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Notes for William Allen Thorn (after 1860 he stopped using the Thorn surname and was known as William ALLEN)

The Families of Lawrence Thorn

Born November 1837 in NY according to 1900 census

1840 - Benton, Yates Co., NY
Lawrence Thorn household:
1 male under 5 (this confuses me. He should have George, age 4; William Allen, age 2 & Fayette, age 1)
1 male 30 & under 40 (Lawrence, age 31, born abt 1809)
1 female under 5 (this confuses me too. His first daughter was born in 1842. Unless the census taker thought Fayette was a girl??)
1 female 20 & under 30 (Hannah, age 27, born 1813)

1848 Lawrence & wife & 6 children among 1st families of Corning, NY

1850 census Painted Post, Steuben Co., NY
Lawrence Thorn, age 40, Mason, b. NJ
Hannah, age 37, b. NJ
George, age 14, b. NJ
William, age 12, b. NY
Fayette, age 11, b. NY
Sarah J., age 8, b. NY
Edward, age 6, b. NY
Maryette, age 3, b. NY
Charles, age 1, b. NY

1855 Census, Scio, Allegany Co., NY shows Lawrence Thorn age 35, Martha age 23 , George age 15, Fayette age 14, Jane age 13, Manult (think they mean Maryetta) age 7 and Edwin 2/12 b. Allegany Co. For the others they have birth place marked unknown, so I wonder if Martha might have given the information and being 2nd wife she would not know where step children were born. Where were William and Francis Edwin at this time?

1860 census Three Grove PO, Cass Co., NE page 69 (listed on familytreemaker.com as page 125) August 7, 1860
#608/467
S. G. Todd, age 30, farmer, b. NY
Lydia Todd, age 25, b. OH
Alminia Todd, age 4, b. NE
Lizzie Todd, age 2, b. IA
D. P. Todd (male), age 2 months, b. NE
Philip Ingle, age 25, laborer, b. MI
William Allen, age 23, laborer, b. NY

AND

Is this Mary Rice or a relative of hers??
1860 census Nemaha Co., Nebraska Territory
#661/612
James Rice, age 25, b. NY
Mary Rice, age 24, b. NH
Georgiana, age 4, b. WI
Ella, age 10/12, b. WI

June 1863 - William Allen (Thorn) married Mary Rice, in Appleton, Iowa, Scotch marriage, no reverend

Served in the Civil War in the 34th Regiment Iowa, Companies C & G
http://freepages.history.rootsweb.com/~cooverfamily/compg.html
Allen, William, age 26, nativity New York, enlisted Jan. 4, 1864. (Company C)

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~isabell/frame.html?IA34th.html
Allen, William (Co. G, Consolidated Co C)- Age 26. Residence, Des Moines. Nativity, NY. Enlisted, Jan. 4, 1864. Mustered Jan 4, 1864. Transferred to 34th Consolidated , Nov. 12, 1864.

http://freepages.history.rootsweb.com/~cooverfamily/consola.html
For service record of men transferred from the 34th Regiment IA Volunteer Infantry see Company after name. All were mustered out August 15, 1865 in Houston, TX, unless otherwise noted.

1867-1868 Erie Business Directory:
Amos Thorn brakeman E. and P. R.R., bds 1299 Chestnut
Edwin Thorn confectionary and fruit store, 609 French
F. Thorn, fruit and variety store, 8 South Park Place, h 26 E 7th
William Thorn, gentleman, h French St. bet R.R. and Buffalo (I don't think this is same William)
Does not list Lawrence Thorn.

1870 census Brownville Pct, Nemaha Co., NE page 284a
#301/291
William Allen, age 32, keep grocery, b. NY
Mary, age 30, keep house, b. NY
Ida M., age 2, b. NE
Estella, age 3 months, b. NE

1880 United States Census Fairbury, Jefferson, Nebraska Page Number 650D
Name Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace
William ALLEN Self M Male W 40 NY Carpenter NY NY
Mary ALLEN Wife M Female W 39 NY Housekeeper NY NY
Ida M. ALLEN Dau S Female W 12 NE NY NY
Florence C. ALLEN Dau S Female W 10 NE NY NY
Charles ALLEN Son S Male W 7 NE NY NY

1885 census Fairbury, Jefferson Co., Nebraska, 02 Jun 1885
Willie Allen, age 46, b. New York
Mary Allen, age 44, b. New York
Ida Allen, age 17, b. New York
Florence Allen, age 15, b. Nebraska
Charles Allen, age 12, b. Nebraska

1890 Veteran's schedule, Fairbury, Jefferson Co., Nebraska
Line 30, House #121, Family #133
William Allen
Rank - Private
Company G, 34th Regiment Iowa
Unknown for dates of enlistment & discharge & length of service
No disability listed

1890 NEBRASKA STATE GAZETTEER
Business Directory for 1890-1891
Omaha: J. M. Wolfe & Co., Publishers, 509-510 Paxton Block 1890
Entered according to Act of Congress in the year of 1890, by J. M. Wolfe & Co., in the
Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.

