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Ellis Island Ship List - P


Follow the links to see a list of the ships that the Ellis Island Knapp's arrived on. Follow the links find information about these ships.


Palatia

Built by A/G Vulcan Shipyard, Stettin, Germany, 1894. 7,326 gross tons; 460 (bp) feet long; 52 feet wide. engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  2,060 passengers (60 first class, 2,000 third class). One funnel and four masts.

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1894 and named Palatia. Mediterranean-New York; Hamburg-New York service. Sold in 1904 and renamed Nikolaiev. Russian Navy service. Renamed Norodovoletz in 1917. Also Russian Navy service. Salvaged and scrapped in 1925.


Panama

Built by W. Cramp & Sons Co., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1898. 5,667 gross tons; 360 (bp) feet long; 50 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 17 knots.  Two masts and two funnels.

Built for New York & Cuba Mail Steamship Co., in 1898 and named Havana. New York-Cuba via Ward Line service. Sold to Panama Railroad Co., American flag, in 1906 and renamed Panama. Panama Canal to New York service. Also served as USA Transport ship. Struck a rock and sank on April 26, 1929.


Pannonia

Built by John Brown & Company, Clydebank, Scotland, 1904. 9,851 gross tons; 501 (bp) feet long; 59 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  840 passengers (40 first class, 800 third class). One funnel and four masts.

Built for Anchor Line, British flag, in 1904 and named Pannonia. London-New York, Mediterranean-New York service. Scrapped in 1922.


Panola

Built by Submarine Boat Corporation, Newark, New Jersey, 1919. 3,569 gross tons; 324 (bp) feet long; 46 feet wide. Steam turbine engine, single screw.  Service speed 10.5 knots.  Cargo ship made of structural steel, yard hull 14.

Built for U.S. Shipping Board, in 1919 and named Panola. Wales and Brest to New York 1919 to 1922 service. Various charter lines. Sold to Ford Motor in Aug 1925 and scrapped in 1926.


Paris

Built by J. & G. Thomson Limited, Glasgow, Scotland, 1889. 10,499 gross tons; 560 (bp) feet long; 63 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 20 knots.  1,740 passengers (540 first class, 200 second class, 1,000 third class).

Built for Inman & International Steamship Company, in 1889 and named City of Paris. Liverpool-New York service. World’s fastest ship 1889-92. Sold to American Line, in 1893 and renamed Paris. Southampton-New York service. Renamed USS Yale in 1898. Returned to American Line, in 1898 and reverted to Paris. Renamed Philadelphia in 1899. Renamed USS Harrisburg in 1917. Returned to American Line, in 1919 and reverted to Philadelphia. Laid up 1920-22. Sold to New York-Naples Steamship Company, American flag, in 1922. New York-Naples service. Mutiny on first voyage and ship laid up at Naples. Scrapped as Genoa in 1923.


Pastores

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Belfast, Ireland, 1912. 7,242 gross tons; 470 (bp) feet long; 55 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  143 passengers (143 first class).

Built for Unifruitco Steamship Company, British flag, in 1912 and named Pastores. Refrigerated passenger-cargo West Indies-US via United Fruit Co. service. Two masts, one funnel scrapped World War II in 1944.


Patria

Built by Chantiers de la Mediterranee, La Seyne, France, 1913. 11,885 gross tons; 512 (bp) feet long; 59 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 1 knots.  2,240 passengers (140 first class, 250 second class, 1,850 third class). Three funnels and two masts.

Built for Fabre Line, French flag, in 1913 and named Patria. Mediterranean-New York service. Salvaged and scrapped in 1952.


Patricia

Built by A/G Vulcan Shipyard, Stettin, Germany, 1899. 13,023 gross tons; 585 (bp) feet long; 62 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  2,489 passengers (162 first class, 184 second class, 2,143 third class).

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1899. Hamburg-New York service. Laid-up 1914-1919. Transferred to United States Government, American flag, in 1919 and renamed USS Patricia. US Government service. Scrapped in 1921.


Pennland

Built by J. & G. Thomson Limited, Clydebank, Scotland, 1870. 3,760 gross tons; 361 (bp) feet long; 41 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  1,200 passengers (200 first class, 1,000 third class).

Built for Cunard Line, British flag, in 1870 and named Algeria. British service. Sold to Red Star Line, British flag, in 1882 and renamed Pennland. Antwerp-New York service. Scrapped in 1903.


Pennsylvania

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1897. 12,891 gross tons; 579 (bp) feet long; 62 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  2,724 passengers (162 first class, 180 second class, 2,382 third class).

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1897 and named Pennsylvania. Hamburg-New York service. Interned at New York at the start of World War I in August 1914. Seized by United States Government, American flag, in 1917 and renamed USS Nansemond. US Navy transport service. Scrapped in 1924.


