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Sellers Family
Wilcox County, AL

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Descendants of Samuel Sellers

Generation No. 1

1. SAMUEL1 SELLERS was born 23 Sep 1788, and died 23 Aug 1852. He married ALICE COOK. She was born 23 Jun 1788, and died 07 Feb 1857.

More About SAMUEL SELLERS:

Burial: Millers Ferry, west of Camden, Alabama

Notes for ALICE COOK:

Alice Cook was the daughter of Daniel Cook and his wife Ruth Moultrie. Daniel Cook was the son of Abram Cook and his wife Phoebe Mastin. Abram Cook's father was also named Daniel Cook. Ruth Moultrie was the Daughter of Dr. John Moultrie who came to this country from Scotland. This information is from Joan Sellers Johnson of Decatur, Georgia. She has a limited publication book on the Cook family of South Carolina. The book reports that Samuel and Alice moved to Alabama in the late 1820s.

More About ALICE COOK:

Burial: Millers Ferry, west of Camden, Alabama

Child of SAMUEL SELLERS and ALICE COOK is:

2. i. CALVIN COOK2 SELLERS, b. 05 May 1812, Chesterfield District of SC; d. Mar 1852.

 

Generation No. 2

2. CALVIN COOK2 SELLERS (SAMUEL1) was born 05 May 1812 in Chesterfield District of SC, and died Mar 1852. He married ELIZA A. HOWELL 1836 in Wilcox County, daughter of WILLIAM H. HOWELL.

Notes for CALVIN COOK SELLERS:

Calvin Cook Sellers was clerk of the court for Wilcox County, a member of the Alabama Senate from Wilcox County and the Whig candidate for Congress from the Mobile District of Alabama in 1849. He is profiled on page 391 of the publication Reminiscence of Public Men in Alabama by William Garrett.

He migrated with his father, Samuel Sellers to Alabama about 1828 and settled in Wilcox County.

He was one of Eight sons and seven daughters of Samuel Sellers and Sarah Stanland; the grandson of Elisha Sellers and his third wife, Mary Willis; the great grandson of William Sellers of Tarboro, NC.

This information from Ernest Sellers is from the 1974 compendium compiled by Clark Heaslett Watters and Elizabeth Stone Watters titled "Some Descendents of William Sellers, who was born in Tarboro, NC in 1750".

Ernest Sellers also says that there were two Samuel Sellers who were born in 1788 and went to Alabama. The Samuel Sellers who married the Stanland moved to Pike County, Alabama in the early 1830s. The other Samuel married Alice (Ailie) Cook and moved to Wilcox County in 1828 or 1829.

According to the Watters Book, the Samuel Sellers who married Alice is a son of Isham Sellers (sometimes listed as Isom Sellers on census records).

 

Ernest Sellers has a photograph of the tombstone that says "Sacred to the memory of Calvin C. Sellers who was born in Chesterfield District, S.C. September 30, 1811, was married to Eliza A. Howell of Wilcox County, Alabama and died March 22, 1852 in the 41st year of his life:

More About CALVIN COOK SELLERS:

Burial: Buried on his plantation near Camden, Alabama.

Notes for ELIZA A. HOWELL:

Eliza Howell, wife of Calvin Cook Sellers, was a sister to William Forbes Howell who married the daughter of Red Eagle (William Weatherford) whose name was Mary Levitia

Weatherford.

The following information was shared by Ernest Sellers concerning Red Eagle and his daughter, Mary Levitia who married Dr. William F. Howell.

