Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

Ellis Island Ship List - C


Follow the links to see a list of the ships that the Ellis Island Knapp's arrived on. Follow the links find information about these ships.


Calamares

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Belfast, Ireland, 1913. 7,782 gross tons; 470 (bp) feet long; 55 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  143 passengers (143 second class, ).Two masts and one funnel..

Built for Unifruitco Steamship Company, British flag, in 1913 and named Calamares. New York-Havana-Cristobal-Port Limon service. Was UK flag then USA flag. Transferred to United States Navy, American flag, in 1918. Troopship and cargo service. Brought home more than 10,000 troops from St. Nazaire and Brest. Transferred to Unifruitco Steamship Company, British flag, in 1922. West Indies to US ports service. Laid up 1938-1941 after being converted to cargo ship. Transferred to United States Navy, American flag, in 1941. Provisions store ship service. Known as AF-18. Returned to US Maritime Commission in 1946. Scrapped in 1945.


Caledonia

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Company, Glasgow, Scotland, 1904. 9,223 gross tons; 500 (bp) feet long; 58 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  1,428 passengers (383 first class, 216 second class, 829 third class).

Built for Anchor Line, British flag, in 1904 and named Caledonia. Glasgow-New York service. Used as a British troopship 1914-16. Torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off Malta in 1916.


California

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Company, Glasgow, Scotland, 1907. 8,662 gross tons; 485 (bp) feet long; 58 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 17 knots.  1,214 passengers (232 first class, 248 second class, 734 third class).

Built for Anchor Line, British flag, in 1907 and named California. Glasgow-New York service. Transferred to Cunard Line, British flag, in 1909. Torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off the Irish coast in 1917.


Cambroman

Built by Laird Brothers, Birkenhead, England, 1892. 6,059 gross tons; 429 (bp) feet long; 46 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 13.5 knots.  1,275 passengers (1,275 third class).

Built for Warren Line, British flag, in 1892 and named Cambroman. Antwerp-New York service. Sold to Dominion Line, British flag, in 1899. Sold to Red Star Line, British flag, in 1907. Antwerp-New York service. Scrapped in 1909.


Cameronia

Built by Wm. Beardmore & Co., Glasgow, Scotland, 1919. 16,297 gross tons; 552 (bp) feet long; 70 feet wide. Steam turbine engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15.5 knots.  Two masts and one funnel.

Built for Anchor Line, British flag, in 1919 and named Cameronia. Liverpool to New York-troopship in WW II, Australian service service. She carried a total of 163,789 troops over 321,323 miles WWII. Sold to British Ministry of Transport, British flag, in 1953 and renamed Empire Clyde. Broken up by British ship breakers in 1958.


Campanello

Built by Palmers Shipbuilding & Iron Company, Newcastle, England, 1902. 9,291 gross tons; 470 (bp) feet long; 56 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  2,290 passengers (40 first class, 50 second class, 2,200 third class).One funnel, four masts.

Built for British Shipowners Limited, British flag, in 1902 and named British Empire. Sold to Navigazione Generale Itlaliana Line, Italian flag, in 1906 and renamed Campania (1901). Mediterranean-New York service. Transferred to Uranium Steamship Company, in 1910 and renamed Campanello. Rotterdam-New York service. Sold to Northwest Transportation Line, British flag, in 1910. Also Rotterdam-New York service. Also sailed for Canadian Northern Line and Uranium Line. Transferred to Cunard Line, British flag, in 1916 and renamed Flavia. Torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off Northern Ireland on August 24, 1918.


Campania

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Company, Glasgow, Scotland, 1893. 12,950 gross tons; 622 (bp) feet long; 65 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 21 knots.  2,000 passengers (600 first class, 400 second class, 1,000 third class). Two funnels, two masts.

Built for Cunard Line, British flag, in 1893 and named Campania. Liverpool-New York service. Sold to British Admiralty, British flag, in 1914 and renamed HMS Campania. Rebuilt as an aircraft carrier. Sunk following a collision in the Firth of Forth in Scotland on November 5, 1918.


Canopic

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1900. 12,268 gross tons; 594 (bp) feet long; 59 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  1,300 passengers (250 first class, 250 second class, 800 third class).

Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1900 and named Canopic. Various Atlantic services to New York service. Scrapped in 1925.


Caribbean

Built by Fairfield Ship Building Co., Glasgow, Scotland, 1890. 5,625 gross tons; 420 (bp) feet long; 49 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 17 knots.  350 passengers (160 first class, 90 second class, 100 third class). Three masts, two funnels, steel hull.