FAIRBURY, the county seat of Jefferson county, is near the center of the county, on the Little Blue river, and has a population of 5,000. It is located on the main line of the C.R.I. & P.R.R. and the St. J. & G.I. division of the U.P. Ry. It is the division station of both lines. A $60,000 court house is in course of construction; a ward school house to cost $6,000 is being erected. Twelve brick business blocks have been completed. Among the enterprising firms doing business here are the Fairbury Iron Works, manufacturers of the "King" windmill, engines, castings, boilers and farm machinery; a planing mill, a roller flour mill, three banks and one banking company, extensive nurseries, etc. The town has also several good hotels, a fine opera house and good church buildings. The churches are Presbyterian, Baptist, Christian and Catholic.

Allen Wm, bakery, confectionery.

abt 1891 - moved from Nebraska to Washington

1892 State Census Seattle, King Co., Washington
Wm Allen, age 54, Speculator, b. NY
Mary, age 52, Housewife, b. NY
Ida W., age 24, Merchant, b. Nebraska
Florence, age 22, b. Nebraska
Chas, age 20, merchant, b. Nebraska

1900 Seattle, King Co., WA District 104 page 258A Precinct 1 6th Ward Roll 1745, Book 1
2117 First Avenue
#36
William Allen, head, Nov 1837, age 63, md 40 yrs, NY/NY/NY, Baker
Mary, wife, May 1839, age 60, md 40 yrs, 2 children, 2 surviving, NY/NY/NY
Ida, daughter, May 1868, age 32, Nebraska/NY/NY, Lodging H.
Charles, son, Nov 1873, age 26, Nebraska/NY/NY, miner
Charles S. Gelespie, head, Aug 1879 (should be 1869), age 30, md 5 yrs, IN/OH/KY, house contract (on familytreemaker.com index as Christopher)
Florence, wife, March 1870, age 30, md 5 yrs, 1 birth, 1 surviving, Nebraska/NY/NY
Breta M., daughter, Jan 1897, age 3, WA/IN/NE

1906 Estate Deed shows his name as William Allen & his wife as Mary Rice Thorn living at 2025 1/2 First Ave., Seattle, Wash.

1910 census Seattle, King Co., WA 6th Ward page 11 Sheet 3A District 115
2025 1/2 First Avenue #28/33
William Allen, head, age 72, first marriage, md 48 yrs, NY/NY/NY, Baker, keeper, lodging house
Mary, wife, age 71, first marriage, md 48 yrs, 5 children, 3 surviving, NY/NY/NY
4 lodgers listed in household also

LDS film # 1612124
Seattle City Directory commencing May 1st 1916
Allen, Chas W (Ida M) grocer 601 21st h 523 do pg. 314
Allen, Wm (Mary) h 724 21st av pg. 317
Gillespie, Chas S (Florence E) gen contr r 724 21st av pg. 724
Spinney, David A (Ida M) Reliable House Mover, Grading and Foundation Work, General Contractor, Prompt Service, Good Work My Motto 7527 12th av NW Tel Ballard 1312 pg. 1446
Thorne, Fred L (Lottie) lineman h R D I pg. 1512

Commencing May 1st 1917 LDS film # 1612124 & # 1612125
Allen, Chas W (Ida M) (Allen & Henderson) h 523 21st av pg. 315
Allen, Wm (Mary) h 1815 23d av pg. 318
Gillespie, Chas S (Florence E) salsn h 1431 8th pg. 743
Spinney, David A (Ida M) house mover 7527 12th av NW h do
Could not find Fred & Lottie Thorne listed