FROM: William Weatherford: His Country and HIs People by Lynn Hastie Thompson:

..Weatherford informed his people that he was going to turn himself in, hoping the women and children would be relieved from suffering and starvation. Mountying his noble black stallion, his constant companion throughout the war, having even saved his life at Holy Ground, he rode out of the camp at Moniac's Island, heading in the direction of Fort Jackson. He had traveled this trail many times, but never with such a heavy heart. Jackson had vowed to hang him. His own people, those who had fought on the side of the Americans, were roaming the woods in search of fugitive Creeks. They, even more than the American soldiers, were determined to destroy any warrior who had been present at Fort Mims. No mercy was shown them at all. Some Red Sticks had aleady been intercepted by these self-appointed avengers while on their way to surrender and because it was believed they had accompanied Weatherford at Fort Mims, they were put to death. Such instances kept alive the distrust that Red Sticks felt toward Jackson. They were afraid that his promises were no more than a means of luring them into his trap. These thoughts all raced through Weatherford's mind as he and Arrow (his horse) continued toward Fort Jackson. The noble Creek bravely rode up to Jackson''s headquarters not knowing what to expect. Approaching a sentinel standing guard near the fort entrance, Weatherford requested to be taken to General Jackson. Unaware that he was in the company of the most sought after Red Stick leader, the sentinel conducted him to Jackson's tent where Jackson sat consulting with his aide, John Reid. There, befor his white enemy, the kingly chieftain stood, unarmed, a tall light-skinned, god-like specimen of a man. His bare muscular chest glistened in teh soft rays of the April sun. Even though he was thin from lack of food, he was still a very handsome man. His worn buckskins and tattered moccasins could not hide his symmetrical limbs. During the long course of the war, Weatherford's greatness was apparent to both the red man and the white, but his finest and noblest hour was yet to come.

Jackson stopped his conversation and looked up at the stately warrior. Even before the general could speak, the Eagle chieftain addressed his victor.

"I am Waeatherford, the chieft who commanded at Fort Mims he stated in calm, deliberate tones. I have come here to ask peach for myself and for my people."

Old Hickory was taken by complete surprise. How dare you, the chieft who is rewsponsible for the murder of so many, appear before me demanding the protection which has been extended to otehrs. You deserve to die for what you have done. Already, I had ordererd that you be brought in to me confined. Had you appeared in this way, I should know how to treat you.

The stern tone of Jackson's voice did not seem to frighten the chieftain, and he continued to address the astonished general. I am in your power," Weatherford replied, do with me as you please. I am a soldier. I have done the white people all the harm I could; I have fought them and fought them bravely. If I had an army, I would yet fight, and contend to the alst, but I have none. At this point, the dark piercing eyes of the brave chieftain filled with sadness, but he forced himself to continue with an undaughted dignity. "My people are all gone. I can do no more than weep over the misfortunes of my nation."

Jackson knowing that it took a truly great man to stand before his conqueror, admit defeat, and ask for peace, could not help but admire Weatherford. Old HIckory saw in this chieftain a man much like himself. He was pleased at the firmness with which he spoke. At the same time, he saw in his eyes, though clouded with sadness, a spirit still untamed and unconquered.

"The only terms upon which your nation can be saved and peace restored", Jackson stated, "have already been disclosed. In this way, and none other, can you obtain safety. If however, you wish still to continue the war, adn are not ready to meet the consequences, though you are completely in my power, no advantage will be taken of you. You are at liberty to go, and unite again with the war party, but if you are taken, you shall papy with your life for your crimes. If this is not what you desire, you can remain where you are and be protected."

It took all of Weatherford's energy to control the anger that raged within him at the arrogant words of the American general. Did he not know how hard it was for him to turn himself in to his victor? Only the haunting cries of his hungry people kept him standing there, andonly his noble desire to save what remained of his nation made him continue.

"I desire peace, he said, that my nation might, in some measure, be saved from their sufferings, for independent of their other misfortunes, growing out of a state of war, their cattle and grain are all wasted and destroyed. The women and children are destitute of provisions." Crossing his arms across his muscular chest, he bravely glared into the eyes of Jackson, almost rebuking him for the tones with which he had addressed him.

"I may well be addressed in such language now! There was a time when I had a choice, and could have answered you. I have none now. Even hope has ended. Once I could animate my warriors to battle; but I cannot animate the dead. My warriors can no longer hear my voice. Their bones are at Talledega, Tallasseehatchee, Emuckfau, and Tohopeka. I have not surrendered myself thoughtlessly. While ther were chances of success, I never left my post nor supplicated peace, but my people are gone, and I now ask it for my nation and for myself. On the miseries and misfortunes brought upon my country, I look back with deepest sorrow. I wish to avert still greater calamities."