Built for Castle Line, British flag, in 1890 and named Dunottar Castle. England to Cape Town run service. Chartered by Panama Railroad Co., American flag, in 1907. Passenger service New York and Panama, also cruise ship service. Sold to Royal Mail Lines, British flag, in 1913 and renamed Caribbean. Southampton and Bermuda to New York service. Foundered off Cape Wrath in very heavy weather during September of 1915.


Carmania

Built by John Brown & Company, Clydebank, Scotland, 1905. 19,524 gross tons; 675 (bp) feet long; 72 feet wide. Steam turbine engines, triple screw.  Service speed 18 knots.  1,550 passengers (300 first class, 350 second class, 900 third class).

Built for Cunard Line, British flag, in 1905 and named Carmania. Liverpool-New York service. Served as an armed merchant cruiser, then troopship 1914-18. Scrapped in 1932.


Caronia

Built by John Brown & Company, Clydebank, Scotland, 1905. 19,524 gross tons; 678 (bp) feet long; 72 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 18 knots.  1,550 passengers (300 first class, 350 second class, 900 third class).

Built for Cunard Line, British flag, in 1905 and named Caronia. Liverpool-New York service. armed merchant cruiser, then troopship during World War I. Scrapped in 1933.


Carpathia

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson Limited, Newcastle, England, 1903. 13,603 gross tons; 558 (bp) feet long; 64 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  1,704 passengers (204 first class, 1,500 third class). One funnel and four masts.

Built for Cunard Line, British flag, in 1903 and named Carpathia. Liverpool-New York and Trieste-New York service. Rescued 705 survivors on April 15, 1912 from the sunken TITANIC. Torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off the English coast in 1918.


Carribean

Built by Fairfield Shipbuildling Co., Glasgow, Scotland, 1890. 5,625 gross tons; 420 (bp) feet long; 49 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 17 knots.  350 passengers (160 first class, 90 second class, 100 third class). Three masts, two funnels, steel hull.

Built for Castle Line, British flag, in 1890 and named Dunottar Castle. England to Cape Town run service. Chartered by Panama Railroad Co., American flag, in 1907. Passenger service New York and Panama, also cruise ship service. Sold to Royal Mail Lines, British flag, in 1913 and renamed Caribbean. Southampton and Bermuda to New York service. Foundered off Cape Wrath in very heavy weather during September of 1915.


Carrillo

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Belfast, Ireland, 1911. 4,593 gross tons; 378 (bp) feet long; 50 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  Passenger cargo vessel; later refrigerated cargo ship.

Built for British owners, British flag, in 1911 and named Carolinian. Leghorn to New York service. Sold to Unifruitco Steamship Company, British flag, in 1912 and renamed Carrillo. West Indies to US ports service. UK flag then 1914 US flag. Transferred to United States Army Transports, American flag, in 1918. Food and other cargo to Europe service. Known as AK-1406. Transferred to Unifruitco Steamship Company, British flag, in 1919. Kingston and other West Indies ports to US ports service. Under the control of the US Shipping Board. Baltimore, Maryland in 1948.


Cascapedia

1,158 gross tons; Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Passenger cargo vessel.

Built for Clyde Steamship Co, American flag, in 1895 and named Fastnet. Sold to Quebec Steamship Company, Canadian flag, in 1910 and renamed Cascapedia. Hamilton, Bermuda to New York1 917 to 1918 service. Bermuda & West Indies SS Co Line. Caught on fire off US east coast and sunk in 1918.


Cedric

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1902. 21,035 gross tons; 700 (bp) feet long; 75 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  2,875 passengers (365 first class, 160 second class, 2,350 third class). Two funnels and two masts.

Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1902 and named Cedric. Liverpool-New York service. Used as an auxiliary cruiser and then as a troopship during World War I. Scrapped at Inverkeithing in 1932.


Ceiba

Built by Swan, Hunter and Wigham Richardson, Sunderland, England, 1911. 1,698 gross tons; 309 (bp) feet long; 39 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 10 knots.  

Built  in 1911 and named Ceiba. Jamaica to New York 1923 to 1924 service. Honduran flag. Torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine on March 16, 1942.


Celtic

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1901. 20,904 gross tons; 700 (bp) feet long; 75 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  2,857 passengers (347 first class, 160 second class, 2,350 third class). Two funnels and four masts.

Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1901 and named Celtic. Liverpool-New York service. Largest ship afloat 1901-03. Stranded in Cobh harbor and declared a total loss and Scrapped in 1928.


C. F. Tietgen

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1897. 8,173 gross tons; 469 (bp) feet long; 53 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  2,350 passengers (200 first class, 150 second class, 2,000 third class).

