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Ellis Island Ship List - B


Follow the links to see a list of the ships that the Ellis Island Knapp's arrived on. Follow the links find information about these ships.


Baltic

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1904. 23,884 gross tons; 726 (bp) feet long; 75 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  2,875 passengers (425 first class, 450 second class, 2,000 third class). Two funnels, four masts.

Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1904 and named Baltic. Liverpool-New York service. Largest ship afloat, 1904-05. Troopship during World War I. Scrapped at Osaka, Japan in 1933.


Barbarossa

Built by Blohm & Voss Shipbuilders, Hamburg, Germany, 1897. 10,769 gross tons; 548 (bp) feet long; 60 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 14.5 knots.  2,392 passengers (230 first class, 227 second class, 1,935 third class).

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1897 and named Barbarossa. Bremerhaven-Australia and Bremerhaven-New York service. Interned at New York 1914-17. Seized by United States Navy, American flag, in 1917 and renamed USS Mercury. Troop transport service. Scrapped in 1924.


Batavia

Built by Blohm & Voss Shipbuilders, Hamburg, Germany, 1899. 10,178 gross tons; 517 (bp) feet long; 62 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 12 ? knots.  2,700 passengers (300 second class, 2,400 third class).

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1899 and named Batavia. Mediterranean-New York, Hamburg-Baltimore and Hamburg-Boston service. Sold to Unione Austriaca, Austrian flag, in 1913 and renamed Polonia. Trieste-Quebec City-Montreal service. Sold to Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1913 and reverted to Batavia. Laid-up at Hamburg in August 1914 owing to the outbreak of World War I. Transferred to German Navy, in 1917. Transport service. Transferred to Messageries Maritimes, French flag, in 1919 and renamed Batavia. Marseilles-Far East service. Scrapped in 1924.


Bayern

Built by Bremer Vulkan Shipbuilders, Vegesack, Germany, 1921. 8,917 gross tons; 466 (bp) feet long; 58 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  766 passengers (16 first class, 750 third class).

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1921 and named Bayern. Hamburg-New York service. Sold to Messageries Maritimes, French flag, in 1936 and renamed Sontay. Sold to Panamanian buyers, in 1955 and renamed Sunlock. Scrapped in Japan in 1936.


Bellingham

Built by Todd Drydock and Construction Corp, Tacoma, Washington, 1918. 4,837 gross tons; 380 (bp) feet long; 53 feet wide. Steam turbine engine, single screw.  

Built for Furness Withy, British flag, and named Bellingham. From 1918 to 1919 US Navy, then 1919 to 1922 Rotterdam to NY service. Cargo ship, was on British registry as WAR HERALD during WWI. Deleted from Lloyd s Registry in 1960.


Berengaria

Built by Bremer Vulkan Shipbuilders, Hamburg, Germany, 1913. 52,117 gross tons; 919 (bp) feet long; 98 feet wide. Steam turbine engines, quadruple screw.  Service speed 23 knots.  4,594 passengers (908 first class, 972 second class, 2,714 third class). Three funnels and two masts, four propellers.

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1913 and named Imperator. Hamburg-New York service. Intended to be the Europa. Largest ship afloat 1913-14. Laid up in 1914. Given as reparations to US Government, in 1919. Ceded to Britain in 1920; resumed sailing but under British flag. Sold to Cunard Line, British flag, in 1921 and renamed Berengaria. Refitted. Transferred to Cunard White Star Line, British flag, in 1934. Withdrawn 1938; scrapping began in 1939. Final remains broken in 1946.


Bergensfjord

Built by Cammell Laird & Company, Birkenhead, England, 1913. 11,013 gross tons; 530 (bp) feet long; 61 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  1,200 passengers (100 first class, 250 second class, 850 third class).

Built for Norwegian-America Line, Norwegian flag, in 1913 and named Bergensfjord. Oslo-New York service. Troopship 1940-46. Sold to Home Lines, Panamanian flag, in 1946 and renamed Aregentina. Mediterranean-South America and Mediterranean-New York service. Sold to Zim Line, Israeli flag, in 1953 and renamed Jerusalem. Mediterranean-New York service. Renamed Aliya in 1957. Laid up 1958-59. Scrapped in Italy in 1959.


