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Notes for Isaiah Harrison

The Families of Isaiah Harrison

1783 - Isaiah Harrison married Mary Reagan in Rockingham, Augusta, Virginia

January 06, 1800 - Isaiah Harrison married Elizabeth Whittenburg in Greene Co., Tennessee

1830 census Greene Co., TN page 153a
Isaiah Harrison
1 male 60-70 (Isaiah, age 68)
2 males age 20-30 (Caleb, age 25 & Joshua, age 25, James, age 22 or George, age 21?)
1 male age 5-10 (William W., age 14??)
1 female 60-70 (Elizabeth, age 60)
1 female 15-20 (Grace, age 19)
1 female 10-15 (Peggy?)
Next to households of John K. Harrison & Josiah Harrison. No slaves noted for anyone on this page. Numbers on Slave schedule are just the totals for people in the household.

February 26, 1839 - Isaiah Harrison married Mary Jones in Greene Co., Tennessee

1840 census Greene Co., TN
**Caleb Harrison
1 male 30-40
1 female 20-30
2 females under 5
**Izaiah Harrison
1 male 70-80 (Isaiah, age 78)
1 male 15-20 (William W., age 24??)
1 female 50-60 (Mary, age 56)
**Jeremiah Harrison
1 male 50-60 (Jeremiah, age 53)
2 males 30-40 (George, age 31 & ?)
1 male 20-30 (James, age 29)
1 male 15-20 (Benjamin W., age 13??)
(Where is William age 12?)
1 female 50-60 (Elizabeth, age 53)
1 female 20-30 (Rachel, age 23, Polly, age 25 or Nancy, age 27)
1 female 10-25 (??)
**Alexander Harrison
1 male 20-30 (Alexander, age 22))
1 male under 5 (Thomas, age 2)
1 female 20-30 (Cynthia Minerva, age 22)
**Henry Brooks
1 male 20-30 (Henry, age 45?????)
1 male 5-10 (Thomas N., age 6)
2 males under 5 (??)
1 female 15-20 Sarah, age 49??????)

1850 census 9th Division E District
#1360
John K. Harrison, age 54, farmer, b. TN
Mary, age 56, b. TN
Benjamin F., age 23, b. TN
Minerva J., age 20, b. NC, b. TN
Levinia E., age 18, b. TN
Elizabeth F., age 15, b. TN
Stephan J., age 13, b. TN
Brunetta E., age 10, b. TN
#1362
Jeremiah Harrison, age 63, farmer, b. TN
Elizabeth, age 63, b. TN
Willie, age 22, b. TN
#1364
William W. Harrison, age 34, farmer, b. TN
Mary, age 36, b. TN
Marion F., age 9, b. TN
Elbert J., age 4, b. TN
Nancy M., age 3, b. TN
#1365
Alexander Harrison, age 33, tenant, b. TN
Minerva, age 32, b. NC
Thomas M., age12, b. TN
Mary E., age 10, b. TN
Nancy J., age 8, b. TN
Martha, age 6, b. TN
Susan E., age 3, b. TN
#1366
William Harrison, age 66, farmer, b. TN
Catherine, age 64, b. PA
Elizabeth, age 37, b. TN
Martin, age 33, b. TN, farmer
Margaret, age 27, b. TN
Rachael, age 25, b. TN
#1367
Caleb Harrison, age 45, farmer, b. TN
Mary, age 32. b. Indiana
Catherine, age 12, b. TN
Amos, age 11
David, age 8
Jacob, age 1
#1368
Isaih Harrison, age 88, preacher, b. VA
Mary, age 66, b. SC

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harrisonrep/Harrison/d0015/g0000007.html#I235

Isaiah HARRISON
1 Feb 1762 - 1 Oct 1848
Repository ID Number: I235
OCCUPATION: Planter; Preacher
RESIDENCE: Rockingham Co., VA >Greene Co., TN
BIRTH: 1 Feb 1762, Augusta Co., VA
CHRISTENING: Quaker; Methodist
DEATH: 1 Oct 1848, Greene Co., TN
BURIAL: Harrison Cem. Harrison Rd.
RESOURCES: See: [S223] [S226] [S465]
Father: Jeremiah HARRISON
Mother: Catherine ADAMS
Family 1 : Mary (REAGAN?) OR (RAGAN?)
MARRIAGE: BEF 1783, Rockingham Co. VA
+Eleanor HARRISON
+Jeremiah HARRISON
Benjamin HARRISON
+Sarah HARRISON
Rachel HARRISON
John C HARRISON
Catherine F. HARRISON
Family 2 : Elizabeth WHITTENBURG
MARRIAGE: 6 Jan 1800, Greene Co. TN
Wesley HARRISON
+John K. HARRISON
Mary Polly HARRISON
Peggy HARRISON
+Caleb HARRISON
+Josiah HARRISON
Joshua HARRISON
James HARRISON
George HARRISON
Grace HARRISON
+William W. HARRISON
Family 3 : Mary JONES
MARRIAGE: 1839, Greene Co. TN [S465]