Built for Holland - America Line, Dutch flag, in 1897 and named Rotterdam. Rotterdam-New York service. Sold to Scandinavian American Line, in 1906 and renamed C.F. Tietgen. Copenhagen-New York service. Transferred to Russian American Line, in 1913 and renamed Dwinsk. Libau-New York and later Archangel-New York service. Transferred to Cunard Line, British flag, in 1917. Transferred to the British Government. Torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off Bermuda in 1918.


Charles Pratt

Built by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Virginia, 1916. 8,982 gross tons; 500 (bp) feet long; 68 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 10 knots.  Tanker, one funnel, named after Charles Pratt, businessman.

Built for Standard Oil of New Jersey, American flag, in 1916 and named Charles Pratt. New York service included Mexico, Panama to NY service. Was chartered to Panama Transport Co., Panama Flag when sunk. Torpedoed and sunk by U.65 on voyage Aruba to Freetown on December 21, 1940.


Chemnitz

Built by J.C. Tecklenborg, Geestemunde, Germany, 1901. 7,542 gross tons; 428 (bp) feet long; 54 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  2,064 passengers (129 first class, 1,935 third class). One funnel, two masts.

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1901 and named Chemnitz. Bremerhaven-New York service. Laid up in Germany 1914-19. Seized by British Government, British flag, in 1919. Ran for Ellerman's Wilson Line 1922 to 1923 service. Scrapped in 1923.


Cherokee

Built by William Cramp and Sons, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1881. 2,624 gross tons; Steam turbine engine, single screw.  Yard hull 225.

Built  in 1881 and named Cherokee. Santo Domingo and West Indies to New York service. Caribbean Steam Ship Co. Transferred to U.S. authorities, in 1897. Used by the Army in the Spanish American War as a transport service. Transferred in 1903. West Indies, Santo Domingo to New York service. Caribbean Steam Ship Co. Transferred to U.S. authorities, in 1916. Used as a Army transport during World War I service. Transferred in 1919. Resumed West Indies to New York and other US ports service. Caribbean Steam Ship Co. Off of register in 1920.


Chester

Built by Caird & Company, Greenock, Scotland, 1873. 4,770 gross tons; 444 (bp) feet long; 44 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  

Built for Inman & International Steamship Company, in 1873 and named City of Chester. Southampton-New York service. Sold to American Line, in 1893 and renamed Chester. Also Southampton-New York service. Sold to United States Government, American flag, in 1898 and renamed USS Sedgwick. US Army Transport service. Sold to Italian owners, in 1905 and renamed Arizona. Renamed Napoletano in 1905. Scrapped in 1907.


Chicago

Built by Ateliers et Chantiers de l’Atlantique, St. Nazaire, France, 1908. 9,350 gross tons; 508 (bp) feet long; 57 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  1,608 passengers (358 first class, 1,250 third class). Two funnels and two masts.

Built for French Line, French flag, in 1908 and named Chicago. Le Havre-New York and later Le Havre-Caribbean service. Renamed Guadeloupe in 1928. Scrapped in France in 1936.


Cincinnati

Built by Schichau Shipyard, Danzig, Germany, 1909. 16,339 gross tons; 603 (bp) feet long; 63 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  2,827 passengers (246 first class, 332 second class, 2,249 third class). Two funnels and four masts.

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1909 and named Cincinnati. Hamburg-New York service. Interned at Boston 1914 owing to World War I. Seized by United States Government, American flag, in 1917 and renamed USS Covington. Torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat in the North Atlantic in 1918.


City of Paris

Built by J. & G. Thomson Limited, Glasgow, Scotland, 1889. 10,499 gross tons; 560 (bp) feet long; 63 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 20 knots.  1,740 passengers (540 first class, 200 second class, 1,000 third class).

Built for Inman & International Steamship Company, in 1889 and named City of Paris. Liverpool-New York service. World’s fastest ship 1889-92. Sold to American Line, in 1893 and renamed Paris. Southampton-New York service. Renamed USS Yale in 1898. Returned to American Line, in 1898 and reverted to Paris. Renamed Philadelphia in 1899. Renamed USS Harrisburg in 1917. Returned to American Line, in 1919 and reverted to Philadelphia. Laid up 1920-22. Sold to New York-Naples Steamship Company, American flag, in 1922. New York-Naples service. Mutiny on first voyage and ship laid up at Naples. Scrapped as Genoa in 1923.


City of Washington

Built by John Roach & Son, Chester, Pennsylvania, 1877. 2,683 gross tons; 300 (bp) feet long; 38 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  Two masts and one funnel.

Built for New York & Cuba Mail Steamship Co., in 1877 and named City of Washington. New York-Cuba via Ward Line service. Originally ran for the Alexandre Line. Became barge carrier in 1911, then wrecked on July 10, 1917.