May 24, 1917 - Mary Rice Allen died

Commencing May 1st, 1918 LDS film # 1612125
Allen, Chas W (Ida M) (Allen & Henderson) h 523 21st ave pg. 317
Allen, Wm r 523 21st ave (I forgot to note the pg. #)
Gillespie, Chas S (Florence) ins agt h 7527 12th av NW pg. 807 (Note: this is the same address as David A. Spinney in 1917)
Peckham, Thos E (Mary) shipwkr h 225 W 39th pg. 1416
Could not find David A & Ida M. Spinney listed
Thorne, Fred L (Lottie) ship calker h 218 W Kilbourne pg. 1731
Thorne, Grace r 218 W Kilbourne pg. 1731 (Note she is Fred's sister)

Family story is that he was called Will & was to have been a Gov't Scout - Last heard from in Fairbanks, Alaska, & may have been with Kit Carson according to Mary Jane Harris (Possibly Fairbury, Nebraska got misheard as Fairbanks, Alaska????)

----- Original Message -----
From: Elizabeth Macdonald
To: Kari Northup
Sent: Sunday, July 03, 2005 9:55 PM
Subject: William Allen/Thorn

Hi Kari,
I have been so busy with helping other people on their research that I decided I needed to stop and do some of my own.

Read the 1916, 1917 & 1918 Seattle City Directories.

I found him in those. I will get those typed up and pass on to you. At least we know he was still alive in 1918. I also ordered the Steuben Co. cemetery films and will be reading them next. Keep hoping to find Hannah in one of them.

I will get back with you. Betty Macdonald

----- Original Message -----
From: Elizabeth Macdonald
To: Kari Northup
Sent: Monday, July 04, 2005 8:14 PM
Subject: Seattle City Directories

Here is what I found:

LDS film # 1612124
Seattle City Directory commencing May 1st 1916
Allen, Chas W (Ida M) grocer 601 21st h 523 do pg. 314
Allen, Wm (Mary) h 724 21st av pg. 317
Gillespie, Chas S (Florence E) gen contr r 724 21st av pg. 724
Spinney, David A (Ida M) Reliable House Mover, Grading and Foundation Work, General Contractor, Prompt Service, Good Work My Motto 7527 12th av NW Tel Ballard 1312 pg. 1446
Thorne, Fred L (Lottie) lineman h R D I pg. 1512

Commencing May 1st 1917 LDS film # 1612124 & # 1612125
Allen, Chas W (Ida M) (Allen & Henderson) h 523 21st av pg. 315
Allen, Wm (Mary) h 1815 23d av pg. 318
Gillespie, Chas S (Florence E) salsn h 1431 8th pg. 743
Spinney, David A (Ida M) house mover 7527 12th av NW h do
Could not find Fred & Lottie Thorne listed

Commencing May 1st, 1918 LDS film # 1612125
Allen, Chas W (Ida M) (Allen & Henderson) h 523 21st ave pg. 317
Allen, Wm r 523 21st ave (I forgot to note the pg. #)
Gillespie, Chas S (Florence) ins agt h 7527 12th av NW pg. 807 (Note: this is the same address as David A. Spinney in 1917)
Peckham, Thos E (Mary) shipwkr h 225 W 39th pg. 1416
Could not find David A & Ida M. Spinney listed
Thorne, Fred L (Lottie) ship calker h 218 W Kilbourne pg. 1731
Thorne, Grace r 218 W Kilbourne pg. 1731 (Note she is Fred's sister)

Then on the Internet - Distant Cousin.com/Directories/WA/Seattle on pg. 286 for 1923, I found:
Allen, Chas W (Ida) gro 601 21st av h 711 do

That seems to be the extend of the Thorne family in Seattle for those years. I did see Chas M Thorn for 1917 & 1918, but I am not sure if he is the one we want.

Betty

http://www.brumm.com/genealogy/walkers_moyers/certificates/Iowa34th.html

On the 21st of September (1864) , Col. Clark, Capts. Boyle, Clark, Waters, Herring and Lieut. Clauson started north for recruiting service. On the 12th day of September, 1864, by order of Maj. Gen. E. R. S. Canby, commanding the military division of the west Mississippi, the Thirty-Fourth and Thirty-Eighth Iowa were consolidated, making a full regiment of about a thousand men, one of the finest regimental organizations that ever marched to martial music.

From the organization of the Thirty-Fourth up to this time, 214 officers and men had been killed or died of disease. With sorrowful and regretful feelings we bade good bye to those who, by the consolidation, were super-numerary and mustered out. Among them, Adjutant Bryant, Capt. Hatton and Lieut.. Boyd, Comins and Dilley, all brave, noble and true men, who had been tried in the fire and not found wanting.