Weatherford, always quick to perceive, knew that Old Hickory was egotistical. Thinking it wise to end his talk with words that were more pleasing to Jackson's ears, he continued. "If I had been left to contend with the Georgian army, I would have raised my corn on one bank of the river and fought them on the other. But your people had destroyed my nation. General Jackson, you are a brave man; I am another. I do not fear to die. But I rely upon your generosity. you will exact no terms of a conquered and helpless people, but those to which they should accede. Whatever that may be, it would be folly and madness to oppose them. If they are opposed, you shall find me among the sternest enforcers of obedience. Those who would still hold out can only be influenced by a mean spirit of revenge. To this, they must not, and shall not, sacrifice the last remnant of their country. You have told us where we may go to be safe. Yours is good talk, and my nation ought to listen. They shall listen."

The surrender was in 1814. Andrew Jackson went on the White House, William Weatherford did go free. He returned to family near Little River, Alabama and became a well-to-do plantation owner.

The last child born to him and Mary Stiggins Weatherford was a daughter, Mary Levitia. She was born in 1822. Pretty Lefitia eventually married Dr. William Forbes Howell in 1841. He was Eliza's brother. They lived near the Sellers till Levitia's mother's estate was settled, in 1851. They then moved to Louisiana.

Children of CALVIN SELLERS and ELIZA HOWELL are:

3. i. CALVIN COOK3 SELLERS II, b. 03 Mar 1837; d. 26 Mar 1900.

4. ii. SAMUEL SELLERS, b. 07 Apr 1843; d. Aug 1885.

iii. DANIEL SELLERS.

Notes for DANIEL SELLERS:

Daniel served in the Confederate Army. He is buried in Randolf, Alabama.

iv. SYD SELLERS.

v. DAVE SELLERS.

Notes for DAVE SELLERS:

Went to Texas.

vi. ELLA SELLERS.

vii. ROSE SELLERS.

viii. LUCY SELLERS.

 

Generation No. 3

3. CALVIN COOK3 SELLERS II (CALVIN COOK2, SAMUEL1) was born 03 Mar 1837, and died 26 Mar 1900. He married SUSAN SELTZER 18 Mar 1858.

More About CALVIN COOK SELLERS II:

Burial: Randolph, Alabama

More About SUSAN SELTZER:

Burial: Randolph, Alabama

Children of CALVIN SELLERS and SUSAN SELTZER are:

5. i. CALVIN COOK4 SELLERS III, b. 02 Jun 1859.

6. ii. WILLIAM THOMAS SELLERS, b. 19 Apr 1863; d. 17 Sep 1905.

iii. PAULINE SELLERS, b. 16 Dec 1865; d. 05 Jan 1866.

iv. REBECCA EMILY SELLERS, b. 07 Apr 1879.

Notes for REBECCA EMILY SELLERS:

Rebecca Emily Sellers, daughter of Calvin Cook Sellers II, married a Williams and lived in Birmingham in 1936.

v. ELIJAH BENJAMIN SELLERS, b. 12 Jun 1872; d. 23 Sep 1872.

7. vi. ERNEST AUGUSTUS SELLERS, b. 19 Feb 1876; d. 1930.

vii. CLARENCE EUGENE SELLERS, b. 07 Apr 1879.

Notes for CLARENCE EUGENE SELLERS:

Clarence Eugene Sellers, son of Calvin Cook Sellers II, graduated with a degree in dentistry. I know he had at least one child, Merrium who married a Eufnuel and has at least one son named Jerry. Jerry and Merrium (Myrium) live in Mobile, Alabama.

Notes from Ernest A. Sellers.

 

4. SAMUEL3 SELLERS (CALVIN COOK2, SAMUEL1) was born 07 Apr 1843, and died Aug 1885. He married LEECIE ANN JOHNSON 30 Jun 1869.

Notes for SAMUEL SELLERS:

He was head of the schcool at Randolph, Bibb County, Alabama.