Cleveland

Built by Blohm & Voss Shipbuilders, Hamburg, Germany, 1909. 16,960 gross tons; 607 (bp) feet long; 63 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 ? knots.  2,841 passengers (239 first class, 224 second class, 2,378 third class). Two funnels and four masts.

Built for United American Lines, in 1923 and renamed Cleveland. Hamburg-New York service. Hamburg-American Line bought back in 1926; trans-Atlantic service. scrapped in 1933.


Colombia

Built by Bergenske Mekaniske Verksted, Bergen, Norway, 1893. 857 gross tons; 207 (bp) feet long; 29 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 10 knots.  One deck steel screw steamer.

Built for Norwegian owners, in 1893 and named Colombia. West Indies-Cuba to New York 1893-1917 service. Chartered to United Fruit Co. Later Semra then sold again. Scrapped in Spain in 1963.


Colon

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1892. 6,583 gross tons; 470 (bp) feet long; 53 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  150 passengers (150 first class, ).

Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1892 and named Bovic. Liverpool-New York and Manchester-New York service. Sold to Leyland Line, British flag, in 1922 and renamed Colonian. Scrapped in Holland in 1928.


Columbia

Built by Larid Bros., Birkenhead, Scotland, 1889. 7,241 gross tons; 464 (bp) feet long; 56 feet wide. engines, twin screw.  Service speed 18 knots.  1,100 passengers (400 first class, 120 second class, 580 third class). Three masts and three funnels, steel hull.

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1889 and named Columbia (1889). Hamburg-Southampton-New York; Genoa-Naples-New York service. Sold to Spanish Government, Spanish flag, in 1898 and renamed Rapido. Used as a troopship by the Spanish government service. Sold to Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1899 and reverted to Columbia (1889). Southampton, Cherbourg and New York service. Repurchased. Sold to Russian Volunteer Fleet, in 1904 and renamed Terek. Used as a troop transport in Russo Japanese War service. Scrapped in 1907.


Columbus

Built by Schichau Shipyard, Danzig, Germany, 1924. 32,581 gross tons; 775 (bp) feet long; 83 feet wide. Steam turbine engines, twin screw.  Service speed 23 knots.  1,725 passengers (479 first class, 644 second class, 602 third class).

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1922 and renamed Columbus. Bremerhaven-New York service. Laid as HINDENBURG 1914; construction halted because of WW1. Sunk by crew to avoid capture by British warship in Atlantic in 1939.


Commewyne

Built by Akt. Burmeister & Wain, Copenhagen, Denmark, 1907. 2,476 gross tons; 310 (bp) feet long; 40 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  Two masts and one funnel..

Built  in 1907 and named St. Thomas. Renamed Commewyne in 1912. New York-Amsterdam-Curacao-Cape Haitian service. Renamed Progresco in 1932. Renamed Har Carmel in 1935. Burned in Black Sea in 1938.


Coppename

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Belfast, Ireland, 1908. 3,192 gross tons; 340 (bp) feet long; 42 feet wide. engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  

Built for Unifruitco Steamship Company, British flag, in 1908 and named Coppename. New York-Trinidad service. 1908 UK flag then 1914 USA flag. Sold to Italy and renamed Anna Maria Gualdi in 1940.


Cretic

Built by Hawthorn, Leslie & Company, Newcastle, England, 1902. 13,507 gross tons; 601 (bp) feet long; 60 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  1,510 passengers (260 first class, 250 second class, 1,000 third class).

Built for Leyland Line, British flag, in 1902 and renamed Hanoverian. Liverpool-Boston service. Sold to Dominion Line, also British, in 1903 and renamed MAYFLOWER. Sold to White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1903 and renamed Cretic. Liverpool-New York and Mediterranean-New York service. Sold to Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1923 and intended to be the Westphalia. Hamburg-New York service. Later also used by Red Star Line. Scrapped in Scotland in 1929.


Cristobal

Built by Maryland Steel Company, Sparrows Point, Maryland, 1902. 9,606 gross tons; 489 (bp) feet long; 58 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  Two masts, one funnel. Crew of 74 and passengers 172.

Built for Panama Railroad Co., American flag, in 1902 and named Cristobal. Cristobal and West Indies to New York service. Renamed PHILIPPA, later ESMERALDA. In fleet in 1939.


Cymric

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1898. 13,096 gross tons; 599 (bp) feet long; 64 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  1,418 passengers (258 first class, 1,160 third class).

Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1898 and named Cymric. Liverpool-New York service. Torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off Ireland in 1916.


Home Up