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Ellis Island Ship List - S


Follow the links to see a list of the ships that the Ellis Island Knapp's arrived on. Follow the links find information about these ships.


Saale

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Company, Glasgow, Scotland, 1886. 5,217 gross tons; 455 (bp) feet long; 48 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 17 knots.  1,240 passengers (150 first class, 90 second class, 1,000 third class). Two funnels and four masts.

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1886 and named Saale. Bremerhaven-New York and Mediterranean-New York service. Badly damaged in Great Hoboken Pier Fire in June 1900. Sold to Luckenbach Line, American flag, in 1900 and renamed J. L. Luckenbach. Freighter service. Renamed Princess in 1924. Renamed Madison in 1924. Scrapped in Italy in 1924.


Saint Laurent

Built by Chantiers de Normandie, Grand Quevilly, France, 1905. 5,607 gross tons; 392 (bp) feet long; 51 feet wide. engine, single screw.  Service speed 12 knots.  725 passengers (25 second class, 700 third class). One funnel, two masts.

Built for Compania Transatlantica Line, Spanish flag, in 1905 and named Saint Laurent. Havre-New York service. Caught fire then sunk then sunk by a torpedoed near Malta on February 5, 1917.


Saint Louis

Built by William Cramp & Sons Shipbuilders, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1895. 11,629 gross tons; 554 (bp) feet long; 63 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 19 knots.  1,340 passengers (320 first class, 220 second class, 800 third class).

Built for American Line, in 1895 and named Saint Louis. Southampton-New York service. Used by US Navy as auxiliary cruiser in Spanish-American War or 1898. Transferred to United States Navy, American flag, in 1917 and renamed USS Louisville. Armed transport service. Returned to American Line, in 1920 and renamed St. Louis. Was badly damaged by fire while being refitted. Laid-up 1920-24. Rebuilding plans in 1922 never revitalized. Scrapped at Genoa in 1924.


Saint Paul

Built by William Cramp & Sons Shipbuilders, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1895. 11,629 gross tons; 554 (bp) feet long; 63 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 19 knots.  1,370 passengers (350 first class, 220 second class, 800 third class). Two funnels, two masts, first USA built screw express steamer.

Built for American Line, in 1895 and named Saint Paul. Southampton-New York service. Used by US Navy as auxiliary cruiser in Spanish-American War of 1898. Transferred to United States Navy, American flag, in 1918 and renamed USS Knoxville. Armed transport service. Capsized while completing refit in April 1918. Laid-up 1918-20. Returned to American Line, in 1920 and renamed St. Paul. Further trans-Atlantic service. Scrapped in Germany in 1923.


Samland

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA, 1903. 7,913 gross tons; 490 (bp) feet long; 58 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  

Built for Atlantic Transport Line, British flag, in 1903 and named Mississippi. London-Baltimore and later Antwerp-New York service. Transferred to Red Star Line, British flag, in 1906 and renamed Samland. Antwerp-New York and Antwerp-Philadelphia service. Transferred to White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1911 and renamed Belgic. Returned to Red Star Line, British flag, in 1913 and renamed Samland. Reduced to a freighter in 1914. Scrapped in 1931.


San Lorenzo

Built by Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, Virginia, 1907. 6,576 gross tons; 401 (bp) feet long; 54 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  Two masts and one funnel.

Built for New York & Cuba Mail Steamship Co., in 1907 and named San Lorenzo. San Juan-New York via NY & Porto Rico SS Co. service. in 1934.


Santa Marta

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Belfast, Ireland, 1909. 4,601 gross tons; 378 (bp) feet long; 50 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  Two masts and one funnel.

Built for Unifruitco Steamship Company, British flag, in 1909 and named Santa Marta. New York-Jamaica-Cuba-Central America service. Sister ship to the Metapan. Scrapped at Baltimore, Maryland in 1948.


Santiago

Built by John Roach & Son, Chester, Pennsylvania, 1879. 2,359 gross tons; 369 (bp) feet long; 39 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  Two masts and one funnel.

Built for New York & Cuba Mail Steamship Co., in 1879 and named Santiago. New York-Cuba-Mexico-West Indies service. Sunk by storm off Cape Hatteras on March 11, 1924.


Saratoga

Built by W. Cramp & Sons Co., Philadelphia, United States, 1907. 6,391 gross tons; 413 (bp) feet long; 50 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 18 knots.  Two masts and two funnels.

