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Ninth Generation


448. Ralph BLANKENSHIP was born about 1660 in England. He died before 15 April 1714 in Henrico County, Virginia. Imported to America by Richard Kennon in 1686.

Probably illiterate since he signed a court deposition in which he was a despondent in 1695, with an "X".

Following is a post from the BLANKENSHIP-L email list from Don Blankenship on Jn 2, 1999

In 1726 the Will of Edward Stanley, the second husband of widow Martha BLANKENSHIP (wife of the immigrant Ralph), we see that a provision is made for three living sons of Martha who are identified as Ralph, John and James. The Will reads as follows:

ITEM: I give and bequeath to Ralph BLANKENSHIP, John BLANKINSHIP and James
BLANKINSHIP my three plantations on Coldwater Run....etc.

So as Colonel Leslie BLANKENSHIP so clearly points out in his book, even within the same family the surname was spelled alternately as Blankenship and Blankinship in legal documents of colonial times. Incidentally, Col. Blankenship incorrectly refers to Coldwater Run as Clearwater Run on page 19 of the first edition of "Blankenship Family History." It should be Coldwater Run which also identified that area north of Swift Creek and just south of the James River extension..

Another observation which Mike Blankenship makes concerns people who presumably are identified as shipmates of Ralph Blankinship and include those named below, all of whom have English sounding names.

Jno. Walker, (JOHN WALKER)
Tho. Mercey, (THOMAS MERCEY)
Ralph Blankship,
Jno. Tossill, (JOHN TOSSILL)
Roger Roberts,
John Howard
Sarah Shepherd

Mike further notes that here is no mistaking that Ralph Blankenship was imported in 1686. {Note: the use of the legal term "imported" which means that someone else paid Ralph's transit across the Atlantic. Normally, anyone who had their passage paid would be required to work in servitude for 2 to 10 years to pay off this debt. During this period of servitude they also could earn credit towards a claim 50 acres of land for themselves, at least that is the way it worked in colonial Maryland until about 1680. We often see the date of arrival for Ralph Blankinship as 1686/7. It is my understanding that if this date is correctly rendered, then the arrival date was between 1 January and 1 March 1686. If the arrival data occurred later than 1 March then the date would be rendered as 1686. This was to account for the old and the new calendars. Mike believes the date should be 1686 which is more logical because the most favorable time for sea passage would occur from spring through summer. The most logical route would have been a departure from a port on the south coast of England, across the Atlantic to Barbados Island in the Caribbean, and then up the eastern coast to Virginia.

More and more colonial era ship manifests and shipping schedules are being discovered and put onto the Internet "Ship Lists." It may be possible to search for ships leaving England in 1686 which also may have carried the aforementioned passengers.

It may even be possible to discover the family trees of those people who traveled with Ralph Blankinship across the Atlantic and by doing so further learn of where those people originated in the British Isles. Mike Blankenship notes that he also has a 1680's Cork County, Ireland record of marriages in his collection of reference materials. In that listing he recalls seeing people with the name BLANKENSHIP. Now that is really quite interesting and needs follow-up work! I think we have been operating for the last 30 years or so on the premise that the surname Blankenship was originally Blenkinsopp and these Blenkinsopps came from Northumberland, England. Why do we believe this? Because author Col. Blankenship believed it and planted it in our minds. Wouldn't it be interesting to discover that our line of Blankenships is not from England at all, but from Ireland.

Here is something from another Blankenship researcher SandraG627@aol.com>
who on 7 Sept 1987 wrote:

"I recently got some info. that there were Blankenships living in Cork Co. Ireland in the 17th century. I e-mailed to the Cork Co. Historical Society but after a nice note promising to do some research I haven't heard from them again....after 2 months. Does anyone else know how I can check out the Irish connection? I doubt very seriously that Ralph was from Northumberland Co., England." So it appears that someone else in the past has stumbled across this possibility that our Blankenships originally may have come from Ireland. They may have come across the Atlantic aboard English ships which departed English ports, but they may possibly have been people of Irish extraction. Now have you ever heard a strong Irish brogue or accent? I bet they could pronounce your surname or any other surname and with the heavy Irish accent you wouldn't even recognize it. That may be why we observe such variations in the early spelling of the name. It may have been difficult for others to capture the name phonetically in order to spell it properly.

