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The Townshend Family

 

 

1. Richard Townshend, Capt. b. ca. 1606, d. 1650, York Co., VA, m. Francis Baldwin. Frances was the sister of Robert Baldwin, Gent., of London, and William Baldwin of Glassthorn, Northamptonshire. Richard was a member of the King's Council from York Co., VA 1642-45. {Albion estate was patented in 1653 by Col. Richard Townshend, who came to the Colony in 1629, settling in York Co., VA} - information in brown brackets seems incorrect given the below evidence for a 1620 arrival, a probable death date prior to 1653, and a more precise location just East of Jamestown in the 1629 time frame. Hog Island was just South (across the James) from the 1629 location. James Utie was located there in subsequent years.

 

Recent articles in The Virginia Genealogist point to Frances' ancestry: July-Sept 2004, July-Sept 2005, and April - June 2006.

Re: John Godfrey Mayor of Southampton information? Email from Jeffery A. Duvall <jeffery@iquest.net> Tuesday, January 15, 2008 5:43 PM

1613 Huntingdonshire, England visitation Baldwyn entry - proving Baldwin connection to Catherine Mackworth (along with articles above and land in John Baldwin's will). Email from Jeff Duvall about Baldwin-Mackworth connections.

 

Richard came to Virginia at age 14 in 1620 in the Abigale. He was apprenticed to Dr. John Pott, February 20, 1621/22, and lived at James City, 1623/24 with the physician, who had agreed to teach him "the art of an Apothecarye." On October 10, 1626, Townshend petitioned and complained that Dr. Pott was not teaching him. The court ordered Dr. Pott to instruct the young man or pay for his services.
 

In 1629, Richard represented the plantations between Archer's Hope and Martin's Hundred in the General Assembly, and represented Charles River (later York) County in 1642. He was sworn a member of the Council on July 31, 1642 and served until 1650. He may have returned to England and married because he (age 28), his wife, Frances, (age 21), and two-year-old Francis were listed as passengers for Virginia in the Globe on August 7, 1635. On March 10, 1639/40, he patented 650 acres in Charles River County. He was named in an Act of the Assembly, January 6, 1639/40, as a tobacco viewer from the west side of Wormeley's Creek to the furthest extent of the parish. On February 10, 1647/48, he gave a power of attorney to his friend Rowland Burnham to conduct business in his absence as he was "by God's grace bound for England in the good ship the Honor of London." He died by February 7, 1650/51 when his widow patented more land.

 

Richard Townshend in 1624 Virginia census as a servant.  

 

His Master's census to show financial status. - Information on this Dr John Pott is difficult to come by.  Vague rumors of Indian poisonings (200 total) near James City... Surely he had other servants from other ships and, like most wealthy men in that time and place, he strove to continually acquire more land.

1624 Map of Virginia from The Old Dominion in The Seventeenth Century A Documentary History of Virginia, 1606 - 1689 edited by Warren M. Billings, ISBN 0-8078-1237-4, c. 1975 by The University of North Carolina Press, pg 8. - 26, 35, 45, and 46 are where our ancestors lived or are mentioned

Bruce, Philip A.
Title: Economic History of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century: An Inquiry into the Material Condition of the People, Based on Original and Contemporaneous Records.
Citation: New York: MacMillan and Co., 1896
Subdivision: CHAPTER IX SYSTEM OF LABOR: THE SERVANT at http://www.dinsdoc.com/bruce-1-9.htm 18 July 05
  HTML by Dinsmore Documentation * Added July 27, 2002

The term “servant” has been misinterpreted in modern times in the light of the menial signification which the expression has gradually acquired.2 The members of this class in Virginia in the seventeenth century included all who had bound themselves under the provisions of an agreement, embodied in a formal legal document, or, in the absence of an indenture, according to the universal custom of the country, which had the force and sanctity of law, to continue for a prescribed time in another’s employment. The term was applied not only to those who had contracted to work as agricultural laborers, or as artisans and mechanics, but also to those who were seeking to obtain, under articles of apprenticeship, a knowledge of one of the learned professions.

In 1626, Richard Townsend, in a suit of law against Dr. John Pott on the ground that Dr. Pott had not instructed him in the apothecary’s art according to the conditions of his indenture, described himself as the servant of that physician, who was so distinguished in the early history of Virginia.1 Nor did the term necessarily imply an humble social origin. Adam Thoroughgood, a man of wealth and influence in the Colony towards the middle of the seventeenth century, and who was referred to as “gentleman” in the patents he sued out,2 a designation to which he was entitled not only on account of his general character and position, but by his social connections in England, came to Virginia as an apprentice or servant. In making his will in 1666, Sir Robert Peake, a well-known citizen of London, devised three hundred pounds sterling to George Lyddall, his cousin, at that time in Virginia, to whom he alludes as his “sometime servant.”3

1 General Court Orders, Oct. 9, 1626, Robinson Transcripts, p. 52.

2 Va. Land Patents, vol. 1623-1643, p. 160.

3 New England Historical and Genealogical Register, for October, 1883, p. 379. There is a case recorded in York County of a similar character. One brother, John Fleming by name, binds himself as the “voluntary servant” of another. See Records of York County, vol. 1694-1702, p. 235, Va. State Library.

