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The Carroll Family of Washington Parish

 

A Work in Progress

The Carroll Family
Click on the picture to see an older, more detailed copy of this picture.

The people in this picture are Grief Carroll and his wife Caroline Oswald, their son Sam Carroll and his wife Mary Jarrell, and Sam and Mary’s children. Grief and his wife Caroline are the older couple standing in the back row. I believe the picture was taken around the fall of 1911. Not all of Sam and Mary Carroll’s children are in this picture. Their children were Fronia Carroll Primes (b. 7-28-1894 d. March 1924); Felix Ernest (b. 9-22-1896 d. 11-18-1921); Lula Carroll Miley (b. 2-16-1899 d. 11-10-1927); William H. “Willie” (b. around 1901 d. in 1950’s); Charles O. “Charlie” (b. 2-8-1903 – d. 12-25-1952); George W. (b. 2-17-1905 d. 4-1924); Reece S. (b. 7-11-1908 d. 9-5-1950); Reuben Richmond (b. 7-7-1909 d. 1-21-1971); John Quincy “J Q” (b. 5-31-1911 d. 3-23-1981); Jessie Paul (b. 6-1-1913 d. 1-16-1961); Daniel H. (b. 4-15-1916 d. 9-23-1981); and Eva Carroll Rogers (b. 1-7-1918 d. 8-27-1978).
Terra Nobles Miley had the original picture.


Much of the following information was taken from census records, Civil War pension applications for Grief and his brother Samuel Carroll and Solomon Oswald, family memories, cemetery records, and from the research of people who are connected in various ways to this family.

The Early Years of the Carroll Family

The following information about Grief and Samuel Carroll's grandparents, Grief and Martha Carroll was contributed by Michael Hill, a descendant of Elizabeth "Betsy" Carroll who married William Williams in Madison County, Alabama in December 1821. Elizabeth was probably the daughter of William W. Carroll's father Grief Carroll. Michael has been researching the Carroll family since 1998.

Grief and Martha Carroll were the parents of William W. Carroll. William W. Carroll and his wife Sarah were the parents of Grief Carroll of Washington Parish.

Grief Carroll's (husband of Martha) mother was Molly Douglass, daughter of David Douglass. His paternal grandfather was probably Daniel Carrol of NC, who served at one point as a local Constable. He left a will in NC in the 1770's. Daniel also had a brother, William Carroll.

The family migrated from North Carolina to South Carolina after the Revolution, then to Hancock County, Georgia, then Alabama. Grief's son William W. Carroll was living in Tennessee when his sons Grief and Samuel were born. They later moved to Mississippi and then to Louisiana.

Grief had a brother, Douglass Carroll who served in the American Revolution. He was born in 1760 in NC. After the Revolutionary War, he moved to Hancock County, Georgia where he died in 1827. Douglass married Elizabeth Vinson, daughter of David Vinson. They had four sons: Richmond, David, Harwell and Allen Carroll. Douglass' son Allen Carroll's given name was Alfred Allison Carroll, but he was called Allen. Allen married Elizabeth Mapp, daughter of Captain John Mapp, in Georgia around 1800. Douglass' son Richmond migrated from Alabama, then Mississippi, finally settling in Texas.

Grief married Martha ___. They had the following children: Richmond Carroll, M.D., James Georgia Carroll who married Rachel Edwards in Madison County, Alabama in 1820, William W. Carroll who married Sarah___. Elizabeth - unconfirmed. William and Sarah had at least the following children: Grief, Samuel W., Catherine, Elizabeth and probably Sarah. Grief died in Lauderdale County, Alabama in 1836.

The following is the Will of Grief Carroll:

WILL OF GRIEF CARROLL, STATE OF ALABAMA, LAUDERDALE COUNTY

I Grief Carroll of the County aforementioned being of sound mind and memory do ordain and constitute this my last Will and Testament by these presence revolking all former Wills by me make to date.

Item 1 My body to be decently interred without incurring any unnecessary expense, I bequeath to mother earth and my spirit to God who gave it.

Item 2 Should be beloved wife, Martha Carroll, survive me, unto her I give and bequeath six Negroes, Frerdrick, for a life of age about 48 years, Edinborough male slave for life of the age of about 24 years, Jenny female slave for life about the age of 55 years, Lerides (?) female slave for life about the age of 42 years, Charity Mulatto girl slave for life of the age of about 17 years, and Betty female slave for life of the age of about 14 years, and further to my beloved wife, I further give and bequeath the following personal property--one horse to be worth $75, tow beds and furniture, one yoke of oxen and one cart, one half of all the household and kitchen furniture except the beds, one year's provisions for her and family, two cows and calves, and further unto the land and promises of herein, i now give and bequeath with all the apportions to my beloved wife, and should she not be disposed to continue to live through my ancestors herein after named are requested and authorized to give the said promises at auction or other ways as they may think proper, and the proceeds arriving from such sales of goods placed in the hands of my son James G. Carroll with which to purchase another place of land for my said wife wherever she may want to move. All the above described property is given and bequeathed to my dearly beloved wife during her natural life, but it is my express wish and bequest that should my wife survive me that due to the property to her above willed and bequeathed share immediately upon my death bed in the hands of and possession of my son, James G. Carroll, who I do hereby ordain and consititue the Trustee of my beloved wife, who is hereby empowered to use the said property in any manner he may think proper for the use and benefit of my said wife, and of the porceeds arising from the work and labor of land, six Negroes with the personal property of aforesaid and tallies of said land after first and annually providing my dearly beloved wife with everything she may desire or may be necessary for her ease and comfort. The balance, he, my said son, James, is authorized to apply to his own undertakings and use.

Item 3 Should my wife survive me of the six Negroes to her above bequest with the land and promises and personal property at her death, I wish disposed of in the following manner: Fredrick and Leudes (?) slaves of aforesaid with the beds aforesaid and personal property of aforesaid, I wish my Executor hereinafter named to sell at public auction on such time as they may think proper and the proceeds of such sale, I wish my Executors to divide equally between James G. Carroll, William W. Carroll, and the heirs of Katherine Matthews, and Joseph S. Carroll should said Joseph apply for his dividend in two years of my wife's death, but said Joseph not apply for said two years, I wish his dividend to be equally divided between James G. Carroll, William W. Carroll, and the heirs of Katherine Matthews.

Item 4 After death of my wife, the aforementioned and said promises whereon she may reside, i give and bequeath to John C. Matthews.

Item 5 At the death fo my wife, to my son James G. Carroll I give and bequeath four Negroes named Edinborough, Jenny, Charity, and Betty.

Item 6 At the death of my wife, I give and bequeath to William W. Carroll one Negro boy named Caleb.

Item 7 At the death of my wife unto John C. Matthews, I give and bequeath one Negro boy called Gebtatha.

Item 8 At my death, all the property herein I may possess of, I wish disposed of at public auction and out of the proceeds of such sale, I wish all my honorable debts paid off and discharged, and the balance remaining from such sale (disregarding $100 for Katherine Douglass) I give and bequeath to Joseph S. Carroll should he apply for the dividends in two years from and after my death, but should said Joseph not make such application, in two years, I wish said balance equally divided between James G. Carroll, William W. Carroll, and the heirs of Katherine Matthews.

Item 9 At the death of my wife, James G. Carroll will be indebted to the heirs of Katherine Matthews for him and the heirs, I wish my executors to take his notes for the same without interest to be said in five equal payments of $100 cash such notes with good and sufficient security are to be plced in the hands of the guardian of such heirs.

Item 10 At my death and out of the provision of the sale of my property not disposed of by the Will, I give and bequeath to Katherine Douglass $100.

Item 11 Provided Charles B. Matthews permits John C. Matthews to remain with his grandmother and Katherine Douglass

Item 12 I do hereby appoint my son James G. Carroll and my trusty friend William Gambal my executors to this my last Will and Testament and also request that William Gambal to act as guardian to the heirs of Katherine Matthews.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my hand and seal this 20th day of August, 1824.

Signed: GRIEF "X" CARROLL

Witnesses: D. McNeal, James Cunningham, J. P. Cunningham, Robert Shane

The Will was recorded at the courthouse in Lauderdale Co., Alabama on 5 March, 1836.

The Family of William W. and Sarah Carroll

Grief Carroll of Washington Parish was the son of William and Sarah Carroll. Grief Carroll was born in July 1833, in Franklin County, Tennessee according to Grief's Civil War pension application. Grief's brother Samuel was born June 30, 1825, in Winchester, Franklin County, Tennessee according to his Civil War pension application.

Grief, his brother Samuel and his sister’s Catherine and Elizabeth were living in Harrison County, Mississippi with their parents William W. and Sarah Carroll in 1850. Grief and his father were Blacksmiths and his brother Samuel was a wood cutter. The family probably moved to Mississippi in the 1840’s. Click here to see the land deed for William W. Carroll dated September 1, 1848 in Harrison County, Mississippi.

CENSUS YR: 1850 STATE or TERRITORY: MS COUNTY: Harrison REEL NO: M432-372
PAGE NO: 106A REFERENCE: enumerated by Louis J Fourniquet 9/12/1850
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34 508 508 Carroll Wm W 56 M Blacksmith 50 N Carolina
35 508 508 Carroll Sarah 54 F Georgia
36 508 508 Carroll Samuel 25 M Wood Cutter Alabama
37 508 508 Carroll Elizabeth 20 F Tennse
38 508 508 Carroll Grief 19 M Blacksmith Tennse
39 508 508 Carroll Catharine 15 F Alabama

Listed in Marriages in Harrison County, Mississippi is a Sarah Carroll married to George Bond February 22, 1847, with a Samuel W. Carroll as surety on the marriage bond (Marr. Bk 1:128). Sarah and George Bond were living in Harrison County in the 1850 census (p. 110) with a child Martha, age 2. George was 35, born in MS, Sarah was 24, born in SC. Sarah Carroll was probably the daughter of William and Sarah Carroll and sister to Grief, but this has not been confirmed. William Carroll’s family was the only Carroll’s living in the area at this time.

Harrison County marriage records show Catherine Carrol marrying a Henry Myers, December 12, 1850 (Marr. Bk 2:2). There was only one Catharine Carroll in the 1850 census in that county. They were married by Nicholas Holly, MBP "Missionary Baptist Preacher"

In 1852 in Harrison County, a Samuel Carrol married a Martha Broadass. The marriage was recorded on 28 Dec 1852 (Marr. Bk 2:23). This couple was also married by Nicholas Holly, MBP. The same minister married Sarah Carrol and Samuel Carrol. I believe Martha Broadass was Samuel's first wife and the mother of his first son William James Carroll. She must have died before 1860, possibly in child birth. She is not listed on the 1860 Census Records with Samuel and his son W. J. Information about Sarah, Catherine and Samuel’s marriages was contributed by Emily Croom.

William Carroll was born about 1794 in North Carolina and died sometime before 1860. William Carroll purchased 40.22 acres of land in Harrison County, Mississippi September 1, 1848.

The North West quarter of the South East quarter of Section twenty eight in Township six South of Range nine West, in the district of Lands subject to sale at Augusta, Mississippi, containing forty acres and twenty two hundredths of an acre. According to the official plat of the survey of the said Lands, returned to the General Land Office by the Surveyor General, which said tract has been purchased by the said William W. Carroll.

The Carroll family was living in Jackson County, Mississippi when the 1860 Census was taken. Grief's mother Sarah is listed on the census, but Grief's father must have died sometime after the 1850 Census and before the 1860 Census. William was 56 years old in 1850. He is probably buried in either Harrison County or Jackson County, Mississippi. Sarah is living with Grief's brother Samuel, her daughter Elizabeth and Samuel's son W. J. William James is listed as James on the 1870 Census in Jackson County, Mississippi and as William J. in the 1880 Census in Calcasieu Parish, LA. Also living with the family is a little girl named Frances Oneal, age 2. This was the last records found for Grief and Samuel’s mother Sarah Carroll. She must have died before 1870.

CENSUS YR: 1860 TERRITORY: MS COUNTY: Jackson DIVISION: No entry REEL NO: M653-582 PAGE NO: 919 REFERENCE: No entry

2 313 315 Carreil Samuel 35 M Laborer TN X
3 313 315 Carriell Sarah 62 F GA X
4 313 315 Carreill Eliz 28 F
5 313 315 Carriell W. J. 6 M
5 313 315 Oneal, Frances 2 F

Frances Oneal, 2 years old, Female, is listed as living with Samuel, Sarah, Elizabeth and W.J. Frances’ birthplace is omitted from the census.

There is a Jackson County marriage record for a Fannie (nickname for Frances) Oneal to Benjamin Seymour, 26 October 1877.

I found an Oneal family living near the Carrolls in 1860, Jackson County.  Frances was possibly related to this family. They were the only Oneal family living in the county in 1860.

Living near the Carrolls in Jackson County 1860 was the family of William Oneal (Jr.) age 32, wife Delphine Oneal age 24, son Thos R. Oneal age 5, and son John age 1.

In 1850 in Harrison County, 22 year old William Oneal, Jr. is living with his father William Oniel, age 49, a farmer born in S. Carolina, his mother Susannah, age 45, born in Mississippi, his siblings: Lemuel 20, Nancy 18, Jackson 15, Aletha 11 and Ely 6. Living next door was De Kalb Oniel age 26, his wife Rebecca age 24 and their daughter Louisa age 4.

The 1840 Census in Jackson County lists as head of households two O’Neal families, James and William. They are also listed on the 1830 Census in Jackson County as James and William Oneal. There are no O’Neal families in the 1820 census with any spelling variations of this name.

Grief and his wife Caroline had two children in 1860, four year old Delphene and two year old Victoria. Grief and Caroline probably married around 1854-55.

33 318 320 Carrel Grif 26 M Laborer TN
34 319 320 Carrel Caroline 25 F
Note: Dwelling & family nos. appear to be entered on wrong line
35 319 320 Carrel Delphene 4 F MS
36 319 320 Carrel Victoria 2 F MS

Caroline's maiden name was Oswald. Eddie Carroll contributed Caroline’s last name. The name Oswald and sometimes spelled “Oswell” is also listed as Caroline’s maiden name on some of her children’s death certificates. There was a Solomon Oswald living in Jackson County, Mississippi at the same time that Grief’s family was living there. The following are some of the reasons why I believe Solomon Oswald was most probably Caroline’s brother.

Grief's wife's maiden name was Oswald, and Solomon's last name was Oswald.

Grief and Solomon joined the army at the same time and place, October 2, 1861, in East Pascagoula, Mississippi when they were both living in Jackson County, Mississippi.

Grief stayed in touch with Solomon because Grief listed Solomon on his pension application dated October 6, 1898, and knew that Solomon still lived in Three Rivers, Mississippi.

Solomon stated on his pension application that he had two older sisters. Solomon was 63 years old when he applied for his pension application on September 5, 1900. He was born around 1837. Grief Carroll's wife Caroline was born in 1835. She was about two years older than Solomon. Solomon and Caroline probably had one more sister.

Grief's wife Caroline was born in Alabama according to census records. Solomon said that he was born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

Emily Croom is researching her husband s family. She believes that her husband s g-g-grandmother Cerelda Jane was the sister of Grief Carroll s wife Caroline Oswald. Emily contributed some of the research for Grief s daughter s Emma and Martha Jane and other information about the Carroll family including the information below about Caroline and Jane Oswell. It is not yet confirmed that Grief Carroll s wife Caroline was the sister of Cerelda Jane.

Emily found a Caroline Oswell in Jackson County, age 15, in the 1850 census records. This was the same age that Grief s wife Caroline was in 1850. She lived in the neighborhood where a Jane Oswell, age 19, also lived. Emily believes this Jane Oswell was her husband s g-g-grandmother, Cerelda Jane and the Caroline Oswell was Jane s sister and the wife of Grief Carroll.

In 1850, Jane Oswell was in Jackson County Mississippi, living in the household of John & Elizabeth Robinson, ages 60 & 63. Alexander and Willialm Kirkwood were also in the household. Jane was 19, born in Alabama. William Kirkwood is listed as head of household on the 1820, 1830 and 1840 census in Jackson County. John Robinson is not listed.

John Herndon who later married Cerelda Jane lived four doors down from where Jane Oswell lived. John is in the household of James and Susan Byrd and kids, including a Jane, age 15. This Jane was not the right age to be the Cerelda Jane that he later married. James Byrd is not listed as head of household on the 1840 census in Jackson County, only John and Sutton Byrd. John Byrd is listed on the 1830 census, and only George, Madame and Sherod Byrd are listed on the 1820 census in Jackson County.

William P. Herndon lived two doors down from John Herndon in 1850 in the household of Isaac and Hannah Wells. Henry Wells, of an age possibly to be Isaac's father, was also living there. Isaac is listed as head of household on the 1840 census in Jackson County and the 1830 census. Only Henry Wells is listed as head of household on the 1820 census in Jackson County, Mississippi.

Caroline Oswell lived next door to William Herndon in 1850. Caroline Oswell was living in the household of Joshua and Susan Cates, ages 77 and 60, both born in Georgia. This was possibly the Caroline that married Grief Carroll. Joshua Cates is also listed as head of household in Jackson County in the 1840 census, 1830, census and 1820 census. Caroline Oswell was living next door from where Grief and Caroline Carroll were living in 1860.