When I checked the Gaelic-Irish dictionary (Faclair GĂ idhlig - Beurla Gaelic - English Dictionary) I discovered that the word SOP, as in BlenkinSOP means the following:

----SOP = nm. g.v. suip; pl.+an and suip, wisp, LOOSE BUNDLE OF STRAW OR HAY.
http://www.sst.ph.ic.ac.uk/angus/Faclair/

Anyone who has seen the Coat-of-Arms for the Blenkinsop family line of Northumberland County, England will observe that on the shield are three LOOSE BUNDLES OF STRAW OR HAY. So it is interesting to speculate that the very earliest Blenkinsops were from Ireland or that the name itself is Irish. Don't know for sure, and I admit it is conjecture, but it is worth pursuing
----------------------------------------------------
The following paragraph comes from "Blankenship Ancestors" by Gayle Blankenship:

Ralph BLANKSHIP's name was listed along with 90 white persons and 70 Negroes imported in 1686 and 1687. (Henrico OB 1678-1793:362) A Ralph BLANKSHIP was named as headright of Capt. Henry Harrison & Philip Ludwell for land in Surry and Isle of Wight on June 16, 1714. (Pat. 10:165). Isle of Wright, Virginia is a small village 17.5 miles WSW of Newport News, VA. Surry is another village 17.5 miles NNW of Isle of Wright. Surry is very close by Jamestown and is about 32 miles from where Ralph BLANKINSHIP first homesteaded in Henrico County, VA and the Isle of Wite is about 45 miles southeast of Ralph's original homestead. The legal court document shows that Ralph was being claimed as a person whose sea transportation from Europe (England) was paid for by Capt. Henry Harrison and Philip Ludwell. The Virginia colony law at the time allowed anyone who paid for the transportation of another person to claim the right (headright) to possession of 50 acres of land as their reward for bringing that person to America.

Don Blankenship
donb@megabits.net
----------------------------------------------------

-----Original Message-----
From: Michael E. Blankenship <mblankenship@mindspring.com>
To: Don in FL <donb@megabits.net>
Date: Saturday, January 02, 1999 10:10 PM
Subject: Earliest spelling of the name Blankenship


I have xerox copies of both the original records from the Henrico Co. Order Book for 1678-1693 which contains the records of the importation of Ralph. The transcription done during the colonial period is much clearer than the original, but both of them clearly give the name as BLANKSHIP. All entries in the list of those imported by Richard Kennon are numbered according to the year in which they were imported. Number 8 on the list is for those imported in 1686, and this included: Jno. Walker, Tho. Mercey, Ralph Blankship, Jno. Tossill, Roger Roberts, John Howard, and Sarah Shepherd. There is no mistaking that he was imported in 1686.

In the same book, on Page 426, is the following entry: "Jno. Higgledy having ye last court sumon'd Cap. Will Soane as an evidence in his suit agt. Ralph Blankeship & ye sd. Soane having then attended on day..." [Oct. 12, 1692]

Or how about the October 1725 record from the Henrico Orphans Court, "Ordered that Edward Stanly who intermarried with Martha BLANKINSKIP be sumoned to appear at the next court & bring the orphans of Ralph BLANKINSKIP, deceased." I also have a xerox of this record.

I also have a xerox of a Henrico Court record from Apr. 2, 1695, "Ralph BLANKINSKIP aged abt. 33 years, depd. that some time in June last being at the plantation whereon John Higledy dwells he heard Sarah Knibbe forewarn John Higledy from paying all the rent to Edward Osborne saying she must have one half herselfe or such like words and further this depon't. saith he heard her tell the sd. Higledy that she should have onation [?] for that planation next year and therefore would have him other ways to provide himself and further saith not." The record is signed with an X, but the clerk spelled the name BLANKNISKIP.

Do you know if Js and Hs were interchangable during the Colonial period? Or, do you think these records intentionally ended the name with SKIP?

The August 7, 1797 deed of Martha Standley [sic] to her sons spells the name Blankinship.

That's about it for copies of original records that I have.

