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102. ELIZABETH BROOKS7,17,103 was born in 1795 in Caswell County, North Carolina.7 She died on 9 June 1858 at the age of 63 in Calhoun County, Arkansas.7,104

Sarah/Sally Williams Brooks did have a daughter named Elizabeth. Family tradition holds that the father of Elizabeth Brooks was Charles. Many of Robert & Elizabeth Holderness' children had traditional Brooks family names. Elizabeth's widowed mother made a deed of gift to all fifteen of her children, including Elizabeth.

Marriage date is Date of Bond [Have copy]. Bondsman: James Watlington Test: Azariah Graves.
Elizabeth and Robert were first cousins.

Caswell County NC Will Books, 1777-1814: 1784 Tax List; Katherine Kerr Kendall, p.119
Caswell Co Oct Court, 1834.
Allotment to Elizabeth Holderness widow of Robert Holderness dec'd for her family. 28 Jan 1834
Jan Court 1835
Sales, property of Robert Holderness dec'd sold 2 Jan 1835 to Elizabeth Holderness and Elisha Evans. By Abner Miles, Admin.


1840 Caswell Co NC Census, p.130. Elizabeth Holderness with 2m 5-10 [Algernon & Jonathan]; 2m 10-15 [George & Robert]; 1m 15-20 [Thomas]; 1f 10-15 [Sallie] and 1f 40-50 [herself]. [This film viewed in B'ham Library - too pale to copy] Total of 11 slaves.

Elizabeth Holderness is listed in 1850 Caswell Co NC Census with property valued at $4000, age 55. William, James M., Sarah E., Robert C., Jonathan I., Algenon S. all listed with her. By 1851, the land has been sold to William and the proceeds divided among the heirs. In the proceedings, George and Thomas are stated to be in Arkansas.

Caswell Will Books/Guardian Accounts of 1848-1868; p.59; from Book R, p.10 - Mrs. Holderness made purchases at the estate sale of Alexander Moore on 26 Oct 1852 - so she was still in Caswell at that date.

Land Patents to Elizabeth Holderness in Calhoun County, AR:
3 11S 14W 39.67a 1855/03/01 SW 1/4 NW 1/4
9 11S 14W 80a 1855/03/01 NE 1/4 NE 1/4 and NW 1/4 NW 1/4 S10
10 11S 14W 80a 1859/07/01 (Elizabeth had died by this date, but perhaps had already started the patent process.) NE 1/2 NE 1/4
3 11S 14W 80a 1859/07/01 Ne 1/4 SW 1/4 and NW 1/4 SE 1/4
3 11S 14W 40a 1883/12/20 SE 1/4 SW 1/4

Son Thomas B. also has land patents for 1855, son Robert C. in 1856, son Algernon not until 1883, but his was in Dallas Co as were some of the land patents of Thomas & Robert.

Buried Double Springs Cemetery, Calhoun Co AR.
Birth: unknown
Death: Jun. 9, 1858
Inscription: "Mrs."; Age 64 years
A picture appeared on FindAGrave but I cannot quite make out all the inscription. When I wrote the contributor - this was his incredible reply:
I will add a better photo when I visit Double Springs again. I don't do very well with pictures. The next time I will have my daughter take the picture. The monument was originally walled with bricks and the marble slab laid on top. When I was young the slab was about two feet off the ground. About twenty years ago, a tree fell across it and broke the slab in several pieces. I removed what was left of the brick wall and lay the slab on the ground and poured a concrete retainer around it. Last winter another tree fell across it. You can see the sawdust where my cousin and I removed the tree. The original house that Ms Holderness lived in is still standing. My family purchased it in the 1860.s and one of my nieces lives there now.
With your permission I will take some water and try to clean slab to get a better picture. It was originally white.

ELIZABETH BROOKS and ROBERT HOLDERNESS were married on 20 February 1819 in Caswell County, North Carolina.75 ROBERT HOLDERNESS105,106,107,108, son of WILLIAM HOLDERNESS and SARAH B. "SALLIE" BROOKES, was born in 1783 in Caswell County, North Carolina.109 He died on 4 October 1833 at the age of 50 in Caswell County, North Carolina.109

Birth year calculated from "Died in his 50th year".

Caswell Co NC Deed Book M p.302. Wm Holderness deeded to Robert four negroes named Beth, Dabney, Dick & John, 20 head of hoggs, 13 head of cattle, a bauld faced horse, a sorrel filly and all his household furniture. Witnessed by Sarah Holderness and Thos. Holderness. Proved by Thomas at the Oct Court 1802.

Caswell Co WB G, p.54
January Court 1815 Debts due Elizabeth Harden, admin of Henry Harden, dec'd. Names included Robert Holderness, Thomas Holderness.

Caswell Co NC Deed Book T, p.108. 27 Aug 1819. Thomas Brooks Senr to beloved grandson Robert Holderness for love and affection, 3 slaves, Ede & her future increase, boys Lewis and Abram. James Watlington witnessed. This is part of the scant proof that Sally Brooks Holderness was the daughter of Thomas Brooks. The Revolutionary pension application of Jonathan Brooks refers to "nephew" Robert Holderness which would reinforce the relationship that Sarah "Sallie" Brooks Holderness was indeed a daughter of Thomas and sister of Jonathan.

Caswell Co DB U, p.62
15 Jan 1822 Sarah [Sally] Brooks to Edmund McCubbins, 3 undivided lots former property of Elizabeth Williams Dec'd on Brown Cr, 2 of which she purchased of Joseph Williams & Nathan Williams & 1 lot her part of 100 acres which belonged to her mother. wit: Rob Holderness, Wm. Merony

Caswell Co Deed Book U, p. 233-235. Two deeds from Philip Pearce to Ibzan Rice - $825 for 150 acres on Moon's Creek adj old line of Edmund Williamson, Brooks, Jethro Brown. And $121 for 24.2 acres on main road from Brown's Store to the Courthouse adj Samuel Moore, Rice. 22 Apr 1823. Wit: Robt Holderness, Anderson Willis. [Ibzan Rice was married to two of Elizabeth Brooks Holderness' sisters so he was a brother-in-law.]

Caswell Co Deed Book X, p.113-114. A deed of gift from Jonathan Brookes to his son John Brookes of 569 acres lists the neighbors as Thomas Graves, Robert Holderness, Watlington, Sally Brookes. [Jonathan is an uncle to Elizabeth Brooks Holderness; Sally is his sister-in-law and mother of Elizabeth.]

