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William DUSTIN
(Bef 1755-1824)
Hannah MARTIN
(1753-1825)
Samuel DUSTIN
(1791-1864)
Mary
(Abt 1791-1871)
Henry DUSTIN
(1838-1869)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
Mary Anne DRAKE

Henry DUSTIN 71,72,73

  • Born: 29 Mar 1838, Plymouth, Devonshire, England 71,72,73,74,212
  • Marriage: Mary Anne DRAKE on 28 Mar 1858 in Registry Office, Plymouth, Devon, England 72,1820
  • Died: 19 May 1869, Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand at age 31 71,72,73
  • Buried: Symonds St.Cemetery., Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand 72,73

bullet   Cause of his death was Tuberculosis.72

picture

bullet  General Notes:

[Henry Dustin Auckland.FTW]

The Census records of the Plymouth, St Andrew area in 1851 show a Henry DUNSTAN, a fisherman's apprentice living at 4 Pin Lane. George Sulley, a pilot, was the head of this household, so it is most likely that it is he to whom Henry is apprenticed. Henry's age is given as 14 years and his place of birth Plymouth. Henry was a fisherman when he married. It would appear that Henry went on to become the founder of the Auckland Dustins, while John and Samuel were the progenitors of the Wanganui Dustin line. The 1861 Census shows the Henry Dustin family living at 16 Parade with four other families. This dwelling was probably a set of small apartments or rooms which would be shared by a number of families. The Dustins may have only had a room to themselves, maybe a couple if they were lucky.
On 2 September 1864 the young family embarked on the biggest adventure of their lives, the voyage from Plymouth to New Zealand. Apart from colliding with a French schooner in the English Channel and having to return to Spithead for repairs, which took two weeks, the rest of the journey, for most passengers, was reasonably uneventful. However Mary Ann was to experience her fourth labour at sea. On 22 December 1864 Susan Ann Dustin was born somewhere off the coast of Tasmania. Thirteen days later, after 107 days at sea, the 'Victory' arrived in Auckland on 4 January 1865.
On their arrival in Auckland Henry and his family had to reside in the Immigration Barracks as they were unable to afford to stay in an hotel and Henry did not have a job to go to. January 1865 saw 1288 immigrants arrive in Auckland and in one week alone 218 applied for accommodation at the Immigration Barracks. At this time there were four immigration barracks in Auckland and it is most likely that the Dustins were staying in one at Official Bay or possibly Newton. Here is an excerpt from the 'New Zealander' newspaper 4 Feb 1865 about Official Bay; "...originally intended for a steam flour mill. It consisted of four floors one above the other and the only ventilation was via small windows in the thick walls. Some of the rooms were 'black holes' in miniature and on mounting to the top lofts anyone endowed with taste and smell was glad to descend again as quickly as possible. Rough plastered walls covered with dust seperated the compartments. The majority of the rooms were in clean and creditable conditions but there was room for improvement in some..."
It was under these conditions that young Susan Ann, aged 5 weeks, died from diarrhoea on 27 January 1865. She was buried at Symonds Street Cemetery. What a terrible start to life in their new country! Unfortunately things did not get better.
The Auckland Directory of 1866-1867 shows Henry Dustien, a mariner, living in Albert Street, East Side, in an area which is now in the vicinity of the Civic Carpark.
By March 1867 Henry and his family were living in Chapel Street, now Federal Street, one street away from Albert Street. it was here on 15 March 1867 that Henry and Mary Ann's daughter was born. She was named Susan in memory of her dear deceased sister, a common practice in days gone by.
By the later stages of 1867 Henry had managed to find employment and was working as a seaman on the cutter 'Severn' under the Master Thomas Taylor. However Henry was having problems wth his health. He was suffering from tuberculosis and was twice admitted to Auckland Hospital. Conditions for tuberculosis patients in hospital left a lot to be desired. The 'Southern Cross' newspaper in 1868 sarcastically reported that the ventilation could not be "more thorough". The Provincial Surgeon, Dr Philson reports in 1868 "any plan which could exclude wind and rain from the wards would be a great blessing to the sick".
Poor Mary Ann having to cope with four young children and a sick husband only three and a half years after arriving in New Zealand, and there were no social welfare benefits in those days.
Henry did not live much longer. On 19 May 1869, after only four years in his new country, Henry died of Pulmonary Consumption, tuberculosis, aged only 32 years.
His widow married Alexander Russell six months later and lived in Mt St Mary, now St Marys Bay. Tragedy struck Mary Ann's life again two years later when Alexander died.[All in One Family Tree Aug 2009.FTW]