Grief and Caroline Carroll were listed between two Herndon families in 1860 and owned land neighboring John Herndon in Jackson County. Grief homestead a piece of state land adjoining the Herndons in October, 1860. John Herndon also served along with Grief and Samuel Carroll in the 27th MS Infantry, Co. L during the Civil War. John died of illness in Atlanta during the war. His widow  C. Jane then married a Goff and later Reuben House, with whom she lived in Calcasieu Parish by 1879. Grief s brother Samuel was also living in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana at that time. R. B. House, age 36,lived next door to William and Sarah Carroll and their children Grief, Samuel, Elizabeth and Catherine, according to the 1850 census in Harrison County, Mississippi. On the other side of the Carrolls was George W. Goff, born in New York, age 24. The name of the Goff that married Cerelda Jane is not known. This R. B. House is the same age, 36 years old, as the Reuben House that Cerelda Jane married. Thirty years later on the 1880 Calcasieu Parish census, Rubin House, living with Cerelda J. in the 1880 Calcasieu Parish Census was 67 years old, Ceralda Jane 47. I believe that the R. B. House living next door to the Carrolls in 1850 was the same man that married Ceralda Jane. And, the George W. Goff living on the other side of the Carroll's was Ceralda Jane's second husband.

Fifteen year old Martha Higginbotham who later married Grief's brother Samuel was also near neigbhors to the Carrolls in 1850. Martha was living with her Mother, Martha and siblings, William George, John and Ramsey.

The 1880 census in Calcasieu Parish shows her as Cerelda J. Her son William Hearndon, age 24, and his son John Hearndon, age 3, was living next door.

According to Solomon W. Oswald/Oswell s Civil War pension application, he moved to Mississippi around 1848-49. Solomon was born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama about 1837. He said that he had two older sisters. Cerelda Jane would have been born about 1831 and Caroline in 1835.

The Carroll Family During the Civil War

In March 1861, the first call for Mississippi Troops for the impending war was given. Grief Carroll joined the Confederate Army October 2, 1861. His family was living in Harrison County, Mississippi in the 1850 census. The family moved to Jackson County, Mississippi some time between 1850 and 1860. Grief joined the 27th Regiment, Company L in Lamar County, Mississippi. He enlisted in East Pascagoula, Mississippi, in Jackson County.

Grief's brother Samuel joined the Civil War in August, 1861, at Scranton, Mississippi (East Pascagoula). He was also assigned to the 27th Regiment, Company L. He and Grief served under Commander Rays and Captain H. Bruno Griffin (Twiggs Rifles). Johnston was the 1st Lieutenant, Jesse E. Thompson was 2nd Lieutenant and William Welch was 2nd Junior Lieutenant. At the time of Grief's discharge, he was serving under William Welch. The rest of the officers had either been captured, killed or wounded.

Grief's friend Andrew Vaughn and Solomon Oswald/Oswell (probably Grief's wife's brother), were living in Three Rivers, Mississippi, and joined the same day as Grief. They were in the same Company and Regiment as Grief and Samuel. Grief listed Andrew Vaughn and Solomon Oswald as comrades and witnesses on his Civil War pension application.

Although I was unable to find Solomon Oswald, sometimes spelled Oswell, listed on Census records in Mississippi, I found his pension application and the death certificate for his wife Elizabeth. Solomon W. Oswald married Mrs. Elizabeth Scarbrough June 30, 1893. They had no children. I do not know if this was Solomon’s only marriage.

Solomon Oswald joined the Confederate army at the same time as Grief, October, 1861. He was 21 years old when he joined. He had a fair complexion and light colored hair. He was 5 feet 6 inches tall. He was born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. He applied for his Civil War pension on September 5, 1900. At this time, he had lived in the state of Mississippi for 51 years which would have made his move to the state around 1849. He was still living in Three Rivers, Jackson County, Mississippi with his wife, Elizabeth when he filed for his pension. They had no children. He said that he enlisted in the Confederate Army in Jackson County, Mississippi in October, 1861, with the 27th Infantry, Company L, all-volunteer army. His commander was H. B. Griffin. He had forgotten the name of his Colonel. He served from October, 1861 to November, 1862, when he was discharged for disabilites caused by injuries received during the war. He could not remember the exact date of his discharge. He had become permanently deaf and was also wounded in the left ankle. His injuries occurred some time in the month of July, 1862, on the Bay Shell Road in Mobile, Alabama. The deafness was the primary cause of his discharge; the ankle injury was secondary. He was given a Certificate of Disability for Discharge in Dalton, Georgia on October 18, 1862.

Solomon Oswald's first muster roll was dated October 2, 1861, by W. A. Rankman. He had a muster roll for May and June, 1862, by W. A. Rankman. He had been last paid on March 1, 1862. He had a muster roll for July 1 to October 31, 1862. He was absent - sick. He was last paid on June 30, 1862. He had a muster roll for January and February, 1863. He was absent - in hospital since August 20, 1862, by order of Regimental Surgeon. He had a muster roll for March and April, 1863. He was absent - sick in hospital since August 20, 1862, by order of Regt. Surgeon. He was admitted to the C.S.A. Post Hospital, Dalton, Georgia on August 21, 1862 with a Contusum, Confed. Arch., Chap. 6, File No. 292, page 133. Solomon was discharged October 21, 1862, Confd. Arch., Chap. 5, File No. 110, page 479. The 27th Regiment, Company L, surrendered about 2 years later, on Missionary Ridge. Solomon said that he was living on another man's land and owned no land of his own at the time of his Civil War pension application. He was living with his wife Elizabeth. He had no children, but he did have two older sisters. In 1900, Solomon was farming and working as a day laborer. The witnesses on his pension application included S. H. Shannon, J. M. Kennedy, J. A. Scarbrough who married Ella Kennedy 09-15-1892, and E. E. Parker. The notory was Garland G. Goff, dated August 20, 1900.

Solomon Oswald married Mrs. Elizabeth Scarborough. The following Scarborough's were living in Jackson County, Mississippi in the late 1800's and early 1900's.

Alex Scarborough married Martha J Whittington, 03-08-1900
George L Scarborough married Minnie Kennedy, 07-20-1897
J A Scarborough married Ella Kennedy, 09-15-1892
Ransom A Scarborough married Nancy M Griffin, 11-06-1879
Will Scarborough married Annie Richard, 05-21-1896
Albert G Scarbrough married Margaret Ann Seymour, 08-18-1887

J. A. Scarborough who married Ella Kennedy signed as a witness on Solomon's pension application. George Scarborough that married Minnie Kennedy was the informant for Solomon's wife's death certificate. Elizabeth died October 10, 1918. Solomon was already dead. His wife Elizabeth's name prior to their marriage was Mrs. Elizabeth Scarborough. She was apparently married to a Scarborough before her marriage to Solomon. The before mentioned Scarborough's were probably either her children or relatives of her first husband. It seems odd that George Scarborough knew very little about Elizabeth. He only guessed her age to be about 65 at her death. He did not know who her parents were or where they were from. Elizabeth's death certificate number 18-21456 states that she died at 9 P.M. on October 10, 1918 after having carcenoma of the stomach for the past 5 years. She was attended by a doctor from May 1, 1918 to July 16, 1918. He last saw her on July 16, 1918. She was buried on October 11, 1918 at the (looks like “Salmoan” Cemetery).

I did not find Solomon Oswald listed on the 1850 Census in Harrison County, Mississippi, but I found the following Scarborough families living very near Grief Carroll and his family in Harrrison County. I do not know if these Scarborough's are related to Solomon's wife who were later living in Jackson County.

CENSUS YR: 1850 STATE or TERRITORY: MS COUNTY: Harrison REEL NO: M432-372 PAGE NO: 107A REFERENCE: enumerated by Louis J Fourniquet 9/14/1850

============

16 512 512 Scarborough B***ly C 40 M Wood Cutter Georgia
17 512 512 Scarborough Mary 34 F Alabama
18 512 512 Scarborough Purcely 2 M Missi
19 512 512 Scarborough Caroline 4 F Alabama
28 514 514 Scarborough David H 70 M none N Carolina
29 514 514 Scarborough Tilphia 60 F N Carolina
30 515 515 Scarborough Alexander 25 M Teamster Georgia
31 515 515 Scarborough Elizabeth 20 F Alabama
32 515 515 Scarborough George W 5/12 M Missi

33 516 516 Scarborough Lovingston 43 M Teamster Georgia
34 516 516 Scarborough Elisa 35 F Missi
35 516 516 Scarborough Emily 19 F Missi X
36 516 516 Scarborough Peter 17 M Teamster Missi X
37 516 516 Scarborough Cyrus 15 M Missi X
38 516 516 Scarborough Abraham 13 M Missi X
39 516 516 Scarborough Elisabeth 11 F Missi X
40 516 516 Scarborough David 9 M Missi X
41 516 516 Scarborough Levi 7 M Missi X
42 516 516 Scarborough William 5 M Missi
43 516 516 Scarborough Joseph 1 M Missi

Andrew Vaughn joined the Civil War at the same time and place as Grief Carroll and Solomon Oswald. Andrew was also listed on Grief’s Civil War pension application. Andrew’s family was living in Jackson County in 1860:

CENSUS YR: 1860 TERRITORY: MS COUNTY Jackson DIVISION: AmericusReel No. M653-582 Page No. 920 Reference: Enumerated on 2 Jul 1860 by a. F. Ramsey

Andrew Vaughn was only 21 years old in 1860, but he went into the army as an officer:

25 327 328 Vaughan S. 45 F Farmer 2,500 10,000 MS
26 327 328 Vaughan Andrew 21 M MS
27 327 328 Vaughan M. J. 19 M
28 327 328 Vaughan Louisse 16 F
29 327 328 Vaughan Laura 12 F MS
30 327 328 Vaughan Jane 10 F

VAUGHN, Andrew A., Co. L, 27th Mississippi Infantry, Born March 20, 1838 – Died January 31, 1912. He is buried in Johnson Cemetery, Jackson County, Mississippi. His wife Mary Goff is also buried there.

Grief Carroll’s Service Record during the Civil War

Grief Carroll was shown as present on a Muster Roll dated December 1 to 31, 1861. At that time he had never been paid for his service.

Grief was present for the May and June, 1862, Muster Roll. He had been paid last on March 1, 1862 by Bardwell. He had enlisted on October 2, 1861 for a period of 3 years.

Grief was captured and held as a prisoner of war January, 1863. He was captured in Middleton, Tennessee. A Prisoner of War document listed him as captured on January 2, 1863 at Stones River and forwarded to the Nashville Ferry 1.

Then, on January 9, 1863 he was sent to City Point - James River. This document was date February 11, 1863.

Grief was admitted to the Number 3 (new) U.S.A. General Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee on February 1, 1863 in Ward 7 and 8.

Grief was again admitted to the General Hospital in Petersburg, Virginia on February 21, 1863 where he was treated for Diarehea.

Grief was paroled through a prisoner exchange and released in Murfreesboro, Tennessee some time in February, 1863. He returned to duty in the Confederate Army on March 27, 1863.

Grief was noted as present on a Hospital Muster Roll in Camp Direction Hospital in Chattanooga, Tennesseee for his March and April, 1863 Muster Roll. This was dated May 21, 1863. He was admitted to the hospital on April 1, 1863 as a patient. He was last paid on March 1, 1863.

His Muster Roll dated July 1 to Oct. 31, 1863, marked him as absent due to sickness.

Grief Carroll was a faithful soldier of the Confederacy, never taking the oath of allegiance to the United States Government at any time during the war. During the January and February, 1864 Muster Roll, he received a furlough from service at Dalton, Georgia by furnishing a recruit to take his place. He was at his home in Mississippi at the close of the war where he was a farmer.

The following battle is where Grief was captured and taken prisoner*:

A devastating battle took place at Stones River in Murfreesboro, Tennessee between December 31, 1862 and January 2, 1863. General Bragg's Confederates withdrew after the battle, allowing General Rosecrans and the Union army to control middle Tennessee. This battle provided a much-needed boost to the North after the defeat at Fredericksburg. Lincoln later wrote to General Rosecrans, "I can never forget [...] you gave us a hard-earned victory, which had there been a defeat instead, the nation could scarcely have lived over."

Just before the battle of Murfreesboro, December, 1862, General Walthall being absent sick, Colonel Jones was in command of the brigade, but in the battle Gen. Patton Anderson commanded the brigade, which was stationed in line of battle, December 28, the left extending into a dense cedar forest, the right next to Chalmers' Brigade. The Twenty-ninth, on the right, was the only regiment in an open field, and the men made rifle pits for protection. There was skirmishing with the Federal line, posted along the round forest and cane brake, during the next two days. On the morning of the 31st, the brigade attacked, the Twenty-seventh being the last, according to the plan of battle, along the whole line to advance. They were immediately swept by a heavy fire of artillery from the front, and partly enfilading the line. Anderson reported: "The ordeal to which they were subjected was a severe one, but the task was undertaken with that spirit and courage which always deserves success and seldom fails achieving it. As often as their ranks were shattered and broken by grape and canister did they rally, reform and renew the attack under the leadership of their gallant officers. They were ordered to take the batteries at all hazards and they obeyed the order, not, however, without heavy loss of officers and men. Not far from where the batteries were playing, and while cheering and encouraging his men forward, Lieut.-Col. James L. Autry, commanding the Twenty-seventh Mississippi, fell, pierced through the head by a Minie ball." There was some confusion in the regiment until they were reformed by the senior Captain, E. R. Neilson, who was seriously wounded afterward in another part of the field. Colonel Jones had gone to the rear for medical attention. Finally the batteries were taken. One company entire, of sharpshooters, posted in a log house near the battery taken by the Twenty-seventh, Twenty-ninth and Thirtieth, was captured by the Twenty-seventh. The casualties of the Twenty-seventh were 11 killed, 71 wounded, 2 missing.

*On January 2 the brigade, which had been assigned to the position on the river front held by Chalmers' Brigade, was ordered across the river (Stones River) to support General Breckenridge, was recalled, and later in the afternoon was sent again. Of this movement General Bragg wrote in his report that on hearing of the defeat of Breckenridge: "Anderson's fine brigade of Mississippians, the nearest body of troops, was promptly ordered to his relief. On reaching the field and moving forward, Anderson found himself in front of Breckenridge's infantry and soon encountered the enemy's light troops close upon our artillery, which had been left without support. This noble brigade, under its cool and gallant chief, drove the enemy back and saved all the guns not captured before its arrival." Breckenridge reformed his line after dark to the left and rear of the Walthall Brigade.

Grief Carroll’s brother Samuel’s Civil War Service

Grief's brother Samuel was captured in May 1864, and held prisoner at Rock Island, Illinois. He was not released until the end of the war in 1865 when the South surrendered. He was sent to Cleveland, Ohio for a pass for home, but did not get any. He, too, was a faithful soldier, never taking the oath of allegiance to the United States Government at any time during the war.

Samuel was captured during the Battle of Peachtree Creek May 13-15, 1864.

General Joseph E. Johnston had withdrawn from Rocky Face Ridge in Dalton, Georgia to the hills around Resaca. On May 13, 1864 the Union troops tested the Rebel lines to pinpoint their whereabouts. The next day full scale fighting occurred, and the Union troops were generally set back except on the Rebel right flank, but Sherman did not fully take advantage of this. On the 15th, the battle continued with no advantage to either side until Sherman sent a force across the Oostanula River, at Lay's Ferry, towards Johnston's railroad supply line. Unable to halt this union movement, Johnston was forced to retreat. The results of this battle were inconclusive. Estimated casualties: 5,547 total (US 2,747; CS 2,800) CWSAC Reference #: GA008.

Following the Battle of Peachtree Creek, Hood decided to attack Maj. General James B. McPherson's Army of the Tennessee. He withdrew his main army at night from Atlanta's outer line to the inner line, enticing Sherman to follow.

Out of approximately 3.8 million soldiers in the Civil War, over 400,000 were at some point taken prisoner. Some were paroled during prisoner exchanges and, despite the required oath of non-combat, went back to their regiments to fight again. A few prisoners escaped.

Many soldiers remained for months or years under increasingly crowded conditions in over two hundred prison sites from Massachusetts to Texas and as far west as California. Between 45,000 and 50,000 died in prison from wounds, from infectious diseases such as smallpox, or, most commonly and tragically, from illnesses related to substandard sanitary conditions, contaminated food and water, abysmal nutrition, and from lack of proper clothing and shelter. Medical care was awful in each army's own hospitals and was much worse for enemy prisoners. Some soldiers killed each other, or themselves, under the duress of prison life. http://humwww.ucsc.edu/gruesz/war/history.htm

The Civil War had widespread effects on Dalton Georgia and the county of Whitfield as a whole. Railway stations in the county built by the state of Georgia 15 years earlier served as a gateway to the battle of Chickamauga. Local residents cheered the armies of General James Longstreet as they moved towards the battle. From 1862 until 1864 many of the buildings near the station served as hospitals for the wounded. With the defeat of the Rebel army at Chattanooga in September, 1863, the county played host to Braxton Bragg's Army of the Tennessee, later under the command of Joseph E. Johnston. Under his command the area was defended against the numerically superior Union Army under the command of William Tecumseh Sherman.

One of the first challenges Johnston faced when he relieved General Braxton Braggs of the command of the Army of Tennessee was a high rate of desertion. Upon arriving he gave all soldiers a week leave to see their family, gave all of them their back pay, and reinstated all soldiers who abandoned their ranks to their former position without penalty. To combat further problems Johnston took deserters out to Crow Valley, north of Dalton and had them shot.

After the battle of Dalton in May, 1864, Union troops occupied the town.


Grief and Samuel Carroll honorably served their country during the war. Part of this time they were prisoners of war. Grief was able to obtain a furlough from service by furnishing a recruit to take his place.

Why was Grief allowed to get a recruit to replace him?