Is the fact that Ralph arrived with people having English names a sure guarantee that he was also English? I also have a record of marriages (somewhere around here) from Cork Co. Ireland which took place in the 1680s, and include people with the name BLANKENSHIP. Do you know anything about these? Of couse, this would have fitted in perfectly with the time frame of Ralph's life.

One great (I think) error in Col. Leslie's book is that he painted Richard (my ancestor!), the son of Ralph, as being the bachelor brother of Ralph. Richard would have been at least 21 years of age when acted as security for Martha in 1714. Richard next appears in Goochland Co. on the tithe lists in 1732 or 1733. Many of the tithe lists are unfortunately gone, but Richard is still in Goochland in 1743. In 1746 there are two Richards on the Goochland tithe lists and his [supposed] sons begin appearing on the list as well, Lodewick in 1746 aged 16 to 21, and the other Richard aged over 21. By 1748 the sons John, Peter and Lodewick appear with Richard, or perhaps Richard has died leaving his sons behind.

Thanks again for your well thought out letter, and I am most anxious to hear your opinions.

Mike Blankenship

Martha CLAY? and Ralph BLANKENSHIP were married in 1690 in Virginia.

449. Martha CLAY? was born before 1683 in Henrico County, Virginia. There is nothing to support the fact that her maiden name was indeed HUDSON, Hudsons, were however, neighbors of the Blankenships in Dale Parish,Virginia, the first home site for Ralph and Martha..

There is a great deal of evidence that supports she was a Clay: (Porvided by Don Blankenship)

INFORMATION ON MARTHA BLANKINSHIP:

It is fairly obvious that Ralph Blankinship (and wife Martha) owned land on the north side of Swift Creek in Henrico Co. which bordered land owned by Charles CLAY, Henry Walthall, Edward Hill and John Farlow. The CLAY family is seen in association with the immigrant Ralph Blankinship because a certain Charles CLAY is mentioned in connection with the administration of Ralph's will and the taking of the inventory of Ralph Blankinship's estate
after his death. So Martha, who is Ralph's wife, Charles CLAY (who is possibly Martha's brother) and Richard Blankinship (the oldest son of Ralph and Martha Blankinship) are all three are declared as executors or administrators, or perhaps caretakers of Ralph Blankenship's estate after his death sometime shortly before April 15, 1714. This would strongly suggest that Charles CLAY had a family tie to Ralph Blankinship through his wife Martha. Again, this is deductive logic and not proof positive: To wit:
-------------------------

Henrico C. order book, April 15, 1714 page 277:
Upon petition of Martha Blankinship, the widow of Ralph Blankinship dec'd and her making oath according to law, certificate for obtaining letters of administration on the said dec'd's estate in due form is granted her, Charles CLAY and Richard BLANKINSHIP entering themselves securities for the same and ordered that she do present to the next court an inventory of the said dec'd's estate. Ordered that John Bowman, Robert Hudson, Eilliam Ligon, and James Aiken or any three of them, being first sworn by Mr. John Archer, do appraise the estate of Ralph Blankinship dec'd and make the return thereof to the next court.
--------------------------

So the Clay and Blankinship families in Henrico Co, Virginia have close ties --- perhaps familial ties ---but most certainly geographical ties because their land adjoined. There is nothing here to confirm that Martha Blankenship was nee Martha CLAY, but one cannot help but conjecture this may very well have been the case. In my extensive study of the late 1700
settlers of the eastern shore of Maryland, it became very obvious to me that most marriageable young men wed young women who lived within a couple of miles of their own home. In fact this correlation is so strong that it is a winning bet almost every time that if you are looking for the wife of a certain ancestor, you simply draw a circle with a two miles radius centered on groom's home. Then you seek to find land ownership within that circle.
Chances are about 90% certain that one of the surnames of people who owned land within that circle will correspond to the surname of the ancestor's wife you are searching for. By the mid-1800's you simply expand the circle to about five miles. Geographic access was limited to the distance a young man's legs would carry him as he went courting a bride. If a young man came from a wealthy family and had access to horses or carriages, the geographic circle of bride eligibility expanded further but is still very much constrained to a manageable search area within a probably geographic domain.