Together we had stood shoulder to shoulder in battle and enjoyed victory; together endured hunger, thirst, storms, heat, cold, fatigue and disaster. There will be found in a supplement to this sketch a roster of the officers of the Regiment, as first organized, and of the Regiment after the consolidation.

The regiment remained in the vicinity of Morganza until the 25th of January, 1865, when we went by water to Barrancas, Fla., this movement being part of the general campaign, under the direction of Gen. Canby, against Mobile.

We arrived at Barrancas on the 28th day of January, 1865. At this time the regiment went into a delightful encampment in a grove of evergreens, on the main land, just across the bay from Fort Pickens, Gen. C. C. Andrew in command of the brigade. It is a pleasant spot in the history of the regiment, and one to be ever remembered as a sort of compensation for the distress and discomfort experienced in many localities.

On the 11th of March the regiment broke camp at Barrancas and marched to Pensacola, a distance of about sixteen miles by land, and half that distance by water.

Ten thousand men, under Gen. Steele, left the old historic town of Pensacola, Florida, on the 20th of March, 1865. Gen. C. C. Andrews commanded the second divisions of these troops; Col. G. W. Clark, the Thirty-Fourth Iowa Infantry, one of the best regiments in the division. The Thirty-Fourth was often called the Star regiment, because its number was the same as the stars which filled the field of our flag, and represented the number of States in our Union at that time. For eleven days we marched through Florida swamps, corduroying many miles of road, were rained upon hours each day, slept in damp clothes at night, were on half rations the last five days: our men gathered and ate the corn which had been left on the ground by the enemy's pickets and had been slobbered over by their horses. During this time we had numerous skirmishes with the rebel cavalry. The first day of April found us opposite Blakely, Ala., at one time a town of three thousand people, now one of the main defenses of Mobile. The fortifications around Blakely were circular in form, three miles long, and included nine well built redoubts. They were armed with forty pieces of artillery, and surrounded by ditches four to five feet deep. All the trees six to eight hundred yards in their front had been felled. Fifty yards out from the works was a line of abatis, and opposite some of the redoubts a second line, then three hundred yards out to the front, parallel with their works, was another line of abatis and behind the latter detached rifle pits. These works were manned by three thousand and five hundred of the enemy. The second of April which operation we lost sixty or seventy killed and wounded.

Hawkins' Division, which was composed of colored troops, was on the right, Andrews' Division in the center, and Garrad's on the left. It is supposed that ten men, well protected by earth works, can successfully resist three or four times their number. So, instead of throwing our troops against the enemy's fortifications, with great loss of life and possible repulse, Gen. Steele determined to work up as near his lines as possible, with pick and shovel, with which we were well supplied. In fact, when the campaign of Mobile was commenced, Gen. Canby, in general orders, provided that one pic, one ax, and one spade be carried by every twelve men. Our first entrenchments were dug a thousand yards from the enemy's works.

For the benefit of our posterity, a few words as to temporary intrenchments [sic] may be inserted here. They are usually called "rifle pits", and are two or three feet deep, the dirt being thrown on the side toward the enemy; occasionally on top of this dirt will be placed the trunk of a tree six or seven inches in diameter. By scraping away a little earth from under this trunk, the enemy could be observed without exposing the heads of our men. These trenches were always dug at night, no talking above a whisper being permitted, and no sound but that which came from digging with pics and shovels. Owing to the scarcity of these, it took three nights' work to complete our first line. The fourth night, the supply of intrenching tools having been increased, more rapid progress was made, so that by the eighth night we had finished a second and a third line of intrenchments, the last being six feet wide and capable of holding troops in three ranks, and was 600 yards from the rebel works.

The skirmishers in front of our division entrenched themselves within eighty yards of the enemy's outer line of pickets. In the mean time small forts for our artillery had been constructed along our first and second lines, and the guns of our light batteries placed in them.

The enemy was not quiet while this was going on as any exposure of our men drew his fire, both of musketry and artillery, killing and wounding each day twenty to forty of ours. Spanish Fort, eight miles south, which had been invested March 27th by the Sixteenth Army Corps, surrendered to Gen. A. J. Smith on the 8th, and some of the guns used in its siege were immediately sent to Gen. Steele, who had them placed in position during the night of the 8th and the morning of the 9th.

Five o'clock, the evening of the 9th day of April was fixed as the hour for a general assault of the enemy's works. At that hour the simultaneous firing of all the cannons on the line of the second division was to be the signal for the charge.