The Enrollment Act of 1863 allowed Northern draftees to pay $300 to a substitute who served for them. The Confederates passed a similar measure.

This amount was a healthy sum in 1863. What type of people was most likely to take advantage of this law?

Young, healthy rich men.

Grover Cleveland, a future President of the United States, never served in the military during the Civil War. He was healthy, of the appropriate age, and educated. His Buffalo, New York, law practice provided him a comfortable living.

Grover Cleveland, twenty-six at the time of his enrollment in June 1863, paid George Beniski, a thirty-two-year-old Polish immigrant, to serve in his place as a private in the Seventy-sixth New York Infantry. Beniski survived the war.

George Templeton Strong, never served in the Union army. He, too, was healthy, of the appropriate age, and educated. His New York City law practice provided him a comfortable income.

John D. Rockefeller, a Cleveland, Ohio, merchant, was also healthy and eligible to serve in the armed forces of the United States. He did not experience the Civil War in uniform.

These men, and many others, were able to avoid military service by simply taking advantage of that section of the Enrollment Act of 1863 allowing draftees to pay $300 to a substitute who served for them.

This amount did not long remain the norm, for George Templeton Strong paid a "big 'Dutch' boy of about twenty" $1,100 to be his replacement in 1864.

G.T. Strong, whose "Dutch Boy" was substitute Herman Henderman, a young man of twenty-two years. Though the War Department recognized him as German rather than Dutch, Hendermann entered the Seventh New York Volunteer Infantry and survived the war.

Did any wealthy men serve their country?

Yes! For example, pharmacists were allowed to recruit substitutes, but some of these brave men were willing to risk their own lives for their country.

Georgia pharmacist John Styth Pemberton (who after the war developed the original formula for Coca-Cola) served as a cavalry captain under Confederate general Joseph Wheeler.

Pharmacist Eli Lily organized an artillery battery in Indiana, ended the war as a colonel of cavalry, and in 1876 founded the drug company bearing his name.

Information about the following battles Grief and his brother Samuel Carroll fought in was obtained from the National Park Service, Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System.

The 27th Infantry Regiment was organized in September through December, 1861. After serving in Pensacola, Florida and Kentucky, the unit was assigned to General Walthall's and Brantly's Brigade, Army of Tennessee. It took an active part in the campaigns of the army from Murfreesboro to Atlanta, moved with Hood into Tennessee, and fought in North Carolina. For a time it was consolidated with the 24th Regiment and in December, 1863 totaled 491 men and 354 arms. At Resaca the regiment lost 6 killed and 27 wounded, and at Ezra Church the 24th/27th had 11 killed and 67 wounded of the 430 engaged. It surrendered on April 26, 1865.

The field officers were Colonels James A. Campbell and Thomas M. Jones; Lieutenant Colonels James L. Autry, A. J. Hays, and Andrew J. Jones; and Majors Julius B. Kennedy, George H. Lipscomb, and Amos McLemore.

A devastating battle took place at Stones River in Murfreesboro, Tennessee between December 31, 1862 and January 2, 1863. General Bragg's Confederates withdrew after the battle, allowing General Rosecrans and the Union army to control middle Tennessee. This battle provided a much-needed boost to the North after the defeat at Fredericksburg. Lincoln later wrote to General Rosecrans, "I can never forget [...] you gave us a hard-earned victory, which had there been a defeat instead, the nation could scarcely have lived over."

After the Tullahoma Campaign, Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans renewed his offensive, and on August 16, 1863, launched a campaign to force the Confederates out of Chattanooga.

In early September 1863, Rosecrans united his forces that were scattered in Tennessee and Georgia. The three army corps comprising Rosecrans' army split and set out for Chattanooga by separate routes. Col. John T. Wilder's brigade of the Union 4th Division, XIV Army Corps marched to a location northeast of Chattanooga where the Confederates could see them. Confederate General Braxton Bragg expected a Union attack on the town from that direction. However, on August 21, Wilder reached the Tennessee River opposite Chattanooga and ordered the 18th Indiana Light Artillery to begin shelling the town. Many Confederate soldiers and civilians were caught off guard in town observing a day of prayer and fasting in church.

Two steamers docked at the landing were sunk, creating panic among the Confederates. The shelling continued periodically over the next two weeks, keeping Bragg's attention to the northeast while the majority of Rosecrans' army crossed the Tennessee River well west and south of Chattanooga. When Bragg learned on September 8 that the Union army was in force southwest of the city, he abandoned Chattanooga. The number of casualties is unknown. CWSAC Reference #: TN018

As the Confederates headed south of Chattanooga, the Union troops followed them and caught up with them at Davis' Cross Roads. General Bragg was determined for the Confederates to reoccupy Chattanooga and decided to meet a part of Rosecrans' army, defeat them, and then move back into the city. On the 17th he headed north, intending to meet and beat the XXI Army Corps. As Bragg marched north on the 18th, his cavalry and infantry fought with Union cavalry and mounted infantry which were armed with Spencer repeating rifles.

Fighting began in earnest on the morning of the 19th, and Bragg's men fought fiercely, but did not break the Union line. The next day, Bragg continued his assault on the Union line on the left, and in the late morning, Rosecrans was informed that he had a gap in his line. Rosencrans created a gap when he moved units to shore up the supposed gap, and James Longstreet's men promptly took advantage of the gap and drove one-third of the Union army, including Rosecrans himself, from the field.

George H. Thomas took over command and began uniting forces on Horseshoe Ridge and Snodgrass Hill. Although the Rebels launched determined assaults on these forces, the Union army held their positions until after dark. Thomas then led these men from the field leaving it to the Confederates. The Union retired to Chattanooga while the Rebels occupied the surrounding heights. The result was a victory for the Confederate army. Estimated Casualties: 34,624 total (US 16,170; CS 18,454) CWSAC Reference #: GA004

Gen. Joseph E. Johnston had withdrawn from Rocky Face Ridge (Dalton, Georgia) to the hills around Resaca. On May 13, 1864 the Union troops tested the Rebel lines to pinpoint their whereabouts.

The next day full scale fighting occurred, and the Union troops were generally set back except on the Rebel right flank, but Sherman did not fully take advantage of this.

On the 15th, the battle continued with no advantage to either side until Sherman sent a force across the Oostanula River, at Lay's Ferry, towards Johnston's railroad supply line. Unable to halt this Union movement, Johnston was forced to retreat. The results of this battle were inconclusive. Estimated Casualties: 5,547 total (US 2,747; CS 2,800) CWSAC Reference #: GA008

Following the Battle of Peachtree Creek, Hood decided to attack Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson's Army of the Tennessee. He withdrew his main army at night from Atlanta's outer line to the inner line, enticing Sherman to follow.

In the meantime, Hood sent William J. Hardee with his corps on a fifteen-mile march to hit the unprotected Union left and rear, east of the city. Wheeler's cavalry was to operate farther out on Sherman's supply line, and Gen. Frank Cheatham's corps was to attack the Union front. Hood, however, miscalculated the time necessary to make the march, and Hardee was unable to attack until afternoon.

Although Hood had outmaneuvered Sherman for the time being, McPherson was concerned about his left flank and sent his reserves-Grenville Dodge's XVI Army Corps-to that location. Two of Hood's divisions ran into this reserve force and were held back.

The Rebel attack stalled on the Union rear but began to roll up the left flank. Around the same time, a Confederate soldier shot and killed McPherson when he rode out to observe the fighting. The attacks continued, but the Union forces held.

About 4:00 pm, Cheatham's corps broke through the Union front at the Hurt House, but Sherman massed twenty artillery pieces on a knoll near his headquarters to shell these Confederates and stop them.

Maj. Gen. John A. Logan's XV Army Corps then led a counter-attack that restored the Union line. The Union troops held, and Hood suffered high casualties. The result was a Union victory. Date: July 22, 1864. Estimated Casualties: 12,140 total (US 3,641; CS 8,499) CWSAC Reference #: GA017

Earlier, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman's forces had approached Atlanta from the east and north. Hood had not defeated them, but he had kept them away from the city.

Sherman now decided to attack from the west. He ordered the Army of the Tennessee, commanded by Maj. Gen. O.O. Howard, to move from the left wing to the right and cut Hood's last railroad supply line between East Point and Atlanta.

Hood foresaw such a maneuver and decided to send the two corps of Lt. Gen. Stephen D. Lee and Lt. Gen. Alexander P. Stewart to intercept and destroy the Union force.

On the afternoon of July 28, 1864, the Rebels attacked Howard at Ezra Church. Howard had anticipated such an attack and entrenched one of his corps in the Confederates' path and stopped the attack, inflicting numerous casualties. Howard, however, failed to cut the railroad. The result was a Union victory. Estimated Casualties: 3,562 total (US 562; CS 3,000) CWSAC Reference #: GA018

In a last, desperate attempt to force Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman's army out of Georgia, Gen. John Bell Hood led the Army of Tennessee north toward Nashville in November 1864. Although he suffered a terrible loss at Franklin, he continued toward Nashville.

General Hood believed that destruction of the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad and disruption of the Union army supply depot at Murfreesboro would help his cause. On December 2, 1864, Hood ordered Major General William B. Bate to destroy the railroad and blockhouses between Murfreesboro and Nashville and join Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest for further operations.

On December 4, 1864, Hood sent Forrest with an expedition composed of two cavalry divisions and Bate's infantry division to Murfreesboro. Bate's division attacked Blockhouse No. 7 that protected the railroad crossing at Overall Creek, but Union forces stopped them.

On the morning of the 5th, Forrest went toward Murfreesboro, splitting his force, one column to attack the fort on the hill and the other to take Blockhouse No. 4, both at La Vergne. The Union garrisons surrendered at both locations.

Outside La Vergne, Forrest joined Bate's division and the command continued to Murfreesboro along two roads, driving the Yankees into their stronghold, and encamped in the city outskirts for the night. The next morning, on the 6th, Forrest ordered Bate's division to "move upon the enemy's works." Fighting erupted for a couple of hours, but the Yankees ceased firing and both sides glared at each other for the rest of the day.

Brig. Gen. Claudius Sears' and Brig. Gen. Joseph B. Palmer's infantry brigades joined Forrest's command in the evening, further swelling his numbers.

On the morning of the 7th, Maj. Gen. Lovell Rousseau, commanding all of the forces at Murfreesboro, sent two brigades out under Brig. Gen. Robert Milroy on the Salem Pike to feel out the enemy. These troops engaged the Confederates and fighting continued. At one point some of Forrest's troops broke and ran causing disorder in the Rebel ranks; even entreaties from Forrest and Bate did not completely subdue these units. The rest of Forrest's command conducted an orderly retreat from the field and encamped for the night outside Murfreesboro.

Forrest had destroyed railroad track, blockhouses, and some homes and generally disrupted Union operations in the area, but he did not accomplish much else. The raid on Murfreesboro was a minor irritation. The result was a Union victory. Estimated Casualties: 422 total (US 225; CS 197) CWSAC Reference #: TN037

National Battlefield - Company L, Known as the Twiggs Rifles

Captain

Griffin, H. B.

First Lieutenant

Hawkins, T. R.

Johnston, S. M. (Wounded at Lookout Mountain)

Welch, William

Second Lieutenant

Johnston, S. M.

McInnis, J. M.

J. G. (Died in service)

Third Lieutenant

Krebs, H. E.

Welch, William

First Sergeant

Baptiste, Antonio (Died at Murfreesboro)

The 27th Regiment Mississippi Infantry fought in these battles:

The Battle of Pensacola (Sept 1861 - Jan 1862)
The Battle of Perryville (Oct 8, 1862)
The Battle of Murfreesboro (TN) (Dec 31, 1862 - Jan 3, 1963)
The Tullahoma Campaign (June 1863)
The Battle of Chickamauga (Sep 19 - 20, 1863)
The Chattanooga Siege (Sep - Nov 1863)
The Battle Chattanooga (Nov 23 - 25, 1863)
The Atlanta Campaign (May - Sep 1864)
The Battle of Resaca (May 14 - 15, 1864)
The Battle of New Hope Church (May 25 - June 4, 1864)
The Battle of Ezra Church (July 28, 1864)
The Atlanta Siege (July - Sep 1864)
The Battle of Franklin (Nov 30, 1864)
The Battle of Nashville (Dec 15 - 16, 1864)
The Carolinas Campaign (Feb - Apr 1865)
Below is a list of the men that served and fought in the same battles with Grief Carroll and his brother Samuel:

27th Mississippi Infantry Roster - Company L

Alexander, John B. (Private)

Ashley, Alfred (Private)

Baptiste, Antonio (1st Sergeant, Died at Murfreesboro)

Baptiste, Vincent (Private)

Beardslee, George (Private)

Blackman, William G. (Private)

Brannan, Bryant T. (Private)

Buist, Alexander P. (Corporal)

Burleson, Edward (Private)

Canty, Thomas H. (Private)

Carroll, Grief (Private)

Carroll, Samuel (Private) (Grief's brother)

Carter, Samuel (Private)

Clark, Charles A. (Private)

Craven, Albert S. (Private)

Croma, Conrad (Private)

Cunningham, Francis

Cunningham, Simon

Clark, Charles A.

Dean, William S. (Private)

Delmas, Lewis

Delmas, Morris

Delmas, Valentine

Dodson, Edmund

Downs, Jack (Drum Major)

Dupont, Alfred

Dupont, Louis J.

Dupont, Lucien (Private)

Dupont, William

Edwards, Jesse M. (1st Lieutenant)

Ellis, Charles

Ellis, Frederic

Ellis, Henry

Ellis, William

Ernest, Alexander P.

Evans, Milton

Faggard, Absalom

Fife, George Beardol

Fisher, Lewis H.

Frederic, Louis J. (Sergeant)

Freeland, Hiram A.

Goff, John H. (Sergeant)

Goff, Joseph

Goff, William

Goff, William W.

Goleman, Randy G.

Goleman, Thomas Y.

Graham, Laird

Graham, S. G.

Graham, William (No. 1)

Graham, William (No. 2)

Grant, John C. (Corporal)

Greenhoe, Frederic

Griffin, Erasmus F.

Griffin, Hiram B. (Captain)

Grimes, Francis

Grizzle, Wilson (Corporal)

Hamlett, Nicholas

Harvard, William

Hawkins, Charles R.

Hawkins, David R.

Hawkins, Thomas K. (1st Lieutenant)

Hawkins, William H.

Helverston, James (Private)

Helverston, Peter (Sergeant)

Helveston, Richard (Corporal)

Herndon, John (Grief Carroll's next door neighbor in 1860. Died during war.)

Hogan, Lemuel J.

Hook, Anthony

Howard, William

James, Joel C.

Johnston, S. M. (1st Lieutenant, Wounded at Lookout Mountain)

Jonte, Joseph

Kelshaw, William

Kiersh, Nicholas

Krebs, Aristide H. (Brevet 2nd Lieutenant)

Krebs, Arthur R. (Private)

Krebs, H. E.

Krebs, Joseph H. (Private)

Lemaitre, Joseph

Lintz, John

Little, Thomas

Lyons, Jacob (Sergeant)

Mallet, William

McInnis, J. M. (2nd Lieutenant)

Mallett, William

McLeod, Kenneth A.

Mizell, Phillip

Mizell, William

Mizzell, Luke

Murray, David K.

Murray, George W.

Murray, Thomas J.

Murray, William

Myers, George

Oswald, Solomon (A comrade Grief listed on his pension application (probably Grif's wife's brother.)

Parker, Hubbard

Passow, William

Pickett, Benjamin F. (Corporal)

Reed, Joseph (Corporal)

Reynolds, J.

Ryder, Richard G. (Sergeant)

Salisbury, William H. (Sergeant)

Sannischsau, Nicholas H. (Sergeant)

Scoval, Benj. F. (Sergeant)

Simmons, Isaiah

Simmons, James

Simmons, John (Drummer)

Smith, John

Smith, Levi

Sticker, Henry

Sticker, Nicholas

Strong, William

Sumrall, Charles R.

Thomas, J. G. (2nd Lieutenant)

Thompson, James G.

Thompson, Jesse G. (2nd Lieutenant, Died in Service)

Thompson, Lewis W.

Thompson, Simon

Trehern, David

Vaughan, Andrew A.(One of the comrades Grief listed on his pension application.)

Vincent, Thomas I.

Walters, Joseph

Walters, Samuel

Ware, Milton

Welch, William (1st Lieutenant) (last remaining officer Grief served under.)

Wells, John J. (Sergeant)

Wells, Louis

Williams, George

Williams, James

Williams, John B.

Williams, Joseph

Yelverton, Ererard H.

Grief was never wounded during his Civil War service, but he said that his eyes had been badly affected by exposure during the war. He said that he was captured and held prisoner in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. He was sent to Chattanooga. He was released February, 1868. This date is incorrect because the 27th Regiment surrendered on April 26, 1865. His release as a POW was February 1863, according to Civil War documents. Grief was captured when his Regiment fought the Union soldiers in Murfreesboro during the the battle that lasted from December 31, 1862 until January 2, 1863.


The Carroll Family After the Civil War

Grief was living in Jackson County, Mississippi at the close of the war where he was a farmer. Grief and his family were, once again, listed on the 1870 Census in Jackson County, Mississippi.

Census Year: 1870 Territory: Ms County: Jackson Schedule 1 Township 6, 1 Range E West? Ocean Springs P.O. PAGE NO: 47 Reference: Enumerated on 13 day July, 1870
Carroll, Griffin age 37 occupation day laborer no land
Caroline age 35
Delphine age 13?
Victoria age 11
Janey age 7
William age 5

The 1870 Census, taken in Jackson County, Mississippi, Vancleave P.O., Page 54 on the 15th Day of July 1870, lists only Samuel Carroll and James Carroll - it does not list any other family members.

