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Adney C Cogdell

On May 10, 1862, at the age of 18, Uncle Adney, a farmer in Cleveland County, enlisted in Company F, the 56th Regiment of the NC Troops, along with his brother Allen. He was reported present throught February, 1864. He was wounded in the thigh at Plymouth on April 18-20, 1864 and returned to duty in July or August of the same year. He was reported present through December, 1864.

Company F, 56th Regiment, NC Troops Roster


Allen C Cogdell

At the age of 27, Uncle Allen enlisted in Company F, 56th Regiment of the NC Troops, along with his brother Adney, on May 10, 1862. He was a farmer prior the his enlistment as a private. He reported present through August, 1863, and was reported absent, sick, at Weldon, September and October of the same year.


He returned to duty in November and December. On April 18-20, 1864, Uncle Allen was wounded in the heel, at Plymouth, and didn't return to duty until just prior to July 1, 1864 and was present through December. He was captured at Fort Stedman, Virginia on March 25, 1865 and confined at Point Lookout, Maryland on March 28, 1865. On June 24, 1865, he was released from Point Lookout after taking the Oath of Allegiance.

Company F, 56th Regiment, NC Troops Roster


Perry Green Cogdell

The day after his first child's birth, at the age of 19, September 16, 1864, Grandpa Ped enlisted, in Cleveland County in Company F, 56th Regiment of NC Troops, as a private. He was reported present through December of that same year, but apparently deserted prior to March 8, 1865.

Company F, 56th Regiment, NC Troops Roster


Richard S Cogdell

11 November 1861 Uncle Richard, a 20 year old farmer from Cleveland County, NC, enlisted as a private in Company I, 38th Regiment of the NC Troops. This company was know as "The Cleveland Marksmen". He was killed at the 1st Battle of Gettysburg on July 1, 1863.

On daughter Eliza's death certificate, her father is listed as unknown. I was very upset at the statement, and set about to find his grave. Assuming he was not brought home for burial, that left only one place, Gettysburg. After many letters, phone calls and e-mail messages, I finally found some information on the Confederate soldiers who were buried at Gettysburg. Many were unidentified. In the 1880s the CSA soldiers were disintered at Gettysburg and moved to the Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia. The director of the Confederate Museum, in Richmond, has verified that Uncle Richard was not among the very small number of the men who were identified. I believe Eliza's father is buried in an unmarked grave in the Hollywood Cemetery. Rest in Peace, Uncle Richard.

Company I, 38th Regiment, NC Troops Roster


William Daniel Henry Covington

21 November 1861 a 20 year old farmer from Cleveland County, WDH Covington, enlisted in Company I, 38th Regiment of the NC Troops and was mustered in as a Private. Mary Rincie Green Covington made sure her children had good educations and WDH's is apparent in letters preserved by the family of his uncle James L Green. In her book, "A Broad River Digest", Irene Roach Delpino, has published three of the letters.

Christmas 1861 found a homesick boy, encamped about 4 miles from Raleigh, NC, at Camp Mangum, surrounded by comrades with measles, mumps and eye disorders, but in the optimism of youth, he made sure the family knew he was "sound" and expected to stay so. He was getting plenty to eat and hoped to come home soon ,for a visit.

In March 1862 he was hospitalized, at Petersburg, VA, but getting well and expected to be sent back to his regiment soon. He told of friends and relatives who were also hospitalized and asked that his Mother be informed he was well treated, and apologised because his paper was cheap. By March the following year, he had been promoted to Corporal and was present or accounted for until 25 July 1863 when he was reported AWOL, but had returned to duty by 25 October 1863. Sometime during the year, he wrote of seeing the "Yankee Balloons" in the evening, of being chosen for a firing squad, and once again of relatives and friends serving nearby. He mentioned the rations were small, but it was okay becaused they didn't need much to eat if they weren't marching. He humbly stated "I will thankfully receive a letter from you any time when you are pleased to write to me" and signed it "Your affectionate Nephew".

8 May 1864 WDH was hospitalized once again, this time with a head wound, at Richmond, VA, but was able to return to duty prior to 1 July 1864 and was present or accounted for until taking the Oath of Allegiance at Washington, DC, on or about 13 July 1865.

7 July 1863 the Charlotte Western Democrat wrote of WDH's kindness after General Thomas J Jackson was mortally wounded at Chancellorsville, VA, on 2 May 1863. The article stated he had found the cap and gloves of the General and "Mr. Covington carefully preserved the interesting articles, and though offered large sums for them by those who wished to possess these mementoes of our great General, he was fixed in his purpose of delivering them to his family". Could it be that's where he was gone when reported AWOL in July 1863? Aunt Mary Rincie did a good job rearing her boys.