Built for New York & Cuba Mail Steamship Co., in 1907 and named Saratoga. New York-Havana-West Indies service. Ward Line. Transferred to United States Army Transports, American flag, in 1917 and renamed Mercy. Was intended to be transport for troops but came hospital ship service. USS Mercy, known as first SP-1305, then AH-4. Scrapped in 1939.


Saxon

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1900. 586 (bp) feet long; 64 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 17.5 knots.  799 passengers (310 first class, 203 second class, 286 third class).

Built for Union Castle Line, British flag, in 1900 and named Saxon. Southampton-Capetown service. Troopship 1917-19. Scrapped in Scotland in 1935.


Saxonia

Built by John Brown & Company, Clydebank, Scotland, 1900. 14,197 gross tons; 600 (bp) feet long; 64 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  1,960 passengers (160 first class, 200 second class, 1,600 third class).

Built for Cunard Line, British flag, in 1900 and named Saxonia. Liverpool-New York service 1919 and later Hamburg-New York service. WWI troopship and POW accommodation center 1914-18. Scrapped in Holland in 1925.


Scandia

Built by A.G. Vulcan, Stettin, Germany, 1889. 4,243 gross tons; 370 (bp) feet long; 44 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  1,430 passengers (30 first class, 1,400 third class). Two masts and one funnel.

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1889 and named Scandia. Hamburg to New York and Philadelphia to 1896 service. Laid down as Scandinavia. Destroyed by fire in dock and then scrapped in 1924.


Schodack

No information.


Scythia

Built by Vickers-Armstrong Limited, Barrow-in-Furness, England, 1921. 19,730 gross tons; 624 (bp) feet long; 73 feet wide. Steam turbine engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  2,206 passengers (337 first class, 331 second class, 1,538 third class).

Built for Cunard Line, British flag, in 1921 and named Scythia. Liverpool-New York service. Troopship 1939-48. Liverpool-Eastern Canada service 1950-57. Scrapped in Scotland in 1958.


Servia

Built by J. & G. Thomson Limited, Glasgow, Scotland, 1881. 7,391 gross tons; 532 (bp) feet long; 52 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 17 knots.  1,230 passengers (480 first class, 750 third class). Two funnels and three masts rigged for sail.

Built for Cunard Line, British flag, in 1881 and named Servia. Liverpool-New York service. Scrapped in England in 1901.


Seydlitz

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany, 1903. 7,942 gross tons; 442 (bp) feet long; 55 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 14.5 knots.  1,900 passengers (100 first class, 100 second class, 1,700 third class).

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1903 and named Seydlitz. Various services including Bremerhaven-New York service. Interned in Argentina 1914-19. Resumed New York sailings in 1922. Scrapped in Germany in 1933.


Shropshire

Built by John Brown, Clydebank, Scotland, 1911. 11,911 gross tons; 526 (bp) feet long; 61 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engine, single screw.  Passenger cargo vessel for the Australian emigrant trade.

Built for Federal Steam Navigation Co, British flag, in 1911 and named Shropshire. Plymouth, London, Liverpool to New York service. Renamed Rotorua in 1919. Sunk on December 11, 1940.


Siboney

Built by William Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1918. 6,937 gross tons; Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 10.5 knots.  Passenger liner; reflit in 1944 and two funnels replaced by one.

Built for New York & Cuba Mail Steamship Co., in 1918 and named Siboney. Cuba-New York via Ward Line service. During 1918-1919 served as USS Siboney ID 2999. Chartered by United States Army Transports, American flag, in 1942. Troops to Europe as well as N. Africa, S. Africa, S. America service. United States Army Transports, American flag, in 1944 and renamed Charles A. Stafford. U.S. Army Hospital Ship with voyages to UK and Mediterranean service. Transferred to U.S. authorities, in 1948 and reverted to Siboney. She ws put in the reserve fleet after the war; scrapped in during January of 1957.


Sixaola

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Belfast, Ireland, 1911. 4,693 gross tons; 378 (bp) feet long; 50 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  Two masts and one funnel, Passenger-cargo vessel.

Built for Unifruitco Steamship Company, British flag, in 1911 and named Sixaola. New York-Jamaica-Cuba-Central America service. Torpedoed and lost on June 12, 1942.


Slavonia

Built by Sir James Laing & Sons Limited, Sunderland, England, 1903. 10,606 gross tons; 526 (bp) feet long; 59 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  840 passengers (40 first class, 800 third class). One funnel and two masts.

Built for British India Line, British flag, in 1903 and named Yamuna. London-East Africa service. Sold to Cunard Line, British flag, in 1904 and renamed Slavonia. Trieste-New York service. Wrecked in the Azores in June 1909. Abandoned as a complete loss in 1909.