More About SAMUEL SELLERS:

Burial: Randolph, Alabama

Children of SAMUEL SELLERS and LEECIE JOHNSON are:

i. MARY ELLA4 SELLERS, m. ROBERT UNDERWOOD.

ii. VIOLA PEARL SELLERS, m. JOHN PEARCE.

iii. SAMUEL SELLERS, m. MAUDE WILKERSON.

iv. EDWIN MOREN SELLERS, m. LUTIE RANSEY.

v. CALVIN SELLERS.

Notes for CALVIN SELLERS:

Never married.

vi. WILLIAM DAVID SELLERS, m. YRMA IVEY.

 

Generation No. 4

5. CALVIN COOK4 SELLERS III (CALVIN COOK3, CALVIN COOK2, SAMUEL1) was born 02 Jun 1859. He married MARTHA ELLEN (ELIZABETH) VAUGHN 20 Nov 1882 in Wilcox County Marriage Records Vol. 10 p. 236, daughter of JOSEPH VAUGHN and MARTHA DUNN. She was born 17 Aug 1856, and died 30 May 1932.

More About CALVIN COOK SELLERS III:

Burial: Capell Cemetery in Camden, Alabama

More About MARTHA ELLEN (ELIZABETH) VAUGHN:

Burial: Capell Cemetery in Camden, Alabama

Children of CALVIN SELLERS and MARTHA VAUGHN are:

i. ADELLE5 SELLERS, b. 1883.

ii. CALVIN COOK SELLERS, b. 15 Jul 1885; d. 22 Apr 1963; m. CLARA HALL; b. 1886; d. 1954.

More About CALVIN COOK SELLERS:

Burial: Capell Cemetery in Camden, AL

More About CLARA HALL:

Burial: Capell Cemetery in Camden, AL

iii. ELIZABETH SUSAN SELLERS, b. 11 Aug 1887; m. ALBERT LUCAS TAIT, 16 Dec 1908; b. 04 May 1886; d. 27 Nov 1946, Camden Alabama.

More About ALBERT LUCAS TAIT:

Burial: Tait Cemetery in Coy, Alabama

iv. JAMES BENSON SELLERS, b. 17 Feb 1889; m. CARRIE AUTREY.

Notes for JAMES BENSON SELLERS:

Dr. James Benson Sellers was a history professor at the University of Alabama and wrote several books about southern history including The History of the University of Alabama and Slavery in Alabama.

 

6. WILLIAM THOMAS4 SELLERS (CALVIN COOK3, CALVIN COOK2, SAMUEL1) was born 19 Apr 1863, and died 17 Sep 1905. He married MARY ANNE GIVHAN 08 Oct 1891. She was born 05 Sep 1866, and died 12 May 1958.

Children of WILLIAM SELLERS and MARY GIVHAN are:

i. SUSAN MABLE5 SELLERS, b. 07 Aug 1892; d. 16 Apr 1953; m. WILLIAM EUGENE WIDEMAN, 21 Jul 1920.

ii. ETHEL CLYDE SELLERS, b. 22 Apr 1894; m. STANLEY L. STROBERT, 24 Aug 1922.

iii. WILLIAM WALTER SELLERS, b. 06 Mar 1896; d. 30 Jul 1958.

iv. LILLIAN SELLERS, b. 16 Dec 1898; d. 07 Jul 1902.

 

7. ERNEST AUGUSTUS4 SELLERS (CALVIN COOK3, CALVIN COOK2, SAMUEL1) was born 19 Feb 1876, and died 1930. He married ESTHER WILLIAMS 1910.

Notes for ERNEST AUGUSTUS SELLERS:

Ernest Augustus Sellers, son of Calvin Cook Sellers II, graduated from the College of Medicine at Birmingham and moved to Altha, Florida where he practiced medicine until his death in 1930.

The Sellers history is from Ernest A Sellers.

Children of ERNEST SELLERS and ESTHER WILLIAMS are:

i. FLORIDA5 SELLERS, m. JACK HIGGENS.

ii. CALVIN C. SELLERS, m. MARY PICHARD, May 1936.

iii. ERNESTINE SELLERS.