Company I, 38th Regiment, NC Troops Roster


Gilbert M Green

Uncle Gilbert was living in Cleveland County, working as a farmer, when he enlisted on 21 November 1861, along with his brother Howell in Company I, the 38th Regiment of NC Troops, "The Cleveland Marksmen". He was present and accounted for until 8 December 1862, when he was discharged due to his age. Certificates on file at the NC Archives state Uncle Gilbert was 45 years of age. Other records indicate he was only 42 and there is evidence he reenlisted and served with Company B, the 49th Regiment of NC Troops.

Company I, 38th Regiment, NC Troops Roster

Company B, 49th Regiment, NC Troops Roster


Henderson Howell Green

21 November 1861, at the age of 34, Grandpa Howell, a Cleveland County farmer by trade, mustered into Company I, "The Cleveland Marksmen", 38th Regiment of the NC Troops, as a private. Shortly thereafter he was appointed musician. Prior to 27 March 1862 Grandpa Howell was wounded and hospitalized at Petersburg, Virginia. He was reduced to ranks before 1 July 1862. In a letter to his aunts and cousins W D H Covington states "Uncle Howell was discharged from the army & sent to Richmond to wait on the sick in the hospital". However, records indicate he was present and accounted for through October 1864. In late April 1864, he was given a leave which he spent with his brother in camp near Orange CH, Virginia. 2 April 1865 Grandpa Howell was captured at the South Side Railroad, Virginia, and confined at Hart's Island, in the New York Harbor 7 April 1865. After taking the Oath of Allegiance, he was released 19 June 1865.

Company I, 38th Regiment, NC Troops Roster


James Lee Green

On being called to duty in the Spring of 1862, James Lee had his will made, had photographs taken with his children and enlisted as a private in Company H, the 30th Regiment of the NC Troops.

Letters written his family have been published in "The Broad River Digest" by Irene Roach Delpino, his Great-Great-Granddaughter.

In May, 1864, Uncle James Lee was captured at the Battle of Bloody Angle in Spotsylavnia Courthouse, Virginia, and transferred the notorious Elmira, New York prisoner of war camp. In June of that year he wrote Aunt Mary Ann advising her of his capture, as well of his illness. On October 4, 1864, James Lee died of dysentery at Elmira. Uncle James Lee is buried at the Woodlawn National Cemetery, in Elmira, in lot number 600W.N.C.


Burnice McKinney

15 April 1863, Uncle Bernice left behind Aunt Betsie, who was either expecting or had just delivered their only child, Martha, and followed his brother, J C, by enlisting in Company B, the 34th Regiment of NC Troops. This company was known as the "Sandy Run Yellow Jackets". He died of disease on 23 September 1863. Apparently Uncle Burnice's records were misplaced during the war, as he was not listed on the rolls. When Aunt Betsie applied for her widow's pension on 29 June 1885, she gave his dates of enlistment and death. Her statement was verified by Isaac Lawrence Powell and Justice of the Peace, Richard M Hord. Her pension was approved.

Company B, 34th Regiment of NC Troops


Divaney Mode

Divaney Mode, a farmer living in Cleveland County, enlisted in the 38th Regiment, Company I "The Cleveland Marksmen", NC Troops on 21 November 1861. He was present or accounted for until 26 June 1862 when he was wounded in the left leg in battle near Mechanicsville, Virginia. On 8 November 1862, he returned to duty and was discharged 19 January 1863, under the provisions of the Conscription Act.

Uncle Divaney re-enlisted, again in Cleveland County, with the 2nd Company B, 49th Regiment, NC Troops on 4 April 1864. This time for the war. On or about 16 May 1864, he would wounded in the left thigh and hospitalized at Richmond, Virginia until returned to duty prior to 1 July 1864. He was reported present in July and August of that year, but apparently deserted to the enemy on or about 15 February 1865 and was confined at Washington, DC, until 21 February 1865. He was released at an unspecified date after taking the Oath of Allegiance.

Company I, 38th Regiment, NC Troops Roster

Company B, 49th Regiment, NC Troops Roster


William Mode, III

14 May 1861, at the age of 19, William Mode enlisted, in Cleveland County, in the 1st Company D, 15th Regiment of the NC Troops, as a private. He was present or accounted for until his death on 29 August 1861, of disease, in Yorktown, Virginia.


Devanie Parker

Uncle Devanie was living in Jackson County when he enlisted on 31 August 1861, at the age of 25. He was mustered in as a Sergeant in the 29th Regiment of the North Carolina Troops, Company F and appointed 2nd Lieutenant 20 June 1863. He lost his right arm at the battle of Chickamauga, Georgia, on 19 September 1863 while serving in General Ector's Brigade.

Being an honorable and very patriotic fellow, he was not happy with the possibility of being discharged as disabled and on 16 April 1864, while in still in Lauderdale, Mississippi, fired off a letter to Col Thomas M Jack.