Persia

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1894. 5,857 gross tons; 445 (bp) feet long; 50 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  1,860 passengers (60 first class, 1,800 third class).

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1894 and named Persia. Hamburg-New York service. Sold to Atlantic Transport Line, British flag, in 1897 and renamed Minnewaska. Sold to US Government, in 1898 and renamed Thomas. Refitted for transport service. Made some Atlantic voyages to New York. Scrapped in 1929.


Philadelphia

Built by J. & G. Thomson Limited, Glasgow, Scotland, 1889. 10,499 gross tons; 560 (bp) feet long; 63 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 20 knots.  1,740 passengers (540 first class, 200 second class, 1,000 third class). Three funnels and three masts rigged for sail.

Built for Inman & International Steamship Company, in 1889 and named City of Paris. Liverpool-New York service. World’s fastest ship 1889-92. Sold to American Line, in 1893 and renamed Paris. Southampton-New York service. Renamed USS Yale in 1898. Returned to American Line, in 1898 and reverted to Paris. Renamed Philadelphia in 1899. Renamed USS Harrisburg in 1917. Returned to American Line, in 1919 and reverted to Philadelphia. Laid up 1920-22. Sold to New York-Naples Steamship Company, American flag, in 1922. New York-Naples service. Mutiny on first voyage and ship laid up at Naples. Scrapped as Genoa in 1923.


Pittsburgh

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1922. 16,332 gross tons; 600 (bp) feet long; 67 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, triple screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  2,400 passengers (600 first class, 1,800 third class).

Built for American Line, in 1913 and renamed Pittsburgh. Liverpool-New York or Boston; Hamburg-New York or Boston service. Sold to Red Star Line, British flag, in 1926 and renamed Pennland. Antwerp-New York service. Placed under German flag in 1935. Sunk by German aircraft in Greek waters in 1941.


Ponce

Built by Harlan and Hollingsworth Co., Wilmington, Delaware, 1899. 3,506 gross tons; 317 (bp) feet long; 42 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 12 knots.  100 passengers (70 first class, 30 second class, ).Two masts and one funnel.

Built for New York & Porto Rico Steamship Company, American flag, in 1899 and named Ponce. Puerto Rico to New York until 1924 service. Sold to Chinese, renamed KING HSING, VEST BAY, TAI ER CHUANG in 1956.


Port Sydney

Built by Russell & Company, Port Glasgow, Scotland, 1909. 5,452 gross tons; 400 (bp) feet long; 52 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  1,325 passengers (50 first class, 75 second class, 1,200 third class). Two masts and one funnel.

Built for Austro-Americana Line, Austrian flag, in 1909 and named Columbia (1908). Trieste-New York service service. Sold to Greek owners, in 1924 and renamed Annoula. Lost off the British coast in 1933.


Potomac

Built by J.C. Tecklenborg, Geestemunde, Germany, 1901. 9,709 gross tons; 409 (bp) feet long; 58 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  750 passengers (200 first class, 550 third class). One funnel and four masts.

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1901 and named Neckar. Laid up 1914-17. Seized by US Government, in 1917 and renamed USS Antigone. Transferred to U.S. Mail Steamship Company, in 1921. Transferred to United States Lines, in 1921 and renamed Potomac. New York-Bremerhaven (1921-1922) service. Scrapped in Holland in 1928.


Potsdam

Built by Blohm & Voss Shipbuilders, Hamburg, Germany, 1900. 12,835 gross tons; 571 (bp) feet long; 62 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  2,103 passengers (282 first class, 21 second class, 1,800 third class). One funnel and two masts.

Built for Holland - America Line, Dutch flag, in 1900 and named Potsdam. Rotterdam-New York service. Sold to Swedish American Line, in 1915 and renamed Stockholm. Gothenburg-New York service. Sold in 1928 and renamed Solglimt. Shetland Islands service. Rebuilt as a whaling mothership. Sold to Norwegian owners, in 1930. Seized by German Navy, in 1941 and renamed Sonderburg. Scuttled at Cherbourg in 1944. Salvaged and scrapped in 1947.


President Adams

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA, 1921. 10,533 gross tons; 502 (bp) feet long; 62 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  528 passengers (78 first class, 450 third class).

Built for U.S. Mail Steamship Company, in 1921 and named Centennial State. New York-London service. .. Transferred to United States Lines, in 1922 and renamed President Adams. Also New York-London service. Transferred to Dollar Line, American flag, in 1924 and renamed President Adams. Around the world service. Downgraded to a freighter 1938. Renamed President Grant in 1941. Total loss after stranding off New Guinea on January 26, 1944.


President Arthur

Built by A/G Vulcan Shipyard, Stettin, Germany, 1900. 10,911 gross tons; 540 (bp) feet long; 60 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15.5 knots.  2,210 passengers (327 first class, 103 second class, 1,780 third class).

