Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

RELEASE DATE: AUGUST 21, 2005



KINSEARCHING

by

Marleta Childs
P. O. Box 6825
LUBBOCK, TX 79493-6825
kinsearch@door.net
 


 

      Another reprint now available is Elizabeth Petty Bentley's INDEX TO THE 1810 CENSUS OF NORTH CAROLINA. Arranging names alphabetically, the work lists approximately 64,000 heads of household in the Tar Heel State. As genealogists would expect, the volume provides the county of residence and the page number of the census where the information can be found. Data from all of the state's counties are included except for Craven, Greene, New Hanover, and Wake, whose schedules are missing.

     Although the internet has made research in population schedules more accessible than ever, having a book that gives an overall view of surnames and locations at a glance often comes in handy. The 282-page paperback (item order #440) may be purchased by check, MasterCard, or Visa from Clearfield Company, 3600 Clipper Mill Rd., Suite 260, Baltimore, Maryland 21211 (toll free phone 1- 800-296-6687; fax 1-410-752-8492; website www.genealogical.com). To the book's price of $28.50, add these handling charges: For U. S. postal mail, the cost is $4 for one book and $1.50 for each additional copy; for UPS, the cost is $6 for one copy and $2.50 for each additional book.


     Were any of your ancestors Czech pioneers in the Lone Star State? If they were, you may be interested in joining the Texas Czech Genealogical Society. For details about the organization and its activities, go to the website at www.txczgs.org or get in touch with Charlene Hurta, 1231 CR 201A, Angleton, TX 77515 (phone 979-849-0348).


     The Ocean Springs Genealogical Society (OSGS) will host a workshop on October 22, 2005, in Ocean Springs, MS. The event will last from 9 a. m. until noon at the Mary C. O'Keefe Cultural Center of Art and Education located at 1600 Government Street. Featured speaker will be Larry E. Caver, Jr., who will discuss resources for Native American family history research (including Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, "lost" tribes of Alabama, and "other" Native Americans in Mississippi) and how to use vital records (U. S. and some foreign) in research.

    Persons attending will receive a program outline and a resource packet. A donation of $15 is requested to cover expenses. Proceeds will go to the Mary C. O'Keefe History and Genealogy Room in memory of Regina Hines Ellison, a founder of the OSGS. To guarantee that there will be sufficient materials, people are requested to register by October 15. For more information, get in touch with Linda D. Robinson at robinsonld@i-55.com or call 228-875-1480.


     These selected birth and death items (surnames capitalized and some punctuation added for clarity) come from the July 31, 1908 issue of The Dallas Semi-Weekly Farm News, published in Dallas, TX:

     Corsicana, TX, July 29 - "Mrs. Tom PASCHALL, residing in the Re community, twelve miles south of this city, last night gave birth to triplets, all girls. The babies are all well formed and apparently healthy. They weighed six pounds each at birth."

     Ennis, TX, July 27 - "The 8-year-old son of Mr. CASHAN at Crisp, five miles north of Ennis, was found Saturday evening near the Midland Railroad track, badly bruised and suffering internal hurts and was unconscious. It is supposed he fell from a freight car that was standing on a side track. He died Sunday from the injuries."

     Springfield, IL, July 29 - "John CRAMER, 51 years old, a harnessmaker, of St. Louis and in good standing in the union there, was found dead in bed at Colfax today. He came here Tuesday to work and appeared in good health. On his body was found a letter to notify Gus CRAMER of St. Louis and to pay the death benefit to Minnie CRAMER of Dallas, Tex."