. (Rather early in his teens he "struck out" for himself.)
For some time he worked on farms in Clinton and St. Clair County and later in Champaign County. He worked in Chicago during the Colombian Exposition in 1893.
As a young man he, with his younger brother Herman, went to Nebraska to homestead where he remained for some time. Many years passed before he sold the land he acquired, both by homesteading and purchase, in that state. During part of the 1890,s he had a restaurant in Dewey, Champaign County, Illinois. While in the restaurant business he broke his leg between the knee and ankle. Following this fracture he had an "Open limb" which paused him much distress and for long periods of time he could not be on his feet to work on account of it.
While in Champaign County Henry Rasch was a member of The Fisher Cornet Band, one of the earliest bands formed in northern Champaign County. It was organized about 1880 and played for many gala occasions during the 80,s. It was to be heard at Fourth of July celebrations, rallies, picnics, and even lent dignity to weddings and anniversaries. On Decoration Day, 1882,  when the band played for a celebration in Rantoul the musicians posed for the camera.( A photograph made at that time is in the writer's possession.)
Four fine horses, drawing a band wagon, carried the Fisher musicians to and from their engagements, and on one occasion, it is remembered the band made an appearance in Champaign to play for a "James A. Garfield for President" rally.
Henry Rasch had blue eyes and blond hair. He was rather below medium height and after middle age became quite heavy, at one time weighing 285 pounds. He always regretted that he did not have the opportunity to acquire more schooling, but continued to improve his mind by constant reading. He was just and exacting and scrupulously honest. He adhered to his national love of merry song and music, and was passionately devoted to his family and friends.
He was a frequent visitor in the homes of his sisters and other relatives, where he would remain for several months at a time. About 1912 he went to California where he lived for several years. It was while he was there, suffering much from his troublesome limb, that a lady gave him a copy of "Science and Health with Key to The Scriptures" by Mary Baker Eddy. He began to study it and the Bible diligently and soon became a devout Christian Scientist. At that time he also gave up the only bad habits he was ever known to have; drinking and smoking.
He used neither intoxicating liquor nor tobacco during the last twenty years of his life.
Upon his return to Illinois from California, after spending several months or a year, visiting relatives and friends in Clinton, St. Clair and Champaign County, he went to live in the home of a niece, Louisa (Sohn)(Rickert) Gray,(Mrs. William D. Gray), in Wheatfield Township, Clinton County. It was while living in this home that he became acquainted with an unmarried neighbor lady 25 years his junior. A rather long, interesting courtship followed. Later they were married, both for the first time.
On September 27, 1917, in the parsonage of the St. John Evangelical Church in Trenton, Illinois, with Mr. and Mrs. Frederick William Huelsmann as witnesses, Henry F. Rasch, age 65, and Amanda B. Beckemeyer, age 40, were united in marriage by Rev. Daniel Buchmueller pastor of the church. They made their home in Trenton, where they lived happily for 15 years, until his death separated them.
Amanda Barbara Beckemeyer was born December 20, 1877, in Wade Township, Clinton County, Illinois, the daughter of William Frederick and Wilhelmina(Pevesdorf) Beckemeyer. Her parents were both born in Germany. Her Mother died August 15, 1911, age 59, and her Father September 16, 1916,age 71. She lived on a farm most of her unmarried life, however at one time, for several years, she was employed as a housekeeper in a home in Carlyle.
She was christened, confirmed and attended the German Evangelical Church, but after her marriage she became a member of the Christian Science Church and remained a member the rest of her life. She was a good housekeeper and an excellent cook.
Henry and Amanda Rasches tastes were simple; their wants few. They were economical and frugal and yet lived well. Together they made, for themselves, a comfortable and happy home. They were kindly and hospitable. They had much company; both relatives and friends. In the community in which they lived they were respected, honored and loved.
Henry Rasch is buried in the Trenton City Cemetery, Trenton, Illinois.
        Heinrich married 1 Amanda Barbara Beckemeyer 1, daughter of William Frederick Beckemeyer and Wilhelmina Pevesdorf, on 27 Sep 1917 in St. John Evangelical Church in Trenton, Illinois. Amanda was born 20 Dec 1877 in Wade Township, Clinton County, Illiinois. She died 8 May 1968 in Trenton, Illinois and was buried in Trenton City Cemetery, Trenton, Illinois.

1930 Census, Trenton, Sugar Creek Township, Clinton County, Illinois, page 218b (have copy) - Amanda Rasch, wife, age 52, married at age 40, can read and write, born in Illinois.