1820 Caswell Co NC Census; 1m -10 [William Henry] 2m 26-45 [Robert was about 37]; 1m +45; 1f 16-26 [Elizabeth was 26]; 1f over 45. Total of 13 slaves. Robert & Elizabeth married in February of 1819 - they had son William Henry. There are two extra males and an older female. Elizabeth's mother has her own household. [ Conjecture: the older female is Robert's mother still living in 1820 - his mother was in the 1810 census as a widow; the other adult males are his two brothers. There was a male 10-16 in the mother's household in 1810 - he should appear as 16-26 but does not unless the ages of the males is wrong.

Caswell DB Y, p.132 10 Oct 1820 Edward Watlington Jun to Thomas Graves, 178 acres on Moon's Crk adj Holderness, Edward Watlington Sen., Leven Roberts, Smith. Wit: A. L. Bennett, F. Smith

Caswell DB Y, p.133 17 Nov 1827 John Brooks & Jonathan Brooks to Thomas Graves. Tract on Moon's Cr adj Holderness, Watlington, Swift. Wit: Woodlief Hooper, Paul A. Haralson.

Caswell DB Z, p.38
30 Mar 1830 Daniel Gwyn Sen to Lyttleton A. Gwyn for $1200, 277 acres on Country Line & Moon's Creeks adj. Ibzan Rice. Wit: William Graves, Robt Holderness
p.47
30 Mar 1830 Daniel Gwyn Sen to L. A. Gwyn, for $700, 2 negro slaves Carrington & Cincinnatus. Wit: William Graves, Robt Holderness
p.154
30 Mar 1830 Daniel Gwyn to John Gyne for $1025, negroes Austin, Valentine, Joshua. Wit: William Graves, Robt Holderness

6 Jan 1834 - Abner Mills is appointed administrator of Robert Holderness. Security with Thomas Graves & Thomas D. Johnson for $10, 000. However, it's possible Robert had died immediately after being appointed Admin. for his brother Thomas since Elizabeth made purchases at Thomas' estate sale. Also another Admin was appointed for Thomas scarcely one month after Robert had been appointed for him.
Jan Term 1834 - Court of Caswell Co laid off and allotted to the widow Holderness one years support
15 Feb 1834 - Inventory of Estate of Robert Holderness by Abner Mills, Admin. The Sale was held on the 3rd & 4th days of Feb 1834. Mrs. Elizabeth Holderness bought all of the household items. Livestock and crops were sold - the sale brought $739. Subsequent livestock sold on 2 Jan 1835 brought another $91. Slaves were hired out for 1834 and 1835 - Dick, Hall, Jerry & Silva [Dick may be one of the slaves from his father William in 1802] Elizabeth kept the slave women Ede and Chaney, their children and the children of Silva for their food and clothing. [Ede was one of the slaves given to Robert by his grandfather Thomas Brookes.] Elizabeth was entitled to one child's part of the estate under NC law.

Caswell WB M, Jan Court 1836
p.554 Account current of Robert Holderness, dec'd by Abner Mills, adm. Cash received of E. Watlington for keeping Thos. Holderness' horses at Robert's house until his death. Paid widow for keeping negroes. Paid Reuben C. Trayhan for coffin - $5. Thomas W. Graves for crying sale; John Kerr atty fee; paid widow's allowance; paid Eliza Holderness widow, her part of balance, being one child's part.

Caswell Guardian Accounts
1837, p.303 Abner Miles for Thomas B., William, Robert C., George W., James, Jonathan I., Algernon S. & Sarah Holderness. Rec'd from adm. of Thomas Holderness estate.
1838 p.13 Abner Miles for 8 Holderness children. Pd. C. Brooks for board for Wm. Holderness.
Guardianship Accounts, Caswell Co NC
1843, p.222 Abner Miles. Receipt of James M. Holderness for all claims and demands. [James has just turned 21]
1845, p.316 Abner Miles. George W., Jonathan I., Albernon S., Robert C. & Sarah B. Holderenss. Pd. C. W. Brooks & A. C. Lindsey for tuition.
1846, p.365 Abner Milles. Receipt of Thomas B. Holderness for full demands of guardian.
1847, p.392 Receipt of Sarah B. Holderness for full claim.

ELIZABETH BROOKS and ROBERT HOLDERNESS had the following children:

+140

i.

William Henry HOLDERNESS110,111,112 was born in 1819 in Caswell County, North Carolina.113 He died on 1 January 1890 at the age of 71 in Snow Hill, Greene County, North Carolina.113 He was buried in St. Barnabas Episcopal Cemetery, Greene County, North Carolina.114

Still at home with his mother in 1850 Census.

The Weekly Raleigh Register, Raleigh NC, October 24, 1855, Issue 52
N. C. State Fair
List of Premiums
Awarded at the Third Annual Fair of the N. C. State Agricultural Society
Branch I - LIVE STOCK
First Class - Thoroughbred
Best pair matched Carriage Horses raised in the State. W. H. Holderness, 1st Premium $20

The land that Virginia and her sister Rebecca inherited was sold to William H. Holderness, her husband's brother that had bought all the Holderness land, before they left for Arkansas. Rebecca had died.
Found in the estate file of Nathaniel P. Thomas as found on FamilySearch.org:
Virginia E. Thomas's Petition to sell real restate. Decree Spring Term 1857
Virginia E. Thomas has intermarried with Robert C. Holderness since the sale of lands set forth in the petition, who come to be made party to the petition in right of his wife.
It further appears to the court, that the petitioner Rebeccah W. Thomas has died under age since the sale of the lands set forth, and that by the death of the said Rebeccah, the whole estate passed over to Virginia E. Holderness, by the Will of the testator, their father Nathaniel P. Thomas, who thereby became entitled to received the whole of the proceeds of the sale.
Further appears that Robert C. Holderness and wife Virginia E. Holderness, formerly Virginia E. Thomas, have by deed duly conveyed all right, title and interest, to William H. Holderness.
Decreed by the Court, that the master pay over to William H. Holderness whatever terms of money are remaining in his hands from the sale of real estate and that the receipt of the said William H. Holderness by a sufficient discharge for the same.


1860 Census. W. H. Holderness, age 40, Farmer, b. NC. J. M. Holderness age 38 [his brother. S. F. Holderness, female, age 31, b. VA [Sarah, William's wife] and J. C. Holderness, female, age 5 [daughter Julia].


