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ComegysCousins honors Cornelius Comegys, Founding Father of the family that bears his name and remembers his descendants who through many generations have contributed to the American experience.


The first Comegys was baptized as Cornelis Cornelissen in the little Dutch village of Lexmond, October 10, 1630 and had arrived in New Amsterdam by 1658. Here, in a way common among Dutch people, he adapted part of his father's name, Comen Gysbert (Trader Gilbert) to Comegys.

He lost a small farm on Manhattan Island, located within easy walking distance of today's New York's Empire State Building and with his young bride, Willemtje, had arrived on Maryland's "Eastern Shore" of Chesapeake Bay by 1661. Here he became a prominent Tobacco Planter and his children put down their roots so that "Comegys" remains today an old Chesapeake name.

Over the years Comegys men and women have played their part in all the great themes of United States history. Since the Comegys were initially a southern family and shared the great American tragedy of slave holding some of these people are Black. All in all, the Comegys are a representative American family of business and professional people, farmers, laborers, artists and clergymen whose lives reveal in small detail the major features of United State history. Comegys Cousins website serves as a special electronic meeting place for us and as a depository for original documents plus the genealogical and historical research of those who cherish this old American family.

By Dr. Robert G. Comegys, Professor Emeritus of History
at California State University, Fresno, California


Dr. Robert G. Comegys, Professor Emeritus of History
at California State University, Fresno, California





Long overdue is my thanks to Karen Davis, one of my Rinehart Cousins. She set this site up for us, got me started and is still there to help me when I dig a hole for myself. She has been a prime example of "Cousins helping Cousins" THANK YOU KAREN . . . Ray Burgess, 2001




Proud to be an American