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Second Generation


9. Jacob FREY2,23 was born in 1710 in Roxborough, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.7,23 He died in 1784 at the age of 74 in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.2,5

His birthyear is usually seen as about 1694, but this is likely an error based on the inheritance of his father's property. He was likely born about 1710. He may have been the youngest son.

Joy Torgeson wrote "Arguments in Support of a Younger Jacob Frey" for the Spring 2001 FREY JOURNAL. Jacob appears to have been accepted as the eldest son because he inherited his father's property. The inheritance was not by primogeniture however, but fell to Jacob because his father and mother deeded it to him on 13 Oct 1732. It would not have been necessary to make a deed if Jacob had been the eldest. It was also quite common for the youngest son to remain on the home farm, care for the elderly parents, and receive the land for his care. There exists an Articles of Agreement on 12 Oct 1732 that indicates this was indeed the situation. The age of Jacob's children at the time of his death [there were minors] indicates he was likely a much younger man. He probably wasn't even married as late as 1732.

Will written 28 Feb 1782 and probated 7 Jan 1785. Wife named as Margaret. Sons named in the will were Jacob, Joseph, George, William and Henry. Jacob to receive one half of the farm with the buildings; Joseph & George to divide the other half. No daughters were named. There were minor children not yet of age. The estate was eventually to be divided equally among "all my children" so it's possible there were daughters. Jacob & Joseph were the Executors of the will. The 220 acres property was in Towamensin on the Skippack.
FRY, JACOB, SR. Towamensin.
February 28, 1782. January 7, 1785. 1.14
To wife Margaret, bed, bedstead, bedding, cow, mare, teatable and 40
pds. in household goods. Personal estate to be sold and wife given 50
pds. and the interest of 250 pds. If she marries, 150 pds. At her death
to be divided among sons: Jacob, Joseph, George, William and Henry. If
she choose, to live in my house and if not sons Jacob and Joseph to
build her a house with four acres of land and pasture for her cow and
mare. Jacob to use the mare when my wife has no use for her. Farm in
Towamensin 220 acres, to be divided into 2 parts, that part on the side
next to Skippack to be again divided into two parts. One-half of farm
with the buildings on to son Jacob at the rate of 600 pds. To son
Joseph 1/2 of the other half part. To son George, the other remaining
half part. Joseph and George to pay 600 pds. for their part, but Joseph
must make up to George what his part lacks in value. Sons to pay 50
pds. a year after becoming of age until all is paid. Rem. of estate
including 1200 pds. for lands paid by sons to be equally divided among
all my children. Younger children to be schooled out of estate
sufficient to read and write. Execs: Sons Jacob and Joseph Fry. Wit:
Melchior Wagener, Gerred Godshalks.
Abstracts of Montgomery Co, PA, Wills & Admins, 1784 - 1823
GenealogyLibrary.com

This Frey homeplace that was inherited by Jacob's son Jacob was passed on to his son Daniel who was still living, age 94 when Thodore W. Bean compiled a HISTORY OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, PA, printed in 1884. Bean described Daniel Frey as "very active" Here was Bean's synopsis of Daniel's story:
"Heinrich Frey or Fry, a native of Altheim, in Alsace, it is stated, came to Pennsylvania before the arrival of William Penn and settled near Roxborough [not quite true, he arrived in Oct of 1685]. In 1692 he was married, at Germantown, to Catharine, daughter of Wigart Levering. They had nine children of whom six were son [there were probably 7 sons]. He purchased, twelve hundred and fifty acres on Towamensin Creek in 1724 [actually date of recording & the purchase was only a part of an original 1250 acres tract]. It is a family tradition that two of his sons walked up from the Wissahickon, 18-20 miles, on Monday mornings, bringing their provisions along with them for the week, for the purpose of making a clearing and erecting a house, which they completed by the following spring. A few Indians, who appeared friendly, were still lingering here, having a couple of wigwams on the banks of the stream. The chief, who visited the scene of their labors, observed them eating bread; when they gave him a piece, which he ate and pronounced good. On the following week they brought him an extra loaf, at which he was greatly delighted, and in return the following day brought them a saddle of venison. The eldest of these brothers was Jacob [perhaps not the eldest] who had two sons and two daughters, whereof Daniel Fry is still living on the homestead at the good old age of 94 years and yet very active. [this account seems to skip one of the Jacob's that occupied this farm.] The family possess an ancient burial-ground in the township, which is not in a dilapidated condition. In the assessment of 1776 we find, as in 1734, the name of Jacob Fry with 200 acres. The late Jacob Fry, of the Trappe, member of Congress and auditor-general Pennsylvania, is represented as a descendant of this family."

The HFFA Lineage Book gives the following on the children of Jacob & Margaret.
Jacob S. Frey (1756-1844) married 1789 to Margaret Springer (1768-1835)
George Frey (1765-1853) married Margaret Bean (1775-1855)

Jacob FREY and Margaret [FREY] were married.20 Margaret [FREY]23 was born (date unknown).

Margaret may very well be a second wife. Or she was much younger than Jacob. There were minor children at the time of his death.