Esther Krost Thomas's Notes
Upon his return to Illinois from California, after spending several months or a year, visiting relatives and friends in Clinton, St. Clair and Champaign County, he went to live in the home of a niece, Louisa (Sohn)(Rickert) Gray,(Mrs. William D. Gray), in Wheatfield Township, Clinton County. It was while living in this home that he became acquainted with an unmarried neighbor lady 25 years his junior. A rather long, interesting courtship followed. Later they were married, both for the first time.
On September 27, 1917, in the parsonage of the St. John Evangelical Church in Trenton, Illinois, with Mr. and Mrs. Frederick William Huelsmann as witnesses, Henry F. Rasch, age 65, and Amanda B. Beckemeyer, age 40, were united in marriage by Rev. Daniel Buchmueller pastor of the church. They made their home in Trenton, where they lived happily for 15 years, until his death separated them.
Amanda Barbara Beckemeyer was born December 20, 1877, in Wade Township, Clinton County, Illinois, the daughter of William Frederick and Wilhelmina(Pevesdorf) Beckemeyer. Her parents were both born in Germany. Her Mother died August 15, 1911, age 59, and her Father September 16, 1916,age 71. She lived on a farm most of her unmarried life, however at one time, for several years, she was employed as a housekeeper in a home in Carlyle.
She was christened, confirmed and attended the German Evangelical Church, but after her marriage she became a member of the Christian Science Church and remained a member the rest of her life. She was a good housekeeper and an excellent cook.
Henry and Amanda Rasches tastes were simple; their wants few. They were economical and frugal and yet lived well. Together they made, for themselves, a comfortable and happy home. They were kindly and hospitable. They had much company; both relatives and friends. In the community in which they lived they were respected, honored and loved.
+ 15 F viii Emma Rasch was born 1 Feb 1854 and died 29 Dec 1913.
  16 M ix Hermann Rasch 1 was born 27 Jul 1857.

1860 Census, Carlyle Post Office, Clinton County, Illinois, page 155 (have copy) - Emma Rash (spelling on census), age 2, born in Germany.
(Though census shows this child as Emma, female, but the age indicates that this is Herman.  This child was born in Illinois rather than Germany.)
1870 Census, Trenton Post Office, Township 2 N R 3 W, Clinton County, Illinois, page 396a (have copy) - Hermann Rasch, age 13, at home, born in Illinois, father of foreign birth.  (Living with the father.  Was born in Germany rather than it Illinois)

Database: Nebraska State Census 1885
Name:    Herman Rasch
Age:    26  
Birth Place:    Illinois  
Location:    Burnett Precinct,Antelope,Nebraska  
Date:    01 Jun 1885  
Enumerator:    B. F. Diffle  
Enumeration District:    28  
Page:    2  
Race:    W  
 
 


Esther Krost Thomas's Notes
Hermann Rasch, the eighth child and fifth son, of Ernst and Luise Rasch was born July 27, 1857 in either St. Clair or Clinton County, Illinois.
As a young man he and his brother Henry went to Nebraska to homestead. It is thought they possibly located in Lancaster County near Lincoln. A search of the indexes to the census records for Lancaster County, and the land records for the Lincoln area brought no results.
It is remembered, the brothers, like other homesteaders had a difficult time. First they had to build some sort of a house. They bought a team of mules with which to farm. The season was dry. Crops failed. One mule died. Uncle Henry went elsewhere for a while to find work to earn money to carry on and to buy another mule.
Coming from a large family and now suddenly finding himself all alone with neighbors miles away, he suffered intensely from loneliness and homesickness, but he tried to carry on. A temporary shelter had been constructed for the team. During a storm the shelter was blown down killing the last mule.
Herman Rasch never had the opportunity to return to Illinois to visit his family, for he died in Nebraska soon after going there. It is thought he was to young at the time to take up a claim and had gone to Nebraska with his older brother to keep him company , at the request of his Father.
Nothing is known as to the cause of his death nor the place of burial. There was a trumpet among his personal possessions returned to Illinois, so he too, must have been musically inclined.
  17 F x Mina(Minnie) Rasch 1 was born 19 Jul 1859 in Clinton County, Illiinois.

1860 Census, Carlyle Post Office, Clinton County, Illinois, page 155 (have copy) - Not Named Rash (spelling on census), age 1, born in Germany. (This child was born in Illinois rather than Germany.)
1870 Census, Trenton Post Office, Township 2 N R 3 W, Clinton County, Illinois, page 396a (have copy) - Mina Rasch, age 11, at home, born in Illinois, father of foreign birth, attended school within the last year.

Esther Krost Thomas's Notes
Mina Rasch, the ninth child and 4th daughter of Ernst and Luise  Rasch was born July 19, 1859 in C1inton County, Illinois. She was only one year, two months and eighteen days old when her Mother died.
Mina, or Minnie in English, was never a strong child, but lived until she was in her early teens. When her father played the accordion she loved to join her sisters and brothers in singing the German and American folk songs. She was buried in a cemetery near the family home which may have been south or south west of Trenton. A tombstone had been set to mark her grave, as also had been done to mark the grave of the Sohn infant, son of Georg and Luise (Rasch) Sohn, who was buried near by.
Many years later the writer's Mother asked her niece, Annie Rasch, to visit the two graves. They could not be found for a farmer living close by had converted the cemetery into a hog?lot. Some of the stones had been left for the pigs to root about, while others were used as steppingstones near his farm house. Benjamin Franklin said, "Show me first the graveyards of a country and I will tell you the character of its people." Although some of our old cemeteries are "lost" it is rather cheering to notice that in some cases they are receiving better care.

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