Notes
Tunis Hood Book states He was md three times, the name of his first wife and probably mother of several of his oldest children is unknown. 2nd wife was Elizabeth Whittenburgh, probably the mother of most of his children; 3rd wife was Mary Jones, no records of children by this marriage. Buried with his second and third wives in Harrison Cem, near Harrison School, six miles south of Greeneville, Tenn, in well marked graves. From his Will, and other reliable sources, the probable children are identified.
William m. Lents; Jeremiah md Eliz Jones; Eleanor md John Kelly Jr; John C. md Polly Brooks; Josiah md Nancy Henshaw; George md Eliz Martin; Caleb md Eliza Henshaw and Mary Bird; Rachel md Zaphaniah Woolsey; Mary Polly md Wm Woolsey; Grace md William Brooks; Wesley md Polly Carter; James md Rebecca Brooks; Sarah md Henry Brooks.

1850 Census Greene Co. TN; wife, Mary, age 66. Isaiah, age 88; preacher.

Isaiah's tombstone: The Bethesda United Methodiat Church, S. of Old Jonesborough Rd, on Harrison Rd, Greene Co. TN.

In the early 1780's, Isaiah, and William "Billy" were the pioneer settlers of the Harrison community, Nolichucky River, ten miles S. of Greeneville, TN. Founder of the Harrison Com. Ch. and contemporary of Bishop Francis Asbury. In 1808, Isaiah deeded land for the Meetinghouse to George Wells, Stephen Brooks, John Kelly, Sr, John Kelly, Jr. and John Whittenberg as Trustees in Trust.

Greene Co. Cemeteries:
Isaiah 2-1-1762 - 8-6-1848 with Wife Elizabeth 1770-1838, erected by Caleb Harrison at a later date. Isaiah d. 1851, he is on the 1850 census.
James 1808-1872.
Rebecca 1814-1872
Martin 1820-1874,
sister Rachel 1826-1902.
Newton A. 1847-1921, wife Mary J.
Gregory 1851-1920.
Benjamin W. 1827-1916; wife Catherine 1840-1921, daughters Louisa, infant, Teulope F.
William Henry 1881; wife Frances Ella 1882.

This is a partial list. Many of these have children buried there and dates are specific Analized first names against Watagua, NC lines; very similiar first names.

Worth Ray, TN Cousins, p. 70 tells about a group of Quakers came over the mountains from NC about 1790 including ELLIS's. Isaiah is mentioned as representing the Maryville Branch of Quakers and the Hickory Valley Branch at an 1822 convention. The Quaker movement was large but of short life, and stronger around Greeneville. This convention had to do with abolition of slavery. James Jones was President; Note: on the 1830 census Isaiah had 2 slaves. [S320] [S320] [S466] [S466]

Ballard-Miller
Entries: 38469 Updated: Sun Feb 1 10:45:13 2004 Contact: Brenda Brown Home Page: My Ballard - Miller Family
My Ballard and Miller Family
D: I22258
Name: Isaiah HARRISON
Sex: M
Birth: 1 FEB 1762 in Augusta Co, Virginia
Death: 6 AUG 1848 in Greene Co, VA
Father: Jeremiah HARRISON b: 1707 in Smithtown, Long Island, NY
Mother: Catherine HARRISON

Marriage 1 Mary JONES

Marriage 2 Mary REAGAN
Children
Eleanor HARRISON b: 10 MAR 1783
Jeremiah HARRISON b: 23 APR 1785 in Greene Co, TN
Benjamin HARRISON b: 9 JUN 1787
Sarah HARRISON b: 20 JAN 1791