I found the following documents at Footnote.com [library access]

"Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms" 1861-65 NARA
Number 22. The Confederate States
To: Wm H. Holderness
Aug 29 1864 To Office Rent for three months at $8 pr month $24
I certify that the above account is correct and just; that the services were rendered as stated and that they were necessary for the public service.
Signed C. R. Kemp, Capt, Quartermaster
Received at Graham NC on 29 Aug 1846.

Another voucher dated the same day was for the following items:
To one month and fourteen Days service as sub-Agent in the Collection of tax in kind at $75 - $110.00
To Two Months and twenty eight days a Q.M.Agent in the collection of tithes at $100 per month. from May 2 1864 to Aug 1/64 - $293.33
To four & half Months labor for Boy at $45 from March 15 - Aug 1 $202.50
Total voucher for $605.83

A third voucher on the same days was for
To one gross Pens $6
To one and a hlaf quire Paper $10
Mucilage $1
Total of $17.
The articles accounted for on my property return for the 3rd quarter ending 5th day of Sept 1864. Signed: C. R. Kemp, Capt. Quartermaster

Also included at Footnote.com was this group
"Case Files of Applications from former Confederates for Presidential Pardons [Amnesty Papers] 1865-67 M1003, NARA
Caswell Co NC
June 17, 1865
Dear Sir,
I was a citizen of Caswell County NC about 45 years. I was appointed Title Agent for this county which office I accepted for the Sole purpose of avoiding conscription in the Confederate Service As I was not able or willing to go into the Army.
I was very anxious to have Civil Government established in the State & see peace, prosperity reign over this Country, and I am now Very anxious to take the oath proscribed by your Amnesty Proclamation and to become a good true and loyal citizen of the United States. Upon a statement of the above facts I ask your Excellency to grant me a full and free pardon.
Very respectfully your,
Obet. Servt.
W. H. Holderness

A copy of a printed form with the blanks filled in:
I, W. H. Holderness, of Caswell County, State of North Carolina, do solemnly swear or affirm, in presence of Almighty God, that I will henceforth faithfully support, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States and the Union of the States thereunder; and that I will in like manner, abide by and faithfully support all laws and proclamations which have been made during the existing rebellion with reference to the emancipation of slaves. So help me God.
W. H. Holderness
Sworn and subscribed to this the 23 day of Augt, A.D., 1865, before
A. A. Pattillo, J.P.

1870 Census. Thomasville, Davidson Co NC. W. H. Holiness age 50, Insurance Agent. S. F. age 43, Keeping house, b. VA. Julia age 15, W. T. age 9, and George A. age 3.

Died. Greene Co. W. H. HOLDERNESS. (WilsAdv, Feb. 6, 1890) USGenWeb Archives:
Marriage and Death Notices in Old Newspapers
Contributed by Roger Kammerer and Elizabeth Ross from microfilmed
newspapers, available at the East Carolina University Joyner Library,
North Carolina Collection, Greenville, NC. [Wilson Advance; Wilson, NC (WilsAdv)]


141

ii.

James M. HOLDERNESS111,115 was born in 1822.116 He died on 22 January 1884 at the age of 62 in Palo Pinto, Palo Pinto County, Texas.117,118

Guardianship Accounts, Caswell Co NC
1843, p.222 Abner Miles. Receipt of James M. Holderness for all claims and demands. [James has just turned 21]

Texas land records of Palo Pinto County reveal J. Holderness was Grantee of a tract of land. Abstract #1581 on file at county courthouse and at TX General Land Office - this could be either James or Jonathan.

1860 Caswell Co NC. James was living with his brother William, William's wife Sarah and daughter Julia age 5.

1870 Caswell Co NC, Locut Hill Twp. James Holdiness lived alone. Age 49, Farmer.

In 1880 in the Palo Pinto TX Census, James was living with Jonathan and suffering from rheumatism.

Buried Palo Pinto Cemetery.

142

iii.

Thomas B. HOLDERNESS was born on 24 September 1823 in Caswell County, North Carolina.119 He died on 2 December 1904 at the age of 81 in Anson, Jones County, Texas.119

According to 1850 Census, born 1825. 1860 Census he was born 1828.

In the 1850 Census of Dallas Co AR, Jackson Twp, p.12, Dwelling 160, George D. Holderness age 21 and Thos. B. Holderness age 25 are living with Samuel A. Saunders a physician born in Tennessee. They are both listed as Merchants.

Posted on the Caswell County Historical Association mail list, November, 2011, are excerpts from the diary of Alanson M. Lea, describing a wagon train trip from Caswell to Dallas Co, AR. The train left on 21 Sep 1847. Few names are in the diary entries but it seems likely the two young brothers, Thomas & George Holderness, were part of this venture. William A. and Phillip Thomas may have been as well - they were brothers of their sister-in-law, Virginia Thomas. The 1850 census reveals over 500 persons living in Dallas Co AR that were born in North Carolina - wonder how many of these families were from Caswell Co.

1 Mar 1855, Thomas B. Holderness was issued a land patent in Dallas Co for 80 acre, NE 1/4 NE 1/4 of S33, T10S, R14W and SE 1/4 SW 1/4 S33, T10S, R14W. A second patent was issued for another 40 acres in S18, T9S, R13W.

Federal Land Patent dated 1 Sept 1856 shows that Thomas B. and Goerge W.
Holderness bought 80 acres in Calhoun County, AR. This was for NW 1/4 SW 1/4, S10, T11S, R14W and NE 1/4 SE 1/4, S9, T11S, R14W.

In 1860, Both Thomas & George W. are in Monticello, Drew Co AR. p.158; dwelling 491. Thomas is 32; George W. 27. Both merchants, born in North Carolina.

Source: TX-OLD-NEWS-L@rootsweb.com
Article Title: The Texas Western
Article Date: June 10 1925
The only paper published in Jones County.
(Edited)
A newspaper is a mirror of the town represented from week to week. The Texas Western, first copy published in Anson January 16, 1883. At that time the town boasted only two hundred people, and had but few business. The old paper indicated that there were no banks, nor regular hardware stores, etc., in Anson at that early date. A drug store owned by F. T. Knox, the Tipton Inn, the Anson House, Stage Line from Anson to Abilene, A. J. Nichols feed and wagon yard, R. H. Foard & Co., dealers in Dry Goods, Groceries, etc., T. B. Holderness, grocery store; L. M. Hinds & Bros., Dry Goods store; J. H. Naler, Dry Goods store; Carr & Pendley, livery and feed business, are represented in the early day issue.

