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PARSONS ANCESTRAL EMIGRANTS


Taken from "Parsons Family History"
Published by the American Genealogical Research Institute
Copyright, 1977


Arrival of the First Permanent English Settlers of Jamestown Island.
The Sarah Constant, the Goodspeed, and the Discovery reached what was to be the site of the first permanent English colony in North America on 13 May 1607.


(Illustration From Above Mentioned Source, Page 23.)


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Benjamin Parsons; born 1628, died 1689; emigrated from England to Windsor, Connecticut in 1685; later moved to Springfield, Massachusetts; married Sarah Vore in 1653.

Christopher Parsons; immigrated from Bristol, England to Virginia around mid-seventeenth century.

Edward Parsons; immigrated to Virginia in 1639.

Francis Parsons; emigrated from Bristol, England to Virginia around mid-seventeenth century.

George Parsons; immigrated to Virginia around 1665.

Giles Parsons; emigrated from Bristol, England to Virginia around mid-seventeenth century.

Henry Parsons; immigrated to Virginia in 1643.

Henry Parson[s]; immigrated to Virginia around 1658.

James Parsons; immigrated to Virginia in 1635.

James Parsons; immigrated to Virginia in 1637.

James Parsons; immigrated to Virginia in 1638.

James Parsons; transported* from Surry, England to Virginia on board the ship Forward Gally in April 1739; indentured servant.

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Jeffrey Parsons; born around 1631; died 1689; emigrated from England to Barbadoes then to Gloucester, Massachusetts in 1655; married Sarah Vinson in 1657.

John Parsons; emigrated from England to Virginia on board the ship Marygold in 1619.

John Parsons; immigrated to Virginia in 1637.

John Parsons; emigrated from Bristol, England to Virginia around mid-seventeenth century.

John Parsons; immigrated to Virginia around 1662.

John Parsons; emigrated from Bristol, England to Virginia around mid-seventeenth century.

John Parsons; immigrated to Virginia in 1653.

John Parsons; immigrated to Virginia around 1665.

John Parsons; immigrated to Virginia around 1666.

John Parsons; immigrated from England to Maryland or Virginia in September 1719; age 19, weaver; indentured servant.

John Parsons; transporated from Newgate Prison to Maryland on board the ship Patapscoe in March 1730/31; indentured servant.

Jonathan Parsons; immigrated to Virginia prior to 1664.

Joseph Parsons; born 1618; died 1683; emigrated from England to Springfield, Massachusetts in 1634; a founder of Northampton; was one of the richest men in Springfield; married to Mary Bliss.

Joseph Parsons; immigrated to Virginia around 1657.

Richard Parsons; immigrated to Virginia prior to 1639.

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Samuel Parsons; emigrated from England to Lynn, Massachusetts; was one of five original settlers of Easthampton, New York in 1649.

Samuel Parsons; transported from Newgate Prison to Maryland or Virginia on board the ship Essex in May 1740; indentured servant.

Thomas Parsons; born around 1663, died 1721; emigrated from England to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; it is said that his brother John and he were one of the first Englishmen to own and operate a mill in Philadelphia; married (1st) to Jean (Jane) Culling in 1685.

Thomas Parsons; immigrated to Virginia in 1639.

Thomas Parsons; immigrated to Virginia in 1639.

Thomas Parsons; immigrated to Virginia around 1658.

Thomas Parsons; emigrated from Surrey, England to Maryland in September 1722; age 20; indentured servant.

Thomas Parsons; emigrated from Kent, England to Virginia on board the ship Elizabeth in November 1774; age 25; carpenter; indentured servant.

William Parsons; immigrated to Virginia in 1638.

William Parsons; immigrated to Virginia in 1653.

William Parsons; immigrated to Virginia around 1662.

William Parsons; transported from Newgate Prison to Maryland on board the ship Alexander in July 1723; indentured servant.

William Parsons; transported from Newgate Prison to Virginia or Maryland on board the ship Elizabeth in June 1728; indentured servant.

* There were no less than 150 capital crimes in England for which a man might be transported. Of course, there were the expected ones of murder, arson, and treason, but there were also lesser ones such as maiming, stealing a cow, cutting down trees along an avenue, sending threatening letters, and standing mute when addressed by a legal official. Some convicts were even people of quality. One gentleman of high birth, for instance, was transported for stealing books out of a library. As a child, George Washington was taught to read and write by a transported convict who had been a schoolmaster. Esepcially in the countryside, the crimes which resulted in transporation were often very petty. One man was transported for stealing a silver shoebuckle. Another was sent to America and indentured for seven years for the theft of a chicken.



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