Marriage 3 Elizabeth WHITTENBURG b: 1770 in South Carolina
Married: WFT Est 1783-1812
Children
Catherine F. HARRISON b: 16 APR 1779
William HARRISON b: 1784 in TN
John K. HARRISON b: 27 APR 1796 in TN
Peggy HARRISON b: 10 NOV 1800
Caleb HARRISON b: 12 FEB 1802 in TN
Josiah HARRISON b: 10 NOV 1802
Joshua HARRISON b: 12 FEB 1805
Grace HARRISON b: 11 NOV 1811
William W. HARRISON b: 1816 in TN

www.familysearch.com
Family Group Record FamilySearch™ Ancestral File v4.19
Husband's Name
Isaiah HARRISON (AFN:135R-5J3) Pedigree
Born: 1 Feb 1762 Place: , Augusta Co., Virginia, America
Died: 6 Aug 1848 Place: , Greene Co., Tn
Buried: 1851 Place: Harrisons Cem., Greene Co., Tn
Married: 1839 Place: , Greene Co., Tn
Father: Jeremiah HARRISON (AFN:9JBR-QD) Family
Mother: Catherine (AFN:135R-5HV)

Wife's Name
Mary JONES (AFN:1D10-XHV) Pedigree
Born: Abt. 1818 Place: <, Augusta Co., Virginia, America>
Married: 1839 Place: , Greene Co., Tn

Family Group Record FamilySearch™ Ancestral File v4.19
Husband's Name
Isaiah HARRISON (AFN:135R-5J3) Pedigree
Born: 1 Feb 1762 Place: , Augusta Co., Virginia, America
Died: 6 Aug 1848 Place: , Greene Co., Tn
Buried: 1851 Place: Harrisons Cem., Greene Co., Tn

Father: Jeremiah HARRISON (AFN:9JBR-QD) Family
Mother: Catherine (AFN:135R-5HV)

Wife's Name
Elizabeth WHITTENBURG (AFN:135R-755) Pedigree
Born: 10 Dec 1770 Place: , Washington Co., North Carolina, America
Christened: Place: Now, Greene Co., Tennessee
Died: 1838 Place: , Greene Co, Tn
Buried: 1838 Place: Harrisons Cem., Greene Co., Tn
Father: Frederick WITTENBERG (AFN:111X-7QS) Family
Mother: Margaret (AFN:111X-7R1)

Children

1. Sex Name
M Caleb HARRISON (AFN:135R-58F) Pedigree
Born: 1802 Place: , Greene Co., Tn
Died: 3 Mar 1881 Place: , Greene Co., Tn
Buried: 1881 Place: Harrisons Cem, Greene, Tn

2. Sex Name
M John K. HARRISON (AFN:1D14-1SM) Pedigree
Born: 27 Apr 1796 Place: , Greene Co., Tennessee
Died: 27 Sep 1863 Place:

3. Sex Name
M Josiah HARRISON (AFN:BF8K-6F) Pedigree
Born: 10 Nov 1802 Place: Greeneville, Greene, Tennessee

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~shipleyharrison/descendants%20of%20Rev.%20Thomas%20Harrison.htm#gen4

5. ISAIAH4 HARRISON (JEREMIAH3, ISAIAH2, REV. THOMAS1, RICHARDA, ROWLANDB)11 was born 01 February 1762 in Augusta Co., Virginia, and died Aft. 08 November 1850 in Greene Co., Tennessee12. He married (1) MARY REAGAN OR RAGAN Bef. 1783 in Rockingham Co., Virginia. She died Bef. 1800. He married (2) ELIZABETH WHITTENBURG 06 January 1800 in Greene Co., Tennessee. She was born 177013, and died 183814. He married (3) MARY JONES 13 February 1839 in Greene Co., Tennessee15,16. She was born Abt. 1784 in South Carolina17.

Notes for ISAIAH HARRISON:

1840 Greene Co Tennessee census, pg 7
Isaiah Harrison
1 male 15-20 ??
1 male 70-80 (Isaiah age 78)
1 female 50-60 (Mary age 56)

1850 Census Greene Co., Tennessee:
Isaiah age 88;preacher
wife Mary age 66

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harrisonrep/
From Harrison Genealogy Repository:

The Tunis Hood book states Isaiah Harrison was married three times. The name of his first wife and probably mother of several of his oldest children is unknown. Second wife was Elizabeth Whittenburgh, probably the mother of most of his children. Third wife was Mary Jones, no record of children by this marriage. Buried with his second and third wives in Harrison Cemetery, near Harrison School, six miles south of Greenville, Tennessee in well marked graves. From his will, and other reliable sources, the probable children are identified.