In October, 1629, Richard Townsend had already worked his way into the ranks of the local Burgesses for the area between Martin's Hundred and Archer's Hope. In March 1629 - 1630, Richard is not listed as such. Dr John Pott was embroiled in legal troubles in July 1630 after a stint as Governor of Virginia.

 

1639 Land documents

 

1646 court held at Richard Townshend's house - scroll to "page 16" at lower middle of page to see that from a servant, Richard Townshend eventually cavorted with the Governor himself!  More complete roster of Richard's Court attendance

 

Proof (first line) that Richard left a widow Francis in Feb 1650 - (lower in paper is 1721 reference to Hooe family)

 

From http://sleepydog.com/genealogy/john/fam115.html:

 

Richard came to Virginia at age 14 in 1620 in the Abigale. He was apprenticed to Dr. John Pott, February 20, 1621/22, and lived at James City, 1623/24 with the physician, who had agreed to teach him "the art of an Apothecarye." On October 10, 1626, Townshend petitioned and complained that Dr. Pott was not teaching him. The court ordered Dr. Pott to instruct the young man or pay for his services.
In 1629, Richard represented the plantations between Archer's Hope and Martin's Hundred in the General Assembly, and represented Charles River (later York) County in 1642. He was sworn a member of the Council on July 31, 1642 and served until 1650. He may have returned to England and married because he (age 28), his wife, Frances, (age 21), and two-year-old Francis were listed as passengers for Virginia in the Globe on August 7, 1635. On March 10, 1639/40, he patented 650 acres in Charles River County. He was named in an Act of the Assemby, January 6, 1639/40, as a tobacco viewer from the west side of Wormeley's Creek to the furthest extent of the parish. On February 10, 1647/48, he gave a power of attorney to his friend Rowland Burnham to conduct business in his absence as he was "by God's grace bound for England in the good ship the Honnor of London." He died by February 7, 1650/51 when his widow patented more land.
 

2. Robert Townshend, Col. d. 1675, Albion, King George Co., VA, m. Mary Langhorne, (daughter of Needham Langhorne). Robert is buried at Albion, and his tomb inscription reads: "Here lyeth interred the body of Robert Townshend, sonne to Mr. Richard Townshend, and husband to Mary Townshend, daughter of Mr. Needham Langhorne of Newton, Brownshall, in Northamptonshire, by whom he had two daughters and one son, Francis, Mary and Robert Baldwin. He departed this life Sept., A.D. 1675, aged 35." Needham left a will which was proved 10 Jun 1675 in Northumberland Co., VA, and witnessed by Nathaniel Alexander and executed by Robert Townshend and Thomas Wildman.

 

3. Frances Townshend b. 1683, Albion, King George Co., VA, d. 26 Apr 1726, Stafford Co., VA , m. (3) 1715, Rice Hooe, Col., III, b. ca. 1660, d. 17 Apr 1726, (son of Rice and Susanna Hooe). Frances was married twice before she married Rice Hooe. Her first husband was Francis Dade II of Stafford Co., VA whom she married in 1683. She married before 1700 to John Withers. Col. Rice Hooe was also married three times, all within a period of ten years. His first wife, ante 10 Feb 1691, was to Mary (Dade) Massey, the widow of Capt. Robert Massey. He married secondly around 1695 to Anne Howson, the daughter of Robert Howson. His third wife was Frances Townshend. Frances Townsend was our ancestress when married to Francis Dade, and Ann Howson was our ancestress when married to Rice Hooe 3rd.

 

 * Transcipt of the tombstone at Albion: "Here lyeth the body of Robert Townhsend, sonne to Mr. Richard Townshend, and husband to Mary Townshend, daughter to Mr. Needham Langhorne of Newton Brownshall in Northamptonshire, by whom he had two daughters and one son, Frances, Mary, and Robert Baldwin.  He departed this life Sept. A.D. 1675, aged 35." On the 17th of May, 1824, the remains of Mr. T. were removed by Mr. Langhorne Dade to the family graveyard."  Francis Dade had - 3. Robert. 4. Townshend. 5. Francis. 6. Cadwallader.

 "Capt. Richard Townshend of Virginia, Esq., by God's Grace bound for England in the good Shipp Honor of London, makes his good friend Rowland Burham his attorney in Va. to sell any goods, chattels, &c., with consent of my dear and well beloved wife Francis Townsh, 10th Feb., 1647." (S.)