Dallas Morning News, 5 Dec 1891
Burglary at Anson.
Anson Tex., Dec 2 - The grocery stores of Holderness & Roland and H. J. Groce were broken into last night. The cash drawer in each store was broken, the burglars obtaining from H. J. Groce a copper cent and from Holderness & Roland, a nickel. Some other little articles are missing. The entrance was effected by breaking out the back window in each instance. No clew [sic] to the perpetrators.


5 Apr 1888 W. A. Chambers and E. A. Chambers his wife of Jones Co TX sold 320 acres school land to T. B. Holderness for $200. Recorded in Book 5, p.467 of the Deed Books of Jones Co TX
8 Nov 1888 T. B. Holderness sold the same 320 acres to D. L. Lindsay for $500.00. Recorded 14 Jan 1890 in Vol 10, p.58 of Jones Co Deed Records.

1900 Jones Co Census; ED 99, L21, Precinct 1. Tom Holderness, born Sep 1823, age 76 and living in a boarding hotel. He and both parents born in NC. No occupation listed.

Buried Mount Hope Cemetery, 2 miles east of Anson TX on Hwy 180.

Pine Bluff Daily/Weekly Graphic. Pine Bluff, AR, Sunday, 4 Dec 1904, p.2
Death of T. B. Holderness
Many of the older citizens of this city will regret to learn of the death of T. B. Holderness, at one time one of the most prominent merchants of southwest Arkansas, who died at Anson, Texas, Friday morning. Mr. Holderness was an uncle of H. I. Holderness of this city, and had scores of friends here.

+143

iv.

Sarah E."Sallie" HOLDERNESS was born on 8 July 1825.7,116 She died on 6 September 1869 at the age of 44 in Chambersville, Calhoun County, Arkansas.117,120 She was buried in Oak Grove Cemetery, Chambersville, Calhoun County, Arkansas.121


Age 27 in marriage record


The Obituary of Anderson McLemore states that he had three children by Sally Holderness, but none were living at the time of his death in 1896. Sally is buried Oak Grove Cemetery, Chambersville, Calhoun Co, AR - in the same cemetery is an infant McLemore, born and died 15 Jun 1855. That was just about a year after Anderson & Sally married. Then a James Thomas McLemore was born 13 Jun 1856, died 12 Sep 1857 and is buried at Oak Grove. And Julia E. McLemore was born 8 Mar 1858, died 30 Jun 1860. Quite possibly these are their three children.

+144

v.

Dr. ROBERT CHARLES HOLDERNESS120,122,123,124,125,126,127 was born on 11 October 1827 in Caswell County, North Carolina.127,128,129 He served in the military in 1863 at Company K, 9th Texas Cavalry (Ross Brigade) in Civil War.130 He died on 2 June 1905 at the age of 77 in Cumby, Hopkins County, Texas.129,131

He was the 5th child of eight in the family and was only about six years old when his father died

Robert "read" medicine under Dr. Allen Gunn in Yanceyville. He then attended and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1850. In the Census of that year, he was living in the household with his mother in Caswell County, North Carolina.

There was a lawsuit that reached the Supreme Court of North Carolina. Robert Holderness and wife and others v. Lavinia J. Palmer, Executrix. June Term, 1858. [Reporter: 57 N.C. 107] Cause removed from the Court of Equity of Caswell Co. The estate of Nathaniel P. Thomas had proved to be greatly more in debt than anticipated by him. Palmer had to sell property disposed of by the will - he chose to sell lands rather than slaves. He sold the home tract, as well as the land devised to Virginia and Rebecca. The slaves were then rented out, several of whom died before they were delivered up to the legatees. Some of the children died from scarlet fever or teething and some of the slaves died in Virginia in possession of William Thomas where they had been taken by force. Palmer was by now himself deceased. The judge ruled that Palmer had acted in good faith by making the decision to sell the land instead of the slaves - if he had sold the slaves they would have been removed from the home tract which would also have been against the wishes of the testator. Palmer would have received no personal benefit from any sale. The slaves were still in North Carolina, many under the direction of the overseer, William Bryant. They had not been mistreated and the illnesses that caused their deaths could just as easily happened regardless of where they were. Palmer also could not be responsible for those slaves forcibly removed by William Thomas. Therefore it was decided Palmer's estate could not be held responsible for the value of the deceased slaves.
By the time this case reached the Supreme Court, I believe the Holderness family had already moved to Arkansas. The case explains somewhat about what happened to Virginia's inheritance.


A Federal Land Patent dated 1 Sep 1856 shows he bought 240 acres in Dallas County, AR It sometimes took a few years before the Patents were issued; likely he had been in Arkansas awhile; two of his brothers were there before 1850. The land was located as following:
S1/2 NE 1/4, S33, T10S, R14W
NW 1/4 NE 1/4, S33, T10S, R14W
E 1/2 NW 1/4, S33, T10S, R14W
SW 1/4 NW 1/4, S34, T10S, R14W

On the same day 1 Sep 1856, Robert C. Holderness was issued patent for another 80 acres, Dallas Co.
NW 1/4 of SE 1/4, S33, T10S, R14W
NE 1/4 of SW 1/4, S33, T10S, R14W

On 1 Jun 1859, Robert received two more patents in Dallas Co. One for 40 acres - the SW 14 SE 1/4, S33, T10S, R14W, and another for the same - the SE 1/4 SE 1/4, S33, T10S, R14W.

He also received a patent on 1 Jul 1859 for 39.9 acres in Calhoun Co., N 1/2 NW 1/4 S4,
T11S, R14W.
On 2 Apr 1860, received another patent in Calhoun for 80.02 acres, S 1/2 NW 1/4, S4, T11S, R14W.
And on 1 Oct 1860, another patent in Calhoun for 80 acres, N 12 SW 1/4 S4, T11S, R14W.


1860 US Census; Dallas County AR; p.1057-8; Household 700. Robt. C. Holderness, age 33, Physician, born NC. Virginia E., age 24, b. NC. Rebecca, age 4, b. AR and Robt age 2, b. AR. Jonathan I. , age 26, a farmer, also born in NC - no doubt Robert's younger brother.

A newspaper article about daughter Elizabeth and her husband J. B. Haden reveals that she was born in Arkansas, but moved to Cumby at 6 weeks of age. This would place the family's move to Texas about October 1863.

Internal Revenue Act of 1 Jul 1862 taxed certain manufacturers receipts and products; also personal items such as pianos, carriages, watches. The tax list for Hopkins Co Dec 1865 - 1866 lists R. C. Holderness of Sulphur Springs, physician, taxed at the rate of $10.00. Printed in the HOPKINS CO HERITAGE, Vol. 5, #3, Sept 1988.