If I had a second guess as to the probable maiden name of Martha Blankinship, I would suggest that it was possibly LIGON. Martha, wife of Ralph BLANKINSHIP, could have been the daughter of William LIGON a neighbor of Ralph's, for whom so many Blankenship descendants of Ralph and Martha are named in subsequent generations. I believe you also see a variation on the spelling, such as Liggon. However, the LIGON surname, later adopted as a first or second name for many Blankenships, could just as easily have resulted from the marriage of the grandchildren of Ralph and Martha to the Ligons who were their neighbors in Henrico County, VA. I would think that CLAY was the more likely surname of Martha Blankinship.
----------------------------------------
NOTES FROM MY FILES ON MARTHA BLANKINSHIP:
(These analyses were provided by other researchers)

It is known that Martha married Ralph Blankinship and after his death she married Edward Stanley. In fact, there is a copy of the orphans and widows court record in Williamsburg. The question is: Who exactly was Martha??
-------------------------------
Martha (maiden name unknown) was first married to generation one Ralph Blankinship, and they had five children. After becoming a widow, Martha married Edward Stanley. Edward was also a widower. They were married in 1716. Edward died in 1726.
---------------------------------------
Henrico Co. Wills & Deeds 1725-37, p. 448; 4 Aug. 1734 Anthony Wilkinson of Henrico Co. to Matthew Turner of Charles City Co....L25...land on north side of Swift Creek..bounded by Charles CLAY, Martha Blankenship, Henry Walthall, Edward Hill, and John Farlow (Farley?)...77 acres; wit: Edward Wilkinson, Benj. Fernando, Littlebury Eppes [Next two recorded deeds are for Robt. Bowman and John Farmer. This is probably the father of William Turner Sr--AAH]

----------------------------------------
I obtained a document from Jerry Blankenship of San Saba, TX. This document was researched by Lloyd Bockstruck of Dallas. Lloyd is a well known and highly respected genealogist who is also the director of genealogy and local history division of the Dallas public library. The exert below is from the article, "The Blankenship Family of Virginia," The American Genealogist, XXXII (1976) pg. 240. Credit goes to Jerry and Lloyd.
. . . .

It was during the summer of 1725 that Martha Blankenship, a widow of eleven years, decided to marry again. She married Edward Stanley, a widower of Henrico County. He was born ca. 1650. His former wife was Hannah (Wilson) Clay, widow of Charles Clay Edward Stanley deposed that he was aged 35 on 14 May 1685 in Henrico County. He had married Hannah (Wilson) Clay between 1 October 1687 and 10 April 1696. Edward Stanley lived on the north side of Swift Creek on a 235 acre plantation next to Robert Hudson which he had purchased from Thomas Powland, Sr. for f3 on 24 March 1703/4." According to the 1704 quit rent roll of
Henrico County, he owned 300 acres. He had acquired an additional 135 acres from Robert Hudson for f5 on the north side of Swift Creek on 30 October 1709.'6 In all probability the property adjoined his own land.

On 5 October 1725 the Henrico County court held at Varina ordered Edward Stanley, who intermarried with Martha the relict of Ralph Blankenship, to be summoned to appear at the next court and bring the orphans of Ralph Blankenship, deceased." Accordingly, some of the children of Ralph Blankenship were still under age in 1725. By this union Martha Blankenship
probably improved her condition measurably. Unfortunately, Edward Stanley did not live much longer. He made his will in Henrico County on 21 May 1726 leaving his daughter Hannah Thweatt one shilling, his wife Martha one-third of his land for life, his granddaughter Frances Thweatt the plantation whereon he lived and the plantation where Richard Dickason lately dwelt, various items to his granddaughters Mary Thweatt and Hannah Thweatt, and his
plantations on Coldwater Run totaling 230 acres to Ralph Blankenship, John Blankenship, and James Blankenship. He named his wife Martha Stanley executrix.

Sub-SOURCE:
Bill Blankinship
Huntington Beach, CA
---------------------------------------------------
Note the mention of William LIGON whom I cited above:

Colonial Wills of Henrico County, Virginia Part One 1654-1737 Abstracted & Compiled by Benjamin B. Weisiger III: p.258

Inventory of RALPH BLANKENSHIP by court order of 5 April, 1714.
Value L26/00/6 by :
James Akin,
Robert Hudson
William LIGON ***
Recorded 3 May,1714.