Carroll, Samuel age 45 W M occupation Blacksmith Real estate 100 Per Value $100
James age 13 W M

Grief Carroll’s son Samuel “Sam” was born in Jackson County, Mississippi January 17, 1871. (Sam Carroll was the informant on his son Felix Ernest Carroll's death certificate. Sam said that he was born in Jackson County, Mississippi).   

The Carroll Family Moves to Louisiana

In 1880, Grief and Caroline's daughter Sarah Victoria was living in 5th Ward, Washington Parish. She was married to Reuben Adams, age 25, farmer. Reuben's parents were Fielding Pharo Pierce and Abigail Pierce. Victoria was listed as 20 years old in 1880. She was listed as 2 years old on the 1860 census in Mississippi and as 11 years old on the 1870 census in Mississippi. She was probably around 21 or 22 in 1880. Reuben and Victoria's children in 1880 were Burnetty E. Adams, daughter, age 3, Lilley Jane Adams, daughter, age 2, Carolinie A. Adams, daughter, age 7 months. Reuben Adams' mother was also listed in the household, Abbigill Hightower, widow, age 50. Abigail's maiden name was Pierce. I have been unable to find her parents. According to census records Abigail was born in Louisiana and her parents were born in Georgia. Abigail first married Fielding Pharo Pierce February 20, 1856. After the death of Abigail's husband Fielding, she married Arnold Hightower. Abigail and Arnold Hightower were married September 18, 1862 in St. Tammany Parish. Arnold Hightower had served in the Confederacy during the Civil War in the 7th Regiment, Louisiana Infantry, as a private, film number M378, roll 14. He has a land record for 320.3 acres dated July 1, 1859 with a land discription of 1 W 1/2 St. Helena No 7 S 5 E 9.

Victoria Carroll and Reuben Adams were married around 1878-79. Victoria died before 1888 in Washington Parish, and Reuben married Ophelia Gerald. T. C. Adams, a descendant of Reuben Adams and his second wife Ophelia Gerald, said that Sarah Victoria is buried in the Morris Cemetery in Franklinton, LA. He can remember visiting her grave with his grandfather when he was very young. He doesn't remember exactly where in the cemetary she is buried and their is no grave marker. Reuben Adams is buried in the Reuben Adams Memorial Cemetery, located in the Stateline Community in Washington Parish. He was born October 9, 1852, and he died March 3, 1940. Reuben and Victoria's daughter Caroline married a Sheridan and is buried in the Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery in Washington Parish. She was born November 9, 1880, and she died September 14, 1953.

Census records dated April 25, 1910, 5th Ward, Township 2, Washington Parish list Reuben Adams, age 52, married 20 years, farmer. His wife Ophelia (Gerald) was 42. She had 10 children with 9 still living in 1910. Their children were Shird (son) age 19, Flouse? (daughter) age 16, Joe? age 13, Marguartte (daughter) age 12, Ida age 9, William age 8, Kinch? (son) age 7, and Annie age 3.

The 1920 Cenus, dated January 14, 1920, 5th Ward, 1st prect. listed Reuben adams age 65, farmer, Ophelia, age 54, and children William, age 16, Kinch, age 14, and daugther Annie age 12.

In 1880, Grief and Caroline's daughter Martha Jane was living around the Pine area, off of Highway 436, with her husband John Miley. They had no children in 1880. She was 18 years old. It is unclear why Grief's two daughters, Martha Jane and Sarah Victoria, were living in Washington Parish and the rest of the family was living in West Feliciana Parish. Perhaps Grief moved to Washington Parish in the 1870's (he moved to Louisiana around 1871 according to his pension application) and by 1880, two of his daughters were married and the rest of the family moved? This is only a guess. By the early 1890s, probably around 1891 (Grief homesteaded over 160 acres of land in Washington Parish 1892) Grief, Caroline and all of their children were living in Washington Parish.

Martha Jane Carroll, daughter of Grief and Caroline Carroll, is listed on the 1880 census records in Washington Parish. She was married to John Miley. They had no children at the time of the 1880 census. Martha Jane and John Miley were living next door to John's parents and younger siblings.

5th Ward Washington Parish, 1880


Martha J. MILEY Wife 18 years old born MS Keeping House Father born MS Mother born MS
John MILEY 20 years old born LA occup. Farmer Father born LA Mother born LA

Living next door:

Joseph MILEY 45 born LA Farmer LA LA
Bacen MILEY Son 18 LA At Home LA LA
Rutha MILEY Dau 16 LA At Home LA LA
Curtis MILEY Son 12 LA At Home LA LA

West Feliciana Parish, Ward 2, 1880.

Grieff CARROLL age 47 born TENN occup. Planter Father born NC Mother born GA
Caroline CARROLL Wife age 45 born ALA occup. At Home Father born ALA Mother born ALA
Delphine CAROLL Dau age 21 born MISS occup. Laborer Father born TENN Mother born ALA
William CARROLL age 16 born MISS occup. Laborer Father born TENN Mother born ALA
Samuel CARROLL Son age 7 born MISS Father born TENN Mother born ALA
Emma CARROLL Dau age 5 born LA Father born TENN Mother born ALA
Ruben CARROLL Son age 3 born LA Father born TENN Mother born ALA

Grief and Caroline Carroll Move to Washington Parish

On November 23, 1892, Grief Carroll homesteaded 160 and ninety five hundredths of an acre of land in Washington Parish.

Grief and his family settled in Popeville*, Washington Parish, Louisiana, probably around 1891.

*Popeville no longer exists. Popeville's store, post office and voting place use to be located on Highway 62 past Pine, going toward Thomas, about 1/3 of a mile before the junction of Highway 62 and LA 438. It was located on the left side of the highway. All that remains is an overgrown drive in a wooded area.

Note: Grief's proper name was Griffin Carroll. He was listed as Griffin Carroll on the 1870 Census in Jackson County, Mississippi. Grief's brother Samuel named one of his children Greif according to the 1880 census in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. As an adult, Samuel's son went by the name Griffin.

Grief and his sons' Reuben Hampton Carroll and Sam Carroll are listed on Voting records in 1898 in Washington Parish.

WASHINGTON PARISH, LOUISIANA, VOTER REGISTRATION INDEX 1898
http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/washingt/court/vote1898.txt

CARROLL, GRIEF
CARROLL, R.H.
CARROLL, SAM

On October 6, 1898, Grief applied for his pension for service during the Civil War. He applied for it in Louisiana where he was living with his wife who was sixty-one years old, this was her age according to the application, and an eight year old child. He said that he had a total of five children; three boys and two girls. He was a farmer and owned forty acres of land with a value of about fifty dollars. He said that he had lived in Louisiana for twenty-six years; which would have made his move to Louisiana in about 1872.

SOLDIER'S APPLICATION FOR PENSION

I, Grief Carroll, a native of Tennessee and now a citizen of Louisiana, resident at Popeville in the Parish of Washington in said State of Louisiana, and who was soldier, (sailor or marine as the case may be) from the State of Mississippi in the Confederate States army (or navy as the case may be) in the war between the United States and the Confederate States, do hereby apply for aid under Act 123 of the General Assembly of the State of Louisiana of 1898; and I do solemnly swear that I served the Confederate States honorably from the date of my enlistment until the close of the civil war, (or until discharged or paroled as the case may be,) as shown by my answers below, and that I remained true to the Confederate cause until the surrender, and that I am now in indigent circumstances, and unable to earn a livelihood by my own labor or skill, and that I am not salaried or otherwise provided for by the State of Louisiana or by any other State or government, and am entitled to receive the benefits of said Act No. 123 of 1898, as further shown by my answers to the questions below, which I swear to be true and correct:

1. In what town, county, State, country and year were you born?

Answer: Franklin County Tenn. W.S.A. 1833.

2. When and where did you enlist, and in what command?

Answer: October 2, 1861 East Pascagoula, Miss.

Capt. H. Bruno Griffin Command

3. Give the names of the regimental and company officers under whom you enlisted, and under whom you were serving at the date of your discharge or parole.

Answer: Capt. Griffin, Johnson 1st Lieut Jesse E. Thompson

2nd Lieut. Wm Welch 2nd Junior Lieut.

Company L. 27th Miss. Reg. at my discharge

Wm. Welch rest of officers being captured killed and wounded.

4. Were you wounded? If so, in what battles, and if not, state under what circumstances during the war you received injury or injuries.

Answer: I received none.

5. What was the precise nature of your wound or wounds, if any?

Answer: None

6. If you have lost a limb or any eye, state when, where and how.

Answer: My eyes are badly effected from exposure during the war.

7. Where you discharged from the army by reason of wound, wounds, or from the effects of service?

Answer: From effects of service

8. If discharged or paroled from the army, where were you, and what did you do until the close of the war?

Answer: Dalton, Ga. at home. I farmed until close of War. I received a furlough from service at Dalton, Ga. by furnishing a recruit.

9. What was the name of the surgeon who attended you when discharged?

Answer: None

10. Where were you at the surrender?

Answer: At home.

11. If a prisoner, in what camp, and when were you released, and to where sent?

Answer: Murfreesborough, Tenn. February 1868

Chattanooga, Tenn.

12. Did you take the oath of allegiance to the United States Government at any time during the war?

Answer: Did not

13. If so, when, where and under what circumstances?

Answer: Did not

14. How long have you been a resident of the State of Louisiana next preceding the date of this application? Where have you resided during that period?

Answer: Twenty six years Louisiana

15. Are you married or have you been married?

Answer: Married

16. If so, what is the size of your family?

Answer: Three

17. What are the respective ages of your wife and children?

Answer: Wife sixty-one child eight

18. How many children have you, and how many of each sex?

Answer: Five three boys and two girls

19. Are you engaged in any business? If so, what do you earn?

Answer: Farming unable to earn a livehood

20. Have you any estate in your own right, real or personal, and what is its value?

Answer: Forty acres land fifty dollars

21. Has your wife any estate in her own right, real or personal, and what is its value?

Answer: None

22. How have you derived support for yourself, and family if you have one, for the last five years, and what prevents you from earning a living now?

Answer: Farming. My eyes and other diseases.

23. Do you use any intoxicants to any extent?

Answer: I do not

24. Have you an attorney to look after this application?

Answer: None

25. Give his name, address, and the compensation agreed between you.

Answer: XX

26. Give names of two or more of your comrades with their postoffice addresses.

Answer: Andrew Vaughan Three Rivers, Miss.

Solomon Oswell Three Rivers, Miss. (*NOTE: Oswell should be spelled Oswald.)

27. Give your postoffice address and that of the two witnesses.

Answer: Louis Crain & Frances Nobles, both of Popeville, Louisiana

Witness my hand this 6th day of October, 1898

his
Grief x Carroll

mark

Witnesses:

Louis Crain

his

Francis x Nobles


mark

APPLICANT MUST GO BEFORE CLERK OF COURT

State of Louisiana

Washington Parish Personally appeared before me, L. A. Bickham

Clerk of the District Court of said Parish, the above named Grief Carroll the applicant, with whom I am personally acquainted, and having the application read and fully explained to him as well as the statements and answers therein made, made oath that the statements and answers are true.

Witness my hand and seal of office, this 6th day of October, 1898.

L. A. Bickham

Clerk

(If possible, the two witnesses as to character should have served with the applicant in the army, and if so, let them, or either, state it in their oath; also any other information regarding applicant's army service.)

State of Louisiana

Washington Parish Personally appeared before me, L. A. Bickham Clerk of the District Court of said Parish, the above named Louis Crain and Frances Nobles, two of the subscribing witnesses to the foregoing application, with whom I am personally acquainted, and known to be citizens of veracity and standing in this community, and who make oath that they are personally acquainted with the foregoing applicant, and that the facts set forth and statements made in his application are correct and true, to the best of their knowledge and belief, and that they have no interest in this claim, and that said applicant's habits are good and free from dishonor.

Witness my hand and seal of office, this 6th day of October, 1998.

L. A. Bickham

 

Popeville, La.

Nov. 14, 1898.

Mr. E. F. Brian.

Baton Rouge, La.

Dear Sir -

Yours of good inst. received and contents noted. My Company L 27th Miss. Regiment. Captain under whom I enlisted was H. B. Griffin.

Yours, Respt.

Grieff Carroll

Grief and Caroline Carroll’s Children

Grief stated on his Civil War pension application that he had five children, three boys and two girls. They were he and Caroline’s sons’ William Grief Carroll, Samuel M. “Sam” Carroll, Reuben Hampton Carroll, and his daughters Emma and Martha Jane. According to information on 1910 census records, contributed by Emily Croom, Grief and Caroline had a total of 13 children.

By the time the family moved to Washington Parish, Delphine is no longer listed as a part of the family. She, too, probably died. Grief is not listed on the 1890 Census in Washington Parish.

Grief also stated on his Civil War pension application that he had an eight year old child living with him and his wife. I have not been able to learn who this child was. It could not have been his.

Their oldest son, William Grief Carroll was obviously named after his grandfather William Carroll and his father Grief.  Gregg Brauwn, the grandson William Hardy Carroll, contributed his great-grandfather William's middle name. William was born around 1865, in Jackson County, Mississippi, after his father Grief came home from the Civil War.  William married Nancy Dykes, somewhere around 1891. They had three children. William and Nancy’s children were William Hardy Carroll, Rachel Carroll and Caroline “Carrie” Carroll. Carrie was obviously named after William Hardy Carroll’s grandmother Caroline.

Grief and Caroline’s grandson (William Grief Carroll’s son) William Hardy Carroll married Madge O. Strain in 1919 in St. Tammany Parish, Volume 6, Page 190. They are buried in the Chinchuba Cemetery in St. Tammany Parish.

Gregg Brauwn, a grandson of William “Hardy” Carroll’s, said that Hardy moved to Mandeville while he was in the CCC Camps. That is when he met and married Madge Strain.

William Hardy Carroll was a private in the LA, Company D, 125th Infantry, during World War I. He was born September 14, 1892 and died December 28, 1959. His wife Madge Strain was born July 3, 1903 and died April 5, 1968. Hardy and Madge Carroll had the following children: Lillian, Howard, Roy, Preston and Shirley. Shirley is the only child still living.

Doyle Carroll who was the grandson of Sam Carroll, William Hardy Carroll's uncle, can remember his father Jessie Paul Carroll going to visit Hardy Carroll when he lived in Mandeville (although he remembered it as the Covington area.) Denver Nobles also remembers Hardy Carroll going to visit Hardy’s Uncle Reuben Carroll and then both of them coming to visit Denver’s family. Hardy’s sister Rachel’s daughter, Patricia Jones, said that they use to visit her mother’s Uncle Reuben Carroll.

Rachel Carroll married Roscoe Delos Green May 4, 1912 in Washington Parish. They lived in the Oak Grove area of Washington Parish, not far from Pine. Rachel Carroll Green died October 10, 1962. She was 67 years, 7 months and 24 days old. She was born in February 1895. Brown Funeral Home in Franklinton took care of the arrangements. Rachel and her husband Roscoe are buried in the Williams Cemetery in Washington Parish. The cemetery is located about one mile southeast of Oak Grove Missionary Baptist Church. Roscoe Green was born March 15, 1895. He died March 8, 1963. Rachel and Roscoe had the following children: Vernel, Audrey, William, Patricia and Samuel. Patricia married Robert Jones. She is the only child still living of Rachel and Roscoe Green’s children. Patricia contributed the names of the children of William Hardy, Rachel, and Caroline “Carrie” Carroll.

Caroline “Carrie” Carroll married Clifford “Cliff” Strain in 1917 in St. Tammany Parish, Volume 5, Page 292. They lived in the Mandeville – Abita Springs area, according to Patricia Jones. Carrie and Cliff’s children were Lloyd, Hazel, Clyde and Alvin.


William Grief Carroll’s wife Nancy Dykes was born in Covington County, Mississippi. She was the daughter of James C. Dykes and Jemima Chain. Nancy was probably named after her mother Jemima’s sister Nancy. James C. Dykes and Jemima Chain married around 1856-57. In the 1860 census in Covington County, Mississippi, their oldest daughter Sabrina was only 2 years old.

James C. Dykes died sometime between 1870 and 1880. Jemima died August 10, 1929, in Covington, Louisiana. She is buried in the Nobles Cemetery in Pine, Louisiana. She was born January 2, 1842. This information was on her death certificate.

Family of Nancy Dykes

James C. Dykes and Jemima Chain were the parents of Nancy Dykes. James C. Dykes was the son of Jacob H. Dykes and Sarah E. Rutland. His wife Jemima Chain was the daughter of William Chain and Melinda Pickering.

William Chain was born in 1796 in Beauford District, South Carolina and died January 20, 1856 in Covington County, Mississippi. He married first Phoebe Smith April 1, 1814 in St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana; daughter of Jeremiah Smith. He married second Mary Robertson on May 26, 1827 in Hinds County, Mississippi. He married third Melinda Pickering January 1, 1836 in Copiah County, Mississippi, daughter of Joseph Pickering.

William Chain was the son of John Chain, born in 1752 in Somerset, Anne Arundel County, Maryland. He married Anne Tucker on July 31, 1777, in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. John Chain was the son of Alexander Chain, born in 1735 in Scotland and died August 1786 in Anne Arunde County, Maryland. His wife is unknown.

James C. Dykes and Jemima’s children were Sabrina, Sarah, William, Josiah, Almira, Charlotte and Nancy Dykes.

James C. Dykes and Jemima Chain (parents of Nancy Dykes) were born and grew up near each other in Covington County, Mississippi.