The Census records of the Plymouth, St Andrew area in 1851 show a Henry DUNSTAN, a fisherman's apprentice living at 4 Pin Lane. George Sulley, a pilot, was the head of this household, so it is most likely that it is he to whom Henry is apprenticed. Henry's age is given as 14 years and his place of birth Plymouth. Henry was a fisherman when he married. It would appear that Henry went on to become the founder of the Auckland Dustins, while John and Samuel were the progenitors of the Wanganui Dustin line. The 1861 Census shows the Henry Dustin family living at 16 Parade with four other families. This dwelling was probably a set of small apartments or rooms which would be shared by a number of families. The Dustins may have only had a room to themselves, maybe a couple if they were lucky.
On 2 September 1864 the young family embarked on the biggest adventure of their lives, the voyage from Plymouth to New Zealand. Apart from colliding with a French schooner in the English Channel and having to return to Spithead for repairs, which took two weeks, the rest of the journey, for most passengers, was reasonably uneventful. However Mary Ann was to experience her fourth labour at sea. On 22 December 1864 Susan Ann Dustin was born somewhere off the coast of Tasmania. Thirteen days later, after 107 days at sea, the 'Victory' arrived in Auckland on 4 January 1865.
On their arrival in Auckland Henry and his family had to reside in the Immigration Barracks as they were unable to afford to stay in an hotel and Henry did not have a job to go to. January 1865 saw 1288 immigrants arrive in Auckland and in one week alone 218 applied for accommodation at the Immigration Barracks. At this time there were four immigration barracks in Auckland and it is most likely that the Dustins were staying in one at Official Bay or possibly Newton. Here is an excerpt from the 'New Zealander' newspaper 4 Feb 1865 about Official Bay; "...originally intended for a steam flour mill. It consisted of four floors one above the other and the only ventilation was via small windows in the thick walls. Some of the rooms were 'black holes' in miniature and on mounting to the top lofts anyone endowed with taste and smell was glad to descend again as quickly as possible. Rough plastered walls covered with dust seperated the compartments. The majority of the rooms were in clean and creditable conditions but there was room for improvement in some..."
It was under these conditions that young Susan Ann, aged 5 weeks, died from diarrhoea on 27 January 1865. She was buried at Symonds Street Cemetery. What a terrible start to life in their new country! Unfortunately things did not get better.
The Auckland Directory of 1866-1867 shows Henry Dustien, a mariner, living in Albert Street, East Side, in an area which is now in the vicinity of the Civic Carpark.
By March 1867 Henry and his family were living in Chapel Street, now Federal Street, one street away from Albert Street. it was here on 15 March 1867 that Henry and Mary Ann's daughter was born. She was named Susan in memory of her dear deceased sister, a common practice in days gone by.
By the later stages of 1867 Henry had managed to find employment and was working as a seaman on the cutter 'Severn' under the Master Thomas Taylor. However Henry was having problems wth his health. He was suffering from tuberculosis and was twice admitted to Auckland Hospital. Conditions for tuberculosis patients in hospital left a lot to be desired. The 'Southern Cross' newspaper in 1868 sarcastically reported that the ventilation could not be "more thorough". The Provincial Surgeon, Dr Philson reports in 1868 "any plan which could exclude wind and rain from the wards would be a great blessing to the sick".
Poor Mary Ann having to cope with four young children and a sick husband only three and a half years after arriving in New Zealand, and there were no social welfare benefits in those days.
Henry did not live much longer. On 19 May 1869, after only four years in his new country, Henry died of Pulmonary Consumption, tuberculosis, aged only 32 years.
His widow married Alexander Russell six months later and lived in Mt St Mary, now St Marys Bay. Tragedy struck Mary Ann's life again two years later when Alexander died.
TEXT: DATA
TEXT Date of Import: 7 Sep 2009

picture

bullet  Noted events in his life were:

Medical Condition: Admitted Auck Hosp 10 Oct 1867, discharged 26 Oct 1867 Age 32 yrs. Admitted Auck Hosp 18 Aug 1868, discharged 28 Aug 1868 age 35 yrs. 72,73,1669

Occupation: Master Mariner. 72,73

Occupation: Fisherman, 1861. 72,73

Emigration: Departed Plymouth on 'Victory', 2 Sep 1864. 72,73

Immigration: Arrived in Auckland, NZ, 4 Jan 1865. 72,73


picture

Henry married Mary Anne DRAKE on 28 Mar 1858 in Registry Office, Plymouth, Devon, England 72.,1820 (Mary Anne DRAKE was born about 1838 in Plymouth, Devonshire, England,71,72,73,74 died on 25 Jun 1911 in Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand 71,72,73 and was buried in Waikaraka Cemetery, Onehunga, Nz 72,73,1821.)


bullet  Marriage Notes:

[Henry Dustin Auckland.FTW]

At the time of marriage both Henry and Mary Ann were twenty years old and neither had been married before. They lived at 4 Pin Lane, Plymouth. both Henry and Mary Ann signed the marriage certificate with their mark, an X, so it is quite likely neither could read or write. Their marriage was witnessed by George Edwin Netherton, who signed his own name, and Sarah Maunders who also made her mark, an X.[All in One Family Tree Aug 2009.FTW]

At the time of marriage both Henry and Mary Ann were twenty years old and neither had been married before. They lived at 4 Pin Lane, Plymouth. both Henry and Mary Ann signed the marriage certificate with their mark, an X, so it is quite likely neither could read or write. Their marriage was witnessed by George Edwin Netherton, who signed his own name, and Sarah Maunders who also made her mark, an X.

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