Dr. Holderness joined the Confederate Army in Black Jack Grove (Cumby), TX and was attached to Company K of the 9th Texas Cavalry (Ross Brigade). Because of the great need for medical service, he was assigned to civilian practice at Primm Hill (Cumby).

From CIVIL WAR SHADOWS in HOPKINS CO TX, by June E. Tuck, 1993:
p.38 "The 4th of March 1864, the County exempted the following doctors from military duty: Robert Holderness of Tarrant .... The Commissioners thought they were needed at home more than the military needed them.
p.90 "On June 24, 1893, Col. Dillahuntz of Mt. Pleasant, TX, met with ex-Confederates at Black Jack Grove (Cumby) Hopkins Co, TX to organize a new chapter to be known as "Dud Jones Camp, U.C.V. Dr. R. C. Holderness [was elected] Surgeon."

U.S. IRS Tax Assessment Lists, 1862-1918; Ancestry.com. From NARA microfilm.
Division 5, Collection District 4, Texas, Octobert, 1866
R. C. Holderness of Sulphur Springs, Physician, was taxed $10.

Voter Registration List, found on Ancestry.com
Hopkins Co, TX, July 29th 1867.
Robert C. Holderness, Black Jack Grove, Precinct 4. He had lived in the state and county for three years; in the precinct for one year.


In 1868 R. C. and J. I. Holderness bought 40 acres from Josiah & Elizabeth Stockton, parents and heirs of Thomas Haden Stockton. Thomas H. Stockton had bought this 40 acres from Thomas Young, part of a survey of 640 acres of Richard Crooks [probably patented to M. Stewart] Thomas H. Stockton was born 2 Apr 1831 and died between the 1860 census and the 1868 date of the deed to R. C. & J. I. Holderness. His parents had 13 children; they were Josiah Smith Stockton, born 15 Apr 1804 in Georgia and Elizabeth Welch born 7 Nov 1812 in TN - they had married 6 Jul 1830 in Laurence Co TN.
PIONEERS OF HOPKINS CO TX, Vol. II; Sylvia M. Kibart & rita M. Adams, co-editors for the Hopkins Co Genealogical Society, 1989.

1870 US Census; Hopkins Co TX , Precinct No. 4, Black Jack Grove P. O. Page 18, household 122. "Holiness" Robert, age 40, Physician born NC. Virginia age 30 keeping house, b. NC Rebecca, 13, attending school, b. AR; Robert age 11, b. AR; Junius age 9 b.AR; Betty age 6, b. AR; George age 4, b. TX; Thomas age 1, b. TX, Jonathan, age 35 b. NC, farmer. Watson, Joseph age 21 b. TN, a farm laborer, and Tinkley, Robert age 16 b. SC also live with the family.

The 1878 Medical Register & Directory of the United States listed as being from Hopkins Co, TX: Holderness, Robert C. - Sulphur Springs. HOPKINS CO HERITAGE, Vol. 7 #4, Dec 1990.

1880 US Census: Hopkins Co TX, Prec 4, p.178D Robert "Holness", Physician. Virginia and 9 of the children. Rebecca was married but living nearby.

From THE WEEKLY GAZETTE, published in Sulpur Springs TX, 11 Oct 1889.
McElee's Wine of Cardul and Thedford's Black-Draught are for sale by the following merchants in Hopkins County: [among these] R. C. Holderness, Black Jack Grove.
Printed in HOPKINS CO HERITAGE, Vol 10, #3, Sep 1993.
1900 US Census; Hopkins Co TX, Precinct No. 4, ED 54, p.185, Household #275
Robert C. Holderness, Physician, age 62. Robert N., son b. Apr 1859, druggist. Thomas B. b. Jun 1870, Day laborer [Thomas was also counted on p.167 with Edward Greaves & Family as Boarder and day laborer.]. Charles S. b. Jul 1875, Druggist. Mary Kate, born Dec 1879. Junius I. & Lynna R, grandchildren are also living with the family.

Dallas Morning News, 6 May 1890.
Black Jack, Tex., May 5 - Another disastrous fire visited this place this morning between 4 and 5 o'clock originating by a brick building owned by will Rash and occupied by A. J. Halbrook, which soon communicated with R. C. Holderness & Son's drug store, consuming three buildings and contents which are a total loss. The flames also spread to buildings occupied by Rash, Smith & Co.'s stock of dry good and clothing which buildings and stock were badly damaged. The fire was stopped and a part of the stock and what was left of the buildings saved. Holderness & son's loss on the building and stock $4000, insured for $1000 on stock, $1100 on building. Halbrook's loss $1000, insured for $750. C. W. White's barber shop total loss, no insurance. Rash, Smith & Co.'s loss on stock is considerable but fully insured. Their loss on building is about $1000 fully insured. Mrs. T. C. Bridgeman's loss on building $100, insured for $1100.

Dallas Morning News, 26 Oct 1898
COMMERCIAL MATTERS
Petition in Bankruptcy
Cumby, Tex. Oct 25 - R. C. Holderness & Son, druggists of this place, filed a petition in bankruptcy at 10:30 this morning. Clark, Esq. of Sulphur Springs was appointed temporary receiver. Amount of liabilities unknown.
Note: the son and partner in the drug store was Robert N. Holderness.

John Haden relates the following story that his grandmother (Bettie Holderness Haden) told him about her father: One dark night the good doctor was riding horseback to assist in a birth and had to pass through a heavily wooded area. He heard a horrible scream in the woods; soon after something of great weight seemed to land behind him on his horse causing his horse to buck and rear in fright. When he was able to stop where there was light after their mad dash from the woods, the horse had deep scratches down his back and haunches. (Was it a bobcat, a mountain lion???)

Printed in HOPKINS CO HERITAGE, Vol 12, #2, June 1995.
"Old Settlers in Hopkins Co: 40 Years Ago" by R. W. Harris. Copied from CUMBY RUSTLER of 15 Jul 1932. [R. W. Harris was a son-in-law of Robert C. Holderness]
Dr. R. C. Holderness was born in Taswell County, NC [actually Caswell Co] 11 Oct 1827. Graduated in medicine from the University of Penn. In 1850, practiced medicine in Calhoun Co Ark. for several years, moving to Texas in 1863. For something like 20 years he did an extensive practice in what was then known as the Prim Hill community north of Ridgeway, and in 1884 located in Black Jack Grove, where he continued to have a lucrative practice for many years. He died June 14, 1905 [grave marker has Jun 2] and is buried in Cumby. He was a man of splendid education attainments, and was known far and wide over Hopkins County.