On the 1880 Census in Mt. Carmel, Covington County, Mississippi, Jemima Chain Dykes was a widow, age 39. Also in the household were her children William age 17, Almira 11, Charlotte 8 and Nancy Dykes 6 years old. http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/frameset_search.asp?PAGE=census/search_census.asp


On the 1860 Census in Williamsburg, Covington County, Mississippi, Reel No: M653-580, Page 69, enumerated on September 18, 1860 by H. a. McLeod:

Jemima Chain, age 18, is married to James C. Dykes age 25. James C. Dykes is a farmer with 250 acres. Their children were Sabrina 2 and Sarah 1.

Jemima’s brother Alexander Chain is also married. He is 27 years old. He is a farmer with 500 acres of land with a value of $1,000.00. He is married to 22 year old Susan __. They have a 1 year old daughter, S. A. Chain.

Jemima’s father is no longer listed with the family. He probably died. His wife Malinda Pickering Chain is 50 years old with 250 acres valued at $500.00. Also listed in the household are her children Lucinda 21, Joseph 20, John 18, Rebecca 16 and Gabrel 14, Nancy 10 and Hannah 8 years old.

Near neighbors are Jemima’s husband James C. Dykes’ parents and siblings. Jacob Dykes is 48, farming with 400 acres valued at $400.00. His wife Sarah is 44. Their children are Harriet 23, Malinda 22, A. D. 20, Vicy 16, Cinderella 14, Samantha 12, Sarentha 10, Levander 8, Caroline 6, J. B. 6, Sarah 5 and Isabella 7 months old.

Near neighbors to Jacob Dykes is James Dykes age 50, his wife Mary Ann is not listed. She probably died. His children were William B. age 20, Henry C. 18, Sarah A. 16, Isaac N. 14, Mahala Ann 12, L. a. 10, W. F. 8, H. L. 6 and J. B. 2 years old.

Elizabeth Rutland age 30 is living nearby with her four children. (James C. Dykes mother was Sarah Rutland, so Elizabeth Rutland was probably related.)

Next door to Elizabeth Rutland is Dennis Dykes age 26, farming 100 acres and his wife Luiser age 17.

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ms/covington/census/1860/pg00023.txt

On the 1850 Census, Microfilm #M432-371, in Covington County, Mississippi, Jacob H. Dykes is 35 years old, his wife Sarah E. Rutland is 33. Their children are James C. Dykes 14 years old, Harriet Dykes age 13, Melinda age 11, Arid J. age 9, Lev**y age 7, Cinderella age 5, Samantha age 4, Sarintha age 2 and Levanda 3 months old.

Living near them is William Rutland age 29, a farmer, his wife Mary E. and their children Hamilton C. age 4, William A. age 2, and Dennis Dykes age 16 – listed as a laborer.

Another near neighbor is Joseph Bridges age 57, a farmer with 300 acres, born in Georgia, his wife Nancy age 58, and their children Celia 20, Ann Pierce age 96, and Lafayette H. Dykes age 12.


Dennis and Lafayette Dykes are probably brothers of James C. Dykes.

Another neighbor is Mary Ann Dykes age 29 and her children William B., James, Henry C., Sarah Ann, Isaac N. and Mahala Ann.

William Chain age 54 born in South Carolina and his wife Melinda Pickering age 34 born in Georgia are living nearby. Their children are Jane J. age 21, Alexander 19, Lucinda 13, Joseph 9, Jemima 7, John 6, Rebecca 3 and Gabriel 1.

A near neighbor to the Chains was Adam Faler age 37, a farmer with 300 acres from France, his wife Caroline age 36, and their children Ferdinand 10, Catherine 8, Charles 6, Caroline 4, Elizabeth 2 and also living with them was Isaac Chain, age 36, a laborer born in Louisiana.

http://www.us-census.org/pub/usgenweb/census/ms/covington/1850/indx-a-l.txt

Grief and Caroline Carroll’s son Reuben

Grief and his sons, R. H. (Rueben) and Sam Carroll are listed on the Voter Rolls in 1898; microfilm reel #L SS1.7. Grief’s brother Samuel moved to Calcasieu Parish near the Texas-Louisiana border near Deridder, Louisiana. His descendants are still living in the area.

Grief’s son R. H. “Reuben Hampton” Carroll was born March 16, 1878 and died November 9, 1953. He was born after the family moved to Louisiana. Reuben is Grief and Caroline's youngest child. He was born in West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana. According to census records, he was three years old in 1880.

Reuben Carroll married Mary Lillie Young (b. 5-12-1886 – d. 11-10-1963).

The picture below is Reuben Carroll's wife Lillie. Standing next to Lillie Carroll is Caroline Arnesia Miley and George Nobles' daughter, Ollie Nobles Hines. The picture was contributed by Ollie's brother, Denver Nobles.
Click on the picture to enlarge.

Lillie and Reuben Carroll lived very near Caroline Arnesia and George Nobles. Lillie had a leg amputated before her death. Her leg was buried, then after her death, she was buried in the same grave. Lillie and Reuben are buried in the Sam Carroll Cemetery.

Reuben and Lillie had three children. One was Willie Carroll who married Acenie Miley. Willie and Acenie are buried in the Gearld Cemetery located on Pine Hwy. (Hwy. 62), 2nd fork, 2nd Blacktop to left. Gerald Cemetery is on the right side of the road.

CARROLL, ACENIE MILEY, b. 6-28-18__, d. 12-3-1985

CARROLL, WILLIAM G., b. 9-8-1897, d. 8-25-1956

A daughter of Reuben and Mary Carroll’s married Houston Dillard. Another daughter married Percy Smith. A granddaughter married Etzel Penton. Information about his children was contributed by Denver Nobles.

Grief and Caroline Carroll’s daughter Emma

Grief and Caroline’s youngest daughter Emma is buried in the Sam Carroll Cemetery. According to Census Records of 1880 in West Feliciana, Ward 2, she was born in Louisiana, and she was 5 years old at the time of the 1880 census. She died June 1, 1953.

Emma in the 1910 census is listed next to John and Jane Miley on the Pine-Varnado Rd, family 109, e.d. 134, sheet 7A, ward 5, township 2 (Pine) of Washington Parish. Emma was 34, born LA, parents born MS (Parents birth was wrong - her father Grief was born in Tennessee and her mother Caroline was born in Alabama), farmer, with 6 children living of 7 she had borne. Kids were Hamp (Hampton 15), Fount (13), Daniel B (Boone) (11), Myrtle (8), Jewell (5), Mary (2).

Emma was born November 17, 1872, according to her death certificate. Her daughter Jewel was the informant. Emma died June 1, 1953. The information from the 1910 census and death certificates of Emma and Martha Jane was contributed by Emily Croom.

Fount Miley married Estella McNeese June 26, 1919.

Hamp Miley married Bessie McNeese September 25, 1918.

Boone Miley married Eliza Jarrell May 4, 1917. Boone was the daughter of Grief and Caroline Carroll’s daughter Emma. Eliza is buried in the Sam Carroll Cemetery. She was the daughter of Jim Jarrell. Jim was the brother of Sam Carroll’s wife Mary Jarrell. Sam was the son of Grief and Caroline Carroll and sister to Emma.

Eliza (Jarrell) Miley, born May 14, 1903 – died July 7, 1946.

Boone Miley is buried in the Central Church Cemetery located off 7 Mile Road on Hilltop Road.

Daniel Boone Miley, born February 28, 1899 – died June 28, 1977.

Grief and Caroline's daughter Martha "Jane" Miley

Martha Jane Carroll married John Mily around 1879. Martha Jane and her sister Victoria were the first in this Carroll family to live in Washington Parish. She is listed with her husband John on the 1880 Census. The rest of her family were still living in West Feliciana Parish. Martha Jane was born November 15, 1872 according to her death certificate. She died January 22, 1926. She is buried in the Miley Cemetery.

John Miley was born February 19, 1860 and died December 15, 1947. He is buried in the Miley Cemetery located on Seven Mile Road, Washington Parish, Louisiana.

Martha Jane Carroll and John Miley’s Children:

Denver Nobles contributed the names of Martha Jane and John Miley’s children. Denver is the grandson of Martha Jane Carroll and John Miley and the son of Caroline Arnicia Miley and George Nobles.

Mary Miley was the oldest child. She married Lafayette “Boy” Rester January 13, 1898. Mary was born 8-11-1880 and died Mary 10, 1906. Boy was born in 1878 in Marion County, Mississippi, son of William Rester and Elvira Carnegie. A child was born and died in 1906. Mary probably died in child birth. Mary is buried in Miley Cemetery.

Joe Miley married Fronia Dykes. Joe was born 7-25-1882 and died 9-22-1966. Fronia was born 9-18-1891 and died 11-26-1976. They are both buried in Miley Cemetery.

Curtis Miley never married. He was born August 7, 1884 and died November 17, 1932. He is buried in Miley Cemetery.

Samuel G. Miley married Ella Nobles 12-23-1908. Ella was the sister of George Nobles. Sam was born 6-6-1886 and died 8-30-1949. Luella was born 8-28-1890 and died 3-31-1949. They are both buried in Miley Cemetery.

Caroline Arnicia Miley married George Nobles March 5, 1908. Arnesia was born March 4, 1888 and died June 8, 1958. George was born September 29, 1885 and died Jan 25, 1962. They are both buried in Miley Cemetery.

Morris Miley married Tera “Tilly” Nobles. Tilly was the sister of George Nobles. Morris was born 9-4-1889 and died 2-4-1979. Tilly was born 2-20-1894 and died 2-28-1983. They are both buried in Miley Cemetery.

Dave Miley married Rossetta Nobles. Rossetta was the sister of George Nobles. David was born 9-17-1891 and died 1-24-1942. Rossetta was born 1896 and died 1958. They are both buried in Miley Cemetery.

Lena Miley married Rufus R. Fussell. Lena was born 11-24-1893 and died Sept 27, 1980. Rufus was born 3-21-1881 and died July 28, 1948. They are both buried in Miley Cemetery.

Morgan Miley married Florance Adams September 2, 1915. Florance was the sister of John Adams. Morgan was born 7-31-1895 and died January 13, 1966. Florance was born 8-5-1894 and died 2-10-1987. They are both buried in Miley Cemetery.

Luther E. Miley married Margerette Adams 3-2-1915. Margerette was the sister of John Adams. Luther was born Feb 20, 1897 and died Jan 27, 1988. Margerette was born Sept. 17, 1897 and died March 4, 1967. They are both buried in Miley Cemetery.

Y. Manson “Doc” Miley married Ida Adams. Ida was sister of John Adams. Doc was born 1-15-1899 and died 3-10-1964. Ida was born 9-21-1899 and died 12-1992. They are both buried in Miley Cemetery.

Jane Miley married William Temples. Jane was born 3-13-1903 and died 4-3-1977. Jane is buried in Miley Cemetery.


Caroline Arnesia Miley and George Nobles Family

Caroline Arnicia Miley married George Nobles March 5, 1908. Arnesia was born March 4, 1888 and died June 8, 1958. George was born September 29, 1885 and died Jan 25, 1962. They are both buried in Miley Cemetery.

Children:

T. C. (Thomas) Nobles married Bertha Jones. T C was born 12-8-1908. He died 7-5-1958. He is buried in the Miley Cemetery.

Martha Nobles married Elzey Lott. Martha was born November 25, 1912. She died May 14, 1940. She is buried in Miley Cemetery.

James Delos Nobles never married. He was born January 16, 1910. He died December 19, 1990. He is buried in Miley Cemetery.

Artis Nobles married Hilda Wallace. Artis was born December 23, 1914. He died September 19, 1978. He is buried in the Midway Baptist Church Cemetery.

J F (John Frances) Nobles married Erma Jones.

Benton Nobles married Sylvia Wheat first. He later married Eva Jarrell.

Benton’s twin sister died as a baby.

Another daughter died as a baby.

Audrey Nobles married Van Jenkins

Ollie Nobles married first Estus Hines second married Joe Cadvenhead. Estus was born July 7, 1912. He died December 30, 1959. He was in the military. He is buried in Miley Cemetery.

Denver Nobles married Vera Wilson.

Alford (youngest child) married first Beatrice Tony, second married Fay Skipper, third married Winney Messer and fourth married Margaret ____. They are still married.

Grief and Caroline Carroll’s son Sam

Grief’s son Sam M. Carroll (b. 1-17-1871 – d. 4-13-1945) married Mary Jarrell (b. 2-14-1878 –d. 2-10-1936). Samuel M. Carroll and Mary Virginia Jarrell were married in 1893 in Washington Parish, LA. They had twelve children. They are both buried in the Sam Carroll Cemetery. Sam Carroll was born January 17, 1871 in Jackson County, Mississippi. He and his family moved to Louisiana when he was about 1 year old in 1872. They were living in West Feliciana Parish prior to moving to Washington Parish.

Grief Carroll stated on his Civil War pension application approximately when the family came to Louisiana, and Sam Carroll’s place of birth can be found on Sam’s son Felix Ernest Carroll’s death certificate. Sam Carroll was the informant. He said that his wife Mary Jarrell was born in Pine. Death Certificate Registration District No. 59-2407,

In 1897, Sam bought 80 acres of land in Washington Parish from James S. Hunt. It is recorded in Bk 9, Vol 217 in the Franklinton Courthouse. It was located in the N ½ of SE ¼ Sec. 5-2-13.

On November 8, 1905, Samuel Carroll homesteaded 160 and ninety-six hundredths acres in Washington Parish.

In 1910, Sam bought 25 acres from H. E. Gayer, et al, off E. - Side of SE ¼ of NE ¼ Sec. 5-2-13, recorded in Bk 17, pg 523. Registered No. 11984.



Children of Sam and Mary Carroll:

1. Fronia (Fronie) Carroll (b. 7-28-1894 d. March 30, 1924) married James Primes. They had two children: Ellis Primes died in infancy. Their son Willis (born November 16, 1923 - died November 10, 1980) was raised by her parents after her death. He was raised as Willis Carroll. Willis' children were: Kathy Lee Dessell; Mary Lee DeLagardelle; and Willis Carroll, Jr.

2. Felix Ernest Carroll was born in Varnado, Louisiana on September 22, 1896. He died of Typhoid Fever on November 18, 1921. He was only 25 years old. His wife's name was Margaret Cauley. Dr. J. H. Slaughter attended Felix during his illness from November 6, 1921 until a day before his death on November 18, 1921. The place of burial was Pine, Louisiana in the Sam Carroll Cemetery. Ernest and Margaret had one daughter: Ladie Carroll Rogers. Ladie had 7 children: Donald, Ernest, Glenn, Barbara Ann, Leroy, Sylvia and Patricia.

Margaret C. was born 8-3-1903. She died 7-3-1982. Wiley Jarrell was born 6-8-1901. He died 4-30-1989. They are both buried in the Gerald Cemetery. The cemetery is located on Pine Hwy. (Hwy. 62), 2nd fork, 2nd Blacktop to the left (Gerald Cem. Rd.) The Cemetery is on the right side of the road.

3. Lula Carroll (b. 2-16-1899 d. 11-10-1927) married Charley Miley February 26, 1921. They are buried in Sam Carroll Cemetery in Washington Parish. They had the following children: Elmer Miley, Delma Miley Toney, Mildred Miley Owens, R. V. Miley, Lloyd Miley (died May 23, 1952 without spouse or children.

Their son Elmer Miley died January 9, 2000.

BOGALUSA - Funeral services for Elmer Miley, 78, a rresident of Bogalusa are scheduled for 10 a.m. tomorrow in the chapel of Brown-McGehee Funeral Home with the Rev. Michael Benson and the Rev. Wesley Quave officiating. Visitation is from 3:30-10 p.m. today, continuing tomorrow after 8 a.m. until the time of service. Burial will be in Carroll cemetery on the Pine-Varnado Highway. Mr. Elmer Miley died Sunday in St. Tammany Parish Hospital, Covington. He was a native and resident of Washington Parish, a member of the Board of Trustees of Talley's Chapel United Pentecostal Church and a retired employee of Gaylord Box Factory. He was preceded in death by his parents, Charles Miley and Lula Carroll Miley; a son, David E. Miley; and a brother, Lloyd Miley. Survivors include his wife, Iva Jewell Hyde Miley, Bogalusa; three sons, Darrell and his wife Barbara Miley, Dalton Miley, Bogalusa, and Don and his wife Amy Miley, Bogalusa and Shreveport; a brother, R. V. Miley, Pine; two sisters, Delma Toney, Bogalusa and Mildred Owen, Bogalusa; nine grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; numerous nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.

R.V. Miley
(Died October 7, 2004)
COVINGTON n R.V. Miley, 78, a resident of The Seven Mile Road community, died Thursday in St. Tammany Parish Hospital in Covington. He was a member of Lighthouse Pentecostal Church.
Survivors include a son, Rodney V. Miley Jr. of Pine; a daughter, Andrea Miley Pounds of Pine; sisters, Mildred Owen and Delma Toney, both of Bogalusa; and grandchildren, Rodney V. Miley III, Benjamin Ryan Miley, Reid Joshua Miley, Brittany Pounds, and Morgan Pounds.
Preceding him in death were his parents, Charlie and Lula Miley; and his brothers, Lloyd Miley and Elmer Miley.
Visitation will be held today at Brown-McGehee Funeral Home from 2-10 p.m. and will continue tomorrow from 8 a.m. until time of the funeral service, to be conducted from the funeral home chapel at 2 p.m. The Rev. Charles Reece will conduct the service. Burial will be in Sam Carroll Cemetery.