"Through you I have the honor to apply to be placed on Recruiting Services, in Western N Car the section of county in which my Regt was raised. On the 19th day of Sept 1863 in the battle of Chickamauga, Ga I lost my right arm by cannon ball shot from the enemy's gun. So severe is my wound that I am unable to perform military duty in the fileds. I believe I can do much good as a Recruiting office for the Regt. I hope the Com'dg Gen'l will assign me, to such duty as I may be able to perform, as I desire to remain in the service of my Country."

In Demopolis, Alabama on 5 May 1864 his request was granted, "XXII Lt. Devania Parker, Co F 29th N. C vols on Surgeon's certificate of disability for field service, is hereby detailed as a Recruiting Officer and will proceed to Western North Carolina, the section of country in which his Regt was raised."

He was photographed at Memorial Day reunions in the early 1900s. Standing tall at 6'2" with a fair complexion, dark hair and eyes, Uncle Devanie cut a very dashing and apparently colorful figure. In 1893 he was convicted of selling liquor without a license, but was pardoned "upon the recommendation of the Judge, Solicitor and the best citizens of Shelby". In 1902 he registered to vote, and his second wife, to whom he as married 40+ years died in 1908. On 29 October 1910 75 year old Uncle Devanie took a 23 year old named Bessie as his third wife. The marriage didn't last, but apparently the friendship did as Uncle Devanie gave the information on the death certificate of Bessie's baby by her second husband in 1917. He had applied for his Soldier's Pension in 1901, 1909, 1914 and again in 1917. In 1926 Uncle Devanie was nearly blinded by cataracts and suffering the ails of age when applied for admission to the North Carolina Soldier's home. He was granted admission, but apparently spent very little time in the institution as his records there had no entries after the initial signing in, and he was back in Shelby for the 1930 and 1931 reunions. Uncle Devanie is buried at Union Baptist Church near Polkville, in Cleveland County, NC. His grave ,and that of second wife Eliza, and son Theodore's wife and child, is only a short distance for the property he owned.

Newspaper article, May 10, 1929

Company F, 29th Regiment of NC Troops.


Hamilton Clark Parker

The "NC Troops 1861-1865 A Roster" says Great-Great-Grandpa Hamilton was born in Rutherford County, resided in Cleveland County and was a farmer before enlisting, at the age of 37, on 22 November 1861 in the 38th Regiment of the North Carolina Troops, Company I. TheRegiment was known as "The Cleveland Marksmen". Records indicate he was present or accounted for until he died in camp, in Cleveland County on May 25, June 30 or July 4, 1862, of disease. However, when she applied for the widow's pension many years later, Great-Great-Grandma Didemia indicated he died in Virginia, in May of 1862. Grandpa Hamilton is buried in the Cogdell Family Cemetery in Cleveland County.

Company I, 38th Regiment, NC Troops Roster


Joseph Parker

.The "NC Troops 1861-1865 A Roster" states Private Joseph Parker resided in Cleveland County where he enlisted at age 17, May 14, 1861 as a Private in the 1st Company D, 15th Regiment NC Troops (5th Regiment NC Volunteers). He was present or accounted for until wounded and captured at Crampton's Pass, Maryland on September 14, 1862. He was paroled prior to September 22, 1862, when he was hospitalized at Richmond, Virginia and was reported absent wounded through December, 1862.

On January 9, 1863, Joseph was transferred to 2nd Company B, 49th Regiment NC Troops. On April 20, 1863, he was captured at Sandy Ridge, Lenoir County, and sent to New Bern where he was paroled and transferred to City Point, Virginia, where he was received on May 28, 1863, for exchange. Joseph was returned to duty prior to July 1, 1863 and reported present from July until December of the same year, then again from in May and June of 1864.

Uncle Joseph was killed at or near Petersburg, Virginia, on or about July 23, 1864.

On July 8, 1887, Joseph's widow, Rebecca Parker, applied for her pension. The document states Joseph enlisted in Company B, 49th Regiment, NC State Troops on or about the 14th day of May 1861 and that on or about the 1st day of October, 1864, in Virginia, he received a wound or wounds that terminated his life.

Company B, 49th Regiment, NC Troops Roster


Marcus Parker

Uncle Mark enlisted in the Militia, the 90th Regiment, 22nd Brigade, District 2, in Cleveland County on
6 November 1861. 

.Uncle Mark's obituary...


Isaac Lawrence Powell

Uncle Isaac was born in Rutherford County, NC, and a farmer in Cleveland County when called to serve the South. On 10 May 1862, at 28 years of age, he enlisted in Company F, the 56th Regiment of NC Troops, for the war. He mustered in as a Private, but in January or February, 1864, was promoted to Corporal. He was present through June of 1864, and reported hospitalized with an illness on 23 August 1864. He was furloughed around 17 September 1864 and returned to duty prior to 1 November 1864 and was reported present through December 1864. Uncle Isaac survived the war and is buried at Union Baptist Church, near Polkville, in Cleveland County, NC.

Company F, 56th Regiment of NC Troops

More to come.....


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