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1900 and named Borussia. Hamburg-Far East and Hamburg-New York service. Renamed Teutonia in 1900. Renamed Kiautschou in 1900. Hamburg-Far East and Hamburg-New York service. Sold to North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1904 and renamed Prinzess Alice. Bremerhaven-Far East and Bremerhaven-New York service. Laid-up at Manila 1914-17. Seized by US Government, in 1917 and renamed Princess Matoika. Used as a troopship 1917-19. Transferred in 1922 and renamed President Arthur. Sold in 1925 and renamed White Palace. New York-Haifa service. Soon sold to New York buyers and then resold. Sold to Los Angeles Steamship Company, in 1925 and renamed City of Honolulu. Hawaiian islands cruise service. Burned out at Honolulu on May 25, 1930. Scrapped at Osaka, Japan in 1933.


President Fillmore

Built by A/G Vulcan Shipyard, Stettin, Germany, 1900. 10,532 gross tons; 521 (bp) feet long; 60 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  2,170 passengers (290 first class, 100 second class, 1,780 third class).

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1900 and intended to be the Bavaria. Hamburg-Far East, New York from 1904, Genoa-NY from 1906 service. Interned at New York at the start of World War I in August 1914. Chartered in 1914 and renamed Red Cross. US Red Cross service. Renamed Hamburg in 1917. Seized by US Government, in 1917 and renamed Powhatan. US troopship service. Known as the USS Powhatan, SP 3013. Transferred to U.S. Shipping Board, in 1919. Chartered by Baltic S.S Corp. Of America, US flag, in 1920 and renamed New Rochelle. New York-Danzig service. Chartered by U.S. Mail Steamship Company, in 1921. Also New York-Danzig service. Renamed Hudson in 1921. Also New York-Danzig service. Chartered by United States Lines, in 1921. New York-Bremerhaven service. Renamed President Fillmore in 1922. Also New York-Bremerhaven service. Transferred to Dollar Line, American flag, in 1924. Around-the-world service. Scrapped in the United States in 1928.


President Grant

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1907. 18,072 gross tons; 616 (bp) feet long; 68 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 14.5 knots.  3,830 passengers (326 first class, 152 second class, 3,352 third class). One funnel and six masts.

Built for Leyland Line, British flag, in 1907 and intended to be the Servian. Sold to Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1907 and intended to be the Boston. Renamed President Grant in 1908. Hamburg-New York service. Laid up at New York in 1914. Seized by U.S. authorities, in 1914 and renamed USS President Grant. Troopship service. Transferred to United States Lines, in 1923 and renamed Republic. Hamburg-New York service. Sailed as a fulltime troopship 1931-51. Scrapped in 1952.


President Harding

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey, USA, 1922. 13,869 gross tons; 535 (bp) feet long; 72 feet wide. Steam turbine engines, twin screw.  Service speed 18 knots.  644 passengers (320 first class, 324 third class).

Built for United States Lines, in 1922 and named Lone Star State. New York-Bremerhaven service. Renamed President Taft in 1922. Also New York-Bremerhaven service. Renamed President Harding in 1922. Also New York-Bremerhaven service. Sold to Belgians, in 1940 and renamed Villa De Bruges. Bombed by German aircraft in the Scheldt River, Belgium on May 14, 1940. Scrapped in 1952.


President Lincoln

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1907. 18,168 gross tons; 616 (bp) feet long; 68 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 14.5 knots.  1,480 passengers (324 first class, 152 second class, 1,004 third class).

Built for Leyland Line, British flag, in 1907 and named Scotian. Sold to Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1907 and renamed Berlin. Renamed President Lincoln in 1907. Hamburg-New York service. Laid up at New York in 1914. Seized by US Government, in 1914 and renamed USS President Lincoln. Sunk in the Atlantic by a German U-boat on May 31, 1918.


Prince George

Built by Earles Shipbuilding, Hull, England, 1898. 2,194 gross tons; 290 (bp) feet long; 38 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 19 knots.  Passenger ship.

Built for Canadian Pacific Steamships, British flag, in 1898 and named Prince George. Bermuda to New York service. Ran by the former Dominion Atlantic Railway Co. Scrapped in Baltimore in 1931.


Principe di Udine

Built by Barclay Curle & Company, Glasgow, Scotland, 1908. 7,794 gross tons; 450 (bp) feet long; 55 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16.5 knots.  1,500 passengers (150 first class, 150 second class, 1,200 third class).

Built for Lloyd Sabaudo, Italian flag, in 1908 and named Principe di Udine. Italy-New York service. Scrapped in Italy in 1929.


Prins Frederik Hendrik

Built by Netherlands Shipbuilding Company, Amsterdam, Holland, 1904. 2,164 gross tons; 317 (bp) feet long; 40 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  59 passengers (51 first class, 8 second class, ).One funnel and two masts.