William m. Lents; Jeremiah md. Eliz Jones; Eleanor md John Kelly Jr; John C. md Polly Brooks; Josiah md Nancy Henshaw; George md Eliz Martin; Caleb md Eliza Henshaw and Mary Bird; Rachel md Zaphaniah Woolsey; Mary Polly md Wm Woolsey; Grace md William Brooks; Wesley md Polly Carter; James md Rebecca Brooks; Sarah md Henry Brooks.

In the early 1780's, Isaiah and William "Billy" were the pioneer settlers of the Harrison community, Nolichucky River, ten miles S. of Greeneville, Tennessee. Founder of the Harrison Com. Church and contemporary of Bishop Francis Asbury. In 1808 Isaiah deeded land for the meetinghouse to George Wells, Stephen Brooks, John Kelly Sr., John Kelly Jr., and John Whittenberg as trustees in trust. Worth Ray, Tennessee Cousins, p. 70 tells about a group of Quakers came over the mountains from North Carolina about 1790 including Ellis's. Isaiah is mentioned as representing the Mryville Branch of Quakers and the Hickory Valley Branch at an 1822 convention. The Quaker movement was large but of short life, and stronger around greeneville. This convention had to do with abolition of slavery. James Jones was president. Note: on 1830 census Isaiah had two slaves. Isaiah's tombstone: The Bethesda United Methodist Church, South of Old Jonesborough Rd., on Harrison Rd, Greeneville, Greene Co., Tennessee. It says 2-1-1762 - 8-6-1848 erected by Caleb Harrison. The date of death is wrong on the tombstone because Isaiah was on the 1850 census.

Greene Co Tax Lists, Capt Reese Gullock's Co-1798
133 ac, 25 squirrel scalps
Greene Co Tax Lists, Capt Reese Gullock's Co-1800
Harrason, Isaih 140 ac, 1 white poll
More About ISAIAH HARRISON:
Burial: Bethesda Cemetery (Harrison's), Greeneville, Greene, Tennessee
Christening: Quaker; Methodist
Occupation: Planter; Preacher
More About ELIZABETH WHITTENBURG:
Burial: Bethesda Cemetery (Harrison's), Greeneville, Greene, Tennessee
Children of ISAIAH HARRISON and MARY RAGAN are:
i. CATHERINE F.5 HARRISON, b. 16 April 1779.
Notes for CATHERINE F. HARRISON:
Need to check her dob. 1779 or 1799?
ii. ELEANOR HARRISON, b. 10 March 1783; d. 12 November 1871; m. JOHN KELLEY, JR., 11 March 1799, Greene Co.,TN
7. iii. JEREMIAH HARRISON, b. 23 April 1787, Greene Co., Tennessee; d. 03 September 1866, Greene Co., Tennessee.
iv. BENJAMIN HARRISON, b. 09 June 1787.
Notes for BENJAMIN HARRISON:
The existence of this son is questionable.
v. SARAH HARRISON, b. 20 January 1791, Greene Co., Tennessee; d. 1866, Greene Co., Tennessee; m. HENRY BROOKS, 09 January 1834, Greene Co., Tennessee.
vi. RACHEL HARRISON, b. Abt. 1793.
vii. JOHN C. HARRISON, b. 1796, Greene Co., Tennessee.
Children of ISAIAH HARRISON and ELIZABETH WHITTENBURG are:
viii. WESLEY5 HARRISON.
ix. JOHN K. HARRISON, b. 27 April 1796; d. 27 September 1863; m. MARY "POLLY" BROOKS, 24 August 1819, Greene Co., Tennessee.
x. MARY POLLY HARRISON.
xi. PEGGY HARRISON.
xii. CALEB HARRISON, b. 15 February 1802; d. 03 March 1884; m. (1) ELIZABETH HENSHAW, 15 March 1832, Greene Co., Tennessee; m. (2) MARY BROYLES BIRD, 20 March 1834, Greene Co., Tennessee; m. (3) MARY FARNSWORTH, 29 May 1860.
xiii. JOSIAH HARRISON, b. 10 November 1802; d. 1872; m. NANCY HENSHAW, 20 December 1827.
xiv. JOSHUA HARRISON.
xv. JAMES HARRISON.
xvi. GEORGE HARRISON.
xvii. GRACE HARRISON, b. 11 November 1811; m. WILLIAM BROOKS, 08 March 1832, Greene Co., Tennessee.
xviii. WILLIAM H. HARRISON.