Smolensk

Built by R. & W. Hawthorn, Leslie & Company, Hebburn-on-Tyne, England, 1901. 7,270 gross tons; 486 (bp) feet long; 58 feet wide. Compound engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  1,646 passengers (50 first class, 36 second class, 1,560 third class).

Built for Russian Volunteer Fleet, in 1901 and named Smolensk. Libau-New York service. Transferred to Russian Navy, Russian flag, in 1904 and renamed Rion. Russian auxiliary cruiser service. Transferred to Russian Volunteer Fleet, in 1906 and reverted to Smolensk. Libau-New York (1907-08) service. Returned to Russian Navy, Russian flag, in 1913 and reverted to Rion. Scrapped in Italy in 1922.


Sorrento

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Glasgow, Scotland, 1881. 2,364 gross tons; 320 (bp) feet long; 36 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 11 knots.  600 passengers (600 third class).

Built for Sloman Line, German flag, in 1881 and named Sorrento. Hamburg-New York service. Wrecked off Spain in 1902.


Southampton

Built by J. & G. Thomson Limited, Glasgow, Scotland, 1888. 10,499 gross tons; 560 (bp) feet long; 60 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 20 knots.  1,740 passengers (540 first class, 200 second class, 1,000 third class).

Built for Inman & International Steamship Company, in 1888 and named City of New York. Liverpool-New York service. World’s fastest ship 1892-93. Sold to American Line, in 1893 and renamed New York. Renamed USS Harvard in 1898. Served briefly for US Navy in 1898 during the Spanish-American war. Renamed New York in 1898. Renamed USS Plattsburg in 1917. Armed merchant cruiser service. Reverted to American Line as NEW YORK in 1919. Sold in 1919. to Polish Navigation Company. New York-Danzig service. New York-Mediterranean service in 1922. Scrapped at Genoa in 1923.


Spaarndam

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1881. 4,368 gross tons; 430 (bp) feet long; 42 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  975 passengers (75 first class, 900 third class). Four masts and one funnel.

Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1881 and named Asiatic. Varied service. Sold to Holland - America Line, Dutch flag, in 1890 and renamed Spaarndam. Rotterdam-New York service. Scrapped in England in 1901.


Spree

Built by A/G Vulcan Shipyard, Stettin, Germany, 1890. 6,963 gross tons; 463 (bp) feet long; 51 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 19 knots.  826 passengers (244 first class, 122 second class, 460 third class).

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1890 and named Spree. Bremerhaven-New York and later Mediterranean-New York service. Renamed Kaiserin Maria Theresia in 1899. Mediterranean-New York service. Built as the SPREE. Transferred to Russian Navy, Russian flag, in 1904 and renamed URAL. Auxiliary naval cruiser service. Sunk off Japan on April 27, 1905.


Statendam

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1898. 10,491 gross tons; 534 (bp) feet long; 59 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  1,375 passengers (200 first class, 175 second class, 1,000 third class). One funnel and two masts.

Built for Holland - America Line, Dutch flag, in 1898 and named Statendam. Rotterdam-New York service. Sold to Allan State Line, British flag, in 1911 and renamed Scotian. Liverpool-Montreal service. Used as a troopship 1914-18. Transferred to Canadian Pacific Steamships, British flag, in 1922 and renamed Marglen. Laid up in 1925. Scrapped in Italy in 1927.


Stavangerfjord

Built by Cammell Laird & Company, Birkenhead, England, 1918. 13,156 gross tons; 553 (bp) feet long; 64 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  1,226 passengers (88 first class, 318 second class, 820 third class). Two funnels and two masts. Rebuilt 1924, 1930, 1938, and 1946.

Built for Norwegian-America Line, Norwegian flag, in 1918 and named Stavangerfjord. Oslo-New York service. Laid up 1939-45. Returned service 1945-63. Scrapped on Hong Kong in 1964.


Stephano

3,449 gross tons; Passenger cargo vessel.

Built for Red Cross Line, British flag, in 1911 and named Stephano. Torpedoed and sunk off Nantucket Lightship on October 8, 1916.


Stuttgart

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Company, Glasgow, Scotland, 1890. 5,048 gross tons; 415 (bp) feet long; 48 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  2,035 passengers (44 first class, 36 second class, 1,955 third class).

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1890 and named Stuttgart. Bremerhaven-New York service. Including sailings to New York. Scrapped in 1908.


S.V. Luckenbach

No information available.


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