 Capt. Rich'd T., father of Robert and Frances, was Justice,  York Co., Va., 1633; Burgess for the "plantations between Archer's Hope and Martin's Hundred, 1629," and for York, 1642; Mem. Ga. Council, 1636-1645.  In noticing this, Mr. Neill (Va. Ca., 73) adds: "Now about 24 years old, came in the Abigail, 1620, had been a servant of Dr. John Potts."  It appears from Mr. Sainsbury's transcript of English State Papers (Va. Stat Lib.) that he was a servant in so far as he was, according to the custom, apprenticed to Dr. Potts to study medicine.  In this sense Dr. Michael Wallace and Dr. Gustavus Brown were also servants. (v. p. .) The Townshend pat. bears the date Feb. 17, 1650. (H., 173, 194-8.)  The deed recorded there gives the estate entail in the Townshend pat. to Francis, Cadawallader, and Townshend Dade, and is dated 1715. ----- Rev. Horace Edwin Hayden-  Virginia Genealogies, 1959,  p. 732

Maria Townsend, late of Newton or Hingham Ferrers in county Northampton, widow, but at Virginia deceased.  Administration 7 November 1694 to Geoffrey Jeffreys, Esq. and John Jeffreys, Esq. principal creditors.  Ditto, 1694, folio 205

 [Mary or Maria, Townsend, was widow of Colonel Robert Townshend of Stafford county, Va. (who died in 1675), and daughter of Needham Langhorne, of Newton Brownshall, Northamptonshire, England.  After her husband's death she resided for a time in England, and there is on record in Virginia a power of attorney from her dated at Newton Brownshall.  Colonel Robert and Mary Townshend had issue, to survive, two daughters: 1.  Mary, who married John Washington, Jr., son of Lawrence Washington, the immigrant, and has many descendants; 2. Frances, married (I) Francis Dade of Stafford county, and has many descendants; (II) Captain John Withers, no issue, it is believed, by this marriage, though Captain John Withers had a daughter and an heiress, who in 1699, was the wife of Richard Fossaker, of Stafford county; (III) in 1699, Rice Hooe, and has many descendants.  See Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, IX, 173, 174; IV, 427-429; Hayden's Virginia Genealogies, 516-522, 731-734, 716-719.

 In the visitation of Hertfordshire, 1634 (Harleian Society), is a pedigree of "Langhorne of Bedford," which begins with William Langhorne, of Bedford [born about 1560], whose eldest son was Robert - marriage or descendants not given - and whose second son William, was father of William Langhorne, of the Middle Temple, 1634, who married Lettice, daughter of Eustace Needham, of Little Wymondley, Hertfordshire.  In the same visitation is the pedigree of Needham  pt1  pt2, of Little Wymondley and Wilwyn, from which it appears that John Needham, of Wymondley (of the third generation in the pedigree), had a daughter Margaret, who married Robert Langhorne, of Bedford, and a granddaughter, Lettice, as above, who married William Langhorne.  Doubtless, Needham Langhorne was a descendant of Robert or William.]  ----- Lothrop Withington - Virginia Gleanings in England, 1980, pp. 28-9      

Dictionary of National Biography entry for "our" James Needham 1 2

 

And this 1826 source for early Needham lineage 1 2

 

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography has a newer entry  for this James Nedeham

 

1940 Article (PDF) on Langhorne family  - It is interesting that this article has proof that Francis Dade Jr. died after 1697, but 1694 is still a date widely used. Is there some later data that refutes this 1940 article or is the article's proof just not well known enough?

 

Update 5 Dec 05 - latest edition of Dorman's Adventurers of Purse and Person Virginia 1607-1624/5. Fourth Edition Volume One, Families A-F cites Stafford County Will Books as the source of a 1698 death date for Francis Dade Jr.

 

Additional support narrowing Frances (Townsend) Dade's birthdate from above PDF to 1666 or 1667.

 

1943  Article (PDF) on Langhorne family connections

 

Sources:

 

1) S.H. Lee Washington's 1940 and 1943 William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine articles on the Townsend and Langhorne families are pretty critical to getting past the limited amount of information on Richard Townsend.

 

2) Both the Dictionary of National Biography and newer Oxford Dictionary of National Biography entries for "our" James Needham are very interesting reading.

 

3) The Virginia Genealogist - selected issues identified above reflect the very latest research and are Must-Haves in order to trace back (and document it) into medieval times!

 

4) Beverley Fleet's Virginia Colonial Abstracts are extremely valuable for providing a detailed look at the things which occupied Richard and his kin and neighbors, costs and monetary (read Tobacco) exchanges.

 

 

Of course the author would be very pleased if anyone has additional source information they wish to share on the above individuals.

 

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