WILL OF EDWARD STANLY. To daughter HANNAH TWEAT, 1 shilling. To wife MARTHA, items and 1/3 of my land for life. To granddaughter FRANCES TWEATT, my two plantations in Henrico County, the one whereon I live, the other where Richard Dickason lately dwelt, to her and her female heirs forever; also slaves and items. To granddaughter MARY THWEATT, items. To granddaughter HANNAH TWEATT, items. To RALPH BLANKENSHIP, JOHN BLANKENSHIP, AND JAMES BLANKENSHIP my 3 plantations at Coldwater Run, 230 acres. Wife MARTHAA to be executor. Dated 21 May, 1726. Wit: Henry Clay, Allason Clark, Samuel Soane. Recorded July 4, 1726. Will of Richard Nunaley. JOHN BLANKENSHIP recorded as a witness July 3, 1727. Will of Abel Turner dated 2 Nov. 1734. JOHN BLANKINSHIP recorded as a witness Jan. 1734.

Hope this helps someone.Barbara Harrell
---------------------------------------

More About MARTHA R BLNKSHPS WIFE: Fact 1: 07 Aug 1727, deed of gift-100 acres so side of James River, head of Proctor Creek to son John (Source: Benjamin Weisiger, Henrico Co VA Deeds 1706-1737 (Richmond: n. pub., 1985) p 90 per Lloyd Bockstruck, Dallas TX
Publ Library)

Children of RALPH BLANKENSHIP and MARTHA R BLNKSHPS WIFE are:
i. RICHARD2 BLANKENSHIP, b. Ca. 1691, Henrico Co, VA.
ii. WILLIAM BLANKENSHIP, b. Ca. 1693, Henrico Co, VA; d. Apr 1745, Henrico Co, VA; m. MARY WMBLNKSHPWIFE.


There is nothing to support the fact that her maiden name was indeed HUDSON, Hudsons, were however, neighbors of the Blankenships in Dale Parish,Virginia, the first home site for Ralph and Martha..

There is a great deal of evidence that supports she was a Clay: (Porvided by Don Blankenship)

INFORMATION ON MARTHA BLANKINSHIP:

It is fairly obvious that Ralph Blankinship (and wife Martha) owned land on the north side of Swift Creek in Henrico Co. which bordered land owned by Charles CLAY, Henry Walthall, Edward Hill and John Farlow. The CLAY family is seen in association with the immigrant Ralph Blankinship because a certain Charles CLAY is mentioned in connection with the administration of Ralph's will and the taking of the inventory of Ralph Blankinship's estate
after his death. So Martha, who is Ralph's wife, Charles CLAY (who is possibly Martha's brother) and Richard Blankinship (the oldest son of Ralph and Martha Blankinship) are all three are declared as executors or administrators, or perhaps caretakers of Ralph Blankenship's estate after his death sometime shortly before April 15, 1714. This would strongly suggest that Charles CLAY had a family tie to Ralph Blankinship through his wife Martha. Again, this is deductive logic and not proof positive: To wit:
-------------------------

Henrico C. order book, April 15, 1714 page 277:
Upon petition of Martha Blankinship, the widow of Ralph Blankinship dec'd and her making oath according to law, certificate for obtaining letters of administration on the said dec'd's estate in due form is granted her, Charles CLAY and Richard BLANKINSHIP entering themselves securities for the same and ordered that she do present to the next court an inventory of the said dec'd's estate. Ordered that John Bowman, Robert Hudson, Eilliam Ligon, and James Aiken or any three of them, being first sworn by Mr. John Archer, do appraise the estate of Ralph Blankinship dec'd and make the return thereof to the next court.
--------------------------