Obituaries for R. V. Miley and Elmer Miley were contributed by R. V.’s daughter Andrea Pounds.

4. William H. “Willie” Carroll (b. February 14, 1901 d. March 25, 1948) married Georgie Carroll 9-8-1921. (Georgie Carroll is not related to William Carroll. There are still two groups of Carroll families in Washington Parish, not related to each other.) Willie served in the Military. He is buried in Poplarville, Mississippi. Willie and Georgie Carroll had two children: Lawrence Carroll and Toxie Carroll.

5. Charles O. ‘Charley” Carroll (b. 2-8-1903 d. 12-25-1952) married Francis Temples December 29, 1927. They are buried in Mt Sinai Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery in Washington Parish. They had three children: Virginia Carroll Williams; Huey Carroll (died October 3, 1951, without spouse or child); and Jerry Faye Carroll (died August 15, 1956, without spouse or child.)

6. George W. Carroll (b. 2-12-1905 d. 4-7-1924) He was limbering a new rope for the church well. The crank that pulls the rope out of the well hit George and killed him. He had no wife or children.

7. Reece S. Carroll (b. 7-11-1908 d. 9-5-1950) married Eva Toney Spears 5-18-1939. They had four children: Samuel Carroll, Max Carroll, Mary Louise Carroll Edwards; and R. S. Carroll (died in infancy).

There are 60 acres recorded for Reese S. Carroll in Bk 56 pg 32 in the Franklinton Courthouse. He acquired this land in 1930 from his father Sam Carroll. It was in the W ½ of SW ¼ of NE ¼ & SE ¼ or NW ¼, Sec. 5-2-13.

8. “Reuben” Richmond Carroll (b. 7-7-1909 d. 1-21-1971) married Ruby Bertha Williams (b. 9-27-1907 d. 5-5-1986) They are buried in Thomas M. Jones Cemetery on Jones Cemetery Road in Washington Parish. They had no children.

9. John Quincy “J Q” Carroll (b. 5-24-1911 d. 3-23-1981) married Myrtis Esma Sheridan. They are buried in Sheridan Cemetery. They had six children: Mildren Carroll Hillhouse; Nellie Ruth Carroll Gerald; Geraldine Carroll Boone; James Edward Carroll; Sidney Ray Carroll; and Brenda Carroll Ard.

10. Jessie Paul Carroll (b. 6-1-1913 d. 1-16-1961) married Edith Louisa Knight 10-25-1935), the daughter of Plummer Knight's son George. Jessie is buried in the Sam Carroll Cemetery. They had seven children: George, Doyle, Ralph, Shirley, Patricia, Roy, and Rickey.

11. Daniel H. “Dan” Carroll (b. 4-15-1916 d. 9-23-1981) married Dollie Adams. He is buried in the Sam Carroll Cemetery. They had seven children: Dorothy Carroll Ladner; Bill Carroll; Charles Carroll; Douglas Carroll; John L. Carroll; Marie Carroll Taylor; and Leroy Carroll.

OBITUARIES / The Daily News / December 28, 1998

John Louis Carroll

(Died Dec. 25, 1998)

BOGALUSA - John Louis Carroll, age 46, died Friday aat his residence in Bush. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn L. Carroll of Bush; his mother, Dollie A. Carroll of Bogalusa; a step-son, Ronald Wayne Thomas and a step-daughter, Rhonda Joyce Thomas, both of Bogalusa; four brothers, Douglas Carroll, Billy Carroll and Charles Carroll, all of Varnado and Leroy Carroll of Bogalusa; two sisters, Dorothy Hodges of Varnado and Marie Duhon of Bogalusa; and a step-grandson, Jeffery Thomas Williams. Visitation was yesterday at the Poole-Ritchie Funeral Home from 4:30 to 10 p.m., and continued this morning at 9 a.m. until time for the final service at 2 p.m. in the funeral home chapel. Interment will follow in the Carroll Cemetery in the Muster Ground community.

12. Eva Carroll (b. 1-7-1918 d. 8-27-1978) married Wiley Rogers, Sr. (b. 6-11-1916 d. 2-6-1998) They are buried in the Sam Carroll Cemetery. They had three children: Jewell D. Rogers; Jimmy Rogers; and Wiley Rogers, Jr.

The Daily News, Bogalusa, La.

Sunday, February 8, 1998

ROGERS, Wiley I. Sr., 83, Died Feb. 6, 1998 at St. Tammany Hospital in Covington, La. Burial in the Carroll Cemetery in Varnado, La.

Obituaries for December 21, 2000

Jimmy D. Rogers

(Died December 21, 2000)

BOGALUSA - Jimmy D. Rogers, 63, a native and residennt of Washington Parish, died this morning in his home in Bogalusa. Survivors include two brothers, Wiley I. Rogers Jr. and Jewell D. Rogers, both of Bogalusa; and numerous nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Preceding him in death were his parents, Wiley I. Rogers Sr. and Eva Carroll Rogers. Visitation will be held tomorrow at Brown McGehee Funeral Home from 5-10 p.m. and will continue Saturday after 8 a.m. until time for the funeral service, to be conducted from the funeral home chapel at 2 p.m. The Rev. Norwood Hoyt, the Rev. B.V. Alford, and the Rev. Willie F. Rogers will officiate. Interment will follow in Carroll Cemetery in Varnado. Brown-McGehee Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

 

The Way I Remember - Memories of my grandparents, Sam and Mary Carroll and their children, by Doyle Carroll

The following memories are from my childhood, so I cannot be sure of the accuracy of some of them. Corrections are welcomed.

I was told that my Grandfather Sam Carroll was a very hard worker. He owned a saw mill. I remember Sam Carroll staying with my family (Jessie and Edith Carroll) right before he passed away when he was very sick. I was very little at the time. I believe that he spent time at my Aunt Eva and Uncle Wiley Roger's, also.

My grandmother, Mary Carroll, died before I was born. I was told that she had asthma so bad before she died that she had to sleep sitting in a chair.

Sam and Mary Carroll's children:

My father, Jessie Paul Carroll, was the son of Sam and Mary Carroll. He was born June 1, 1913, on a farm in the country near Varnado, Louisiana. He was a good man who loved God, his neighbors and his family. He was a poor man, but he generously shared whatever he had with anyone who needed it. He died of a heart attack at the young age of 47 on January 16, 1961.

My father loved people. Neighbors were always coming by our home to visit him, and he was always going to see them. Sometimes, when I was riding in the truck with him, and we passed by a neighbors' home, he couldn't resist stopping. He would tell me that he was just going to stop for a minute and say hello. Many times I would get out of the truck and walk home, because I knew that I could get there faster walking than waiting for him to say hello to a friend.

We always grew a big garden, and he always made sure that we planted enough food to share our food with all the neighbors. He would loan his tractor, and my brother George and me along with it, to anyone who needed a garden of their own plowed.

His love of people drew him to local politics. When I was about 17 years old, my father ran for Justice of the Peace and won. He held the office until his death.

My father's mother died before I was born, and his father died when I was very little, but I remember how much he loved his brothers and sisters, and he was always visiting them. They were a very important part of his life.

My father never shared his feelings with his children while we were growing up. I guess it was just the way he was raised. But, right before he died, I got to know him much better, and he began talking to me like the adult that I had become.

My father, along with most of the other people in the area, grew up Baptist. My mother was also Baptist, and my family went to a local Baptist church when I was very little.

When I was very little and growing up in the country, we and our neighbors had few of the luxuries that we enjoy today.

When I was about eight or nine, my father built a cellar, which was a very unusual addition to a house in Louisiana. He dug a very large hole next to our home and built a room over it. The cellar had stairs leading down to it, and the room was used as a bedroom. The cellar stayed a very comfortable temperature year round. We stored our can goods and potatoes in it, and it also made a very good place to escape the summer heat. I guess you could say that we were the first in the area to have air-conditioning.

My father made the quilts and mattresses for our beds. Many people used feathers for their pillows and mattresses, but he used cotton. He had a machine for making the cotton mattresses. He bought the material and sewed the seams, leaving one corner unsewed. He attached the open corner to the discharge part of the machine and filled the material with cotton. Then, he finished sewing it.

My father raised chickens and cows for our food and milk. He cured our meat from a smokehouse and made syrup for our family and neighbors. The juice for the syrup was made from crushed sugar cane. The syrup was made in a metal pan that was about 12 ft long and about 4 ft wide. The pan had metal dividers about every six inches. Every other divider was attached to the opposite side, leaving a small opening for the juice to flow through. The pan sat over a furnace that was located at one end of the pan. The syrup in the pan sat directly over the furnace, which was much hotter than the rest, and cooked sooner. Rags were used to stop the flow of syrup that was not yet ready from mixing with the cooked syrup. A wooden peg was pulled, and the syrup that was ready was drained into one gallon cans. Then, the rags were pulled, and more syrup was allowed to flow to the hottest part of the pan, to prepare another batch of syrup for canning.

My father had a variety of jobs. He worked as a carpenter with his brother J. Q. Carroll. He owned a service station for a while; drove a milk truck from Bogalusa to Pearl River, Louisiana; drove a school bus; made grave markers for the local cemeteries and, while I was a teenager, we had a dairy farm. We had about sixty cows. About 30 were used at one time for milking.

My father has been gone for many years, but his memory will always be with me for as long as I live, and I will pass those memories down to my son, and hopefully, he will pass them down to his children.

 

Fronia Carroll married James Primes. She was very young when she died. Fronia is buried in the Sam Carroll Cemetery. One of their children, Willis, was raised by Sam Carroll after his mother died. Willis was raised as Willis Carroll. He is also buried in the Sam Carroll Cemetery.

Another son of Sam Carroll, Willie Carroll, received a military funeral in Poplarville, Mississippi. My father brought some of the people who attended the funeral on his school bus. He died in the 1950's.

Charles “Charlie” Carroll married Francis Temple. Their son, Huey, was killed in a car accident in California while he was in the Navy. After the family returned from the accident site, their daughter Jerry Faye became ill with polio. I remember her as a very pretty little girl with a big smile. Her illness finally confined her to an iron long in a New Orleans hospital. While loading necessities into his car so that he could bring Jerry Faye home for a short visit, Uncle Charlie collapsed and died of heart failure. Jerry Faye died when she was about sixteen years old.

George W. Carroll was asked by his church to limber up a new rope for well water. He was injured in the accident by the rope and never recovered. He died at the young age of nineteen. He was buried in the Sam Carroll Cemetery. His grave marker reads, "He Was Faithful To Every Duty."

I can remember Uncle Reuben Carroll staying with us (Jessie and Edith Carroll family) sometimes while he was still single. He built a big yard for his fox hounds. This was a passion of his for life. He was a frequent visitor to his brothers and sister. He was injured in a car accident while delivering mail and never recovered from the accident. His wife, Aunt Ruby, was a very pleasant person and a school teacher.

Dan Carroll and his family lived as near neighbors to my family while I was growing up. He served in the military, but I don't remember which branch.

Grief Carroll was born in Franklin County, Tennessee in 1833. He died in October 1917. His wife Caroline was born August 12, 1835, in Alabama and died on June 25, 1915. He and Caroline are buried in the Sam Carroll Cemetery in Washington Parish, Louisiana.

The cement slab that Grief’s name, date of birth and date of death were written is very faded and the dates are illegible, but the letters Jun (June) can still be read as the month of his birth. An inscription on the marker at the head of his grave reads:

"To The Passers By

As you Are Now

So Once Was I

As I Am Now You

Soon Must Be

Grief also has a Civil War marker at the foot of his grave.

The inscription on Caroline Carroll's grave marker reads: "In God I Did Trust."

Grief and Caroline were the first people buried in the Cemetery

A newspaper article dated July 1, 1915: Mrs. C. H. Carroll, wife of Greaf Carroll, died 6-25 at Varnado. She was 85 years, being born in 1832.

Note: The obituary had Grief's wife born in 1832, but if you subtract the age of 85 given in the obituary from the year 1915 which was the year of her death, it would put her birth at 1830. Her grave marker in the Sam Carroll Cemetery has her born in 1835. The 1850 census had her age as fifteen, which would have her born in 1835. The 1860 census in Jackson County, MS had her age as 25, which would have her born in 1835. According to his pension application, Grief said that his wife was sixty-one years old in 1898, which would have her born about 1837. With all the conflicting dates, I believe that she was born in 1835, the date on her grave marker and also on the two census. She was probably 80 years old at the time of her death.


Grief Carroll’s brother Samuel Carroll Moves to Louisiana

According to his second wife, Martha Jane Alexander's (maiden name Higginbotham - first husband James R. Alexander) Civil War pension application, Samuel married for a second time on January 25, 1876, by John Hughes, Justice of the Peace in Jackson County, MS. I do not believe this date is correct because Samuel's son Hardy, according to the 1880 census in Calcasieu Parish, was 7 years old and living with Samuel and Martha. His son Greif is 10 years old. Both of these children were born before Samuel and Martha's marriage date of January 25, 1876. Grief would have been born about 1870 and Hardy would have been born about 1873. I believe Samuel and Martha were married earlier than this date. I believe this Martha was their mother because when they were returning her pension check after she died, it stated that these were her living children. It included all of Samuel's children except his son William James from his first marriage. According to the pension application, Samuel moved to Louisiana around 1880. David Sprinkle, a descendant of Martha's, told me he believes the family moved to Calcasieu Parish earlier than this. I also believe that they probably came around the same time as his brother Grief, around 1872.

Martha Higginbotham and her family were living very near the Carrolls in the 1850 census in Harrison County, Mississippi.

1850 Census Harrison County, MS

31 Huggenbothan Martha 35 Georgia pg0111b.txt
32 Huggenbothan Martha 15 Missi pg0111b.txt
33 Huggenbothan William 14 Missi pg0111b.txt
34 Huggenbothan George 9 Alabama pg0111b.txt
35 Huggenbothan John 7 Alabama pg0111b.txt

36 Huggenbothan Ramsey 1 Missi pg0111b.txt



Martha Higginbotham’s Family


The following information was contributed by David Sprinkle, a descendant of Henry W. Whittington, the brother of Samuel Carroll's second wife Martha's mother:

Martha's maiden name was Higginbotham. She was the daughter of Martha Whittington, born in 1815, and Moses Higginbotham, born in 1811. Martha and Moses married in 1832 in Jackson County, MS.

Martha Whittington's father was Burrell Green Whittington born 1787, married Nancy Wells born 1794, in Tattnell County, Georgia. They moved to Jackson County, Mississippi in 1826, then Harrison County, Mississippi, and finally settled in Washington Parish, Louisiana by 1860. They had the following children:

Henry Wells Whittington, born in 1812, married Anna Bounds. They moved to Calcasieu Parish, LA after 1850.


Martha Whittington born in 1815, married Moses Higginbotham.

Ellen Whittington born in 1818, never married, moved to Washington Parish after 1850.

Nancy Whittington born in 1820, married James Eason, moved to Calcasieu Parish, LA after 1850.

Mary Whittington born in 1824, married William Leonard Bounds.

William Joshua Green Whittington born in 1829, married Malissia Ann Stafford, moved to Washington Parish.

Wesley Whittington born in 1837, married Elisabeth Keaton, lived in Washington Parish.

Moses Higginbotham and Martha Whittington had the following children:

Martha Jane Higginbotham born in 1834, married first James R. Alexander in Harrison County, MS on October 15, 1857. It is believed that James Alexander was killed in the Civil War. Martha married second Samuel Carroll.

William August Higginbotham born in 1836.

George Washington Higginbotham born in 1841 married Hannah Morrow and moved to Calcasieu Parish, LA. George is buried at Hopewell Cemetery at Beaurguard Parish, LA. Beaurguard Parish was made from Calcasieu Parish.

Ramsey Higginbotham born in 1848.

Marinda Higginbotham born in 1850.


Samuel Carroll’s First Son, William James

Samuel Carroll and his first wife's (probably Martha Broadass) son W J (William James) was listed on the 1860 census and the 1870 Census in Jackson County, Mississippi. He is listed as 6 years old on the 1860 census. He was born about 1854 in Mississippi.

William James “W J” was living about 12 doors down from his father Samuel Carroll and his second wife Martha Higginbotham Alexander in Calcasieu Parish. William James was living with his wife Mary Francis Guilerise. They had no children in 1880.

Wm. J. Carrel Age 23 Occupation Laborer
Mary F. Carrel Wife Age 18

The following information about the family of William James Carroll and Mary Francis Guilerise was researched by DONALD H. PISERCHIO.

William James Carroll married Mary Francis Guilerise. Mary Francis Guilerise's father was __Guilerise and her mother's maiden name was Hebert.

James and Mary Carroll had the following children:

1.William Carroll born in the 1880's in LA. William maried Norma Bellevue about 1908 in Louisiana. They had at least one daughter.

2.Maydella Carroll born in the 1880's in Oakdale, Allen Parish, LA.

3.Lonie Dezille Carroll born in the 1880's in Oakdale, Allen Parish, LA. She died June 6, 1929 and was buried June 7, 1929 in Oakdale, Allen Parish, LA. Lonie married first about 1902, Vester Commodore Monk born 1885 in LA. Vester died October 1, 1911 and is buried in Oakdale, LA. Lonie and Vestor had the following children:

James Benjamin Monk born about 1905 in Oakdale, Calcasieu, LA. He died March 12, 1937 in Shreveport, Caddo, LA and is buried in Oakdale, Allen Parish.

Holly Francis Monk born 1906 in Oakdale, Calcasieu, LA. She died in 1925 and is buried in Oakdale.