http://www.tngenweb.org/goodspeed/greene
The first Methodist Church in Greeneville was built in 1821, and was known as Mount Moriah. it stood fronting on Irish Street, upon a lot back of where Mr. Blackstone McDaniel now lives. The trustees at that time were William Goodman, William Carter, Elza Bridewell, John Whittenburg, Peter Whittenburg, Richard M. Woods, William A. Hankins, Isaiah Harrison and Stephen Brooks. Afterward the congregation removed to a frame house, which had been erected at the southwest end of Main Street. This building was destroyed by fire and was replaced by the present brick structure, which is now occupied by the Methodist Episcopal Church South.
After the close of the war a Methodist Episcopal Church was organized, and for about nine years occupied the old building erected before the war. The were then dispossessed of this property through legal process by the Methodist Episcopal Church South. They then worshipped in the courthouse until they completed their present handsome church edifice in 1875.

The Goodspeed Publishing Co., History of Tennessee 1887Greene County

Green County is the fourth county in size in East Tennessee, having an area of 530 square miles. It lies between the Unaka Mountains on the south and Bays Mountains on the north, and is traversed by a series of valleys and ridges. The principal stream is the Nolachucky River, which receives as tributaries Lick Creek, Little Nolachucky, Horse Creek and Camp Creek. The soil of the county is generally fertile, with the exception of the extreme southern part, and even in this section the lands are found to be well adapted to tobacco culture. The richest farming lands occupy the northern portion of the county and the bottom of the “Chucky River.” The minerals embrace almost every variety found in East Tennessee, with the exception of coal. Iron is especially abundant in many places, and has been worked with success. The settlement of what is now Greene County was begun about 1788. One of the first settlers was Anthony Moore, who in that year located not far from Henderson’s Station, and whose daughter is said to have been the first white child born in the county. Other settlers followed soon after, and during the next two years, the greater part of the land, along Lick Creek and the Nolachucky River had been occupied. Daniel Kennedy came in 1779, and located on the river four miles east of Greenville, at the mouth of Holley Creek. He was one of the most prominent pioneers of the State, and deserves to rank with Sevier, Shelby and Cocke. He was chosen clerk of the county court upon the organization of the county, and continued to hold it under four successive changes of government, a sufficient proof of his integrity and worth. He was an ardent support of the State of Franklin, and was an active participant in the convention which founded it. He was also elected a brigadier-general of the Franklin militia. Among the other early settlers of the county were James English, on the headwaters of Lick Creek; Joseph Hardin, on the Roaring Fork of Lick Creek; George, William and Henry Conway, at the mouth of Lick Creek; Amos Bird, on the Chucky River; Alexander Galbraith, on Sinking Creek; James Delaney, on Holley Creek; Lewis Brayles, on Horse Creek; James Houston, in what is known as the Cove; Lanty Armstrong, on the sight of Rheatown; Robert Carr and Robert Hood, on the sight of Greeneville; James Patterson, who had four sons -- James, Andrew, Nathaniel and William -- located on Lick Creek in 1783. The Moores, Rankins and David Rice also settled in the same vicinity. A station was erected by the Carters about eight miles northwest of Greeneville. Zephaniah Woolsey lived south of the river. About 1790 a large number of Friends or Quakers began to come into the county from Pennsylvania and North Carolina, although a number of person of that faith had come several years before. Among the pioneers were William Reese, Garrett and Peter Dillion, William and Abraham Smith, Solomon, David and John B. Beales, Samuel and Mordecai Ellis, Abraham Marshall, Samuel Pearson, Samuel Stanfield and George Hayworth. The first religious services were held on the eleventh day of the ninth month, 1791. Other meetings were held from time to time, and on the twenty-eighth day of the second month, 1795, New Hope monthly meeting was organized about one mile west of Rheatown where a house of worship was erected. A church house was also erected on Lick Creek at an early day.
While some of these Friends were slave-holders the great majority was opposed to the institution of slavery, and it was among those earnest, simple and God-fearing people, that the first society for the abolition of negro slavery in America originated. The first branch of the Tennessee Manumission Society was organized at Lost Creek Meeting-house in Jefferson County on February 25, 1815. On that day eight persons met for the purpose of forming themselves into a society, under the style of the Tennessee Society for promoting the Manumission of Slaves. These persons were Charles Osborne, John Canady, John Swan, John Underwood, Jesse Willis, David Maulsby, Elihu Swan and Thomas Morgan. The constitution for this society was as follows:
ARTICLE I.