Owing to an unforeseen delay, this signal was not given until 5:30 p.m. At that hour our troops had all been formed in line of battle, in the lines of entrenchments nearest the enemy with bayonets fixed. One regiment of each brigade was deployed as skirmishers along the front of its brigade, in the entrenchments. Breathlessly they waited the signal to move forward. The silence was interrupted only by an occasional shot from a rebel picket.

The waiting and suspense was a severe test of courage. Some tried to conceal their anxiety by an effort to appear reckless, careless and brave, and whispered jokes and puns, pretending they enjoyed it immensely.

Others, more serious, gave their comrades messages to be delivered to loved ones at home, in case they fell. The countenances of none indicated that they shrank from the approaching contest; while all dreaded it, they were impatient for the battle.

With the crashing of the signal guns our first line of skirmishers leaped from the trenches and with yells rushed forward 150 yards, while the second line, with loud cheering soon joined them and all rushed forward together. Now every cannon the enemy had on his lines, and every rifle, poured forth their deadly missiles on our men, and tempests of bullets, pieces of bursting shell, canister and grape whistled about their ears.

They were met by deadly and unseen and unknown dangers in sunken torpedoes, which, when trod upon, exploded, stripping the flesh from their legs, and wounding terribly. Fallen trees, abatis and wire stretched along near the ground impeded their way and exposed them longer to the enemy's fire. No reply was made except by our artillery, which pounded away over our heads at their forts.

In fifteen minutes we had surmounted all the obstructions, climbed their works and given them the bayonet. They staggered backward and dropping their guns, threw up their hands in token of surrender, and our work was done.

We were victorious but 654 of our men, who an hour before were joking and laughing with each other, had been laid low. In these fifteen minutes our losses were greater than those on our side in the four revolutionary battles of Lexington, Bunker Hill, Trenton and Bennington.

We captured 3,423 prisoners, 40 pieces of artillery besides small arms. The enemy's loss in killed was probably a third as much as ours. Gen. Steele reached the works soon after the capture, and in his squeaky voice exclaimed: "I knew you'd do it, I knew you'd do it."

Those were glorious moments. There are few such in a life time. Victory had crowned our efforts. The end for which days of toil and nights of waking had been passed, was quickly and gloriously accomplished. At half past three this same afternoon, Lee, at Apomattox, had surrendered to Grant and the war was virtually over two hours before our charge.

On the 14th of April our regiment entered triumphantly into the city of Mobile. One hundred guns were fired in honor of this event, and glorious victories reported from all quarters.

Mobile, a city of 25,000 before the war, was reduced at this time to about 12,000.

While the regiment was still rejoicing over the great victories, and as we were steaming up the Alabama River we received a signal announcing the assassination on the 14th of President Lincoln and Secretary Seward, causing great revulsion of feeling, from highest exultation to deepest sorrow.

On the 24th we landed at Selma, Ala., where we remained in camp a few days only. We returned to Mobile, where we remained, performing light guard duty, awaiting developments until June, when the division under command of Gen. C. C. Andrews, sailed for Galveston, Tex. Feeling that the war was closed, and our contract filed, this movement was very distasteful, and gave rise to many complaints from the boys.

We arrived at Galveston and soon after proceeded to Houston, Tex. Our regiment marched through the streets of this old historic town, the first army if free "Yankee" soldiers who had ever trod the soil of that region. The dwellings were closed, shutters were drawn, the women of that city having sworn never to look upon a Yankee, hence they closed and barred their doors and windows.

But it is historically true, and should be so recorded, that before the Thirty-Fourth left Houston, many of these rebel ladies smiled sweetly upon the "Boys in Blue," and the leading spirit of them all married a Yankee soldier, and now lives happily with him in Chicago.

Others became wives of Union soldiers.

Our stay in Houston was in many respects comfortable and pleasant, but all were eager and anxious to return to their homes. We did not leave Houston, however, until the 17th of August, when the regiment was mustered out of service, and returned to Iowa, to peace, rest and home.

Before closing I would like to speak of the courage, excellencies of character, and efficiency of Gen. Clark, of Col. Dungan, of Majors Kellogg and Kern -- poor Kern, who tried so hard to see us at our last re-union, and who is now awaiting us beyond, for the last and final re-union above -- of Bryant, Davis, Coffmann and the captains and others -- but what shall I say more? For the time would fail me to tell of Gideon, and of Barak, and of Sampson, and of Jeptha and all the rest. Other historians must follow and carry forward and finish the work.

Respectfully submitted,

J. S. Clark
Historian