So the Clay and Blankinship families in Henrico Co, Virginia have close ties --- perhaps familial ties ---but most certainly geographical ties because their land adjoined. There is nothing here to confirm that Martha Blankenship was nee Martha CLAY, but one cannot help but conjecture this may very well have been the case. In my extensive study of the late 1700
settlers of the eastern shore of Maryland, it became very obvious to me that most marriageable young men wed young women who lived within a couple of miles of their own home. In fact this correlation is so strong that it is a winning bet almost every time that if you are looking for the wife of a certain ancestor, you simply draw a circle with a two miles radius centered on groom's home. Then you seek to find land ownership within that circle.
Chances are about 90% certain that one of the surnames of people who owned land within that circle will correspond to the surname of the ancestor's wife you are searching for. By the mid-1800's you simply expand the circle to about five miles. Geographic access was limited to the distance a young man's legs would carry him as he went courting a bride. If a young man came from a wealthy family and had access to horses or carriages, the geographic circle of bride eligibility expanded further but is still very much constrained to a manageable search area within a probably geographic domain.

If I had a second guess as to the probable maiden name of Martha Blankinship, I would suggest that it was possibly LIGON. Martha, wife of Ralph BLANKINSHIP, could have been the daughter of William LIGON a neighbor of Ralph's, for whom so many Blankenship descendants of Ralph and Martha are named in subsequent generations. I believe you also see a variation on the spelling, such as Liggon. However, the LIGON surname, later adopted as a first or second name for many Blankenships, could just as easily have resulted from the marriage of the grandchildren of Ralph and Martha to the Ligons who were their neighbors in Henrico County, VA. I would think that CLAY was the more likely surname of Martha Blankinship.
----------------------------------------
NOTES FROM MY FILES ON MARTHA BLANKINSHIP:
(These analyses were provided by other researchers)

It is known that Martha married Ralph Blankinship and after his death she married Edward Stanley. In fact, there is a copy of the orphans and widows court record in Williamsburg. The question is: Who exactly was Martha??
-------------------------------
Martha (maiden name unknown) was first married to generation one Ralph Blankinship, and they had five children. After becoming a widow, Martha married Edward Stanley. Edward was also a widower. They were married in 1716. Edward died in 1726.
---------------------------------------
Henrico Co. Wills & Deeds 1725-37, p. 448; 4 Aug. 1734 Anthony Wilkinson of Henrico Co. to Matthew Turner of Charles City Co....L25...land on north side of Swift Creek..bounded by Charles CLAY, Martha Blankenship, Henry Walthall, Edward Hill, and John Farlow (Farley?)...77 acres; wit: Edward Wilkinson, Benj. Fernando, Littlebury Eppes [Next two recorded deeds are for Robt. Bowman and John Farmer. This is probably the father of William Turner Sr--AAH]

----------------------------------------
I obtained a document from Jerry Blankenship of San Saba, TX. This document was researched by Lloyd Bockstruck of Dallas. Lloyd is a well known and highly respected genealogist who is also the director of genealogy and local history division of the Dallas public library. The exert below is from the article, "The Blankenship Family of Virginia," The American Genealogist, XXXII (1976) pg. 240. Credit goes to Jerry and Lloyd.
. . . .

It was during the summer of 1725 that Martha Blankenship, a widow of eleven years, decided to marry again. She married Edward Stanley, a widower of Henrico County. He was born ca. 1650. His former wife was Hannah (Wilson) Clay, widow of Charles Clay Edward Stanley deposed that he was aged 35 on 14 May 1685 in Henrico County. He had married Hannah (Wilson) Clay between 1 October 1687 and 10 April 1696. Edward Stanley lived on the north side of Swift Creek on a 235 acre plantation next to Robert Hudson which he had purchased from Thomas Powland, Sr. for f3 on 24 March 1703/4." According to the 1704 quit rent roll of
Henrico County, he owned 300 acres. He had acquired an additional 135 acres from Robert Hudson for f5 on the north side of Swift Creek on 30 October 1709.'6 In all probability the property adjoined his own land.

On 5 October 1725 the Henrico County court held at Varina ordered Edward Stanley, who intermarried with Martha the relict of Ralph Blankenship, to be summoned to appear at the next court and bring the orphans of Ralph Blankenship, deceased." Accordingly, some of the children of Ralph Blankenship were still under age in 1725. By this union Martha Blankenship
probably improved her condition measurably. Unfortunately, Edward Stanley did not live much longer. He made his will in Henrico County on 21 May 1726 leaving his daughter Hannah Thweatt one shilling, his wife Martha one-third of his land for life, his granddaughter Frances Thweatt the plantation whereon he lived and the plantation where Richard Dickason lately dwelt, various items to his granddaughters Mary Thweatt and Hannah Thweatt, and his
plantations on Coldwater Run totaling 230 acres to Ralph Blankenship, John Blankenship, and James Blankenship. He named his wife Martha Stanley executrix.

