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The Hughes Family

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Back to Noland Page by Shirla Howard
Dr. William Hughes by Wanda Bodemann

FROM HISTORICAL BOOK ABOUT UNION COUNTY, SC


Two brothers, Thomas and William Hughes were born in Wales and emigrated to Virginia.. They were surveyors by profession and well educated. They moved from Virginia to Union Co., SC, to the west bank of Broad River near what is known as the town of Lockhart, a short while after 1753. Thomas married Miss Ann Jolly of Virginia and William married Miss Mary Gill Leonard of Maryland.

Thomas Hughes and his brother, William Hughes, with their wives, settled along the banks of Broad River just below the present town of Lockhart sometime shortly after the year 1753. With the consent of the British Government, the King of England, they surveyed and appropriated land for fourteen miles up and down on both sides of Broad River including Lockhart Shoals. The Hughes brothers, being industrious men, planted crops, built two-story homes for themselves, a saw mill, a corn mill, and a flour mill. They employed a miller, named John Lockhart, who, with his wife, lived on the hill overlooking the shoals. The shoals were named for the miller: Lockhart Shoals.

The family lived on the Union Co side but had a house built on the east side of the river. At times of indian raids they would move by boat the children, women and old men across to the other side for safety. When the fighting ceased they would move them back across the river. There were many skirmishes between the whites and indians. Probably the first Masonic Lodge organized in the upper part of South Carolina was instituted in the home of William Hughes.

Because the Hughes family had been active in the cause of freedom, the feeling among the Tories was bitter. After the war while going about his duties at home, Thomas Hughes was shot down and killed. He is buried on the old plantation in the family plot known as the "Old Hughes Burying Ground.

I am proud to be a descendant of Thomas Hughes, the pioneer in this area. Thomas married Martha Tucker Jolly. He died in 1777. [note from SRH: this date would not have been "after" the war and believe it is in error].

Among their children was Thomas Hughes, Jr., who was born in 1752 and died after 1809. He married his cousin, Mary Hughes, who died in 1832. They had a daughter, Mary Leonard Hughes, born 1800 and died 1878, who married Captain William Dunn. Their daughter Mary Eugenia Penelope Dunn, born 1837 and died 1866, married William E. Johnson who was born in 1830 and died 1873. They are buried at the Dunn Family Cemetery near Broad River.

Their son, William Chatman Johnson, born 1864 and died 1954, married Anne Thorn Meng, b. February 14, 1870 and died October 8, 1951. I, eighth of eleven children from this marriage, was born January 15, 1905 and married on December 14, 1928 to Reverend John L. Bobo who was born February 10, 1900. Our home is situated on a portion of the land which was granted by the King of England to Thomas and William Hughes. --Marion Johnson Bobo


Two brothers born in Wales, named Thomas and William Hughes, came to America in the early 1700s. They came as land surveyors for the King of England. They stopped in the Virginia area now crossed by the Mason Dixon Line. Thomas Hughes married Miss Ann Jolly [some say Martha Tucker Jolly] of Virginia, and William married Miss Mary Gill Leonard of Maryland. Not long after their marriages, they migrated to South Carolina with some others. Mrs. Thomas Hughes had relatives in Georgetown and their intention was to settle there. When they reached Carolina they crossed the Broad River and set up camp on the west side in what is now Union County. Some became ill, and they were forced to stay all winter. They were so impressed with the climate and surroundings they decided to settle here. Mrs. William Hughes was especially impressed as it reminded her of Maryland. The two brothers made surveys and with the consent of British government, they appropriated a large tract of land extending fourteen miles up and down on either side of Broad Rier which included the present Lockhart Shoals. This settlement must have been made sometime subsequent to 1753 because it was not until that year that the indians ceded the upper section of South Carolina to England.



More About NANCY HUGHES:
Burial: Old Noland Cemetery, Pickens Co., AL
Cause of Death: died of a fever
Fact 1: BELIEVE HER FATHER WAS THOMAS HUGHES
Fact 2: SHE NAMED A SON THOMAS HUGHES NOLAND
Fact 3: 1850, died of a fever

More About PHILLIP NOLAND and NANCY HUGHES:
Marriage: 28 Sep 1794, Chester Co., SC

Children of PHILLIP NOLAND and NANCY HUGHES are:
i. JAMES6 NOLAND, b. Abt. 1795; d. aRKANSAS.

More About JAMES NOLAND:
Fact 1: MOVED TO ARKANSAS

2. ii. SAMUEL NOLAND, b. 20 Nov 1796, Chester Co., SC; d. 19 Jun 1864, Pickens Co., Ala.
3. iii. MARY NOLAND, b. Abt. 1798, Chester Co., SC.
4. iv. THOMAS HUGHES NOLAND, b. Abt. 1799, Chester Co., SC; d. Bef. 1850, Pickens Co., Ala.
5. v. ELIZABETH NOLAND, b. Abt. 1800, Chester Co., SC.
6. vi. PHILIP NOLAND, JR., b. 26 Mar 1802, Chester Co., SC; d. 13 Sep 1886, Pickens Co., Ala.
7. vii. DORCAS NOLAND, b. 1805, Chester Co., SC; d. Bet. 1880 - 1900, Pickens Co., Ala.
8. viii. SAMPSON NOLAND, b. 25 Feb 1811, Chester Co., SC; d. 13 Nov 1881.
ix. WILLIAM S. NOLAND, b. 28 Jun 1813, Chester Co., SC; d. 29 Jul 1846, Pickens Co., Ala.

More About WILLIAM S. NOLAND:
Fact 1: Died in fever epidemic that killed many in his family
Fact 2: Buried at Old Noland Cemetery, Pickens Co., AL
Fact 3: Justice of Peace in 1843
Fact 4: Have no record that this man married

9. x. AUBREY RICHARD DAVIS NOLAND, b. Abt. 1814, Chester Co., SC.