Built for Royal West Indian Mail Service, Dutch flag, in 1904 and named Prins Frederik Hendrik. Amsterdam-Caribbean-New York service. Sold to French buyers, in 1931 and renamed La Mecque. Scrapped in Italy in 1936.


Prins Willem I

Built by Netherlands Shipbuilding Company, Amsterdam, Holland, 1901. 2,121 gross tons; 284 (bp) feet long; 38 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  24 passengers (12 first class, 12 second class). Two masts and one funnel.

Built for Royal Netherlands Steamship Co / Royal Dutch West India Mail, Dutch flag, in 1901 and named Prins Willem I. Amsterdam-Caribbean-New York service. Sold in 1920 and renamed Ahmedi. Scrapped in India in 1935.


Prinz Sigismund

Built by Akt. Ges. Neptun, Rostock, Germany, 1902. 4,689 gross tons; 370 (bp) feet long; 45 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 12.5 knots.  Two masts and two funnels.

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1902 and named Prinz Sigismund. Central America then South American service. Seized by U.S. Shipping Board, in 1917 and renamed General W. C. Gorgas. USS ID SP 1365 in 1919; then USAT 1941-1945 service. Handed over to Russia in 1941.


Prinzess Alice

Built by A/G Vulcan Shipyard, Stettin, Germany, 1900. 10,911 gross tons; 540 (bp) feet long; 60 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15.5 knots.  2,210 passengers (327 first class, 103 second class, 1,780 third class).

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1900 and named Borussia. Hamburg-Far East and Hamburg-New York service. Renamed Teutonia in 1900. Renamed Kiautschou in 1900. Hamburg-Far East and Hamburg-New York service. Sold to North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1904 and renamed Prinzess Alice. Bremerhaven-Far East and Bremerhaven-New York service. Laid-up at Manila 1914-17. Seized by US Government, in 1917 and renamed Princess Matoika. Used as a troopship 1917-19. Transferred in 1922 and renamed President Arthur. Sold in 1925 and renamed White Palace. New York-Haifa service. Soon sold to New York buyers and then resold. Sold to Los Angeles Steamship Company, in 1925 and renamed City of Honolulu. Hawaiian islands cruise service. Burned out at Honolulu on May 25, 1930. Scrapped at Osaka, Japan in 1933.


Prinzess Irene

Built by A/G Vulcan Shipyard, Stettin, Germany, 1900. 10,881 gross tons; 540 (bp) feet long; 60 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15.5 knots.  2,354 passengers (268 first class, 132 second class, 1,954 third class). Two funnels and two masts.

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1900 and named Prinzess Irene. Bremerhaven-New York and Bremerhaven-Australia service. Interned at New York 1914-17. Transferred to United States Navy, American flag, in 1917 and renamed USS Pocahontas. Troop transport service. Transferred to U.S. Shipping Board, in 1919. Chartered by U.S. Mail Steamship Company, in 1919. New York-Mediterranean service. Sold to North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1921 and renamed Bremen. Resumed Bremerhaven-New York service. Renamed Karlsruhe in 1928. Bremerhaven-Gulf of Mexico service. Scrapped at Bremerhaven in 1932.


Prinz August Wilhelm

Built by Flensburger Schiffsb. Ges., Flensburg, Germany, 1902. 4,733 gross tons; 370 (bp) feet long; 45 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  Two masts and one funnel.

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1902 and named Prinz August Wilhelm. West Indies to New York service. Burned and scuttled by crew to prevent capture by Colombian Government in 1917.


Prinz Friedrich Wilhelm

Built by J.C. Tecklenborg, Geestemunde, Germany, 1908. 17,082 gross tons; 613 (bp) feet long; 68 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 17 knots.  2,519 passengers (425 first class, 338 second class, 1,756 third class). Two masts and two funnels.

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1908 and named Prinz Friedrich Wilhelm. Bremerhaven-New York service. Laid up during World War I. Given as reparations to Canadian Pacific Steamships, British flag, in 1921 and renamed Empress of China. Renamed Empress of India in 1921. Liverpool-Quebec City service. Renamed Montlaurier in 1922. Renamed Monteith in 1925. Renamed Montnairn in 1925. Scrapped in Italy in 1930.


Prinz Joachim

Built by Flensburger, Schiffsb. Ges., Flensburg, Germany, 1903. 4,760 gross tons; 370 (bp) feet long; 45 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  Passenger cargo steamer; later refrigerator cargo ship.

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1903 and named Prinz Joachim. Seized by U.S. authorities, in 1917 and named Mocccasin. Managed by the US Shipping Board. Transferred to United States Navy, American flag, in 1918. Known as SP-1322. Carried food across Atlantic. Transferred to U.S. Shipping Board, in 1919 and renamed Porto Rico. Puerto Rico and West Indies to New York service. Chartered. in 1938.


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