Sub-SOURCE:
Bill Blankinship
Huntington Beach, CA
---------------------------------------------------
Note the mention of William LIGON whom I cited above:

Colonial Wills of Henrico County, Virginia Part One 1654-1737 Abstracted & Compiled by Benjamin B. Weisiger III: p.258

Inventory of RALPH BLANKENSHIP by court order of 5 April, 1714.
Value L26/00/6 by :
James Akin,
Robert Hudson
William LIGON ***
Recorded 3 May,1714.

WILL OF EDWARD STANLY. To daughter HANNAH TWEAT, 1 shilling. To wife MARTHA, items and 1/3 of my land for life. To granddaughter FRANCES TWEATT, my two plantations in Henrico County, the one whereon I live, the other where Richard Dickason lately dwelt, to her and her female heirs forever; also slaves and items. To granddaughter MARY THWEATT, items. To granddaughter HANNAH TWEATT, items. To RALPH BLANKENSHIP, JOHN BLANKENSHIP, AND JAMES BLANKENSHIP my 3 plantations at Coldwater Run, 230 acres. Wife MARTHAA to be executor. Dated 21 May, 1726. Wit: Henry Clay, Allason Clark, Samuel Soane. Recorded July 4, 1726. Will of Richard Nunaley. JOHN BLANKENSHIP recorded as a witness July 3, 1727. Will of Abel Turner dated 2 Nov. 1734. JOHN BLANKINSHIP recorded as a witness Jan. 1734.

Hope this helps someone.Barbara Harrell
---------------------------------------

More About MARTHA R BLNKSHPS WIFE: Fact 1: 07 Aug 1727, deed of gift-100 acres so side of James River, head of Proctor Creek to son John (Source: Benjamin Weisiger, Henrico Co VA Deeds 1706-1737 (Richmond: n. pub., 1985) p 90 per Lloyd Bockstruck, Dallas TX
Publ Library)

Children of RALPH BLANKENSHIP and MARTHA R BLNKSHPS WIFE are:
i. RICHARD2 BLANKENSHIP, b. Ca. 1691, Henrico Co, VA.
ii. WILLIAM BLANKENSHIP, b. Ca. 1693, Henrico Co, VA; d. Apr 1745, Henrico Co, VA; m. MARY WMBLNKSHPWIFE.

Children were:

i.

Richard BLANKENSHIP was born about 1692 in Henrico County, Virginia. He died after 1768 in Goochland County, Virginia. Alternate source (Don Blankenship) says he died 1745

Donald Hobbs shows he died 1793 in Goochland County

ii.

William BLANKENSHIP was born in 1690 in Henrico County, Virginia. He signed a will on 29 October 1744. The will of he was Probated in Henrico County, Virginia on in April 1745 To son RALPH, 200 acres on both sides of Winteropock Creek, part of survey of 400 acres (paten not yet come from the office) also after death of my wife MARY 100 acres and plantation whereon I now live, being part of a larger tract belonging to Thomas Man, Sr. To John Man, son of said Thomas Man, 200 acres being the rest of my patent, provided Man
make over to my son RALPH the land where I live. To daughters MARY BLANKINSHIP, WILMOTH BLANKINSHIP, and FRANCIS BLANKINSHIP, livestock & items. All the rest to wife MARY, who is to be executor
. Dated 29 October, 1744. Wit: William Herringham, Francis Man, John Jackson.
Recorded April 1745. Henrico Co.,VA William died in 1745 in Henrico County, Virginia.

224

iii.

John B BLANKENSHIP.

iv.

