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Ellis Island Ship List - H


Follow the links to see a list of the ships that the Ellis Island Knapp's arrived on. Follow the links find information about these ships.


Hamburg

Built by A/G Vulcan Shipyard, Stettin, Germany, 1900. 10,532 gross tons; 521 (bp) feet long; 60 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  2,170 passengers (290 first class, 100 second class, 1,780 third class).

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1900 and intended to be the Bavaria. Hamburg-Far East, New York from 1904, Genoa-NY from 1906 service. Interned at New York at the start of World War I in August 1914. Chartered in 1914 and renamed Red Cross. US Red Cross service. Renamed Hamburg in 1917. Seized by US Government, in 1917 and renamed USS Powhatan. US troopship service. Transferred to U.S. Shipping Board, in 1919. Chartered by Baltic S.S Corp. Of America, US flag, in 1920 and renamed New Rochelle. New York-Danzig service. Chartered by U.S. Mail Steamship Company, in 1921. Also New York-Danzig service. Renamed Hudson in 1921. Also New York-Danzig service. Chartered by United States Lines, in 1921. New York-Bremerhaven service. Renamed President Fillmore in 1922. Also New York-Bremerhaven service. Transferred to Dollar Line, American flag, in 1924. Around-the-world service. Scrapped in the United States in 1928.


Hannover

Built by Wigham Richardson & Company, Walker-on-Tyne, England, 1899. 7,305 gross tons; 429 (bp) feet long; 54 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  1,970 passengers (120 second class, 1,850 third class).

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1899 and named Hannover. Bremerhaven-New York and various other service. Laid up in Germany 1916-19. Surrendered to Britain 1919. Scrapped in 1932.


Hansa

Built by A/G Vulcan Shipyard, Stettin, Germany, 1900. 16,502 gross tons; 684 (bp) feet long; 67 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 22 knots.  2,050 passengers (450 first class, 300 second class, 1,300 third class). Four funnels set in pairs, two masts.

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1900 and named Deutschland. World’s fastest passenger ship 1900-06. Renamed Victoria Luise in 1910. All-first class cruise ship service. Rebuilt in 1910-11. Unused in Germany during World War I. Renamed Hansa in 1921. Scrapped in 1925.


Havel

Built by A/G Vulcan Shipyard, Stettin, Germany, 1890. 6,875 gross tons; 463 (bp) feet long; 51 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 18 knots.  826 passengers (244 first class, 122 second class, 460 third class).

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1890 and named Havel. Bremerhaven-New York service. Sold to Spanish Government, Spanish flag, in 1898 and renamed Meteoro. Used as an armed merchant cruiser in the Spanish Navy. Sold to Compania Transatlantica Line, Spanish flag, in 1899 and renamed Alfonso XII. After 1916 Bilbao-New York service. Scrapped in Italy in 1926.


Hellig Olav

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Glasgow, Scotland, 1902. 9,939 gross tons; 515 (bp) feet long; 58 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  1,170 passengers (130 first class, 140 second class, 900 third class). One funnel and two masts.

Built for Scandinavian American Line, in 1902 and named Hellig Olav. Copenhagen-New York service. Made some Hamburg-New York voyages for Royal Mail Lines, British. Scrapped in 1934.


H. H. Meier

Built by Armstrong, Mitchell & Company, Newcastle, England, 1891. 5,140 gross tons; 421 (bp) feet long; 48 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13.5 knots.  1,116 passengers (84 first class, 32 second class, 1,000 third class). Three masts and one funnel. Steel hull.

Built for British owners, British flag, in 1891 and named Lucania. Bremerhaven-New York service. Sold to North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1892 and renamed H.H. Meier. Bremen to Baltimore then Bremen to New York service. Sold to Compania Transatlantica Line, Spanish flag, in 1901 and renamed Manuel Calvo. Barcelona-New York-Caribbean service. Damaged by a mine off Turkey; later repaired and resumed service. Laid up Spanish owners, in 1952 and renamed Drago. Scrapped in Spain in 1959.


Hilversum

No Information Available


Homeric

Built by Schichau Shipyard, Danzig, Germany, 1922. 34,351 gross tons; 774 (bp) feet long; 82 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 19 knots.  2,766 passengers (529 first class, 487 second class, 1,750 third class). Two masts and two funnels.

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1913 and named Columbus. Construction halted until 1914 due to World War. Ceded to Britain 1919. Sold to White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1919 and renamed Homeric. Southampton-New York service. Scrapped in Scotland in 1936.


Hudson

Built by Chantiers de Normandie, Grand Quevilly, France, 1905. 5,558 gross tons; 390 (bp) feet long; 50 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 12 knots.  760 passengers (60 second class, 700 third class).

Built for French Line, French flag, in 1905 and named Hudson. Le Havre-New York and later Le Harve-Montreal service. Scrapped in Belgium in 1930.


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