Berlin

Built by A. G. Weser Shipbuilders, Bremen, Germany, 1909. 17,323 gross tons; 613 (bp) feet long; 69 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  3,212 passengers (266 first class, 246 second class, 2,700 third class). Two funnels and two masts.

Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1909 and named Berlin. Bremerhaven-New York and Mediterranean-New York service. Transferred to German Navy, in 1914. Converted to a minelayer service. Seized by British Admiralty, British flag, in 1919. Troopship by Britain to India service. Under P&O management. Sold to White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1920 and renamed Arabic. Trans-Atlantic service. Chartered by Red Star Line, Belgian flag, in 1926. New York - Plymouth - Cherbourg - Antwerp, then Liverpool to NY service. Refitted to 177 cabin, 319 tourist and 823 third class passengers. Broken up in Italy in 1931.


Bermuda

No information available.


Bermudian

Built by Sir James Laing & Sons Ltd., Sunderland, England, 1904. 5,530 gross tons; 425 (bp) feet long; 50 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  405 passengers (405 second class, ).Two funnels and two masts.

Built for Quebec Steamship Company, Canadian flag, in 1914 and named Bermudian. Hamilton, Bermuda to New York service. Trooping voyage to France 1914 and 1917. Transferred to Furness Withy, British flag, in 1920 and renamed Fort Hamilton. Bermuda and Halifax to New York service. Bermuda and West Indies SS Co. Sold to Cosulich Line, Italian flag, in 1926 and renamed Stella d Italia. Mediterranean cruising service. Later for the Italia Line then Lloyd Trestino, Trieste. Scrapped in 1934.


Bermudez

No information available.


Blucher

Built by Blohm & Voss Shipbuilders, Hamburg, Germany, 1902. 12,334 gross tons; 550 (bp) feet long; 62 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 ? knots.  2,102 passengers (333 first class, 169 second class, 1,600 third class).

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1902 and named Blucher. Hamburg-New York and Hamburg-South America service. Interned at Pernambuco, Brazil in August 1914. Seized by Brazilian Government, Brazilian flag, in 1917 and renamed Leopoldina. Transferred to French Line, French flag, in 1923 and renamed Suffren. Le Havre-New York service. Laid up 1928-29. Scrapped in Italy in 1929.


Brazos

Built by Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, Virginia, 1907. 6,576 gross tons; 401 (bp) feet long; 54 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  

Built for New York & Porto Rico Steamship Company, American flag, and named Brazos. San Juan, Puerto Rico to New York service. Hull 65, two masts, one funnel, became San Lorenzo, scrapped during January of 1934.


Bremen

Built by A/G Vulcan Shipyard, Stettin, Germany, 1900. 10,881 gross tons; 540 (bp) feet long; 60 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15.5 knots.  2,354 passengers (268 first class, 132 second class, 1,954 third class). Two funnels and two masts.

 Built for North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1900 and named Prinzess Irene. Bremerhaven-New York and Bremerhaven-Australia service. Interned at New York 1914-17. Transferred to United States Navy, American flag, in 1917 and renamed USS Pocahontas. Troop transport service. Transferred to U.S. Shipping Board, in 1919. Chartered by U.S. Mail Steamship Company, in 1919. New York-Mediterranean service. Sold to North German Lloyd, German flag, in 1921 and renamed Bremen. Resumed Bremerhaven-New York service. Renamed Karlsruhe in 1928. Bremerhaven-Gulf of Mexico service. Scrapped at Bremerhaven in 1932.


Britannic

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1874. 5,004 gross tons; 468 (bp) feet long; 45 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  1,720 passengers (220 first class, 1,500 third class). Two funnels and four masts rigged for sail.

Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1874 and named Britannic. Liverpool-New York service. Fastest ship on the Atlantic in 1876. Scrapped in Germany in 1903.


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