Early History of Hopkins County Texas; Biographical Skethches and Incidents of the Early Settled Families, E. B. Fleming, 1902; reprinted 1976
p.108-110
“Biography of Dr. R. C. Holderness”
Dr. R. C. Holderness was born in the state of North Carolina in the year 1827. In the year 1850 he graduated in medicine from the University of Pennsylvania, and subsequently moved to the State of Arkansas, Calhoun County, where he began the successful practice he has always enjoyed. In the year 1863 he migrated to Hopkins County, where he has lived since in the enjoyment of a lucrative practice. The doctor married Miss Virginia Thomas, an old Carolina lady, in the state of Arkansas. They both came from the same county in North Carolina and migrated to the same county in Arkansas. They were united in marriage in the year 1854. Ten children were born to this union, five sons and five daughters. Fourt of these were born in Arkansas. Nine of his children are living; only two single, who live with their aged father in Cumby. His companion died in the year 1894 and is laid away in the cemetery in Cumby. She was a Christian lady, and practiced her religion in all the walks of life; a devoted mother and an affectionate wife. Dr. Holderness has ever taken great interest in public enterprises and has contributed his time and money to aid in the completion of them. He is a cool-headed man of fine judgment. The social position of his family is equal to any in the state, and the doctor is a polished gentleman. He is an ardent supporter of Christianity, being a member of the Methodist church, and has acted as steward in this church for fifty-two years. He was converted in Arkansas. He had ever been a man of good habits, using neither spirits nor tobacco in any form. He is a hale hearty fellow. His step is elastic and his form erect, although he is burdened with the weight of seventy-five years. He attributes his physical condition to his abstemious habits.

The Commerce Journal, April 21, 1905, p.11
Dr. Holderness [Robert C.] of Cumby was among the visitors to Commerce this week. He was here visiting his son Dr. Holderness [George W.].
Newspaper Archive.com

Robert is buried Cumby Cemetery. No record in the cemetery book of Virginia being buried there with him, but she must be. She is on FindAGrave and it says she has one of her own and is also on Robert's marker; picture included.

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/tx/hopkins/obits/h/holderness-rc.txt
HOLDERNESS, R. C. DR. - Cumby, Hopkins Co., Texas- June 2, 1905 - Dr. R. C. Holderness died here today from an apoplectic stroke. He was born Oct. 11, 1827, in North Carolina, and had lived in Hopkins County 40 years and had practiced medicine in Ark. and this state nearly 50 years. Burial was by the masonic Fraternity. ( Dallas Morning News, June 3, 1905)

The Commerce Journal, Friday, June 9, 1905, p.2
Death of Dr. Holderness
Dr. R. C. Holderness was stricken with apoplexy at his home in Cumby Friday morning and died about five o'clock that afternoon. His sudden death was a sad shock to all. His son, Dr. G. W. Holderness of this city was notified of his illness and hastened to his beside and was with him in his last hours. His funeral was conducted by the Methodist minister and was one of the numerously attended funerals ever held in Cumby. His death marks the end of a long useful life. He had resided in that community for many years and was known and esteemed far and wide for his many gentlemanly and Christian excellencies. He enjoyed in an unusual degree the respect and confidence of the public. He raised a large family, nine of the ten children born to him having been raised to maturity and he had the satisfaction of seeing them all comfortably established in life and within a radius of about 100 miles of him. He was a man of distinguished bearing and pleasing personality and lived nearly a decade beyond the three score years and ten allotted to the righteous, being about 78 years old.


Dallas Morning News, 28 Aug 1905
Drug Store for sale; stock all new and well selected; good location, established trade, good paying business, invoices $1,200; population 1,000. Reasons for selling, death of proprietor. Address C. S. Holderness, Administrator, Cumby, Tex.


If you wish to follow the Holderness descendants, go here . You will be leaving this file.



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vi.

George W. HOLDERNESS132 was born about 1829. He served in the military in 1862–1864 at Owens Battery (Light Artillery), Arkansas Volunteers in Civil War.133 He died on 17 November 1864 at the age of 35 in Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama.133 George was buried in Magnolia Cemetery, Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama.

In the 1850 Census of Dallas Co AR, Jackson Twp, p.12, Dwelling 160, George D. Holderness age 21 and Thos. B. Holderness age 25 are living with Samuel A. Saunders a physician born in Tennessee. They are both listed as Merchants.
In 1860, Both Thomas & George W. are in Monticello, Drew Co AR. p.158; dwelling 491. Thomas is 32; George W. 27. Both merchants, born in North Carolina.

According to 1850 Census he was born 1829; the 1860 census shows 1833.

Federal Land Patent dated 1 Sept 1856 shows that Thomas B. and Goerge W.
Holderness bought 80 acres in Calhoun County, AR. This was for NW 1/4 SW 1/4, S10, T11S, R14W and NE 1/4 SE 1/4, S9, T11S, R14W.

Merchant of Monticello, AR
Enlisted in Confederacy by Capt. J. A. Owens at Monticello, AR 8 Feb 1862 for 1 year; later extended to 3 years or the War. Served as Sgt. Major in Owens Battery (Light Artillery) of the Arkansas Volunteers. He was sent to Ross Hospital in Mobile AL on 19 Oct 1864 where he died on Nov 17th. His complaint was acute diarrhoea. His Effects were list as "sundries" and he was owed $91.75.

Inscription found on back of picture in Haden House in Ladonia, Texas, Christmas of 1994 when Don and I visited Cathy & Stuart. "My brother Dock. Died in War" Since this is a brother of Dr. Robert C. Holderness and did die in the Civil War, I can only assume it could have been his picture. This picture did not again surface in any of the papers later retreived from the Haden House, so has been lost.

FindAGrave.com has his military marker pictured in Magnolia Cemetery, Mobile, AL.


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vii.

Jonathan Iverson HOLDERNESS120,134 was born in March 1832 in Caswell County, North Carolina.116 He died on 13 May 1907 at the age of 75 in Palo Pinto, Palo Pinto County, Texas.118

The given name Iverson also occurs in the Brooks and Gwyn families in Caswell Co - they may have come from Gloucester Co VA at the same time. The surname Iverson is found also found in the records of the Kingston Parish in Gloucester.