James BLANKENSHIP96,97,98 was born in 1698 in Henrico County, Virginia. He was born about 1698 in Henrico County, Virginia.96 He died in 1748 in Henrico County, Virginia.96 Will Written 1748, in Henrico County, Virginia James died in 1749 in Chesterfield County, Virginia. Don Blankenship says he died aft 9 Ap 1751, Chesterfield County, Virginia
James Blankenship seems to have been content with his holdings in Chesterfield, and when he wrote his will, recorded in Deed and Will Book of Henrico county 1748-1750, page 36 and noted the following in his estate:

"In the name of God, Amen, I, James Blankinship of Henrico County, being sick and weak, but parfitt memory, do ordain this to be my last will and testament, in the manner and form following. To Witt, I give my soul to God who gave it, in hopes of his acceptance thereof, and my body to the yearth- from whence it was taken, to buried by my exectour.
"Item: I give and bequeath to my son, Drury Blankinship, the plantation he now lives on, to him and his heirs forever, only the said Drury is to pay five pounds cash it being for the plantation I now live on. Also, I give to my son, Drury, all the goods and chattels he is now possessed with to him and his heirs forever.
"Item: I give to my daugher, Ann [Nancy], a young hefer of three years old.
"Item: I give and bequeath to my son, Joel Blankinship, all my land lying above the spring branch and so up the branch joining on Robert Man and Frances Man's lines to him and to his heirs forever. I give to my son, Joel, my new bed and furniture as it now stands, one iron pot of four gallons, two pewter dishes and two plates, also my bay horse, bridle and saddle.
"Item: I give and bequeath to my youngest son, Fore Blankinship, the plantation I now live on and to him and to his heirs forever.
"Item: I give and bequeath unto my loved wife, Mary, all the remainder if my estate not yet mentioned as beds, cattle and household furniture during her widowhood but in case she should marry then to be equally divided among the rest of my children by two or three neighbors, but not my children. My will and desire is that the estate be not appraised. I also maintain and appoint my belowed wife, Mary, my whole ... [remainder missing]."

Source: The Blankenship History, by Col. Leslie C. Blankenship.

James Blankenship seems to have been content with his holdings in Chesterfield, and when he wrote his will, recorded in Deed and Will Book of Henrico county 1748-1750, page 36 and noted the following in his estate:

"In the name of God, Amen, I, James Blankinship of Henrico County, being sick and weak, but parfitt memory, do ordain this to be my last will and testament, in the manner and form following. To Witt, I give my soul to God who gave it, in hopes of his acceptance thereof, and my body to the yearth- from whence it was taken, to buried by my exectour.
"Item: I give and bequeath to my son, Drury Blankinship, the plantation he now lives on, to him and his heirs forever, only the said Drury is to pay five pounds cash it being for the plantation I now live on. Also, I give to my son, Drury, all the goods and chattels he is now possessed with to him and his heirs forever.
"Item: I give to my daugher, Ann [Nancy], a young hefer of three years old.
"Item: I give and bequeath to my son, Joel Blankinship, all my land lying above the spring branch and so up the branch joining on Robert Man and Frances Man's lines to him and to his heirs forever. I give to my son, Joel, my new bed and furniture as it now stands, one iron pot of four gallons, two pewter dishes and two plates, also my bay horse, bridle and saddle.
"Item: I give and bequeath to my youngest son, Fore Blankinship, the plantation I now live on and to him and to his heirs forever.
"Item: I give and bequeath unto my loved wife, Mary, all the remainder if my estate not yet mentioned as beds, cattle and household furniture during her widowhood but in case she should marry then to be equally divided among the rest of my children by two or three neighbors, but not my children. My will and desire is that the estate be not appraised. I also maintain and appoint my belowed wife, Mary, my whole ... [remainder missing]."

Source: The Blankenship History, by Col. Leslie C. Blankenship.

v.

Ralph BLANKENSHIP was born in 1700 in Henrico County, Virginia. He died in 1754 in Chesterfield County, Virginia. Ralph's children all named in his will.

vi.

Ann BLANKENSHIP was born in 1702 in Henrico County, Virginia. She died about 1763 in Marion, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Ann became involved with ? Gordon. Unknown why they could not marry. She went to Massachusetts in 1720, where she gave birth to her son. Grave record near Marion, Massachusetts. Settled in the southeast corner of Massachusetts near Rochester.