Living Female

Vester Commodore Monk born March 12, 1912 in Oakdale, Calcasieu Parish, LA, died October 30, 1983 in La Junta, Otero, CO and was buried Nov. 2, 1983 in Ordway, Crowley, CO.

Manuel Crocket Monk born August 28, 1905 in Oakdale, Calcasieu, LA, died March 17, 1995 in Oakdale, and is buried in Plainview, Calcasieu, LA.

Lonie married second Gaspin Jerome Crow about 1914 in Oakdale, Allen, Parish.

4.Samuel Carroll born about 1889 in Oakdale, Allen Parish, LA. Samuel married Annie Myers born about 1893.

5.James L. Carroll born about 1890 in Oakdale, Allen Parish, LA. James maried Linnie Myers September 5, 1912 in Evangline Parish, LA.

6.Dreyfus Carroll born about 1892 in Oakdale, Allen Parish, LA.

7.Nancy Carroll born May 14, 1884 in Oakdale, Allen Parish, LA. She died June 17, 1933. Nancy married William Obrey Yielding born about 1880.


Samuel Carroll and Martha Higginbotham Alexander’s Children


Samuel and his second wife, Martha Higginbotham Alexander's children were Grief (also spelled Griffin), Hardy, Alfred Richmond Carroll and a daughter, Centilla who was 9 months old on the 1880 census. Centilla is probably Martha's daughter S. E. Seal (listed on the letter returning Martha's last pension check after her death) - Centilla was possibly spelled Sentilla. Samuel's son William James was probably the son of Martha Broadass.

According to Samuel's pension application, after moving to Louisiana, he always lived in Calcasieu and Rapides Parishes. Samuel and Martha are buried in the Black Jack Cemetery in Allen Parish, Louisiana.

According to the 1880 Census, Grief's brother Samuel Carroll and his family were living in Calcasieu Parish, Ward 1

Carrel, Samuel Male White Birthplace Alabama (this is incorrect)

Other members of the family

Carrel, Martha J. wife age 45 Alabama

*Grief (Griffin) son age 10 Louisiana

Hardy son age 7 Louisiana

*Richard son age 3 Louisiana

Centilla daughter age 9 months Louisiana

* Note - The correct name for Richard should be Alfred Richmond Carroll, not Richard as indicated on the 1880 census. Samuel and his second wife's son Alfred Richmond Carroll had a son William Barney Carroll. William Barney Carroll's daughter Geraldean married a Newhouse. Geraldean's son's wife, Barbara contributed this information. The family still lives near DeRidder, LA.

Samuel Carroll was born June 30, 1825 and died Nov. 28, 1908. He is buried in Black Jack Cemetery in Allen Parish, LA.

Martha Carroll was born Oct. 17, 1834 and died Dec. 3, 1925. She is buried in Black Jack Cemetery.

George Hardy Carroll was born Nov. 13, 1869 and died Nov. 9, 1965. He is buried in Black Jack Cemetery.

Richard (Alfred Richmond) Carroll was born April 29, 1876 and died Nov. 18, 1913. He is buried in Black Jack Cemetery.

Black Jack Cemetery is located adjacent to the Hopewell Methodist church in northwest Allen Parish.

Directions to Black Jack Cemetery: From the intersection of Highways US 165 and LA 10 in Oakdale, LA, go west on LA 10 for 9.7 miles to LA 112. Turn left (south) on LA 112 for 7.6 miles to LA 377. Turn right (north) on LA 377 for 1.0 miles to Black Jack Road. Turn left on Black Jack Road for .5 mile to Black Jack Cemetery on left. http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/allen/cemeteries/blackjackcem.txt

According to Samuel's pension application dated September 7, 1901, he had lived in Louisiana for about 21 years, always in Calcasieu and Rapides Parishes. According to this information, he would have come to Louisiana about 1880; about 8 years after Grief came to Louisiana and after he married Martha Alexander in Jackson County, Mississippi in 1876. Also, on Samuel's wife Martha's Widow's Application For Pension dated November 3, 1914, she stated that she had lived in Louisiana about 35 years. I believe they were living in Louisiana earlier than this. Their son Grief and Hardy were born in the early 1870's, and according to census records, were born in Louisiana.

Below is Samuel Carroll's Pension Application due to him for his service during the Civil War.

1814
READ ACT AND ARTICLE ON BACK.

Parish of Calcasieu

No. 3625

SOLDIER'S APPLICATION FOR PENSION

The Board Reserves the Right to Call for Additional Testimony.

Sam W. Carroll

P. O. Pawnee

Company and Regiment Co. L 27 Miss Inf

Filed Sept 9th 1901

Allowed

Quarterly Allowance, $ 2.30 10.50 $12.80

Pension Allowed From

Rejected

(Signature unreadable), President

E. F. Rnau sp?, Secretary.

Board of Pension Commissioners

Dec. 19/01

SOLDIER'S APPLICATION FOR PENSION

I, Samuel W. Carroll, a native of Tennessee and now a citizen of Louisiana, resident at Pawnee in the Parish at Calcasieu in said State of Louisiana, and who was soldier, (sailor or marine as the case may be) from the State of Mississippi in the Confederate States army (or navy as the case may be) in the war between the United States and the Confederate States, do hereby apply for aid under Act 123 of the General Assembly of the State of Louisiana of 1898; and I do solemnly swear that I served the Confederate States honorably from the date of my enlistment until the close of the civil war, (or until discharged or paroled as the case may be,) as shown by my answers below, and that I remained true to the Confederate cause until the surrender, and that I am now in indigent circumstances, and unable to earn a livelihood by my own labor or skill, and that I am not salaried or otherwise provided for by the State of Louisiana or by any other State or government, and am entitled to receive the benefits of said Act No. 123 of 1898, as further shown by my answers to the questions below, which I swear to be true and correct:

1. In what town, county, State, country and year were you born?

Answer: Winchester, Franklin County Tenn., in 1825

When and where did you enlist, and in what command?

Answer: In August 1861, at Scranton Mississippi.

In Company “L” 27th Miss. Inf. Regt. Capt. Bruno Griffin

3. Give the names of the regimental and company officers under whom you enlisted, and under whom you were serving at the date of your discharge or parole.

Answer: Bruno Griffin, Capt. Co. “L”. Wathall commanding Regiment. I served under said officers until I was taken prisoner. At the time of surrender I was a prisoner at Rock Island.

4. Were you wounded? If so, in what battles, and if not, state under what circumstances during the war you received injury or injuries.

Answer: I was wounded at Look Out Mountain. Was sent to Hospital at Newman Ga. Remained there about four weeks, and then rejoined my command.

5. What was the precise nature of your wound or wounds, if any?

Answer: A shell burst and a piece struck me in the hip. Have ever since suffered more or less from the effect.

6. If you have lost a limb or any eye, state when, where and how.

Answer: I have not.

7. Where you discharged from the army by reason of wound, wounds, or from the effects of service?

Answer: I continued in the service, except about four weeks in Hospital, until I was taken prisoner

8. If discharged or paroled from the army, where were you, and what did you do until the close of the war?

Answer: I was taken prisoner near Peach tree Creek, near Atlanta Ga., and was a prisoner at Rock Island at the time of surrender

9. What was the name of the surgeon who attended you when discharged?

Answer: Doctor Redwine attended me at the Hospital

10. Where were you at the surrender?

Answer: At Rock Island, Illinois

11. If a prisoner, in what camp, and when were you released, and to where sent?

Answer: A prisoner at Rock Island, Ill, released at the surrender, & sent to Cleveland fro a pass for home, but did not get any

12. Did you take the oath of allegiance to the United States Government at any time during the war?

Answer: No.

13. If so, when, where and under what circumstances?

Answer: --------

14. How long have you been a resident of the State of Louisiana next preceding the date of this application? Where have you resided during that period?

Answer: About twenty-one years. All the time in the parishes of Calcasieu & Rapides

15. Are you married or have you been married?

Answer: Yes!

16. If so, what is the size of your family?

Answer: Myself and wife. My children are all married

17. What are the respective ages of your wife and children?

Answer: My wife is 68 years of age

18. How many children have you, and how many of each sex?

Answer: Five - Four boys and one girl All married

19. Are you engaged in any business? If so, what do you earn?

Answer: I farm a little. but to old feeble to do much

20. Have you any estate in your own right, real or personal, and what is its value?

Answer: None whatever

21. Has your wife any estate in her own right, real or personal, and what is its value?

Answer: No, she has not

22. How have you derived support for yourself, and family if you have one, for the last five years?

Answer: Principally by being supported by my children, and especially one of them

23. What prevents you from earning a living now?

Answer: Old age, and general infirmity

24. Do you use any intoxicants to any extent?

Answer: Not at all

25. Have you an attorney to look after this application?

Answer: No

26. Give his name, address, and the compensation agreed between you.

Answer: X

27. Give names of two or more of your comrades with their postoffice addresses.

Answer: Riley Alexander, and Billy Welsh, both of East Pascagoula, Miss. now called Scranton

28. Give your postoffice address and that of the two witnesses.

Answer: Pawnee, La.

Witness my hand this 7th day of September, 1901.

his

Samuel W. x Carroll

mark

Witnesses:

D. J. Williams

his

L. V. Bazin sp?

mark

APPLICANT MUST GO BEFORE CLERK OF COURT

State of Louisiana

Rapides Parish Personally appeared before me, C S Randell Deputy

Clerk of the District Court of said Parish, the above named Samuel W. Carroll the applicant, with whom I am personally acquainted, and having the application read and fully explained to him as well as the statements and answers therein made, made oath that the statements and answers are true.

Witness my hand and seal of office, this 7th day of September, 1901.

C. S Randell

Dy Clerk.

 

(If possible, the two witnesses as to character should have served with the applicant in the army, and if so, let them, or either, state it in their oath; also any other information regarding applicant's army service.)

State of Louisiana

Rapides Parish Personally appeared before me, C S Randell Deputy Clerk of the District Court of said Parish, the above named D J Williams and L V Bazin, two of the subscribing witnesses to the foregoing application, with whom I am personally acquainted, and known to be citizens of veracity and standing in this community, and who make oath that they are personally acquainted with the foregoing applicant, and that the facts set forth and statements made in his application are correct and true, to the best of their knowledge and belief, and that they have no interest in this claim, and that said applicant's habits are good and free from dishonor.

Witness my hand and seal of office, this 7th day of September, 1901

C. S Randell

Dy CLERK OF COURT.

 

13487

Parish of Vernon

No. 9011

 WIDOW'S APPLICATION FOR PENSION

THE BOARD RESERVES THE TRIGHT TO CALL FOR ADDITIONAL TESTIMONY

Mrs. Martha J. Carroll

widow of Samuel W. Carroll

Company and Regiment L. 27th Miss. Inf

P. O. Hardshell, La.

Filed Nov 6, 1914

Allowed Dec 10th 1914

Quarterly Allowance, $ 6.50 8.00 $14.00

Pension Allowed from

Rejected

A C Allen President

______Secretary.

Board of Pension Commissioners

Cause of Death of Widow's Husband?

Old and feeble

When Did He Die?

Nov. 28th 1908

Where?

Vernon parish, La.

Date of Granting Pension?

Monthly Amount?

Date of application?

Nov. 3, 1914

To save delay, applicants should furnish all documentary evidence they may possess, and sworn statements of comrades of their husbands when obtainable. All applications should be addressed to the Secretary of Pension Commissioners, at Baton Rouge. Blanks will be furnished by the Secretary on request. Regular meetings of the Board, second Tuesdays in March, June, September and December.

WIDOW'S APPLICATION FOR PENSION

STATE OF LOUISIANA

PARISH of Vernon

On this 3rd day of Nov 1914, personally appeared before me, W. G. Winfree, Clerk of the District Court, within and for said Parish and State, Mrs. Martha J. Carroll, aged 81 years, a resident of the Town of Reids parish of Allen and State of Louisiana, who being duly sworn according to law, declares that she is the widow of Samuel W. Carroll, who entered the service of the Confederate States during the civil war under the name of Samuel W. Carroll on the ___day of___18 , in Co. L. 27th Miss. Inf. that he served honorably until discharged Prisoner at Rock Island Ill. (Here give where paroled or discharged) on the _____; and that he remained true to the Confederate States, until the surrender, at which time he was in ___as____that she was married to the said soldier under the name of Martha J. Alexander on the 25th day of January 1876, by John Hughes, Justice of the Peace at Jackson County, Miss. that she has not married again, and that she is now in indigent circumstances and unable to earn a livelihood by her own labor or skill, that she is not married or otherwise provided for by the state of Louisiana or by any other State or Government; that her said husband died on the 28th day of Nov. 1908; at his residence near Reids, La. that she has resided in the State of Louisiana for 35 years next preceding the date of this application, and that she claims the aid and benefit of Article 303 of the Constitution of 1898 and subsequent Acts of the Legislature of the State thereunder as is further shown by her answers to the following questions which she swears to be true and correct:

1. Under what circumstances did your husband die?

Answer: He was crippled about 24 yrs. prior to death and also old and feeble

2. Where is he buried?

Answer: at Black jack Cemetery in Allen Parish, La.

3. What are your means of support?

Answer: No means at all. Am at the mercy of the world

4. What is the value of your property, real and personal, if any?

Answer: none

5. Have you conveyed property to any one in the past few years?

Answer: no

6. If any, How much and to whom conveyed?

Answer: none

7. Give your postoffice address and that of your two witnesses.

Answer: Post office is Reids, La. My witnesses address is Hardshell, La.

 

Witness my hand on this 3rd day of Nov. 1914

her

Mrs. Martha J. x Carroll

mark

Witness:

Isaac Houston

T A Seal

Also personally appeared Isaac Houston residing at Hardshell, La. and T. A. Seal residing at Hardshell, La. persons whom I certify to be respectable and entitled to credit, and who being by me duly sworn, say that they were present and saw Mrs. Martha J. Carroll, the claimant, sign her name to the foregoing declaration, and that they verily believe that the facts and declaration of said claimant are true and correct, that their acquaintance with her for 25 years and 35 years respectively, justify them in making this statement, and that she is the identical person she represents herself to be, and that they have no interest in the prosecution of this claim.

Isaac Houston

T. a. Seal

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me on this, the 3rd of Nov. 1914, and I hereby certify that the contents of the above declaration were fully made known and explained to applicant and witnesses, and that I have no interest, direct or indirect, to the prosecution of this claim.

Alfred impz sp?

Clerk of Court.

 

The State of Louisiana.

parish of Beauregard.

In person appeared before me S. N. Dorsett, Notary Public duly commissioned and sworn in and for said Parish and State, In person appeared before me Notary Public, Griffin Carroll, George H. Carroll, Mrs. S.E. Seal, Born Carroll, Being all of the living children of Mrs. Martha J. Carroll, who departed this life on December 3rd 1925, at the home of her daughter Mrs. S.E. Seal, in Beauregard Parish Louisiana: And the following grand children and the children of A.R. Carroll Deceased, as follows Douglas Carroll, Plummer Carroll, Edgar Carroll, Barney Carroll, and Mrs. Manervy Richmond, Born Carroll, and that we are all Majors Deponants further state that we are all of the Children and decendents of Mrs. Martha J. Carroll, who was drawing a pension at the time of her death to wit on December 3rd 1925. And we herewith return the check issued to her, under date of Dec. 24th 1925, and now request that a check be issued payable to Griffin Carroll, for what ever is due us as her heirs and maild to him Griffin Carroll at Reids Louisiana, and that he use the money when received in paying the expenses of her last illness and Funerl expenses, Thus done and passed at my office in the City of De Ridder Louisiana on this 28th day of December and on the 30th day of Dec. 1925.

Griffin Carroll

Barney Carroll

Plummer Carroll

Edgar Carroll

Minerva Richmond

Douglas Carroll

S. E. Seal

S. N. Dorsett Notary Public

Beauregard Parish Louisiana

Griffin Carroll

Reids La.


S. N. Dorsett

Attorney and Notary

Telephones

De Ridder, LA.

January 14th 1926.

The Secretary of the Board Pension Commissioners.

Baton Rouge, La.

I am handing you the check issued to Mrs. Martha J. Carroll, of Reids La. for $90.00 I am also enclosing an application of the Heirs sworn to in order to have the amount due the heirs issued payable to Griffin Carroll. You will notice we have field to locate George H. Carroll one of the heirs, and may never get his signature. The heirs assure me that when he is located, he will make no complaint as the amount received will go to pay the funeral expenses. If you will not issue for the full amount of all the heirs issue check covering the part due the 7 heirs signing.

Very truly,

S. N. Dorsett;

Atty. for Heirs



 $90.00

To Treasurer State of Louisiana Office of Board of Pension Commissioners, Dec. 24, 1925.


Payable at Marine Bank & Trust Company of New Orleans, La.


Pay NINETY DOLLARS TO THE ORDER OF 9011 Mrs. Martha J. Carroll Reid, La.

Amount due for pension for quarter ending December 31, 1925.

Check Returned Jan. 15, 1926. Died Dec. 3, 1925.



Samuel Carroll was sent to Rock Island, Illinois as a prisoner of the Civil War.

Rock Island Prison was located on the north side of the government-owned island in the Mississippi River between Davenport, IA and Rock Island / Moline Illinois. 12 acres of this swampy island were designated as a spot to build the prison. During Civil War times, it was known as Rock Island but today is referred to as Arsenal Island.

The prison was built in mid 1863, and not yet completed in December 1863 when the first prisoners were incarcerated. 468 Confederate prisoners captured in battles at Chattanooga, Tennessee were the first to arrive, although, over 5000 total would swell the population of Rock Island Prison in that month alone.