15 Aug 1860 Federal Land Patent - Calhoun Co AR, issued at the land office in Champagnolle. Military Warrant under the Scrip Warrant Act of 1855, Jonathan I. Holderness and Algernon S. Holderness. 80 acres located in S32, T12S, R12W, the S1/2 SW 1/4. Originally issued to Graves Gunn, Warrant #35386, Corporal, Captain Patterson's Company, Kentucky Militia, War of 1812. Said warrant having been assigned by Graves Gunn to Jonathan I. Holderness and Algernon S. Holderness in whose favor the tract has been located.

Article from Hopkins Co Heritage, Mar 1998, stated Jonathan was a farmer & stock grower in Palo Pinto Co TX.

In 1870, Jonathan, was living with his brother Robert in Black Jack Grove, Hopkins Co TX. Occupation - Farmer, age 35, born NC.

27 Aug 1877. 160 acres school land surveyed and assessed for J. I. Holderness in Palo Pinto Co. His application dated 15 Jun 1877. land on the waters of Elm Creek, about 3 miles NC of Palo Pinto. Patent dated 8 Mar 1886.

Census 1880 Palo Pinto TX; ED 155, Precinct 30, Dist 155. p.135; Household 231. Jonathan Holderness age 45, Farmer, he and both parents born in NC. [He was actually 48] Living with him was James, age 60, a brother with Rheumatism.

Census 1900 Palo Pinto TX: ED 119, S9, L77, Precinct 1. Holderness, J. I. Born Mar 1832, age 68, Stock Farmer. [living alone]

Letter dated 29 Sep 1905, Palo Pinto TX from J. I. Holderness to Mrs. J. B. Hayden.
My dear niece,
No doubt you think I have been very negligent in not answering your letter before this time but I hope you will excuse me as I have not been very well and we have had so much hot weather and have been called on to give up another one of our dear relatives - Bob who died in Aug it makes me feel so bad but that is something we all will be called on to do sooner or later so let us try to be redy when the time comes to go. [Nephew Robert N. Holderness died in Aug, 1905.] Hope this letter will finde you all well and that Mr Harris, Jennie and Kate have returned from Colorado improved in health. I will be compelled to stay here for a while as my stock water has all dried up in my pasture but have a plenty close by in another pasture and I have to be here to see that my cattle get water. It looks at this time a little like it might rain. I want to sell my cattle as soon as I can get a fair price for them as I don't feel able to look after them. Cattle are very low at this time. Crops of all kinds are good here - corn is making from 30 to 40 bushels per acres, and other crops in proportion. Cotton will do better than at first it was thought it would - the dry weather has been a great help to cotton. it will make about 1/2 bale to the acre and is bearing a good price now.
I will have to close as I have writen more than I thought I would be able to write.
Much love to you and Mr. Hayden and your children.
J. I. Holderness
P.S. Old people don't write very good as you will see. [He was 73.]

Buried Palo Pinto Cemetery. The Cemetery book had 1885? for year of birth - stone probably getting difficult to read. On FindAGrave he is also listed as J. I. Holderness 1885 - 13 May 1907. There is also a note: Tex SGT US Army World War I. That note could not refer to this man who died in 1907, ten years prior to the war - I believe it is a confusion with Junius I. "Ive" Holderness. I have since taken over management of the site and corrected the information.

+147

viii.

Algernon Sidney HOLDERNESS MD130,135,136,137 was born on 6 February 1834 in Caswell County, North Carolina.113 He served in the military in 1862–1865 at Company B, 1st Regt., Arkansas Cavalry (Monroe's Regt.) in Civil War. He died on 28 April 1904 at the age of 70 in Fordyce, Dallas County, Arkansas.113,129,138

In Caswell Co NC there was also an Algernon Sidney Yancey born 28 Jan 1816, son of Bartlett Yancey & Nancy Graves. Algernon Sidney was an Englishman who wrote a book on personal freedoms - a book muchly celebrated during the Revolution - and he was put to death for espousing such views.

Medical Degree from the University of Pennsylvania.
Vital Records: Directory of Deceased American Physicians, 1804-1929
Holderness, Algernon S.
Died: Apr 29, 1904 in: Fordyce, AR
Born: 1833
Type of practice: Allopath
State/year of licenses: AR
Journal of the American Medical Asociation citation: 42:1303

1860 Calhoun Co AR Census: A. S. Holderness, age 26, "Doctor", born in NC lives with his sister and her husband. A. McLemore & Sallie.

15 Aug 1860 Federal Land Patent - Calhoun Co AR, issued at the land office in Champagnolle. Military Warrant under the Scrip Warrant Act of 1855, Jonathan I. Holderness and Algernon S. Holderness. 80 acres located in S32, T12S, R12W, the S1/2 SW 1/4. Originally issued to Graves Gunn, Warrant #35386, Corporal, Captain Patterson's Company, Kentucky Militia, War of 1812. Said warrant having been assigned by Graves Gunn to Jonathan I. Holderness and Algernon S. Holderness in whose favor the tract has been located.

Confederate records from National Archives state A. S. Holderness enlisted 16 June 1862 by J. M. O'Neill at Hampton to serve 3 years or the War. Company B of 1st Regt. Arkansas Cavalry (Monroe's Regt.) 18 Apr 1863, he was detailed as Asst. Surgeon and left at Fayetteville with 1 horse. His papers include a Parole for A. S. Holdiness (sic) of Calhoun Co, Ark. aged 29 years, 5' 9 1/2 " high, eyes blue, hair light, complexion fair; dated 23 Apr 1863 at Fayetteville, Ark. He promises not to give information to the enemies of Government of the United States or harbor any spies of the so called Confederate Army or communicate to any members thereof. Handwritten on the parole is "and that I will not go beyond the Hospital Limits of the Town of Fayetteville, Ark., nor bear arms whilst on duty". Signed with his signature: A. S. Holderness, Ass. Surgeon, CSA, Monros Regt.
I have found a reference on p.215 of Goodspeed's book on NW Arkansas to "Assist-Surgeon Holderness" in an article on the battle of Fayetteville.

From The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture, Fordyce [county seat of Dallas County]
In the 1870s, Henry Atkinson, an African American, secured the land that would become Fordyce and later sold it for $118 to Dr. Algernon Sidney Holderness, who built a sawmill on the site.

1880 Calhoun Co AR. Alernon & Catherine, children down through James. Catherine's mother Moriah Dixon lived with them. She was 70, born in Georgia.