Each member is to have an advertisement in the most conspicious part of his house, in the following words, viz.: “Freedom is the natural right of all men. I therefore acknowledge myself a member of the Tennessee Society for promoting the manumission of slaves.” ARTICLE II. That no member vote for a governor or legislator unless he believes him to be in favor of emancipation.
ARTICLE III.
That we convene twelve times at Lost Creek Meeting-house. The first on the 11th of the third month next ****** shall proceed to appoint a president, clerk and treasurer, who shall continue in office twelve months.
ARTICLE IV.
The required qualification of our members are true Republican principles **** and in form of ***** and that no immoral character be admitted into the society as a member.
Soon after societies were formed in Greene, Sullivan, Washington and Cocke Counties and in Knoxville, and on the 21st of November, 115, the first general convention was held at Lick Creek Meeting-house of Friends, in Greene County. The second annual convention was held on the 19th and 20th of November, 1816, at Greeneville. Unfortunately the first minutes of this society have been lost, and but little is known of the original members of other branch societies. The first secretary was John Marshall. How long this society existed could not be ascertained, but the following facts are learned from the minutes of the eighth annual convention, held at the Friends’ Meeting-house at Lick Creek, in Jefferson County, on August 12 and 13, 1822. The delegates present were as follows: Green Branch -- John Marshall, Samuel McNees and David Stanfield; Maryville Branch -- David Delzel, ISAIAH HARRISON, Aaron Hackney and Andrew Cowan; Hickory Valley Branch --ISAIAH HARRISON and John Coulson; Nolachucky Branch -- Lawrence Earnest; Turkey Creek Branch -- William Milliken; Washington Branch -- Joseph Tucker; French Broad Branch -- William Snoddy and John McCroskey; Holston Branch -- Jesse Lockhart; Jefferson Branch -- John and James Caldwell and Elisha Hammer; Middle Creek Branch -- John Kerr. Beaver Creek, Sullivan, Powell’s Valley, Knoxville and Newport Branches were not represented. James Jones was chosen president; Thomas Doan, clerk, and Asa Gray, treasurer. The whole number of members in the various branches was reported at 474. Robert M. Anderson and Jesse Lockhart were appointed to draw up a memorial to Congress, and Stephen Brooks, Thomas Doan, Wesley Earnest, Abraham Marshall and James Jones were appointed the committee of inspection for the ensuing year. As had been the custom at each preceding convention an address advocating the abolition of slavery, to be distributed to the various branch societies, was prepared. Since it inaugurated the anti-slavery agitation, which culminated in the civil war, the organization of this society must be regarded as one of the most important events in the history of the country.
The first Methodist society in the State was organized in this county. It was named Ebenezer, and was established in the Earnest neighborhood some time about 1790. This neighborhood is on the Nolachucky River, opposite the present Fullen’s Depot. Henry Earnest located there in 1778 or 1779. He was the father of five sons and six daughters, and it is said that his wife with the children constituted four fifths of the membership of the new church. The first church building was erected prior to 1795, as in that year the Western Conference held its annual meeting there. From this time for several years this church seems to have been a favorite meeting place of the conference, that body having convened there in 1801, 1805, 1807 and 1822. One of the largest camp-grounds ever built within the bounds of the Holston Conference was erected about one and one-half miles from Ebenezer, near what is now Henderson’s Depot. It was used for many years and was not abandoned until the civil war. It was known as Stone Dam Camp-ground.
Another Methodist society was organized at a very early day at Vanpet’s, in the vicinity of Carter’s Station, on the north side of Nolachucky, in the western part of the county, where a camp-ground called Center was erected some time prior to 1813. The first church building was built as early as 1792.

The first Methodist Church in Greeneville was built in 1821, and was known as Mount Moriah. it stood fronting on Irish Street, upon a lot back of where Mr. Blackstone McDaniel now lives. The trustees at that time were William Goodman, William Carter, Elza Bridewell, John Whittenburg, Peter Whittenburg, Richard M. Woods, William A. Hankins, ISAIAH HARRISON and Stephen Brooks. Afterward the congregation removed to a frame house, which had been erected at the southwest end of Main Street. This building was destroyed by fire and was replaced by the present brick structure, which is now occupied by the Methodist Episcopal Church South.
After the close of the war a Methodist Episcopal Church was organized, and for about nine years occupied the old building erected before the war. The were then dispossessed of this property through legal process by the Methodist Episcopal Church South. They then worshipped in the courthouse until they completed their present handsome church edifice in 1875.