There were over 12,000 total prisoners imprisoned at Rock Island during the Civil War. Recorded deaths numbered almost 2000.



Temperatures when prisoners began arriving in December 1863 were below 0 and sanitation was deplorable due to the overcrowding. Disease broke out swiftly, including a smallpox epidemic which killed hundreds of prisoners in the first few months of the prison's existence. Prisoners were buried next to the prison. In the spring of 1864, the bodies of dead prisoners were moved, a hospital built, and sewers installed. These measures improved health conditions tremendously and ended the smallpox epidemic.



In June 1864, the government ordered rations to be cut at Rock Island, in response to the treatment of Union prisoners at Andersonville. Malnutrition and scurvy resulted from these orders contributing to the death toll of Confederate prisoners at Rock Island Prison.



After the war, the prison was completely destroyed. What remains.....approximately 1950 Confederate soldiers interred under row upon row of pointed grave markers to tell the story of these valiant men who fought for the Confederacy. It has been reported, the reason the markers were created with points was to keep "Yankees" from sitting on them.



There are two cemeteries located on Rock Island Arsenal. One is the National Cemetery and contains over 18,000 federal soldiers. The other is Rock Island Confederate Cemetery and contains almost 2000 Confederate soldiers who died at Rock Island Prison.



Many have compared this Union prison with the Confederate's Andersonville equalling the two in horror and death. In reality, the death toll at Rock Island, though high was about 17 % of the total prisoners while more than 27% of the total prisoners incarcerated at Andersonville died.

27th Infantry Regiment-

HISTORICAL NOTES:


This regiment was organized at Pensacola, of Mississippi companies that went there in 1861. The regiment was organized by General Bragg, then commanding the Army of Pensacola, who selected the filed officers, Jones, Autry and Lipscomb. General Bragg wrote, December 11, 1861, "that a regiment of independent companies was on the eve of organization when the War Department ordered Coopwood's company to join Dowd's Regiment at Savannah, and he should apply to Governor of Mississippi for another company to fill the regiment." January 5, 1862, the Secretary of War wrote Bragg that "the President has ordered the appointment of Major Jones to be Colonel of the new regiment of Mississippians organized by you, which you will please to number as the Twenty-seventh, but he does not seem entirely to concur in your recommendation of the LieutenantColonel." General Bragg in reply urged the excellent service of the officer recommended and said: "I intend assigning this regiment, thus admirably officered, to Fort McRee and adjacent batteries."

Colonel Thomas Marshall Jones was a native of Virginia who had graduated at West Point in 1853, and resigned a first lieutenancy in the United States Army in 1861 to enter the Confederate service. He was transferred from the regiment after the battle of Murfreesboro, and in 1864 was in command of Fort Caswell on the North Carolina coast. Autry, early in 1862, on account of the naval expedition under Commodore Farragut, which reached Ship Island March 21, was sent to Vicksburg, where he was Military Governor and Post Commandant, and with Engineer D. B. Harris began the work of fortifying. He continued in this position after Gen. M. L. Smith was put in command of the troops for the defense of Vicksburg, and when, after the fall of New Orleans, a part of the fleet, under Commander Lee, came up the river, captured Natchez, and summoned Vicksburg to surrender. May 18, 1862, Autry replied in a note saying "Mississippians don't know and refuse to learn how to surrender to an enemy. If Commodore Farragut or Brigadier-General Butler can teach them, let them come and try." He continued on duty at Vicksburg, it appears, during the bombardment of May, June and July, 1862, but returned to the regiment before the battle of Murfreesboro, where he was killed. A.J. Hays, Lieutenant-Colonel in Autry's absence, was a veteran of the Mexican War who had resigned a lieutenancy in the United States Marine Corps, and had been commissioned Captain in the Confederate navy before being assigned to the Twenty-seventh. He was made Inspector-General on the staff of General Bragg, commanding the army.

When the main body of troops at Pensacola were sent to Corinth, Colonel Jones was assigned to command at Pensacola, March 9, 1862, with orders to prepare for evacuation after removing the heavy guns and ammunition and burning the navy yard. In his report of the evacuation Colonel Jones wrote that the garrison was marched out early on May 9, and at 11:30 everything combustible from the navy yard to Fort McRee was set afire and consumed, under a heavy cannonade from the guns of Fort Pickens. Colonel Jones made particular mention of Captain J. H. Nelson, who commanded at Fort McRee, the most exposed point, and Major W. H. Kilpatrick (Fifth Battalion), who commanded at the navy yard, and the detachment under Captain Hays. Next day the regiment proceeded to Mobile.

When General Bragg's army was transferred from Mississippi to Chattanooga for the advance into Kentucky, the regiment was ordered to Chattanooga, where, in the organization of August 18, 1862, it was assigned to Hardee's Corps. Colonel Jones was put in command of a brigade of Gen. Patton Anderson's Division, including the Twenty-seventh. Late in August the army crossed Walden's Ridge, marched through Middle Tennessee and reached Glasgow, Ky., September 13. On the 16th they marched to Munfordville and secured the surrender of the garrison that had repulsed Chalmer's Brigade. Hardee moved to Perryville, where the Union army advanced to attack, bringing on the battle of October 8. In this battle Jones' Brigade charged in line with the brigades of Wood, Brown, Jones and Cleburne, driving back the enemy in their front about a mile. The casualties, however, were very heavy, and the victory did not extend along the whole line. General Bragg fell back to Cumberland Gap, through which the troops passed October 19-24, retreating to East Tennessee. In December they advanced from Chattanooga to Murfreesboro.

In November Jones' Brigade included the Twenty-seventh, Thirtieth and Thirty-fourth Regiments. Anderson's Division was broken up and the Twenty-seventh and Thirtieth were joined with the Twenty-ninth and Thirtieth Regiments to form the brigade of Colonel Walthall in Withers' Division of Polk's Corps. Colonel Walthall announced his staff December 4, 1862. He was soon commissioned Brigadier-General. Just before the battle of Murfreesboro, December, 1862, General Walthall being absent sick, Colonel Jones was in command of the brigade, but in the battle Gen. Patton Anderson commanded the brigade, which was stationed in line of battle, December 28, the left extending into a dense cedar forest, the right next to Chalmers' Brigade. The Twenty-ninth, on the right, was the only regiment in an open field, and the men made rifle pits for protection. There was skirmishing with the Federal line, posted along the round forest and cane brake, during the next two days. On the morning of the 31st, the brigade attacked, the Twenty-seventh being the last, according to the plan of battle, along the whole line to advance. They were immediately swept by a heavy fire of artillery from the front, and partly enfilading the line. Anderson reported: "The ordeal to which they were subjected was a severe one, but the task was undertaken with that spirit and courage which always deserves success and seldom fails achieving it. As often as their ranks were shattered and broken by grape and canister did they rally, reform and renew the attack under the leadership of their gallant officers. They were ordered to take the batteries at all hazards and they obeyed the order, not, however, without heavy loss of officers and men. Not far from where the batteries were playing, and while cheering and encouraging his men forward, Lieut.-Col. James L. Autry, commanding the Twenty-seventh Mississippi, fell, pierced through the head by a Minie ball." There was some confusion in the regiment until they were reformed by the senior Captain, E. R. Neilson, who was seriously wounded afterward in another part of the field. Colonel Jones had gone to the rear for medical attention. Finally the batteries were taken. One company entire, of sharpshooters, posted in a log house near the battery taken by the Twenty-seventh, Twenty-ninth and Thirtieth, was captured by the Twenty-seventh. The casualties of the Twenty-seventh were 11 killed, 71 wounded, 2 missing.

On January 2 the brigade, which had been assigned to the position on the river front held by Chalmers' Brigade, was ordered across the river to support General Breckenridge, was recalled, and later in the afternoon was sent again. Of this movement General Bragg wrote in his report that on hearing of the defeat of Breckenridge: "Anderson's fine brigade of Mississippians, the nearest body of troops, was promptly ordered to his relief. On reaching the field and moving forward, Anderson found himself in front of Breckenridge's infantry and soon encountered the enemy's light troops close upon our artillery, which had been left without support. This noble brigade, under its cool and gallant chief, drove the enemy back and saved all the guns not captured before its arrival." Breckenridge reformed his line after dark to the left and rear of the Walthall Brigade.

In the Chickamauga campaign Walthall's Brigade and Govan's Arkansas Brigade constituted Liddell's Division of W. H. T. Walker's Corps. Walthall's Brigade, on September 18, forced a Federal command from Alexander's bridge, but finding the bridge destroyed were compelled to cross at Byram's ford, after which, on the next day, they marched to the north and went into battle in that confused area where Ector and Wilson had been worsted. The Twenty-seventh, under Col. James A. Campbell, participated in the charge that ran over King's Brigade of United States regulars as they were changing front, capturing four hundred prisoners and a battery. This was in the woods, between the fortified position that Thomas held next day, and the creek. Being flanked and losing many officers and men, the Twenty-seventh and other regiments fell back in some confusion. Next morning they moved a mile to the left and then three miles to the north, and went into battle on the Chattanooga road, which they occupied and crossed in the rear of General Thomas. Here most of the skirmishers of the brigade were captured, and Lieut.-Col. Jones, then acting as field officer of the day, was wounded. At this time only three were left on the field of the ten field officers of the brigade. Colonel Campbell commended the conduct of Captains Kennedy, Company G; Baugh of F, and Boyd of E. Casualties of the regiment, 10 killed, 88 wounded, 19 missing.

The regiment was commanded in the battle of Lookout Mountain, November 24, 1863, by Lieut.-Col. A. J. Jones, Col. James A. Campbell being in command of the brigade picket line. Before the pickets were attacked Jones was ordered to put his regiment in line of battle across a bench of the mountain where they had been in bivouac, and here they were soon attacked, the enemy "seeming to force everything before them as though there was no resistance." At close range the regiment delivered two volleys with great effect, so that the lines immediately in front broke and fell back, but the great numbers of the assaulting forces enabled them to flank the regiment and so nearly surround it that six commissioned officers and about half the men were made prisoners before they could retreat. Lieut. A. V. Snowden, Company K, was killed; Lieutenant Johnson, Company L, dangerously wounded and captured; Captain Boyd, Company E, severely wounded. Jones attempted to rally the remainder of the men at the ridge on the northern slope, three or four hundred yards back, but they were again outflanked and under fire at distances of eight or ten paces among the rocks at their front, and were driven back with heavy loss around the point of the mountain several hundred yards south of the Craven house, where they formed line with the rest of the brigade, and, again advancing, fought with Pettus' Alabamians until 9 o'clock that night. The regiment was again in the fight on Missionary Ridge late in the evening of November 25, but was not exposed to the direct assault. Colonel Jones declared that the regiment never fought better, if so well, as it did on Lookout Mountain. Captains Kennedy, Baugh, Pegg and Boyd, Lieutenants Brown, Bailey, Poole, Major, Welch, Hannah, and especially Lieut. J. J. Hyde and Sergt.-Major Watkins, were commended for gallantry. Colonel Campbell and most of the picket line were cut off and captured in the first advance of the Federal line. Casualties of the regiment at Lookout Mountain 6 killed, 36 wounded, 166 missing; at Missionary Ridge, 5 wounded.

In January, 1864, Lieutenant-Colonel Jones was in command of the Twenty-fourth and Twenty-seventh Regiments, in winter quarters near Dalton, Ga.

In the Atlanta campaign Walthall's Brigade was part of Hindman's Division, commanded by Gen. John C. Brown and Gen. Patton Anderson, in Hood's Corps, after July 27 commanded by Gem S. D. Lee. General Walthall was promoted to command of a division in June, and Colonel Benton commanded the brigade until Brig.-Gen. Brantly was promoted. The Twenty-seventh began the campaign joined with the Twenty-fourth under Colonel Benton, who was soon succeeded by Lieut.-Col. McKelvaine. They were on the intrenched line at Alt's Gap, May 7, and on May 14-15 engaged in the battle of Resaca, where the brigade was distinguished for the gallant defense of a position exposed to an enfilading fire of artillery as well as the assaults of infantry which were repulsed in front. Lieut.-Col. A. J. Jones and Capt. J. R. Poole fell, instantly killed, in this battle line. In all there were 6 killed and 27 wounded. The brigade was not seriously engaged at Cassville, New Hope Church, or Kenesaw Mountain, though skirmishing was constant, nor in the battles around Atlanta, until July 28, when McKelvaine's command advanced on the Lickskillet road, driving the enemy from a hill. When moving by the right flank, a Federal attack was made which threw the command into temporary confusion. Here McKelvaine was severely wounded, and Lieut.-Col. W. L. Lyles took command. The two regiments had 430 in battle; 11 killed, 67 wounded, 10 of whom were left on the field. The Twenty-seventh served in the trenches on the west side of Atlanta (see Fourth Regiment) until August 30, when they marched to meet Sherman's flank movement, and went into battle at Jonesboro, where the brigade suffered heavy losses in a front attack upon the Federal intrenched line. The Twenty-seventh had 4 killed and 23 wounded. Capt. J. R. Baugh, commanding the regiment, was mortally wounded; Adjutant J. L. Bufkin, Capt. S. M. Pegg, Capt. J. H. Wood, Lieuts. J. J. Jumon and William Welsh severely wounded.

Brantley's Brigade shared the operations of Lee's Corps during the October, 1864, campaign against the Chattanooga and Atlanta Railroad, the investment of Resaca and the holding of Snake Creek gap against Sherman's army while Hood retreated behind the mountains. Brantly's men were engaged in sharp skirmishing at the gap October 15. Thence they moved to Gadsden, Ala., and crossed the Tennessee River on the last days of October. The division, under the command of Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson, advanced with Lee's Corps to Columbia, and was then taken, November 29, by General Hood, to assist in the rear attack at Spring Hill. The Federal troops making good their retreat to Franklin, on the Harpeth River, Hood ordered an assault upon the intrenched position November 30, in which Johnson's Division took part after dark. In this terrible night battle in the trenches along the parapets Brantly's Brigade, no stronger than a single regiment, lost 76 killed, 140 wounded, 21 missing. At the battle of Nashville, December 15, Brantly's men, sent to the support of Stewart's Division, endeavored to check the Federal advance on the Granny White pike. Next day they were moved to the right of Lee's line, where they repulsed a Federal attack, when the line was broken on their left and they fell back with the army to Brentwood. The brigade crossed the Tennessee River December 26 and moved to the vicinity of Tupelo for winter quarters.

The brigade was furloughed until February 12, 1865. Under orders for the Carolinas 152 of the brigade assembled at Meridian February 14. They started east on the 18th and were detained some time at Montgomery by the Mobile campaign. In March they proceeded to Augusta and thence to North Carolina. April 3 the aggregate present of the brigade was 283. Organization of the army near Smithfield, N.C., March 31 1865, Twenty-fourth, Twenty-seventh and Thirty-fourth Regiments consolidated under the command of Capt. M. M. Rowan. April 9, Twenty-fourth, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-ninth and Thirty-fourth Mississippi Regiments consolidated in the Twenty-fourth Regiment, Col. R. W. Williamson commanding. This regiment, with the Twenty-second Alabama, consolidated from Deas' Brigade, and the Thirty-seventh Alabama and Fifty-eighth North Carolina, representing consolidated fragments of other brigades, constituted the brigade of Gen. W. F. Brantly, in D. H. Hill's Division of S. D. Lee's Corps. The army was surrendered April 26, and paroled at Greensboro, N. C., soon afterward.

FIELD OFFICERS: Colonels -- Thomas M. Jones, resigned March 26, 1863; James A. Campbell, died at Johnson's Island, 4 February, 1864. Lieutenant-Colonels -- James L. Autry, killed at Murfreesboro; A. J. Hays, transferred to staff of General Bragg; James A. Campbell, promoted; Andrew J. Jones, killed at Resaca. Majors -- George H. Lipscomb, killed at Perryville; James A. Campbell, promoted January, 1863; Andrew J. Jones, promoted May, 1863; Amos McLemore, killed by a deserter; Julius B. Kennedy, killed at Atlanta.

Adjutants -- W. S. Crump, G.. W. Rice. Surgeons -- Issaac Shelby, K. C. Divine, promoted brigade staff December 4, 1862. Assistant Surgeon -- J. S. Buckner.

Quartermaster -- Addison Craft, promoted to brigade stafff December 4, 1862; Lieut. G. B. Denham, Lieutenant Catchings. Commissaries -- John Boyles, Lieuts. G. W. Rice, J. W. Grayson. Sergeant-Majors -- J. P. Garter, Isom Watkins.

ROSTERS:

Company A -- Oktibbeha Riflemen (raised in Oktibbeha County, MS)

Company B -- Rosin Heels (raised in Jones County, MS)

Company C -- Fredonia Hards (raised in Pontotoc County, MS)

Company D -- Rayburn Rifles (raised in Lawrence County, MS)

Company E -- Leake Guards, aka Leake Rovers (raised in Leake County, MS

Company F -- Covington Fencibles (raised in Covington County, MS)

Company H -- Jasper Blues (raised in Jasper & Lauderdale Counties, MS

Company I -- Harris Rebels (raised in Lawrence County, MS) (Jasper Rifles - Jasper County?)

Company K -- Enfield Rifles, aka Enfield Riflemen (raised in Monroe County, MS) [formerly Co. B, 5th Battalion MS Infantry]

Company L -- Twiggs Rifles (raised in Jackson County, MS)

BIBLIOGRAPHY REFERENCES:

Howell, H. Grady. For Dixie Land I'll Take My Stand

Rowland, Dunbar. Military History of Mississippi, 1803-1898

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