Land Patent issued 15 May 1883 to Algernon S. Holderness from the land office in Little Rock. Dallas Co. 80 acres.
Located S35, Township 10S, Range 13 W. NE 1/4 NW 1/4 & SW 1/4 NW 1/4.

Holderness, A.S.
DALLAS COUNTY
Submitted by: Jamila Sloan
<http://www.genexchange.org/biodex.cfm?state=ar>
Dr. A. S. HOLDERNESS, physician and surgeon, Fordyce, Ark. A prominent physician and surgeon, who by his own great abilities has attained distinction in his profession, is Dr. A. S. HOLDERNESS. This gentleman was born in Caswell County, N.C., in 1834, and is the son of Robert C. and Elizabeth (BROOKS) HOLDERNESS, natives also of Caswell County, N.C., where the father passed his last days, dying in October, 1833, four months before Dr. A. S. HOLDERNESS was born. The mother came to Arkansas in 1851 and died in Calhoun County in 1859. Robert C. HOLDERNESS was a farmer by occupation and the son of William HOLDERNESS, who was a native of England, but came to America when a young man, served in the Revolutionary War, and died in Caswell County, N.C. He was a successful tiller of the soil. The grandfather, Charles Brooks, was a native of Caswell County, N.C., and there passed his entire life engaged in farming. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Dr. A. S. HOLDERNESS was the youngest of seven sons and one daughter born to his parents, and received a good education. He attended three and a half years at Dan River Institute, Yanceyville, N.C., and finished at Caldwell Institute, at Hillsboro. He came to Calhoun County, Ark., in 1850, and four years later graduated in medicine from the University of Pennsylvania. Since then he has practiced his profession in the immediate vicinity of Fordyce, where he has lived since 1850. He is one of the oldest physicians of Southern Arkansas, and one of the most successful. He was nearly all through the war, in the Confederate army, as assistant surgeon of the First Arkansas Cavalry, and operated in Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas and Texas. For a short time he held the rank of first lieutenant of Company B. He was discharged in Texas, May 27, 1865, and the same year was married to Catherine B. DIXON, a native of Chambers County, Ala. When her father died she was quite small and came with her mother to Arkansas at a very early day. The mother died at the home of Dr. HOLDERNESS, in Fordyce, about 1888. To the Doctor’s marriage have been born nine children - five sons and three daughters living, and all have received excellent educational advantages. The Doctor owns several thousand acres of land, and considerable property in Fordyce. When he first came to Arkansas he and family settled near Chambersville, where they resided until 1882, and then moved to Fordyce, where he erected a sawmill, which he operated for three years. He owned the site where Fordyce now is, was first to settle where the town is and was the first mayor of the place. In politics he is Democratic, and his first presidential vote was for J. Buchanan, in 1856. The entire family, except the youngest child, are members of the Methodist Church, and Dr. HOLDERNESS has been a steward in the same since 1859. His wife has been a member for many years, or since early girlhood.
Source: Biographical & Historical Memoirs of Southern Arkansas (1890) The Goodspeed Publishing Company.Page 723-24.

from Dallas County, AR History (1890). EBook from Hearthstone Legacy Publications, 2008.
First Settlers: "Dr. A. S. Holderness, physician and surgeon, who by his own great abilities has attained distinction in his profession, is Dr. A. S. Holderness. This gentleman was born in Caswell County, NC, in 1834, and is the son of Robert C. and Elizabeth (Brooks) Holdernes, natives also of Caswell County, NC, where the father passed his last days, dying in October, 1833, four months before Dr. A. S. Holderness was born. The mother came to Arkansas in 1851 and died in Calhoun County in 1859. Robert C. Holderness was a farmer by occupation and the son of William Holderness, who was a native of England, but who came to America when a young man, served in the Revolutionary War, and died in Caswell County, NC. He was a succesful tiller of the soil. The grandfather, Charles Brooks, was a native of Caswell County, NC, and there passed his entire life engaged in farming. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Dr. A. S. Holderness was the youngest of seven sons and one daughter born to his parents, and received a good education. He attended three and a half years at Dan River Institute, Yanceyville, NC, and finished at Caldwell Institute, at Hillsboro. He came to Calhoun County, AR, in 1850, and four years later graduated in medicine from the University of Pennsylvania. since then he has practiced his profession in the immediate vicinity of Fordyce, where he has lived since 1850. He is one of the oldest physicians of Southern Arkansas, and one of the most successful. He was nearly all through the war, in the Confederate army, as assistant surgeon of the First Arkansas Cavalry, and operated in Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas and Texas. For a short time he held the rank of first lieutenant of Company B. He was discharged in Texas, May 27, 1865, and the same year was married to Catherine B. Dixon, a native of Chambers County, AL. When her father died she was quite small and came with her mother to Arkansas at a very early day. The mother died at the home of Dr. Holderness, in Fordyce, about 1888. To the Doctor's marriage have been born nine children -- five sons and three daughters living, and all have received excellend educational advantages. The Doctor owns several thousand acres of land, and considerable property in Fordyce. When he first came to Arkansas he and family settled near Chambersville, where they resided until 1882, and then removed to Fordyce, where he erected a saw-mill, which he operated for three years. He owned the site where Fordyce now is, was first to settle where the town is and was the firs mayor of the place. In politics he is Democratic, and his first presidential vote was for J. Buchanan, in 1856. The entire family, except the youngest child, are members of the Methodist Church, and Dr. Holderness has been a steward in the same since 1859. His wife has been a member for many years, or since early girlhood (723-24)."
"Fordyce is in the bloom of robust health. Its site was partly cleared by W. W. Killabrew before 1850, and late in the seventies Henry Atkinson, a negro, secured it, and in 1881 sold the plat to Dr. A.S. Holderness for $118. Dr. Holdernes had located a saw-mill on the woolen-mills’ sited, and also built his home. The railway came in 1882, and the land was sold to the Southwestern Improvement Association, who platted a town late in 1882, and named it in honor of S. W. Fordyce, president of the railway company" (704). He is also listed as the first mayor, in 1885 (705). "The Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Conference Training School, at the foot of Chief Street, was erected by the citizens in 1888, led by Dr. Holderness, J. D. Dunn, Hampton Bros,. G. C. Story, E. A. Acruman and others, and given to the Little Rock Conference. Its cost was, entire, about $10,000, and the frame, two-story, with seven rooms and four instructors, under Principal J. D. Clary, B. A., enables students to prepare for any Methodist college. There were 125 enrolled last year" (706).


Buried Oakland Cemetery, Fordyce, Dallas Co AR.